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11

Jacob Neilson has long argued against opening links in new windows (#2), for many years (#2), and in multiple ways (#9), though there are are exceptions. He has the explicit research to back up these assertions, though a typical report costs $50 to $500 dollars to get the hard proof.


10

I'd suggest there is a distinction between a web site and a web application - a distinction that very well didn't exist when Jacob Nielson wrote his book. When you click a web link from within Microsoft Word, a new browser page opens and your word document stays in place. Equivilently, when you click a link from within a Web Application, the user will ...


9

Two other features that are less intuitive in my opinion are: the fact that you can no longer select several taskbar items with ctrl+click. On XP, that was the way I used to close multiple windows. And not only does this not work now, but it does the exact opposite of what it used to do, creating another instance of the ctrl+clicked app. I've been using ...


7

Instead of opening the terms and conditions in a new window, you could display them in an area with a scrollbar. This way, the terms are immediately visible and there is no need to open them in a new window / tab.


7

There's also the accessibility issue to consider. If a link opens in a new window, it breaks the "Back" button, which is problem enough for a sighted user, but for a user with visual disabilities who browses with a screen reader, it makes things even worse. These users will have their "Back" button disabled without having any visual clues to alert them, and ...


5

Two solutions I had in mind: If you estimate your users will open many such param windows: Open the params window inline. Make the rows higher to begin with, or expand them if you need to, but have each param window beneath its block. This will keep them associated so the user is clear on what they're working on. If you think just a few will be opened ...


4

I strongly suspect that as your application matures you will find you want to put some very common controls on the left of the tracks. Once you have controls there at all, it is very natural to access other controls that affect the audio from there too, but with the user able to choose when to have them visible. You are also likely to find that some of ...


4

It's an ongoing discussion whether a UI can be considered "intuitive" at all, according to e.g. What objective qualities make a user interface intuitive? However, one part of Win 7 (I don't know if this was already present in Vista) I find confusing is the "Move file" dialogue. At first glance, it has only one button (apart from the red close button in ...


4

I'm of the mindset that as soon as I hear the words "TOPIC is evil" I'm ready to discredit anything else the person says. Then I have to pull back and consider the context of when and where that was said to get a better understanding of what they mean. Famous people can be wrong (ever hear the quote that "Noone will ever use more than 640KB?") The bottom ...


4

I think some of you are missing the point of the redesign that is Windows 7. The point was not to make things easier for people comfortable with computers; it was to make things easier for those that don't use computers. In addition, some of these things may seem counter-intuitive to you, having used the "old way" for several years, but for someone having ...


4

IMO, it's not about getting people back to your site by having it open in the background. That thought process is outdated, hence the fact that you cannot find any recent studies. This article on Smashing Magazine sums it up nicely I think: http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2008/07/01/should-links-open-in-new-windows/ My .02 cents on this topic (no ...


3

I think it really depends on what sort of content will be represented in each of the document windows. Docking works well for Visual Studio because most of the windows that are being docked are text editors, or text representations of items (tree view, list view, grid view, etc). Our software currently uses a dock manager control, even though the majority ...


3

I greatly miss these "sort by" headers in Windows Explorer (e.g. sort by name, last modification or type) that are now displayed only in detailed mode; the only way to access the sort filters in the other modes is in a submenu of the right-click menu. I still don't see what was the intended benefit of this design decision. More about this on SuperUser.


2

Managing windows is a bookkeeping task. It would be the best if a user does not have to manage windows. Certainly a user does not use a computer to manage windows! Indeed, as long as I am concerned, the UI for moving or resizing windows does not matter much. If I have to move or resize windows, I am already uncomfortable. I use Windows 7 on a laptop PC ...


2

Your idea immediately made me question, why keyboard shortcuts? If all windows are visible, why not the mouse? What you are doing is shifting focus, for input and maybe output (as the window is visible, I'm assuming you are getting partial to complete results of what you want to see). The main reason for using the keyboard, I think, is that you are using ...


2

Gutenberg Diagram shows that eye movement starts from Top Left, and work its way down to bottom right. So top left position generally takes precedent over top right. Back in 2010, Ubuntu linux distro controversially switched the window control position from Right to Left. Ubuntu 9 - with controls on the right Ubuntu 10 - with controls on the left ...


2

If you're lucky enough to have a 2560x1440 screen and your desktop app looks odd even though you are already assigning the extra space to the controls that can make use of it, and there is no added value in making the presentation/input areas that big, then consider introducing an extra pane in those extreme situations. The content of this extra panel ...


2

Use the available space as well as possible, and never limit the size unless there is a very good reason to. Specifically, the primary content area of your application should scale to contain more content the larger the screen gets. This use case is also one of Microsoft's major drivers for the Ribbon interface; the Ribbon scales well so that it can take ...


2

I think that every website should not open links on new windows. I think that user can do that alone, "right click" and open in a new window... or holding ctrl and click... there are many ways for the user to choose if open or not a weblink to a new window. Web developers can not force users to open a new window and when a developer have to do that shold be ...


2

It sounds like what you're looking for is a docking window framework. A docking window framework lets users dock, detach, and combine windows in any way that they see fit. The windows can be moved to other monitors and the entire application appears as one entity on the taskbar. Visual Studio 2012 is one example of an application that uses this model. If ...


1

I think that both of your options grant too much liberty for the user. I believe that when users cannot grasp a clear and simple workflow they feel lost. When an app allows you to do the same thing in many different ways, I feel this way. When an apps allows you to position its controls in many different ways, I feel the same. What I would do is to approach ...


1

I recommend following OS X guidelines and using one window per document. In general, people will be using other applications far more than yours, and you should conform to the other applications they use on that OS. This is why Microsoft Office for Mac behaves quite differently than Office for Windows... consistency with the OS is far more important than ...


1

I think it depends on the nature of the link. In our application, links to other web resources don't open in a new window, but links to files (i.e. resources that the browser wouldn't likely display itself) do open in a new window. So a link to a PDF or DOC opens in a new window, for example. The key there is that the behavior is consistent enough that ...


1

Keep in mind that not losing context has become a very important consideration in interaction design. I would say that the best way to handle that is something more ajaxian, in which the "new window" is actually a an on screen element which shows and hides itself as needed. You will, in that case, need to gracefully degrade if there is any chance that your ...


1

The issue here is rather the "wipe out all of the user's work" part - Why would navigating to a help page and going back again do that? On Stack Overflow it certainly doesn't, and neither does it on most basic websites. The problem are those "special place reserved in Hell" web dev people that think it's a good idea to wipe a form whenever you navigate ...


1

One great benefit of having the "Reveal Desktop" control at the bottom right of the screen is speed of acquisition. You don't need any eye-hand coordination to rapidly get your pointer to bottom-right. An advantage of this behavior in our evermore cubicled world is if you are working on something confidential and somebody strolls up to your desk, you don't ...


1

My problem isn't so much that some XP features are indeed more intuitive (and less cumbersomme) than Win7 (although that statement is by itself very true, nevertleless). My problem is that lots of my (admittedly a bit exotic) hardware does not work any more with Win7 because there are no Win7 drivers for them. And I am getting a bit tired of having to junk ...


1

Hardest and most confusing thing in W7 (and Vista, maybe) for me are their settings dialogues. In XP there was a single window with tab, in Win7 there are these “helpful”, context-dependent links on the left, which are: Much less readable and rememberable, because they are much longer than tabs; Always changing their order, so I am completely losing my ...


1

The minimize desktop capability on Windows 7 was definitely a problem for me. I would be curious to know the decision making process around that one. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Minimize-all-open-windows-to-view-the-desktop They implementation goes "over the top" in terms of subtlety. How are you even supposed to know it's a button that ...


1

The ideal window management would be most efficient with screen space and allow users to do window management tasks as quickly and easily as possible. However, there is often a tradeoff between these goals. This is my opinion of the best compromise: Buttons It really doesn't matter which side of the window the buttons are on. They should be ordered from ...



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