Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

If you have more options than can be easily shown, a "more" link may be easier to understand than using arrows download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups As to placeholder values for dates. using "dd-mm-yyyy" would be preferable than using a real date for international users. In North America, we're used to the "mm-dd-yyyy" ...


0

You could add a word cloud with tags like 'photoshop', 'indesign', 'html' and have them scaled based on how many projects of you use that technique, how many years you've used it. This way you highlight your strong suits in an intuitive and relative (no absolute numbers or percentages) fashion. The point is not to accurately grade yourself on how good you ...


0

One solution is to visually demarcate the forms, as shown below:-


1

From your description, I understand that the rating is mandatory while the description is optional. You can have two solution here: You can make use of Progressive Disclosure. Quoting from the NN/g article: Progressive disclosure defers advanced or rarely used features to a secondary screen, making applications easier to learn and less ...


0

As other users have pointed out, under most circumstances, this behaviour is not suitable for web content. So when would you use this style of navigation? When you have limited content that should be viewed sequentially and You're dealing with a fixed (or easily controlled) viewing screen dimensions and User would not use mouse scrolling as primary ...


0

There's an old UX tenet about leaving the user in control. The second link you posted, the one page scroll link, takes control away from the user. On top of that it hijacks normal/expected browser behavior. Without knowing the specific details of this particular site and use case I can't say it's good or bad but based on what I wrote above I'd say it's ...


8

Something I do which I believe is more relevant, is instead of using ambiguous percentages I use years, relative to my career. I still use a sort of 'bar graph', but the numbers have context in relation to the length of time I've been working: The numbers across the top are the years of my career (2000 - 2015) and each skill is represented as a ...


1

What could work is a blurred out version of the same background: Just make sure to blur it enough to not draw attention away from rest of the page.


0

For a more dynamic and strong site, use the opposite color of your website background for your navbar background. If you want to have a more calm, minimal and subdued feel to your site (and navbar), you should use the same color for your navbar and background. I would recommend having a white background for the navbar though, potentially, if your ...


0

I don't really know of any formal research on this topic, but this is a fairly common problem in companies (see related question: Ways for a company to organize common/shared Icons Images and Graphics) Some use cases I came across related to this: I need to make external communications and I'm looking for branding and communication guidelines e.g. ...


1

These comments about modal dialogs "interrupting workflow" are silly and naive. If you build your parent screen and modal dialogs as symbiotic parts of the overall task process, there is no interruption. All complex operations have to be broken down into steps or "consumable chunks of task" no matter how you build the design for simplicity. Modals work ...


2

I believe the simplest answer to the primary question is based on the following logic: If it didn't link to the home page, then where else? If it didn't link anywhere, wouldn't that be a waste? It's desirable to hyperlink anything that can logically and unambiguously be linked in the context. Therefore I would say it is no accident of ...


1

The existing answers claim that it is done merely because it has become a self fulfilling standard. That may be partially true but neither are UX answers and they miss out why it is intuitive. A user often clicked on a site logo to get to your site, so it is consistent and makes perfect sense for any click on the same logo to take you back to that same ...


0

There's one strong advantage to the white navbar over any kind of color: it can be easily customized with any logo if/when the system is whitelabeled or rebranded. However, if white-labeling isn't anywhere in your perspective, a colored bar can be great for building some extra personality with a bold color block.


0

Establish a process for "hanging" check-outs to keep the system running Don't check in data automatically — that would be equal to publishing "work in progress." However, you could certainly check in the original data after a period of inactivity. Establish a certain threshold for inactive check-outs — if after some time the user doesn't go back to his ...


1

Thinks will go wrong; users will go on holiday; computers with crush; users will die (or just get a new job). Therefore anther user MUST be able to do their work when an item is left checked out. So there must be a way to get a checkout undone. This could be by having an “admin” user with the power to undo checkouts, or by allow any user to undo a ...


2

From a technical standpoint, you'd use javascript: onbeforeunload When they close the window, first prompt them to check in (or discard) their checkout. From a UX standpoint, I'd strongly argue that you never check in automatically. Check in should always be a user-triggered event. There's just no way to know if they forgot vs. they abandoned it. If you ...


1

Leaving it checked out to the user sounds an acceptable solution if there may be a reason they left it checked out. One option could be to give any user the ability to unlock files but stress that the user that has it checked out would lose any changes by doing so. Another option would be for users to flag that they want something unlocked, this then ...


6

I have always heard them called "splash screens" (especially on mobile). I think the traditional splash screen doesn't include the down arrow but this site includes many examples that include them. http://line25.com/articles/web-design-trend-showcase-splash-screen-revival Modern examples of splash screens are built right into the main page, filling the ...


13

There's no official pattern name for it but the NN/g termed it as "False Floors". They've written an article on it and have discussed how this practice leads to bad UX as it does not naturally encourage the users to scroll. Good designs shouldn't need an arrow to tell users to scroll. To quote from the article: When pages of any size offer little content ...


0

Your question contains answer in itself because of word 'Navigation' Navigation When a user views a website and wants to go to the home page there will have to be a link to the home page. If the website LOGO is not linking to the home page then the user will have to select a "home" link on the Navigation bar. Users familiar with Big Brand sites are ...


46

Where was this first seen This practice dates back at least to the earliest days of image hyperlinks. For example, the Internet Archive's earliest snapshot of Yahoo's home page from October 1996 has a clickable Yahoo! logo. Why has it become an industry standard? 1. Convention Conventions are self-perpetuating. Given the ubiquity of this practice, ...


48

It's become standard because everyone does it. Everyone does it because it's nice to have a 'home' link but it's not something that needs to clutter the menu, either. Hence the idea to just make the logo link to the home page. Not sure if anyone can answer where this was first seen. But I recall doing it close to 2 decades ago so I think its been around ...


4

Scrolling pattern and navigation largely depends on the information architecture and content strategy of your website. The page scroll UI pattern has been largely used to showcase features of a product and I think it has been misused in this way. In most cases, the features are not peers but are related/dependent on each other. It seems page section ...


2

1. Are objective reasons that would make this font choice sub-optimal in terms of user experience? This is pulled from the Web Accessibility in Mind website: "Trebuchet is an attractive font, but it has subtle curved embellishments that may decrease overall readability for long passages of text. The curve at the bottom of the lower-case "L" helps to ...


0

Our company built a fairly complex SaaS web app for project management. Until the recent redesign, we've been using MS Trebuchet for displaying content within data grids. Trebuchet isn't a "pretty" modern web font, however it does one thing very well which is to offer crisp legible text across platforms (Windows, Macs) for small font sizes. Suppose you ...


-1

If all your users use Windows systems (this includes phones and tablets) you're good to go. Otherwise, you should provide a fallback font for other systems that don't have this font available.


0

Explane why they should not multitask and how this correlates with the number of good votes they will receive when writing their part of the story in that flow. Use exactly those points you mentioned for argumentation. If they realize that their point of view was taken in to account and your program wants the best for them, they will realize that they are ...


1

"Feature set" is the term I'm familiar with for features on a single product. If they are discrete items grouped together, you can call it a "bundle" or "product package".


0

Here are a few reasons why people prefer top navigation. Users consume website content in F pattern http://www.nngroup.com/articles/f-shaped-pattern-reading-web-content/ This suggests both the left and top real estate grab equal attention. So, top navigation is another choice that can be used unless the number of menu items are not too many. Content ...


1

Many modern website designs that eschew vertical left navigation menus use one or more of the following instead: Hidden hamburger menus Simple horizontal navigation at the top of the page Long single-column content Targeted call-to-action buttons Those design decisions help maintain focus on the content and allow each page to deliver information with a ...


3

The four Divs on your homepage could be treated as Cards. By popular convention, you can create an action panel underneath your card and include buttons or links for actions such as "more details" or "share". download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

The criteria varies and the usual answer is "it depends". I go by this principle, If the user has to scroll or do complex interactions to get to UI:A on PAGE:A just to interact and navigate to PAGE:B then make UI:A sticky. Its made up, and origin is common sense. But then, sites like medium.com have a variation of this sticky top bar. When a user ...


2

The sticky header should contain tools or information that are so important for the website that you need to access them from everywhere at any given time. This could be the search and their settings on Google, your money amount on an online banking website or current running popular livestreams on Twitch while searching for something to watch. Facebook ...


1

I have been in your position where eventhough your rationale and design approach is right, the client can't understand unless you show him the final product. Here are the types of clients I have come across and how I communicate to them. Just-the-looks clients I have dealt with a few clients who are concerned only about how the site looks. I just finish up ...


1

Your question is a great one! UX can be a confusing concept. User experience is about creating an overall experience that meets user needs. It involves understanding human behavior, attitude and emotions around a certain product ad/or service. Some personal attributes of a UX designer include analytical thinking while being open minded, empathy for people ...


-1

You want to create a class for all divs. <div class="box"></div> but for the last div, create an id. <div class="box" id="rightbox"></div> then style them via css .box { //Your styles } #rightbox { // your unique styles for the right box } Make sure that you mark conflicting styles as !important in the ...


1

Designing in browser is a potent method. It is a bit more work than sketching away in photoshop, but its definitely worth it. Building an interactive prototype means you give your designs a new depth. Its no longer a static PNG or JEPG, people can interact with it, explore it and get a clear idea of what the app or the site could do for their business. But ...


9

I think you're on a classic designer dilemma, and addressing the issues you mention is of foremost importance. First of all, the classic design failure approach: I need to give several different mockups to the client so he can pick the one he like. WHAT?!?!?! You're basically telling your client: "listen, I don't give a damn, I have no idea what you ...


0

If I were you, I would: 1) Do wireframes for initial approval, and work with the client to see what needs to be there. Research has shown (though I can't recall specific research) that the "less polish" the draft looks, the more the client will feel they are part of the creation at the next stage and will be less likely to change it. 2) Do the work in ...


6

As the first stage of development. I need to give several different mockups to the client so he can pick the one he like This is the 'traditional' way to handle 'graphic design'. It's not a good way to handle user experience design or web design. If the goal is to handle figuring out the 'look and feel' and 'branding' then I'd suggest the first step ...


3

I would simply separate it a little bit from the group and put a subtle divider in between. White space is a powerful tool for grouping.


1

If you do decide to go with gridlines, you must consider a few issues: Screen size is important - lots of grid lines close together on a small screen will be far more confusing than helpful. Besides, if the screen is small enough (i.e. anything mobile) your users will probably be able to check easily against the relevant axis. Perhaps have a rule that ...


3

I think it varies with the amount of data you wish to display. Let's take line charts for example - if you have only one or two lines describing your data, I think it becomes relevant to see the grid (and does not cause much clutter) as it helps to see the reference values. e.g. Seeing that the blue line just went over the '50' line grid is pretty easy to ...


0

Your web page is about Fashion so "NO" you should not remove the image slider as Fashion industry websites rely more on images than text.... I will add few suggestions to Devin's great answer above Use full page single image slider on Desktops and on mobiles convert it to 3 image carousal where right and left slider images fall out of the screen ...


0

First of all, take a look at this page, and continue with all links at the bottom of that page. If after that you still want to use sliders or carousels, here you have some advise do NOT autorotate them. Instead, give the user control over the content use big arrows for navigational purposes (previous / next) and if possible, some other navigational option ...


2

You mention "I think it will create cognitive load for the user" and then say you want buttons not to look like buttons.... I think you'll need to: a) specify a little: is this ONLY for desktops? are you ABSOLUTELY sure nobody will use a touch device to visit your site/app? And if not: how do you plan to do what you want on touch devices? b) use elements ...


4

I don't think shadow on a button is old design if used elegantly and sparingly. You can see here in Googles Material Design they use "raised" buttons with shadow to show depth. https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/buttons.html#buttons-flat-raised-buttons


6

Relying solely on mouseover isn't enough. You'll need to find a way to communicate to users that the div is clickable so they will point the mouse at it. The mouseover change will be helpful as a confirmation at that point. Look at how other sites accomplish this. A textual call to action will make your div look clickable. Or making it look like a link ...


1

I have seen horizontal navs with a great many options in them and they can be made to work fairly effectively The example I have here is from "maplin.co.uk" - an electronics store that has many "departments" each with it's own set of 'sub departments':



Top 50 recent answers are included