New answers tagged

1

You probably should keep animation to its minimum when access via mobile due to bandwidth, viewport and JavaScript (rendering power) limitation. There are tons of articles written on Mobile best practices, do a search. Having said that, you might want to use CSS to do the animation. CSS animation has JavaScript equivalent of fade in/out and other slick ...


0

Use pagination by default and only switch to infinite scroll if Javascript is enabled. Consider that some users will have javascript disabled, and it'd be nice if your site worked for them too. Typically this is not the case when infinite scroll is the only option. However, you can make it work for everyone and just give the JS users a smoother ...


0

You can probably find statistical proof for arguing both cases, because it really comes down to the nature of the application and how people use it. In an environment where there are multiple screens and multiple windows open, placing a window in the centre of the screen by default might not be the best thing. Is it not possible to allow the user to set a ...


0

The best I've seen is the input you selected (type in entries with commas) which then turns into tags, a la gmail. That way every comma entered creates a tag, and in theory removing the comma brings back the text (though that's technically more complicated). It provides a really simple UX with no real training, except that people are currently used to the ...


0

N.b. The following answer is based on you wanting to return to the page you were on before linking off to one of these sub page types. Wizard Using a cancel button within the wizard pages should return the user to the page they first linked to the wizard from. Hierarchical Using a breadcrumb will allow users to navigate back through the hierarchy, but ...


0

For wizards, you could use a step navigation system (like Google's "steppers"). A component like that would serve many purposes: give users the right affordances to move throughout the process, tell them where they are and how many steps they have left, and tell them at a glance that they are in a linear process.


3

While this isn't necessarily suitable for a friendly social network styled website, the Health & Social Care Information Centre, an organisation responsible for providing IT services, software, etc. for healthcare in the UK, have some guidelines for gender values. As far as UK healthcare systems are concerned, there must be 5 options, no more and no ...


-3

Of course its not. It's a stereotype at most, and stereotypes exist mostly because they are common traits. Yes, not all women have long hair, but your (may I add, quite nice looking) design isn't saying "do you have long hair?", it's not saying "are you a stereotypical white woman?", and of course not all men have short hair or are bald (although it's ...


6

Thank you for asking this question. Short answer: yes. Not all women have a hairstyle like that, and neither do all men. And not everyone is white, either, so it is racist (or at the very least ethnocentric) too. Also, do you mean biological sex, in which case male and female are appropriate, or do you mean gender identity, in which case you need more ...


4

Do I need to make my website compatible with IE8 and earlier? Do a significant number of users of your web site use IE8 or earlier and would they be unwilling to upgrade to use your site? If so, then yes. Otherwise, no.


0

If it were me, I'd set your persons schedule to maybe start at the start of every hour (or however you'd like to do so) So have a drop down (or radio set) that has: 10-10:45 11-11:45 12-12:45 Then maybe a dropdown for recurrence: Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly


2

When IE8 makes up 0.3% (one third of one percent) of internet browsers that hit your site, I'd say it's probably not worth spending that much effort on: http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_explorer.asp http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp


0

Just because you're designing for both desktop and mobile doesn't mean the designs should be the same. Interaction that mobile users might be accustomed to might not be apparent to desktop users. For example, white cards with a caret on the right side. To mobile users this is obviously something you can tap on. To desktop users, not as much (especially if ...


0

How about an open and close? You Open the page for editing and close it to leave. I have worked on several CMS that use this method. Or can they just be in edit mode all the time? Seems the simplest to me. No need for buttons.


1

Check my solution... some simple changes.


1

If I understand the question correctly, and using the example of your mockup: you're wondering the best way to present the user with the choices of Apps, Games, Movies, Books and Newspapers? users can only submit one form at a time (i.e. they can't select 'Books' and 'Newspapers' and submit both together. Have you considered using tabs instead? Assuming ...


1

One big reason this isn’t done is that the trend is towards invisible scroll bars. If you go through every category of computing device (phone, tablet, small notebook, pro notebook, desktop, etc.) the #1 device in every category has invisible scroll bars for years now. Also there are a lot of graphics tasks that you can do to improve a website today that ...


0

A big part of why it isn't done is because it isn't easy to implement consistently cross browser. There are solutions, as others pointed out (on GD.SE). However, I personally think it is a very bad design decision for UX. The scroll bar is part of the browser, not the content. This is why it is hard to implement a cross browser solution, because all ...


1

I've done a couple of nice scrollbars before because I wanted the design to transition into the scrollbar since I didn't like how it looked bulky with the theme of the site. Another site design I had it to go along with the color palette and one because I could control the thickness of the scrollbar since the site was estimated to be viewed on mobile ...


2

Well, even if this is kinda off topic, I feel like answering it anyway. The main trouble with the default scroolbar is the browser compatibility, if you code it yourself you will never get a one-script-for-all solution, you will have to code another line for almost each browser out there and it's not easy, especially if you want it to work on relic versions ...


0

It looks like you're trying to show both progress and score in a simple way. Something that's in progress would not have a score, and something with a score would not be in progress, so you should be able to merge this. Show a progress bar when in progress, or show a grade when complete.


0

I think you need to work out all the different types of interactions and states that the element can have before you can decide on the best way to represent it, because you will need to take into account of what are some of the expected user behaviours, what the standard conventions are and whether you can cater for changes easily in the future. Just to ...


0

There are so many ways in which you can show an item is read. You can play with greying out, using green highlights, showing a 'read' label hovering over the thumbnail of the document, showing a green tick, etc. Here are some quick sketches - I think based on the user group you are targeting and the kind of data you have, adding slight gamification ...


4

You should not do this. Users know about the back button. "The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links)". Jakob Nielsen in 1999. Or a Firefox study in 2010: "Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day ...


1

I think there may be a couple of other reasons for the change in font size in addition to those listed. I don't think it's necessarily age related. Previously web designers were in complete control. In my experience, we do more user testing now, which means that designers get to hear feedback such as "I can barely read that article" or "My sight's not ...


0

People sometimes get confused between whether it actually goes back in browser, or goes back to a preset page, for example if it just links to another page that the website thinks you've visited.


-1

I think placing a in page back button will not harm your usability. In fact it will support novice users which are still unaware of the browsers back button. It will surely not harm your website, it can only improve it.


0

I mostly agree with adamsoh. Some audiences may need more 'spoon feeding' than others to navigate around though. In which case I would consider offering some extra on-screen navigation. If you’re worried the site may need that ‘back button’ there’s a good chance your gut feeling is correct.


0

If your intention is to duplicate the exact same feature as the browser back button, then I would say a customize back button is a bit redundant. I can think of situation whereby a customize back button would be problematic. Say you access a subpage via url or bookmark, then the back button makes no sense at all. You also risk confusing the users on their ...


0

Since Reset All has the same color as Date Picker and Filter By I expect it to affect these two fields. However, I'm not sure because there is no other visual grouping of Reset All with these fields. Also taking into account it has the same color as other elements, including the buttons, I really can only guess what it will do. That said, this design needs ...


0

Since the "Reset All" is not visibly connected to any of the dropdowns I would say it returns the top bar to the default state. One suggestion is perhaps to hide the Export and Email button under a share icon. I would also make the Reset All into a button kinda like the Export CSV but with a nice reddish tone to indicate a "irreversible action".


1

Given the picture you provided, I would expect the large date text ("Sun, 25 Oct 2015") as well as any changes in the Date Picker and Filter By to return to the values they were when the page was loaded. I would, however, not expect the table sort toggles to be reset. This is because of your use of white space and proximity as well as font style, the "reset ...


0

While this is ultimately speculation, I think this was a design/implentation decision to separate two sites with different purposes. When you are not logged in, you are viewing an advertisement site for the service. Once logged in, you access a site that lets you work with your account. There really isn't any overlap between the two, so they were ...


4

Yes, it's not something made for User Experience (on contrary) but to improve security. Imagine this situation. You're accessing one secure site, home page is not secure (it uses HTTP protocol) to greatly reduce server CPU usage (because homepage is hitted very often by random users and search engines or because it contains non-critical material). You ...


2

Have the user agree separately to each term and condition you specifically want them to be aware of: Label1 [Textbox] Label2 [Textbox] Terms and Conditions [Textarea] [] I will not upload any copyrighted material to this service [] I promise to be respectful to other users [] I am aware that all my usage data will be sold to the Russian mafia [Submit] By ...


0

Both are front-ends, but for different kind of customers of yours. One is for your customer who would use your website to make an order or buy, another one for the the customer who would use your website to fullfil an order or sell. What you need to guard against is Both have different user profiles and task profiles, Both have different frequency of ...


0

If this person is doing or going to do design labors and you have time to spare (you'd be the first) and she can manage the workload... then it's fine. I've done it myself and is not an impossible task, just time consuming.


2

Same person? Ideally, but nearly impossible to pull off as nearly any software project of even moderate size requires a rather diverse team. Same entity? Absolutely. The ability to create a great UX is as much about the back end as it is about the front end. This is true both for pure UI work (consumer facing UI vs. admin facing UI) as well as the product ...


7

To answer this question (as well as many other on UX) we have to start with user stories. Story A. User requires frequent access to navigation elements and these elements are in the header. Then, yes, it's better to fix the header and don't let it go with the scrolling. Story B. Critical information is displayed in the header. Then it's better to keep it ...


0

Integrated dashboard (which users and admins are on same place) is literally hard to be well-implemented. Without designing the right way, how to split user input, and what to be common on API, your system could become a mess. Most of the time when I see those dashboards, below the UI are spaghetti codes. I will choose separate dashboard design approach, ...


0

If your goal is to increase the clicks for "Link4" you could do two things: Contrast the "Link4" button against the others by making the background color different - for example orange or green provide good affordances. Move "Link4" to the leftmost or rightmost position. People can easily spot the first and last option in a list. In this case visual search ...


0

In that have you tried mega-menu https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/3a/29/3d/3a293db3ac85d0facc63b3af77af2a33.jpg


3

The main problem with nested menus is that as UI objects they are somewhat feeble. Their task is to appear for a short period of time and disappear once user made a selection. From this perspective, asking user to select multilayered menus is an awful task as menus tend to disappear on a wrong move of the mouse. I think a better option is to make nested ...


1

There are several reasons to not add a tooltip that says 'Click...': It adds no reason for the user to take an action. It provides no context. They can click anywhere on the screen at any time. Why should the be interested in clicking that particular link? What is special about it? It's non-standard approach for prompting a user to take an action on a ...


0

The call to action doesn't have to be directly under the link. Consider another option, to include a banner on top of the menu that links to the same page as link 4. Doesn't block the sub navi links.


0

I think a red (or another strong color) circle before or after the link label would be sufficient to draw attention, but since the stakeholders thought of text bubbles, they might want something more appealing to the user. In this case, I'd use a corner ribbon with a strong color and contrast between the background and the text color, or animate the button ...


0

What about placing an expand/collapse button on every article? (Pardon the very quick and dirty mockups.) Or, less preview is more compact:


0

Consider providing the ability to easily sort the list by either "Invoiced Amount" or "Days Past Due", in addition to providing both data points on each line item. This empowers users to push the items they are most interested in to the top, instead of scanning the entire list searching certain icons, colors, or number ranges. As a starting point, given the ...


0

A simple way is to give the user an option to insert what's more confortable for him, like: ( ) Male ( ) Female ( ) Other: [Text field] -- if selected, opens the field below: -- How do you want to be called: [list to choose: Mr, Ms, 'no need for that', etc.] What do you think about this? :)


3

In a comment you say you're asking for male/female simply so you can address them correctly. I interpret that to mean you're corresponding with them as "Dear Mr Lastname" or "Dear Ms Lastname." So you could ask for that specific information. Here in the US we sometimes see registration forms asking users to choose "Mr" or "Ms" as a title, though these days ...



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