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1

If you have a Contact Us page rather than just listing your email somewhere, you can specifically state on that page that most questions will be answered by the FAQ. Provide a link to the FAQ even if it's one of the top navigation tabs just to make it really easy for users to go there and find their own answers. If you're still getting too many emails ...


3

I was going to post some answer about the user being too hasty or inept at using websites but after looking at your website I would like to gently point out some observations: Home-page posts appear mashed together and it takes more cognitive load than I am willing to spend in order to understand it. It also looks like there is some important info in some ...


1

Building on @dan1111 's suggestion to "make the FAQ more prominent", consider implementing a task-centric help solution, which places on the screen help content relevant to what the user is doing. So your application could feature a prominent "help" button: When the "help" button is pressed, the page content gets squished to the left to make room for the ...


0

I don't think "clean" is meaningless. It refers to an uncluttered, elegant, simple design. If you hear that a lot, it is probably because this characterizes most good design. As for what to do, if stakeholders think your design is great, that is a win. Don't get too worried about it! I'm not sure that it is worth a lot of effort to get more detail ...


2

I read an article once that made an interesting point. I'm sorry, I was 90% sure it was on smashing, but I couldn't find it. However, the takeaway for me was to set ground rules before starting a review. The first rule was to relay a set of words that were considered "out-of-bounds". Basically a list of words that could not be used during the session. I ...


7

This is a very common problem. Many companies and other large organizations that offer a lot of support solve this by essentially requiring you to go through FAQ-like content before they even provide you with any way to contact them directly. Some take this to such lengths that it is very annoying for those of us who actually have a question not answered ...


2

IMO, a responsive website hides no content and adds no content no matter what. It simply rearranges the content to fit on a screen better. If a webpage has location capability, why use it only on the mobile version? What if I'm on a laptop? When I use a website, I expect it to behave the same way no matter what I'm using it on.


2

I would recommend an "accordion" style form. Namely: Select a provider: [ Provider drop down v ] Or [ Add a new provider ]. When the user clicks the button (or the hyperlink, whatever you prefer), the form slides apart to reveal the new provider form. That information is submitted at the same time the main form is submitted, and you can handle the sequence ...


0

Do you need a Now checkbox? Can't the date and time just be set to "now" when opened and if it's not changed to any other date and time, then it will simply be now...


1

Don't show irrelevant form controls that clutter your UI. Luke W has a good video up on YouTube titled "How to Make Form Input Faster" -- he talks about mobile, but the concepts do translate to desktop. In a Date & Time widget that I recently defined, I wanted to make it more compact and wanted to hide less used information. In my case, must users ...


2

I do not comprehend why zooming is suppressed. The whole purpose of zooming is to read what is on the site. If our eyes cannot read small print we need to zoom to prevent severe eyestrain. If it is suppressed to make sure we see the ads - keep in mind that we will not bother using the site at all if the print is too small. Also, why are so many people ...


1

The responsive text is a thorny road to travel. Not only is there the screen size issue, you also need to correct for font size, orientation, and language direction. In my opinion, you should eliminate the text altogether. A user who sees the form will immediately know it's for contact based on the nature of the page and the fields requested. If you must ...


1

Don't use a splash screen; instead, make the choice between patients and doctors clear in the navigation on the main page. If you display Doctors and Patients prominently, with some subheadings under each, it will allow site visitors to navigate your site more quickly and conveniently. As for what other content you display on the main page, there are a few ...


0

The Apple demo just shows me three and a half phones, nothing else. I cannot even scroll the page. Now you might call me a special case because I use a portrait monitor and use Vimperator instead of a mouse. But I know of quite a few users who use screen readers and other non-conventional input and output devices. If you can assume that 100% of you users ...


14

This design loses all novelty the instant you realize it's a slideshow. However, as a slideshow, it wins in these areas: having a single direction to swipe/scroll makes it easier to figure out "where do I go from here" than something like Prezi (where the "next" direction can be anywhere, even into/out of the page) a smooth transition from one page to the ...


1

I wanted to post this as a comment on andrewb's answer, but I ran out of room. andrewb gave a number of good points about these websites. The problem is that ALL of these good points can be applied to a non-full-screen scrolling page WITHOUT the downsides dan1111 pointed out, and often even better. A scrolling page allows you fine control over what a user ...


5

dan1111 has pointed out potential issues with this design, but I think that it's quite a robust idea if executed correctly. Case example is the Mac Pro introductory website. This garnered a lot of attention when it came out, providing a good way to introduce users to the new product. Things they did well: 1. It looks great Black backing, appropriate font ...


2

These single page apps were in trend which led the way to a few frameworks with which the similar view can be achieved in a better way. The point is the user has to use a loads of scroll either to go to top (unless the link to top is provided) or to scroll to the bottom and they might be clueless about the category they are going through except to say ...


1

responsive design isnt so much about rendering out different elements so they fit on a screen. responsive is about providing content and data for a user's behaviour on a platform do people really want mobile versions of websites which are completely different from their desktop counterpart? they want an experience that reflects their behaviour on ...


0

No, they don't. In my personal life it always annoys me immensely when I search for something on my phone, have a result appear (say, a forum topic) and then click on it only to be taken to the mobile version of the main page. In my testing experience...yes. Users familiar with full versions of programs/sites tend to disproportionately miss even small ...


48

The visual appeal of those sites is undeniable. However, they have serious problems in terms of usability: All control is taken away from the user. All of these sites force everyone to view a multi-page glossy ad, whether they want to or not. What if I just want to buy your product? What if I want to quickly get your contact information? Forget about ...


0

As ECM says this seems awfully close to a dark pattern. Really tricky language, confirming a negative. However, what they say...check off the boxes you want to unsubscribe from... Is it the case that the screenshot we are seeing here is of someone not currently subscribed to any? In which case updating preferences and tick off the boxes isn't such bad ...


1

The amount of effort you put into something is the equal value you will get out of it. IE: If you want mathematics to do the work for you instead of having to go through each environment and do it yourself by hand, you will get the equal quality from that mathematics. A similar example is kerning (the space between characters in a font). You can use the ...


0

I tend to call them flush (right|left) tabs to imply that they normally exist outside the normal flow of the layout. But that's just a convention. Just saying vertical tabs tends to imply that they are part of the normal layout.


0

What would be optimal is that when I click Unsubscribe at the bottom of the email, I'm taken to a page where the work has been done for me and I'm simply given confirmation that I have been unsubscribed. Done deal. I think they make it confusing by using a header like Update your preferences. That's not the action I'm there to take -- I'm really there to ...


3

This is known as a Dark Pattern; a user interface designed to trick people. From the DarkPatterns.org website: A Dark Pattern is a type of user interface that appears to have been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills. In this particular case you are confirming ...


0

I agree that checking the boxes to unsubscribe seems backwards. If this page has access to the information of whether or not the current visitor is already subscribed to any or all of these emails, they could load the page with those boxes already checked and then tell the user If checked, you will receive the following email(s): I also think the last ...


0

Updated after user's comment: You can find further information on this subject here as well: What to do when a page's content doesn't fill up enough of a fixed area? What is a good way to fill in too much white space? When thinking about a design problem I find useful to list the constraints I have to deal with. In this case, I would list the ...


0

I would suggest looking at this with the persona of a prospect gym goer. If I'm looking for a new gym, what are the things that matters? Location, equipment, facility services, price, environment. What sort of clientele does this gym serve? Is this higher end or price sensitive? If the people you are targeting are price sensitive, you better be darn sure ...


0

You could put replies which are too deep onto a different page (linked to in the thread). See reddit as an example.


0

The first option is better because it makes very clear that there is a very clear developer option that the user can see. Furthermore, when a user activates the developer option, they most certainly want to use it. Further, with the big button to switch between the two modes, the user can effortlessly switch between the two modes without going through the ...


0

It's called "extra site navigation". Just connect users to other team sites via navigation that resides on every unique domain/site. This is also used when a parent company (e.g., sears, etc.) connects users to their brands (e.g, lands' end, etc.). Examples of extra site navigation: Sears (top bar with brand logos)) ESPN (e.g., editions, cities, etc.) ...


1

Companies are always looking for ways to better target customers, and there are documented cases of using operating system information to do this. For example, Orbitz suggested higher price hotels to Mac users: Orbitz Worldwide Inc. has found that people who use Apple Inc.'s Mac computers spend as much as 30% more a night on hotels, so the online travel ...


2

I saw this question, made some sketches, got distracted, came back to see that @dan1111 had described the majority of the fixes. In fairness though, all that's happening here is the application of some design conventions. The biggest variation is regarding the addition/editing of cases. I've proposed that the inputs mirror the data in the table. This could ...


1

Answers to "Asking location in the UK" suggest using a post code. I can't see very many downsides to using this solution for your current problem. It's not entirely clear what level of specificity you have in mind when you talk about "places" but by any definition it is extremely unlikely that two place names will be in such close proximity to each other as ...


2

A few suggestions: Cases should be rows, not columns. As bdimag already mentioned, there are some display problems with the current format, particularly when you can add an arbitrary number of cases. In addition, I would say that making the cases be rows would be more intuitive to the users. Add/edit cases in a pop-up overlay. The current "add case" ...


1

I think you actually have this nearly right. That is because you are clearly needing them to make this decision and I don't think you can get away from that. Therefore if you need to offer two distinct options then yes I think your implementation is good. Some changes to improve it though: The second option, make the second line slightly less technical ...


2

This is not a good choice to offer the user. A few problems: The user might change their mind about whether they want to share it, but they will be locked into a choice. The user has to remember what setting they chose. If they forget and accidentally share a non-sharable file, it has destructive consequences. (Yes, you could have your program visually ...


2

Long-Page Scrolling Design The paucity of answers show that the industry hasn't settled on a term yet, but my personal preference is Long-Page Scrolling Design. This has been around for at at least a couple of years, being identified as a trend by Usability101.net as early as June 2012. What could conceivably have started out as a way to facilitate super ...


1

I don't care for this. You are asking the user to make a technical decision that they do not want to make, and should not have to care about. Essentially, you're giving them a non-choice: on the one hand they can have safety and recoverability that comes with unfriendly complexity; on the other they have an easy-to-use but unrecoverable system. I much ...


0

Providing different routes to content is a common challenge made more complex in global organisations where local, regional and global content all compete for attention. This article discusses how to surface the content people actually need. Your links page is clearly useful to people, so find out what they struggle with and work on improving it. ...


0

It has been generally referred to as 'Snowfall', coming from The New York Times website when they posted this article Interestingly, Wired have created a new version of this that scrolls horizontally instead of vertically, which is possibly more tablet friendly. I think the first examples we saw of this were from the BBC a few years ago when they ...


0

I've been seeing this kind of layout generally used in landing pages with a low amount of content, which is then divided into sections or blocks and laid out vertically in just one page. When speaking to colleagues, we call this kind of approach a "one-page layout", generally assuming we do that kind of visual division between sections. There's also the ...


1

Redirect to the detail page of the item which the user just created/edited. This allows users to immediately check the result of their submission (they can spot spelling mistakes, syntax/formatting problems, etc.). To make them aware that the item is published automatically, show a (temporary) message at the top of the detail page, like Created and ...


2

As JonW rightly pointed out, trying to define the fold is going to be a challenge with the surfeit of devices out there and you would be stuck trying to fit in as much content in a relatively small space (irrespective of the fold dimensions you choose). You could make a strong case that your form page design is like a single page design which basically ...


2

I get a lot of "above the fold" with a fairly arbitrary minimum height in my workplace as well (ours is based on the screen height of company-distributed laptops). What we've gotten away with arguing is, as long as the key element (form in this case) appears partially on the page, it will be obvious to the user that they need to scroll to see the full ...


1

My suggestion would be to put it in My Items since going by your answer to my question, there will be a lot of items in All Items and it would be easier for the user to find the item he just created in myitems. Also it would be consistent with experience created by similar apps where you can save content from a huge list and while that content might be ...


0

My recommendation would be something along these lines. Obviously, this is just a mock and you may want to do different things in terms of sizing, shading, and things like that. I think this makes sense because you have risks that are global, one-time type risks. Below that, you have phases which are visual descendants of the event and they have their own ...


2

Tabular data is traditionally difficult to read this becomes even more of an issue when additional layers of complecity are added in. I would suggest to look at the basic information you would like to convey and move away from tabular data (if your design efforts are not constrained of course) Based on my undertanding the main building blocks are : A- ...


3

What @JonW is saying is key here. You should always have your content in mind when designing a UI, therefore if the names are long, you most definitely should have a long field instead of a short one to accommodate them. That being said, and assuming you have already thought about this and your current situation impedes you from doing so, I found that the ...



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