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1

Another benefit not mentioned: The company pays for the call, not you. So it’s a nice offer, especially for international customers. In case an international telephone number is entered (or in case of multilingual regions), it would make sense to also ask for language, which would allow the company to let an employee, who is proficient in that language, ...


3

Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


1

Reuters articles are probably written to serve both print and web and they don't have a rewrite-for-web process in place. CNN's markup strikes me as dated in many respects (note it's XHTML, not HMTL5 - not that there's anything wrong with that), possibly an artifact of an older CMS or other technology. Many of these outlets still publish in print and/or ...


1

It's likely an unintentional artifact of the platform both sites use: WordPress. People who wrote/formatted the articles aren't UX, SEO or accessibility experts. The WordPress WYSIWYG editor is terrible when it comes to adding headings to text. The dropdown you need to switch from paragraphs to headings is hidden within the so call "kitchen sink" row. ...


0

How about trying to use some kind of wordmap API to generate a wordmap based off of how often they missed specific words. You could create an array of words, repeating the word bassed of the ratio of correct:incorrect matches, and pass that onto a wordmap api. This way, you could get a more visual representation instead of a quantitative representation ...


0

Assuming you'd like to display the individual words together. You could display the words in a list but with heat or temperature colour coding. For example start with a dark red for the words they get wrong frequently and then move towards orange as they get each word wrong less often. So in the above image the user gets the word "wrong" wrong the most, ...


0

My experience with ecommerce: Use big buttons [45-60px heigth] with the company visual; if is a Windows 8 desktop application, use the windows store default button, the user will know that is app button and not an ad button; avoid using other buttons near this and avoid ads near it; keep things clear around the button and the content, it is a flow, the ...


0

Given your question, is this the sort of thing you're trying to do?


0

You’ve got quite a bit of unused real estate. I would skinny-up the campaign list and make it the main column and create a right-hand column with the an h2 title ”Members” listing the top ten most popular/active/last-logged-in (whatever) members and have a link that says “Show all” at the bottom of the list. This should be relatively short and leave another ...


2

Best practice for "download" buttons is don't make them flashy or look like spam. We're all used to fake download buttons. Make it clean. I'd recommend you use flat design for it so that it stands out from all of the 90's era buttons that are still all over the web to get you to download trojans.


0

OK - so as mentioned in the comment above, my assumption that "every column in the set sits in the same row" was misguided, as was my trying to use the ux paradigm that we're used to for resizing say, columns in a table. Here's my working model going forward. Please note, I removed the UI elements for adding additional columns for clarity in this example. ...


3

I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


0

The issues with using gestures in mobile sites is more of a developmental limitation, in my opinion. In the event of an error, you risk losing essential functionality if a gesture is key in navigating throughout a site. We see gestures in apps because they are developed for specific devices using the method that is made FOR that device (i.e. Swift, etc). ...


1

I think icons are fine to a degree, however when you need to display information that isn't easily represented by icons, I'd revert to text. In use (sorry I don't have the same icons, hopefully you get the picture)


2

No one should not solely rely on the browsers back button. Why? Because Smart phones on average are growing at a faster rate than humans hand sizes. Look at where these back buttons typically are. Top right (general) Iphone standard view (bottom left) Iphone 6 horizontal view (top left) Now lets take a look at how users hold their devices ...


0

I would think about it on the basis of conversions (i.e. as a landing page). In the case of the Housing.com link the information could be considered by some to be, as you say, cramped and more difficult to digest effectively. In the case of AirBnB it feels more like a dedicated landing page in order to attempt to convert as many visitors as possible. ...


2

Assuming the number is greater than what you can show at a given time i would favor infinite or a looping pattern. However I would make sure to give them some contextual clue of the state of the system. Let them know that they are going to loop back around to the begining. I dislike carousels where I think haven't I seen that before and realized it was ...


1

User need to know how many box he has. You can implement something as infinite but with the number of box displayed under the carousel pictures. (or somewhere else) The infinite approach will stay disruptive and if you have a certain amount of box, display them like they are : limited.


1

Theres a lot of stuff here about not removing or interfering with the browser back button but I don't think that's what the questioner is asking. The Browser's back button is there for the user and shouldn't therefore form a part of your projected user journeys. The user may have customised their browser so that the back button does not show - If you are ...


1

I opted to implement a mix between the provided answers. There are now three states: 0 images have been added: 1 image has been added: 2 images have been added: Now there is always a placeholder. The placeholder is the same size as the other grid items and is always at the end of the list so the interface will not change drastically after ...


0

i wont use any site or app the forces me to do anything not needed to use it. if i were making this app (and i've stopped using two like this, btw. I'm an iphoneographer, mother of a dev with apps in the appstore, and i create literally 2 to 4k images a month), one would be sufficient. let busy people do one if they want. if the like how it goes they might ...


3

Instead of showing an empty list, show one with two placeholders that need to be filled before continuing - this shows the user that you're expecting at least two images. As real images are added, remove the placeholders.


0

I would use some caution with incredible granularity of gamification. The old style of gamification encouraged competition and with the more levels of granularity the greater the percieved competion. Research has shown that certain demographics are less likely to participate or shy away with too much competition (women primarily). So if you ...


1

Link rewards to experience goals Gamification should be inextricably linked to UX. It should not, most of the time, be fun for fun's sake (that can be a brand strategy). What I mean by that is simply that the rewards should be linked to key experience goals. The granularity of those goals should drive the gamification strategy. Take SE as a superb ...


0

You can use a type of switch control to let user choose option. Switching to the different option will change the list below. Highlighted part is a good header for the list, too:


2

It's about them, not you The design logic goes something like this: Sales calls can be time intensive and unpredictable since different customers will have different needs, and call load can vary a lot with time of day, advertising campaigns, etc. Most businesses don't have the luxury of hiring excess staff to sit around waiting for calls. Labor is often ...


0

Without know what the options are it's harder to say if these solutions will work, so hope fully this works in your context. I'd maybe break this up in to two steps, you choose the your first option, then your second. But the mix of radio, then select boxes seems strange (again unsure of the content), so maybe something like:


0

How about: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The reason why a tabular view is not recommended is because the user will not be able to see all of the data at once, allowing him/her to compare what's offered. Just make sure it's quite obvious what is selected and what isn't. Also keep an eye on hierarchy. Best of ...


2

Disable the non-active combobox. Leave it visible, but grayed out, so that only the selected one is interactive. But can I ask why it's split into radio buttons with comboboxes? What kind of options is the user actually picking here?


2

Its a nice question! I agree there is confusion among many people and drawing a line between all the branches is difficult. Reason being all the branches mentioned overlaps at one point or other. The answer actually lies in the names but due to their overlapping nature people do get confused. Even the companies while writing job descriptions. Understand, ...


1

From your diagram, we can add a simple message next to the 'add bikes' button, stating "x images to go." or "1 of x images added." after an image is added. Additionally, to ensure that the user uploads the correct amount of images, we can disable the save button until the correct amount of images is reached.


4

A simple resolution would be to show a simple descriptive text which tells them what to do i.e. they need to atleast upload two images to continue. Here is a quick wire frame for that. Until the user doesn't add the required number of images keep the continue\save button disabled.


0

Perhaps strike through list prices and show discounted prices in red I think most people realize there's a level of bullshit involved with that. Test, obviously, but in general, I'd avoid that altogether. If you want to show that your prices are especially low, consider showing competitors prices along side. In general, the best way to show ...


7

I've implemented such services at the request of clients and I currently work with a company that offers it as part of their software. In the right circumstances, it's a highly successful feature. Here's what I can tell you. Call me when you're ready to talk No one wants to sit on hold, get bounced from one department to another, or deal with some gateway ...


1

If you offer a send an email, contact with forms, phone us, visit us, talk to us on facebook or twitter and so on.. Why not propose a give your phone number. Some visitor maybe shy to call for support and will accept easier if you call back. It could be too for cost off the call in local or international, or if the visitor is in a company who block outgoing ...


0

I think they simply want to be in control of when to call you. I actually have never seen anything like that, but I'd imagine they have a follow-up form to ask for your number with with a few questions so they can prepare a specific pitch. Or maybe they just don't have a call center and they get lots of call daily. If you call there's a high chance you'd ...


0

Study your users The only way to answer this question is user research. Every target audience has their own preferences when it comes to this kind of problem (perceived value). Some demographics will respond to big red prices with "original" prices slashed out; some will favor a focus on product details and imagery, with price as a secondary data point ...


1

Without going into dark UX patterns, I'd recommend many of the techniques from http://www.goodui.org/ Some specific examples would be to recommend a specific product instead of treating everything equally (#7), use the anchoring effect on prices or trim the cents (#41, #51), or sell in limited quantities (#36). Another thing to consider would be the the ...


1

With this request I feel like you're starting to enter into the overlap of Marketing/UX - which can maybe explain why this might be a little different of a request. Humans are strange creatures when it comes to purchasing - they want to feel like they got a good value (generally - not talking about purchasers that purchase due to high price - aka the very ...


0

Seriously – are you asking for a site review here? Well – here's my two cents: the site looks like somebody took a standard theme and put minimum effort in editing it. there is almost no 'real' content – that makes 'reviewing' your site even more difficult. I would suggest you spend some time working on your site! Then, if you have a specific question ...


0

If you want to use dropdown in that way, you must teach your users that "this" thing work different on your site. Actually most people know only how standard ComboBox works, so in this case you may need usability tests. What I mean? I don't know the context of use, but the rest of elements on your site must work similarly, creating something like "Design ...


0

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you want usability stick to the classic combobox.The phone and tablet browsers understand what is a combo and they will display it full screen when opened. It will be easier for your users on small screen to select options.If you absolutely need horizontal selection, go to to a ...


0

Really depends under which context you are using it in. If you're using content like icons, thumbnails, numbers or short words in the drop-down(drop-right) it might actually look better than on using a drop-down. Optionally you could also go for a drop-down grid to get a more balanced result.


0

Its might looks new, but it's depend on the number of content you have on the list. if it's like 'choosing a name of a country'; think about the width of your screen (pretty wired right ..!). but for a small number (<6) , its might be better . but remember, if you going to use it then be consistent throughout the application, because your user might ...


3

This pattern has been used in gaming such as selecting the hardness of the game or for simple controls. ( easy - medium- hard) If there is Left - Center - Right arrangement, i think that it will increase some factors, especially reduced error and speed. If your project needs to be used in smaller screens, having horizontal arrangement will not be the ...


4

Lose the breadcrumbs ... ... and you are fine : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups As @DA01 said: Given the left menu is a tree menu, is there really a need for breadcrumbs? A tree menu is, essentially, vertical breadcrumbs


1

if they don't affect your design negatively, just leave both. Most users knows what a breadcrumb is since they use it in their computers and they know the breadcrumb is a path they can follow (hence the breadcrumb term). However, your left navigation is more of a question mark in terms of usability, because, by definition, you can take "jumps", thus you're ...


1

What makes you think bread crumbs are bad idea? The details on it is essential for the user to know target page. Especially when the navigation menu tab on the left is collapsed.


1

I would prefer to have the Breadcrumbs. As a user for me the LHN is telling me the list of the available reports, whereas the breadcrumb is about the exact report i'm looking at. Breadcrumb helps to give a clear direction for the users, if there are any sub-reports available within REPORT 1 (as in your scrnshot)


1

A selection from 100+ items is rarely usable, I fear, without search and/or structure. And I wonder whether this might get even worse because the user might want to have not only the sequence of prior decision (acting like a stack), but also might want to see paths he explored earlier - resulting in a tree (or network, depending on your scenario) of ...



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