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0

Can we go back a step and ask the question, have you verify that a filter to limit results based on frequency is actually something that users want? It sounds like a highly artificial metric for filtering and I'm wondering if this is the reason why users don't understand how this control works as oppose to them not understand how the UI control works. What ...


3

It's a one-page responsive website. More descriptively, it's a one-page/long-scrolling responsive website with a hero shot, sticky header, and scrolling transitions. Let's break that down: One page refers to a site where the principle content narrative appears in sections on a single page rather than on different linked pages (as in a traditional ...


0

It's usually called infinite scrolling with a hero shot. It describes it well but obviously not all sites have "infinite" scrolling.


0

Single Page or One Page sites (or applications). Yes, flavor of the month. A design option.


2

The recommendation is typically to go responsive. Barring that, there is no one recommended size. That's something you need to decide based on your users' needs, the context of your site, your business needs, etc.


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Setting default viewport size is typically used for responsive or mobile-optimized sites to prevent unnecessary resizing of the viewport because the webpage has been optimized for that particular viewing format. If you have a fixed width site that is NOT optimized for small screens. Then you really should not be setting a viewport size and allow the native ...


2

Most travel websites suck when it comes to anything other than single guests or couples, especially with children. In many cases, you have to special case kids even more: Infants usually don’t count, but may require a crib. Toddlers may stay for free if sleeping in bed with their parents, but sometimes have to pay for breakfast, though probably not full ...


3

This seems to be more of a graphic design question than UX question. But there's something called "vertical rhythm" that might help in laying out the flow of elements on a page. Here's some references to get started if you're dealing with webpages: http://www.markboulton.co.uk/journal/incremental-leading ...


2

There is no general rule However, here are some concepts and approaches that UX designers use. You may want to look up these terms to help you think through layout: UI or UX layout White space or breathing space. Grid alignment OS guidelines (look for layout metrics for iOS, Android, Windows, for example) This set of terms should help you get started.


2

Consider how AirBnB shows the maximum number of guests allowed in a location. They start by asking the user to put in their number of guests. If it's missed here, the user can change it on the next screen, where they have the same dropdown as on the previous search. This time though, the results will dynamically update as the user changes their number of ...


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I am taking the liberty of assuming column text is something related / in context to the content on the page. This brings to mind many news websites and how they handle content. Here are a couple of websites. New York Times and NDTV respectively. They provide a clean header area for title. It gives central attention to the primary content on the page. ...


1

Depends on the relation between the title and the columns, I'd say. If your title also covers the second column, then the visual hierarchy should reflect that, i.e., you should follow (2). If the title is not related to the second column, approach (1) is right. As an example, if the title says "Search Results for XYZ", and the second column contains ...


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So I actually did my Masters thesis research on the default zoom level and level of detail that users prefer when working with way finding and identification tasks. Overall, users tend to prefer a large scale map (more zoomed in) and a generalized view (as opposed to satellite imagery). However, there are exceptions to this. When setting the initial zoom, ...


0

"In general terms the international format for a telephone number actually is +<country> [(0)]<area> <subscriber>" AS others have mentioned, there isn't really a "general" way phone numbers are formatted. For example here in Denmark all numbers are 8-digit but there is never a leading zero when calling in-country, so for a Dane that (0) ...


1

Predictable placement is important for common tasks If creating files is important (as it is for most sites of this nature), then it's important that users know instantly where to navigate to create a file. If you add the create widget to the end of a list, you are forcing the users to hunt around for it, which can be very frustrating. For frequently ...


1

I don't think this is an area where UX design patterns are going to be helpful, because this isn't a well defined enough user flow that a reasonable pattern can emerge. That said, if I were designing this app and looking for helpful examples, I would assemble a taxonomy of something like the following sites: Banking and payment sites which offer ...


2

The first option will fail when the user has enough files to put the "+" button below the fold. The second option doesn't suffer from this flaw, although it could benefit from a call-to-action heading, e.g. "Add a new item"


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Each interface has to be optimized for it's goals, and for those goals ONLY. The goals are different, so the interfaces would become different if you follow that rule. It does not make any sense to show the marketing content to the user who has already bought the product (unless you have some exceptional situation). It's just irrelevant. The other main ...


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You could solve this without an extra UI flow, have a default group that new users, and users who had their group deleted automatically go to. And when an admin deletes a group, you just move all those users to the default group.


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There are two flows here. Delete a group Reassign a user It appears to me that you are trying to fit these two operations in a single action. I would avoid that. I would rather design a system which has two separate operations. Delete group and reassign user. If an admin tries to delete a group which has users associated to it, I'd notify the admin to ...


2

Allow direct editing of the columns headings. Allow direct editing as much as possible. Make the initial table creation as quick and easy as possible but understand this initial creation will likely be modified many times. So to create a table requires 2 numbers, number of rows and number of columns. Then show the table and let the user work on a "live" ...


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The UK Meteorological Office App makes a pretty good job of the basic interface: the colour coding of the temperatures is a nice touch


-2

It's called a parallax design. Search online for "define parallax website" and you'll get a number of examples and definitions. FWIW I was banging my head, trying to remember this word, found this question but no one (yet) had the answer. Mercifully, the word then popped in my head: parallax.


1

Why couldn't OAuth and a fake name coexist? Use OAuth to set up an account for each new commenter. Keep the information acquired during the OAuth private, for your own use only. Then let the user create a fake name which they can share with the community. Best of both worlds? Also, while you're getting the OAuth Authorization, be sure to acquire Facebook ...


2

As this source suggests, this is the recommended markup: <map title="Breadcrumbs"> <a href="/">Home</a> > <a href="/foo">Foo</a> > <a href="/bar">Bar</a> </map> The links are part of the G65, which states: Breadcrumb trails are implemented using links to the Web pages... The ...


1

First and foremost: You should think about satisfying the needs of your users. No SEO argument should stand in the way of providing them with the tools they need. With that in mind: Breadcrumbs do highlight important keywords for search engines but most importantly they act as secondary navigation and help users know where they are within a website ...


0

I don't find the article I read which speak about this subject. But anyway, It says (from a Google employee) that they will reward websites for the user experience comfort more than technical guidelines everybody's following. And I think giving everything to the user is better (in business terms) than SEO (word of mouth, satisfaction, retention)


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To achieve information persistence across pages and gain even more flexibility in linking to important parts of the website, why not consider a more creative use of the footer. below is an idea: This is an excellent idea, because it allows users to contact you without having to navigate to the contact page. source: Informative And Usable ...


0

If you really, really, really have to use a tree view with hundreds of nodes, then it needs to be just that: a very basic tree view and absolutely nothing more. Sometimes this situation is unavoidable. A tree view is often used for expert users who want to be able to navigate a complex hierarchy quickly, without waiting for page reloads. In this ...


0

I may not solve your problem with the following approach, but I am fairly certain that the current implementation is overwhelming to the user. It adds a lot of performance issues. It is also hard to comprehend if I want to have a look at more data in one go. Let us start with 80:20 rule. When I design something, I generally make sure that my solutions ...


1

Put a "Skip Navigation"or "Skip to main content" Links first element before every thing on top of your pages. So the keyboard user will decide to let screen reader go through all navigation and other stuff or just skip to go to the main content. so you can use visuallyhideen class to make the link invisible for sighted people. ...


2

I'm coming from a web developer perspective, so I am a bit biased, but here's my two cents: Local domains are great, but hard to remember, if you're going to be using different countries, I would go with website.com/ca/mcdonalds. This actually makes it easier for other websites to integrate as well, as it is a simple RESTful interface. The /ca/ designates a ...


1

A URL must uniquely identify a page. This is simply a basic principle, and you should discard any option that breaks it. Note the requirement you mention in your question: I need the businesses to be able to post the URLs of their pages... It won't be acceptable to businesses if the only available URL goes to a page where the user selects from ...


0

This is a question that can be answered easily and quickly by Google. But since it is a popular question, here's a reusable approach: W3Schools keeps statistics on web browser screen widths. The last set is from Jan 2014, but it's enough to make the point since the movement has been towards 16:9 since then: Based on this analysis I would ...


1

If it links to another page, why not use the standard link analogy? The convention is well known for users. Otherwise a small symbol next to the row title in Tohster's solution would also work. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

I think it's hard to solve this problem without changing styling or adding elements. However, you may be able to indicate the navigation in a way that minimizes the impact on styling. The basic issue here is, the section titles and row headers are perceived as passive because they almost always are. Therefore, you will need some kind of indicator to ...


0

the browser back button MUST work as expected. your web UI back button MUST NOT provide a back button unless it does the same thing the browser back button does example: filtered category view in ecommerce - if the back button return to unfiltered category view it MUST NOT look like a back button, but rather like a breadcrumb. you SHOULD provide ...


0

Speaking not as a designer but as a user; anytime I have to default to my browser's back button to continue navigating a site, I can't help but consider it a failure of the site's UX. The more I have to use it, the more frustrated I get. The only exceptions are instances like "What was that seller's address on the last page?" or "What did I put in that form ...


0

No, you shouldn't rely on the browser's back button. While its easy to say that you can expect it to be present and that you can expect it to always function a certain way, that's simply not the case. Because the back button exists in an application outside of your own, you can't reasonably expect it to be present or function in any specific way. If ...


7

Rely is the wrong word You're asking if you should rely on the button, which you shouldn't. You're also asking if you should offer another option. Which you could, and in certain situations, should. So here's the thing: Back button You should never, ever, break the behavior of the back-button. At all times, you must strive to keep it's functionality in ...


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A web application should always strive to be compatible with the browser's back button. That is, using the back button should have deterministic results within that application that match expected behavior (global consistency). A common scenario that comes to mind with this is an eCommerce site that has a list of products. A user clicks on one of the ...


0

I wouldn't use it exclusively. The first example that comes to mind is Google Chrome for Android. Every "tab" is a new instance, and so opening a new window is akin to starting a brand new session. In these instances, the back button will simply take the user to the homescreen instead of actually going back. The same thing will happen if a user chooses ...


-2

You should rely on the browser back button but not exclusively! Best case scenario: back button on the screen support for browser back-button


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Yes. You should rely on the browser back button. Users expect the button to be there, so make sure it's functional. But should you mimic the same button with its functionality? If your application or website needs it, yes, but not always exactly the same. In some cases, like your example of a webshop, a button that just says back or an arrow might not be ...


0

I believe that you should not rely exclusively on the browser's back button. If the user is interacting with your site to get somewhere, I think it's reasonable they would expect to be able to return the same way. Displaying where the user is within the context of the website is important so the user has a frame of reference where they are in the overall ...


3

I usually try to provide both on-screen back-button and support for browser back-button. Reasons: If the user is immersed in the flow of the app, an on-screen back button can help keep focus inside the flow and avoid losing the user's attention. Supporting the browser back button is important to me, even at great cost, because it's presumptuous design to ...


3

As several folks have commented on the question - it's a technical reason. However, as with most technical reasons, there are technical solutions (in most cases - secure apps are a whole different kettle of fish!). They're probably costly, slow or otherwise nasty in some way, but it's not an impossible problem. The real reason sites break the back button ...


2

For most web sites, it is very hard to justify breaking the back-button. Even shopping carts, bank money transfers, etc, can be made idempotent, so refreshing, back, then forward, etc doesn't cause unexpected behaviour. There are some scenarios where the back-button cannot be supported. For example, I worked on an extremely complex web application a couple ...


3

Colors should really match the theme of the site and be easy to the eye. For example, if the site is about valentines day, use shades of red and pink. Most importantly, make sure contrast is good. An example of bad contrast which many websites produce is light grey on white. Visit checkmycolours.com and put any URL in it to see if the website has good ...


2

I'm not sure it's deliberately obscure, but rather a victim of circumstance. For example, the UX team's requirements might have been: We need to show how long ago a post/tweet was shared, as it creates a sense of immediacy and relevance We need to provide a link an individual post/tweet We need to cut down on UI clutter for the majority of users 99.9% of ...



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