New answers tagged

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Seems about right As long as the programmers know how to deal with high-density retina displays, this size (or even slightly bigger) shouldn't be an issue. Of course, as long as we're talking about JPG files like photos with fine details. Otherwise, if your images are vector based, you could (should) use SVG files. What your programmers seem to be missing ...


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This will depend on your specific issue, but specific implementation issues are off topic here at UX.SE, so I will go with the usability part of your question. In general, and barring some specific needs, your client is correct. Like you say: site zooming and responsive design are not the same thing basically because responsive design is a web design/...


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350KB is too much for a single image and it is not good ballance. As a rule of thumb you should not exceed 100Kb per image (think about people with really slow internet). Suggested density of the pictures for the web is 72 DPI. Majority of users have laptop resolutions, such as 1366x768. Most used desktop resolution is 1920x1080 which means that picture ...


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I do NOT think the current table is a good solution. It makes me think of a spreadsheet, but then does not follow the conventions of a spreadsheet (with a totals column, etc.). This does not mean that a table is wrong, just that the current use is misleading. The symbols do not mean anything much to me; you have to ask your actual users. My solution is not ...


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First and foremost principle: Never hide important information from your user Second: User Expectations: User might not be able to see the hidden same black + sign in the right most corner and chances are it is unexpected for normal user so avoid this technique "+" symbol doesn't always mean expand, it could be add or user might think it will show a ...


2

Why do you think interacting with select boxes is annoying? Remember not all mouse clicks are to be considered bad. Select boxes have been around for a very, very long time, and are a neat concise way to select a value. You can also set a default value (if it makes sense), which could be beneficial to the user because they may not even need to interact with ...


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The option with two select list is much better than adding 10 more options. Users do not like to read. They just scan, a big part of time. Considering the fact that you are gonna to use only two select lists with pretty small number of items inside, it is not such a big deal for user. Seeing a ton of similar information is pretty annoying and hard to ...


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Most of the websites probably choose a horizontal header because it is commonly considered that this visual organization of website elements is more consistent with human perception. However, an outside the norm approach, when used correctly, can become a memorable experience, thanks to its rare occurence.


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Consider these 2 thoughts: A) Many users will have a wide screen monitor. So for them the horizontal space is not really an issue. Instead the vertical space is where the premium is at. B) Secondly, your side menu can easily collapse or slide in/out, thus effectively saving you the horizontal space you are concerned about.


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Here's a couple of ideas: A) Replace those ugly blue buttons with DIV's with an image. the effect would be a grid of picture cells. Kinda like app icons on your smart-phone but with little or no margins. B) replace the blue buttons with a smaller image + hyperlink. the effect would be more professional/mainstream media sites. I would try going for option ...


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There are regions where you read right-to-left (Kurdistan is a region that comes to mind). In such a culture, putting the navigation elements on the right-hand-side may make more sense, since that is where a reader's eye may start browsing the page.


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The following are guidelines that I typically use when making this decision. Tables are good when comparing data points across records/sorting/filtering. Use a table display when: it is important to be able to visually compare values from several different records (e.g. which address records are from Spain, order records by users' last name) you'd like ...


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By scrolling to the bottom of the page a user assumes that they have reached the end of the fold. By hiding more information at the end of the page you are in fact creating a bigger cognitive load for the user to work out where they can find footer links. In essence, a footer is the end of the page and it doesn't make much sense to hide it. If content is in ...


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1 - Depends on your use case. If it's likely that a user will just want to see the page without making changes, then I'd prefer to minimize the chances that the page will go live by mistake: I'd make the users request the internal page explicitly by navigating to Edit mode. But if that's not a likely scenario and in most cases users will only want the page ...


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Looking at the heatmaps, you'll realise very less % of people reach to the footer. And those who scroll till there are the once who are finding an important link or a shortcut to reach to a desired page. While traversing through the entire page in search of a link, I'm sure hiding that would be really mean. Just to make your design minimal, you might lose ...


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From a design standpoint, however, drop-down menus are an excellent feature because they help clean up a busy layout. If structured correctly, drop-down menus can be a great navigation tool, while still being a usable and attractive design feature. drop-down navigation menus can be user-friendly. Recently Jacob Nielsen the results of his recent drop-down ...


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In 99% of the cases you don't need to keep multiple parent items expanded at once. Moreover, it is advisable not to do so, as you don't want the user to get confused about her current location on your website and eventually get lost. And yes, there are scenarios in which you would want to have all the items expanding without collapsing their siblings. Such ...


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"It doesn’t matter how good your website is if users can’t find their way around it." - By jerrycao Continuing with my answer posted just a day before. I stated that collapse menu's are better, and also gave some valid reasons. Note: Please read my previous answer(linked above), come back and continue here. Now talking about your case, I would ...


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Provide them shortcuts for expand/collapse all, then let them organize it from there (unless there's some explicit reason for them not to be able to expand multiple siblings concurrently).


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I've found that letting users choose when tabs open and closed is best, so I would leave it up to the user to collapse one menu, even when following a link in another menu. A scenario describing why would include users who might be navigating through different parts of the site multiple times. If I want to go to the pratius page, then artius, them to ...


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I previously worked for a company sent out roughly 1 million subscriber emails an hour to people subscribed to bulletins, should those users choose to respond to those emails they would click a link to go to our web site where they would continue on their journey. After much research, as every response was effectively money in the bank we came to one simple ...


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Though it depends on what type of users you are dealing with, but in most of the cases yes it's required. For example if there is a page of "terms and conditions" , or say "our team". Because of mental model of the user(most of the websites place it on the bottom) normal user tendency will be, to look at the bottom of the page (Footer). But, if you are ...


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Of course it is better to eliminate unnecessary elements on the interface. The big question is how much slower it would be if you implement those additional checks? In my opinion a several checks would not noticably slow down the interface so try to do it. If you have good developers you will find a way to optimize your code. Also, leaving the normal user ...


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I would suggest you should be focusing on the user journey and based on that with the kind of mental load the users have(while using the product), take your decision. In some cases providing unnecessary/useless/redundant options (buttons in your case) might dramatically increase the friction. No harm in cleaning up unless you are hiding useful things. ...


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You can also try playing with typography with some pictogram. That might help in this case. I had a similar issue in one of my project and it worked. Different kind of animations (shake, wobble, rubber band etc.) are also helpful. For example in case of a hard alert, a shaky animation will serve the issue. That will not only attract the eye, but also ...


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Use a different shade or hue of red/green/yellow/neutral, and use it consistently for your positive/negative/warnings/neutral. Also use iconography along with the colors to enforce the message. For example, use a light red with 1px border along with an "!" icon on all error messages. Ensure that you do not use your primary website color in any messages or UI ...


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There is no way to answer that question in general. First, there is no single metric of "better". You could try to use some common metric like overall satisfaction, but maybe some other metric is more important to you, like user retention. We can't tell which one you need. Second, even if we were to agree on a single metric, the ways in which a negative UX ...


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Use a discreet color. If you want to use a another color, then use white or blue. Sometimes a bright, friendly orange works good, too. But don't use a color which annoys the user.


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You could try presenting the primary hotel and alternate as cards, with the primary accommodation presented as the top card. Show some details of the hotels on each card. Label the primary hotel card "Primary hotel" or "planned accommodations" or something like that, and make the primary hotel card background color brighter than the secondary one. Label the ...


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A simple solution would be to mention the hotel which is most popular in bookings OR the nearest hotel to the user's selected or current location. Below, you can have a drop-down or a button that mentions View 1 More Location. As far as a holiday feel is concerned, I would advise you to switch to a better interface and use images to your advantage. The ...


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Hover is certainly discoverable if the user might expect that clicking on the element would give more information. In your design, a user who wants more information about a menu item is very likely to try clicking on the item, or its title. Such an action would often lead to more information. So, they would discover the hover functionality (given your ...


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In short, yes, hover states will be more discoverable on a site that has fewer elements. Imagine these two scenarios: A full-screen page with a single element in the center with a hover state A full-screen page with a 16x16 grid of elements, of which only 2 elements have a hover state Being an interactive medium a user's instinct is to interact with ...


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Open a new tab when you leave the basic navigational structure of your website. This is a very "open" rule, since a lot of minor things can take you away from said structure, but bear with me. Searching, finding Always allow a user to navigate to anywhere on your site. Every page you show should have some way to escape the current funnel, and switch to a ...


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The most common situations when I chose to make a link open in a new tab are when I am taking the user away from my site to another site but I don't want them to leave my site completely, or when I am linking to something contextual for what they are working on, on my site. Consider these examples: 1. I don't want them to leave my site Say I am running ...


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Both options seem valid for me, it all depends on the business rules behind it. You cannot compare a content website like youtube to a brand website like wacom of pg. A brand website usually create this kind of pages because they have different localised website across the regions. The websites might look really different in terms of look and feel and ...


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It might also be interesting to try to access these sites with restricted browsers (say lynx or with JavaScript disabled) or from a machine equipped for blind users. Having a dedicated, static HTML page might be part of the strategy for dealing with these situations.


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I don't think you are missing anything, the above site 'http://us.pg.com/ or http://www.wacom.com/' options are handled very well. My analysis on apple.com, country selection must be in new page because the country list is more than 140+. Its hard to handle such a big number selection on same page. My suggestion on providing the Country selection option ...


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What you could do is group your categories by major themes and use a similar style as bestbuy.com where categories appears in a dropdown and when you go above one category, the window expands and shows other relevant categories based on that theme.


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While I agree with @dan1111, one alternative, I can think of is a Chris Coyer's implementation for big drop down. You can see the example below: https://css-tricks.com/examples/LongDropdowns/ But honestly that would be an unfamiliar behavior for the user and that cannot happen inside a side menu. The other thing is sidr.js which you could see been used ...


2

This is a pretty common interaction on a lot of shopping websites and the norm is pretty much always: If user clicks/taps on open icon (default), turn open icon to filled icon and add to favorites. If user clicks/taps on filled icon, turn filled icon to default and remove from favorites. Moving the products to a separate section during the interaction ...


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Don't move it automatically. If I'm halfway down the list and think "Oh, I like this one!" and click the star, I would be very frustrated if it disappeared from sight. I would instead just provide feedback that it was added to the user's favorites list by filling in your "favorites" icon. Additionally, provide a way to filter by favorites. If the thing I ...


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I would add a ♡ when the item is not selected, then give it an action color like this ♥ when its favorited. Use a bright success color like green or yellow or anything else that works with your theme or template, when the user clicks add some transitions or animations so that the color eases into the outlined heart and the user registers the ...


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I def. recommend this option for the desktop version but not for mobile. Look at the attached image, the window gets really tiny whenever you attempt to input text into the field.


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Just refer the google inbox for web on providing the shortcut, you will get better idea. They have consolidated all shortcut to a modal page. It's easy to understand, the way they placed the shortcut list is clear and easy to scan. ( we don't read the text, but we scan - cognitive process of scanning text) Refer the attached screenshot for more info


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It's always better if you keep the explanation right under the filed for both desktop and mobile. In case you need long explanation, you can always include a title for the helper line and link it to another page or a popup. You'll get what I really mean by checking out this example from mailchimp. I use it and find it helpful.


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In light of adapting to minimalistic design, having an expandable footer may prove space-saving and allow for unique interactions if designed right. It allows the user to focus on the main content of the page and not get distracted by the overload of information footers provide in tiny font. In http://us.topshop.com/?geoip=home having a sticky footer and ...


1

this is VERY subjective Some more suggestions -add to Need list -save to own list -add to my precious list Product teams and marketing people get really go overboard with labeling for these kind of features, but forgetting to check the language their users are speaking. It really depends on your audience, you need to align it in the same language as them.


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I don't think Facebook would have redundant button that calls to the same action.Beside, that looks a bad design from my point of view.Nevertheless, I could only answer why Facebook uses the color green as their sign-up button. One of the test that was done by Hubspot, they find that colors "red and green" increases conversion rate, uses different color " to ...


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Although I do not have an example of your layout, I would personally choose top aligned in this case. This will probably give the most visual order and harmony, especially since your paragraph block text is also left aligned (meaning you already have an unconsistent visual area on the right). Compare:



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