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1

That is quite a loud background, but I think there's a problem with the contact form as well. I don't think it's impossible to open with a contact form, but it doesn't work here. I'd pinpont the following (potential) flaws: The site doesn't follow social norms. You don't ask questions before telling people something about yourself, and why they should ...


0

Don't completely rely on social network signups, Users should be able to signup using there email address. Facebook & Twitter are the most important Signup buttons due to the number of users these social networks cover. Add linkedin singup only if a great part of your targeted audience is Corporate or your product have to do something with business, ...


0

In your particular case (where you know that the language suggested by Accept-Language is wrong), I would do the following: Use GeoIP data to set the defaults; When the GeoIP data doesn't match the Accept-Language, offer the user to preset locale to the value in Accept-Language (if it does match: great!). Regarding offering the user to set alternative ...


1

I would blame it on bad form design. Often personal information like address, city, phone number and email are considered to be standard inputs for forms. It's used because other forms use them too. When I worked for an ecommerce company I asked them questions about their forms. I asked them why there were two input for phone numbers (optional). They said ...


2

I'm a little unclear on the form you filled up; it sounds like an online coupon you filled out and not an actual membership form. I can see legitimate reasons for collecting phone numbers for gym members (e.g. a way to contact you if they find a lost object of yours, emergency contact in case of accident) but in this case it sounds most likely like they're ...


2

Potentially for further identification of the gym member. i'm not sure what other information they may have asked for in the form, but it is possible (not probable) that two members have the same name, birthday, and several other identifying features, but they're not too likely to have the same phone number.


0

I assumed "the golden ratio" stuff was true for a long time for webdesign. But now I actually found the whole golden ratio stuff is utterly nonsense , see: http://vimeo.com/88132964 NO: architects, painters etc... did NOT use the golden ratio in their works, never, NOT: NOT it is not from the "antiquity", not the egyptians, nor greeks and the Da Vinci stuff ...


1

Here are three reasons: Collecting numbers database for spam Use phone number as a login (not your case) Bad form design


0

I know this is an older string but wanted to weigh in with my experience on this. We launched a mobile payments website with the log out link originally appearing in the footer. We discovered, however, that during the payment process (and other areas of the experience) users were fat fingering the log out option which was immediately kicking them out (my ...


0

Most of the people don't know what internet browser is ! so they end up using the default one(Internet Explorer) in case of windows. Windows dominate the computer market, so most of the users use internet explore. Most of the people don't care about internet browsers they just want to the work to be done


-1

I don't think you can say most users. It's highly contextual and depend entirely on the particular web site and the demographics of said site's visitors. In general, why you still see IE at all, however: many people browse the internet from work. Large corporations tend to still use IE for reasons including: Cost. People were still running XP up to this ...


0

I've been a web designer for roughly a decade and while I tested out Adobe Edge Reflow and Adobe Muse, I don't use them professionally. I'm not ruling out using them for websites, though I don't see myself using them for web-based applications. Applications generally need to be edited in IDE like Eclipse, which means you want the cleanest code possible, and ...


0

I have been designing and building websites for about 5 years now, and tend to avoid tools and frameworks that claim to make the job easier - not because I don't believe those claims, but because they are often not the right solutions for me personally. Early in my first web design role, my employers tried to hook me up with software like Dreamweaver, and ...


0

From my experience as a Web Designer, most people design in Photoshop or Illustrator. In a professional environment, designers and developers are almost always separate people. So the person who designs the site, is not the person who builds it. They're two completely different skill sets, and both designers and developers are experts in their own fields. ...


0

I think the size of the UX changes should reflect their scope. If the developer option is something like "now you can change the background color!", then the "normal way" is totally fine, as it's not a big change. Option 1 makes sense if the "Developer's area" is totally separate from "Profile options", and has a similarly scope for changes. This seems ...


0

"Just sketch it out and code it" is better by far than slicing and using anything directly from Photoshop, and DA01 gave great reasons why. I'll add, to your question about other ways of doing it, that it can be helpful to sketch it out in a graphics program that will be used to produce the actual assets. I use Illustrator, some use Sketch, and even ...


3

Old way: "design the site in like Photoshop and then slice it" New way: "just sketch it out then code" So, you're doing it the preferred way. The problems with the old way were numerous: Those doing the PhotoShop often weren't well versed in the medium they were designing for (ie, they didn't have a clue about web browsers, CSS, HTML, web servers, etc) ...


-1

Definitely avoid pairing red and green together on your website. It'll give low contrast between the two colors because color blind users will see them both as yellow. Why You Should Never Pair Green and Red Together on the Web


5

...to see if it is useful for our company to put some extra attention into our designs for those who are colourblind. It's not just colour-blind users who can't see certain colour combinations - actual blind people can't either, so you need to ensure data isn't represented purely visually. Webaim have some useful info on this topic that covers off the ...


2

Is activation absolutely required before continuing the process? If not, you might try something like this: Checkout form is one page. At the top is two or three fields for registration: email address, password, maybe their name. Then below that is just their payment information. When they submit the form, it logs them in and takes them to their dashboard. ...


8

Here's three tricks that spring to mind: Create a visual effect of a square torn out of the paper, and show the ad through the hole. This combats banner blindness: the ad is integrated with the design principle, and yet clearly stands out. The visual joke will soften the user's annoyance at seeing an ad. The edges of the ad will be partially obscured, ...


3

I would advice you to place the ads in a graphical place holder that matches the style of the web page. I don't think it's a sane option for you to redo all the ads to match the style (in the sense that you'll probably go insane :) ) What'll probably save you in this case is banner blindness. Things that really stand out on web pages tend to have the exact ...


1

About the menu: I agree with Dave, that you could perhaps explore possibility to have it vertical, albeit you could gain more with simply restructuring and hoping you can fit all menu items in one row and still have only 2 levels. However, another alternative would be to have the top navigation contain only the most primary and sought after links that most ...


1

I would entertain thinking slightly differently and exploring a vertical side navbar. Perhaps, provide some organization to the navigation links. Two or three categories may help the user better digest your offered nav topics. Also, the text does not need a shadow, the white on dark blue pops for pleasant reading. I hope this helps.


0

Tag clouds should not be used for tags, much less for website functions. One of your problems could be the site's functionality is somewhat complex, and so explaining its functionality is one of the main challenges). Taking a complicated problem, and adding a complicated way of displaying that problem does not simplify the solution. And tag ...


0

You'll be happy to learn that are a wide range of solutions to just this problem. Check out services like AddThis, AddToAny, and ShareThis. As their names suggest, they don't differ too much, but it's worth experimenting with each to find the one best fits your needs. You're asking for minimal functionality, and one may do a better job not pushing the ...


1

I don't think it's useful to think of these redesigns in terms of simply "changing fonts", even though new typography is part of the new designs. Typography is an element of the design and the selection of fonts is considered within the context of the design as a whole. Designers generally don't just change fonts (or just change colors, or just change ...


0

At first, please make yourself sure that such a feature is necessary — you describe you checklist as "small", so multiple selection can make your tiny checklist more functional, more complex, but it can be not useful for and unused by most users (so by adding such a feature in certain contexts cane make the checklist worse, not better). If such a feature is ...


1

I don´t think that anybody here can tell the real reason behind any change on Google or Wikipedia, so we only can speculate about it and try to do educated guesses. First the easiest part. An option to revert those changes would be cumbersome considering that you can change the size of content and zoom on any browser easily. Of course some people may not ...


0

It isn't an easy question to answer. Here are my guess: + Use cases for login after session ends. + Technology used. + Usually, banking or any user sensitive sites require you to not to see any aspect of the user's information that is why you have the entire new login page. + In site where you can browse you have to login only when you have to comment or ...


1

Here are reasons why it is in a popup, under most circumstances: Login is a one-time-per-visit action (if even that) - do it and you're done. Because of that, no need to take up real estate all the time with it. In addition, once you have logged in, do the fields remain? Likely not. Once logged in, the interface updates to a logged-in experience (new ...


1

The bigger question is who is your audience. In word, Excel, etc; they use the word "Insert Picture". In Adobe Photoshop, where users mostly know the different types of images, uses "Insert Image". So, the answer to your question lies in the audience.


2

Yes, you don't want to be intrusive and block the content for your users. Showing relevant content is important, but you don't want to do that at the cost and risk of annoying some users. If it is clear that the site is international, most users will be looking for a way to select their respective local version themselves. All you need to do is make it easy ...


3

image: mostly related to digital photo. More technical term picture: can be digital photos , paintings. Less technical term If you are expecting people to upload their photo,paintings most appropriate will be Picture If you are expecting people to upload photo of things ,most appropriate will be Image. its also depends on context: Technical Issues , ...


1

Implementation is rather simple and can be done entirely with CSS. It's just a matter of adding an ID or class to a top level tag - HTML, BODY, the topmost DIV. As long as you only add the selector to the pages you want with a fixed width, you can make a specific enough selector in your CSS to set some pages to fixed width and others to 100% width. As far ...


0

If you plan to have content to the left of the form or right of the form, then either one works. If you do not have any content on the page other than the form, it is best centered.


2

In a responsive mindset, you definitely need to favor flexibility over precise control. Especially in your case since you don't seem to be able to predict the number of images in your grid. In my opinion, your current breakpoints work really well. A good way to improve the feeling of that “widow” image would be to set your gallery container to text-align: ...


1

Semantic differential scale (SDS) To begin with, your example of SDS is incorrect (Love - Like - Indifferent - Dislike - Hate). Essentially, you have amplified a key challenge in differential scales - coming up with a dichotomous pair. SDS pairs A SDS is based on a dichotomous (bi-polar) pair of adjectives. For example: Simple O O O O O Complex ...


4

I think first you have to understand the purpose of skeuomorphism and use it for the right reasons. Don't use it because you want to trick the user into thinking it's "real" and don't use it solely for aesthetic reasons. What is the purpose of skeuomorphic design? To convey functionality. Skeuomorphic Design Should Convey Functionality


2

You have two questions: 1. What kind of design do users like the most at the time of this question, 'Flat' or 'Skeuomorphic'? 2. So my question is, 'should I change it, or keep it the same' To answer Immediate answer is Flat (with caveat). Flat design is in a clear trend. The aesthetic and visual language/vibe of 'flat' is something that most people ...


1

I completely disagree with the notion that Skeuomorphic was to compensate for low resolution. Historically, we can see that Flat design was in use in the early 1990's for computers, i.e. CGA and EGA level monitors, due to their limited resolution and colors. As resolution improved, there was a desire to try to make graphics more realistic, because the ...


1

This is a content strategy issue. The question is: what is that content? On a lot of media sites, the comments are horrific content. Typically argumentative, factually suspect, poorly written, and for the most part, damage the actual content on the page rather than enhance it. In many cases, the comments aren't there to enhance the content in any way. ...


1

It can be a very good idea as long as you don't consider your comments to be a very relevant part of the content. In your example the second news block is centered, which feels weird and breaks the reading flow. I think a news feed needs to be quickly scannable when you scroll through it. So keeping the Comments Block even if it's empty would keep a ...


3

The rule of thumb here is to at least set an expectation for the user that there is more below the fold. if there is too much of a gap between the top area and the rest of the content (say 200px or more) it may be difficult for the user to otherwise instinctively determine the need to scroll, aside form the size of the browser's scrollbar. You can set the ...


1

http://iampaddy.com/lifebelow600/ http://www.cxpartners.co.uk/cxblog/the_myth_of_the_page_fold_evidence_from_user_testing/ These two articles got me really thinking about this after "the fold" was brought up from a couple clients I was working with a year or so ago. The long and short of it is, it's 2014 and people know how to scroll. Whether or not you ...


1

I see benefits for you but none for your users. Merging 2 different websites can be very confusing for customers because each plateform got its own identity, its own personnality.


0

Not really. This notion is built on the premise of regular expressions (http://www.regular-expressions.info/) which are one of the most hardest things to get. Even though '*' is as simple it can get, it still needs to be learned what it means in this context. It's general use in typography is to censor out some characters, or to correct spelling, or to ...


1

If it's understood by the general public? No. Programmers might understand it, but as far as I know, the asterisk is mostly used as a multiplication sign. Me personally, have only the asterisk in CSS and mySQL meaning 'everything'. So even if your audience consist of programmers, it's possible it's not understood by everyone. I can't really recommend a ...


1

You don't need to have a formal UX education to have good instincts about what good UX is. You just need to stick to your guns and fight for what you believe. Not everyone is going to agree with you all the time, no matter how good you are, but you have to present your case in a logical, data-driven way. You have to be confident in your knowledge, if you're ...


0

I think that context is very important to answer this question. In a complex site that might be graphics heavy, flat design might not compete. The age group also makes a difference as well. But which ever way you think is best, I don't think mixing them is advisable. In my experience, mixing them has lead to the flat designs being unable to compete for ...



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