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1

There's not yet a widely accepted term, but most terms and descriptions point the same general direction. On Android, these are called DotsPageIndicator. According to Apple's guidelines all the dots together form the Page Control and it indicates the number of views. Bootstrap's Carousel plugin calls them Indicators JSSOR calls the combined element ...


1

I would call the set of dots a navigational indicator for an image scroller/carousel In the iOS Human Interface Guidelines these dots are used on a page control, which is very similar to an image carousel if you think of an image as being a view or page. And are decribed as: A page control indicates the number of open views and which one is ...


0

Its called "Page Control". You usually use it during App tutorial screens but obviously you can use it at any place.


0

Entire widget is called as "Image Carousal", small circles and arrows on the loaded image are called as 'Navigator', through this user can navigate to first, last, next, and prev images slides.


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It may be a pager control Do the circles also act as links that display a different image? If so, the set of circles could be called a pager control. The fact that they have circles rather than numbers doesn't really change their navigation function.


1

You mean what those circles are called or what the whole page element is called? The element is called (image) carousel, circles are probably just circles or dots.


0

Context is very important here. Are the events and times presented in a list or are the times included in a paragraph of text. (Or both depending on the screen?) If you have a lot of events and all the times are during normal working hours then the AM and PM may not be necessary. Lecture 1 ---- Location A ----- 10:00 - 11:30 Lecture 2 ---- Location B ----- ...


1

There's not a very specific name, but it looks like a variation of "Clean Entry Points" navigation model. According to the book "Designing Interfaces": These entry points act as "doors" into the main content of the site or application. From these starting points, guide the user gently and unambiguously into the application until he has enough context ...


1

As addition to the points mentioned before: Business pages or shopping websites might not want to disclose their visitor numbers to the competition. You could revisit a page after a week and then somewhat estimate how much visitors or orders a site gets. It was never really clear if a counter shows the pageviews for this particular page, or the number of ...


1

When someone lands on the page, you should introduce people to what this does, what it's useful for, etc. That will be an easy win. For increased engagement, you need some interesting content to engage with. I would add a few lists myself, maybe those of actual dishes, and have them show, with the calorie count, on the homepage. That way, instead of coming ...


2

For my point of view there are few things you can improve 1) Add a tag line on your main page which tells what this app is about. As i kept wondering for 5 seconds and then clicked on ABOUT link to know what is this search input do 2) This information is not very sensitive so you can skip the password part and let the user save their list by providing just ...


4

It's a pull quote You're asking about pull quotes. Wikipedia explains its main purposes: A pull quote (also known as a lift-out pull quote) is a key phrase, quotation, or excerpt that has been pulled from an article and used as a graphic element, serving to entice readers into the article or to highlight a key topic. (Emphasis added.) So the answer to ...


1

My answer may partially answer your question. Now a days website owners get the full website statistics in Google Analytics, so they don't feel like having counters. This might be the one of the reason that they are not showing the counters. It's not current trend to show count In 90s internet users were less n that time getting the count was trend.


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Deprecated Social Proof Back in time users didn't have any accessible indicator of the popularity of a page, "SEO" didn't exist. Social networks didn't exist. Users had not a clear way to determine the popularity of a web. Someone could see a 3500 users visits indicator and think "oh pretty good!", because there wasn't a number or scale that users could ...


1

It depends on the requirements. Motoin on page is a best way to get attention on things where we want our user to focus , on the other hand they may be distracting in some cases. But sometime you have to show the motion to give the user more clear idea as in your case. I suggest you to use a combination of both as continues rotation/motion of pictures on a ...


3

Web Counters, particularly the original <img src="/cgi-bin/webcounter.pl?pageId" /> variety have largely fallen off the map, mostly because (a) they're inaccurate in some cases (easy to double-count or miscount visitors because of proxy caching, and artificial increases from web-engines crawling the page), (b) many sites offer a mobile app, where the ...


2

Some possible reasons: If some of your pages don't get many hits, the low hit count may discourage people from spending more time on your page. Many social networks (Like Facebook and Twitter) have social plugins that show how many people have shared the site on social media, which might've replaced the visitor counters. It doesn't offer any extra value ...


1

I'll chip in another perspective on this. Even though it's a bit different than how social media like Twitter, Fb or StackExchange does it, I really like how real-time collaboration apps do this. Google docs, for example. Something going on is really, really clear here. Reloading the page doesn't even cross user's mind. For most of the time, at least.


1

Technically speaking, prompts and pop ups at some point in time, had issues of inconsistency across browsers. However, one does see the change and great deal of improvement on this front offerred by prominent UI frameworks for the web. I have used forms placed inside a Bootstrap modal for a web application and it shows consistent behavior on the desktops ...


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Try something along these lines. you will probably have to push down your ad banner tho.


2

The exact design will probably depend on your page (e.g. how frequently the page actually updates). For example, if you're using a periodic poll (say, every 30 seconds), you can provide a visual indicator, such as a progress bar in a corner that reads something like "next update in X seconds", perhaps with a visual progress bar alongside it that that ...


3

This is something the web community needs to get used to. But right now, we're looking for a way to make the community get used to real time loading. To do that, we'll have to condition users not to click a button (sounds like reversed reallity, doesn't it?). How it's done right now Example from Stackexchange: Example from Twitter: UX Stackexchange, ...


1

I would also suggest you make the box red rather than green. Green gives off the feeling it is completed successfully, IMO red would imply more action is required.


2

Not a full answer, but your approach #1 is wrong, as you likely guessed. Bank of America has a similar page when transferring money between accounts or to a friend's account. You pick the from account, the to account, the total amount, the date of the transfer, then hit next. Then you're on the "review everything" page. Once you click "complete transfer", ...


0

The 5 second test is essentially evaluating the quality and appropriateness of the visual/graphic design. As such, it could really be applied to most any visually designed piece...be it a brochure, desktop web site, or a mobile app.


1

I like 5 sec tests but You can't get so much from 5 second test. it is more get OK test type and can be named as guerrilla kind of test. Trustworthy , company domain, service type can be questioned within 5 sec test. Brand engagement and recalling name can also part of this test. It can be also used when you choose an image, logo or icon. 5 sec test can ...


1

It depends on the colors used in the rest of your website, the mood you're trying to achieve, the content you're presenting, etc. Contrast In general you should aim to have a lot of contrast between the navbar and the rest of the page, so that users can find it easier. This is what Stack Exchange does, the blue navbar contrasts heavily with the ...


1

Most of the major styleguides advocate a very limited use of pop-ups, or modals. This bit from the iOS guide is typical: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/MobileHIG/Modal.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40006556-CH64-SW1. Perhaps you can collect the information in a separate screen of the application. If it's a very ...


4

Add a 'confirmation' tab last, after 'submit' (and change 'submit' text to 'summary'), so the user knows there's another section to go before they're done. It's odd for user to be on the last step in tabbed checkouts, but not be done.


1

Is there a very good reason why you are putting the confirmation page after the payment details page? Normally, one confirms their email address and shipping details, followed by the payment details (card numbers have checksums to guard against typos, negating any need for additional validation). Furthermore, most banks require some form of 2-factor ...


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I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


10

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


3

Your page gives everything equal weighting, and this is why it looks like a summary page - your instincts are correct. Pick some stuff to highlight, such as what they have bought and how much. The summary information you have here is good. My previous user testing has shown that customers really do read it and use it for correction. For that reason I don't ...


3

You should consider that your checkout funnel is too long. ( so many steps in your progress bar. Think about combining or eliminating of some steps ) , this may scary users + too many opportunities for user to leave funnel w/o converting.


72

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


0

As a marketer, I think it's really hard to think about content and UX/layout at the same time. I don't think our brain is built for thinking about both things simultaneously. It's really hard. So I open up my document first and imagine I'm writing a product description instead. I write a basic headline, list the benefits and divide up the content as best as ...


0

As someone who is platform agnostic. I have to say that horizontal scrolling confuses me in either OS. With vertical scrolling I would immediately reach for the scroll wheel on the mouse (or gently stroke the top of the magic mouse) or use the multi-touch touch-pad with two fingers to scroll down the page. I am currently writing this from a company Dell ...


11

Apple removed scrollbars from appearing, unless in use, from viewports in 2011 with the release of Lion, immediately sparking multiple articles about how to get them back. The usability rationale and merit of this can still be debated today. Not showing it until it is needed is a clean design and does not clutter the display, but the user must figure out ...


4

Perhaps a stopwatch icon with the time counting down under.... It could actually change colors from green to yellow to red as the sale is winding down. If you want a minimalist approach you can simply use text such as : sale ends in 00:31 mins (for example ) Any of the above methods will do, no reason to overcomplicate the interface.


1

It is not something that I have seen. One thing to keep in mind is that if you implement an uncommon feature on your site then you're asking users to learn a new mechanic and are increasing their cognitive load (perhaps unnecessarily). If it's only 2 categories, why not just have them both expanded from the start? If there were numerous categories I could ...


1

I think the bigger question here is, how long is the checkout experience? When I say that, I mean how long the whole process is: From loading times, to input fields, to even the perception of the process is (if the page is longer than need being, people will walk away). It doesn't matter whether you use single vs multiple pages, but what matters is how ...


2

As mentioned in the answer linked by @DasBeasto, a good solution might be an auto-completing text field. The user only needs to start typing the name of the location, and the text box will start filtering it down. However, this really only works for users who already happen to know where this location is exactly located. If the user is searching for a ...


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For any select list of over a couple dozen options, free-text search with autocomplete support is the only sane option. This is a common pattern seen on real estate sites (Zillow, Redfin, etc) and travel sites (AirBnb, Kayak, any airline, etc.) Kayak shown below. Fred Meyer (big-box retailer) has a 'Select Store' search box to solve this - requesting you ...


2

The simplest solution I can think of is a numerical text input followed by a drop down for unit size - something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

If that's a responsive design, you will probably move the sidebar into a collapsed panel. In such case, tabs or accordion in the rightside content area are actually a better idea than trying to fit them into the sidebar. Consider such flow: User opens sidebar User chooses object Sidebar is automaticaly collapsed User sees the chosen object and already ...


0

Who likes iFrames: people with "C" as the first part of their title acronym. marketing folks Who doesn't like iFrames: everyone else in the universe An iFrame in most scenarios is essentially a technically lackluster way to "hide" the fact that you're using a 3rd party solution. This doesn't build trust with the customer. The more trustworthy ...


2

Using an iframe will result in a disjointed and potentially confusing experience that will inhibit conversion such that users are likely to abandon the process before trust really becomes an issue. Even if you style your site to just look just like the other site in an effort to make the alien content look more natural, it will just add to the confusion. ...


2

Why do web designers still choose to use this? Same reason you still get emails from Nigeria explaining to you how some deposed leader has a bazillion dollars they want to deposit in your bank account. People are gullible. Or rather, enough people are gullible to make the ploy work. Does that hold true for 'fake web counters'? Probably not. As you ...


1

I think it depends entirely on the site in question. I would imagine that in many cases it's being used to illustrate a selling point or feature of the product or service in an easy to understand way. I'm sure nobody (especially those with technical knowledge) is going to believe the numbers are 100% accurate, but it certainly would describe the service ...



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