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0

You should rely on the browser back button but not exclusively! Best case scenario: back button on the screen support for browser back-button


1

Yes. You should rely on the browser back button. Users expect the button to be there, so make sure it's functional. But should you mimic the same button with it's functionality? If your application or website needs it, yes, but not always exactly the same. In some cases, like your example of a webshop, a button that just says back or an arrow might not be ...


0

I believe that you should not rely exclusively on the browser's back button. If the user is interacting with your site to get somewhere, I think it's reasonable they would expect to be able to return the same way. Displaying where the user is within the context of the website is important so the user has a frame of reference where they are in the overall ...


1

I usually try to provide both on-screen back-button and support for browser back-button. Reasons: If the user is immersed in the flow of the app, an on-screen back button can help keep focus inside the flow and avoid losing the user's attention. Supporting the browser back button is important to me, even at great cost, because it's presumptuous design to ...


2

As several folks have commented on the question - it's a technical reason. However, as with most technical reasons, there are technical solutions (in most cases - secure apps are a whole different kettle of fish!). They're probably costly, slow or otherwise nasty in some way, but it's not an impossible problem. The real reason sites break the back button ...


2

For most web sites, it is very hard to justify breaking the back-button. Even shopping carts, bank money transfers, etc, can be made idempotent, so refreshing, back, then forward, etc doesn't cause unexpected behaviour. There are some scenarios where the back-button cannot be supported. For example, I worked on an extremely complex web application a couple ...


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Colors should really match the theme of the site and be easy to the eye. For example, if the site is about valentines day, use shades of red and pink. Most importantly, make sure contrast is good. An example of bad contrast which many websites produce is light grey on white. Visit checkmycolours.com and put any URL in it to see if the website has good ...


2

I'm not sure it's deliberately obscure, but rather a victim of circumstance. For example, the UX team's requirements might have been: We need to show how long ago a post/tweet was shared, as it creates a sense of immediacy and relevance We need to provide a link an individual post/tweet We need to cut down on UI clutter for the majority of users 99.9% of ...


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I think the crux of the issue here is that while web browsers were very good tools for navigating web sites in the past decades, modern web sites work in fundamentally different ways, and the browsers we use are no longer necessarily the best tools for navigating them. The simplest web site consists of a hierarchy of static documents with hyperlinks between ...


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If I understand the question properly then the answer falls into many different areas. You should be well read on the subject but I would recommend looking into a range of articles from the Gestalt School to Tufte to Nielsen to computer scientists looking into color and data visualization (as for example): Why Should Engineers and Scientists Be Worried ...


1

I would not show pricing for non-commercial customers on the page. Reasons: Those prices will be irrelevant to the vast majority of users. So it will just add unnecessary clutter and choice. The paradox of choice shows that having more choices actually makes it more difficult for users to buy, and you want to reduce, not increase purchase friction. Then ...


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There are three reasons for this behaviour: A lot of new web apps are utilising Javascript MVC frameworks and the concept of the single page app. In this context, in order tot make the sort of behaviour described work you need to use the history API. This is all very new technology and designers, developers and product managers are still getting to grips ...


0

Why are you fixing its width? Surely the size of the message box is dependant on the size of the message. Short messages (such as you have illustrated) will look better in a smaller box, which could even be centred. As the message size increases the ideal box pushes wider until it fills the entire screen. However you refer to messages which leads me ...


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Interestingly we are working on similar patterns this week, the design we are recommending has a clear classification of error messages. Classification based on type : Error, Warning, Info Classification based on target : which part of the screen is initiating the message. The first classification is used to decide on the color and fading properties. ...


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Or another way is If you are interested in this apartment, Contact Mr. XYZ on 123-123-1234 only between 9 AM to 5 PM during weekdays.


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According to me and based on the mistakes i have made in the past, putting any kind of condition for the user is not a good idea. Instead of showing countdown, you could tell them more about advantages of opening an account with your service. They should find value in opening an account at first place. People would die to open an account only if you are ...


0

One must understand the strengths of each medium. So what works for the leaflet may not necessarily work in store, which may not work in web / mobile as well. There are some things that should be kept intact. Logo Branding (trademark Information) Distinctive color palette Some of the typography if it helps identification of the brand personality You ...


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In my opinion (which might not be representative of the other tenants), I would get really frustrated looking for the number. Showing basic contact info. is one of the primary purposes of a website like that, and so I would keep poking around the website trying to find it. Instead, try doing what other companies do- show the different ways of contacting the ...


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Great question! This is a very common design pattern and it's one that sites screw up all the time (IMO!). Usually the objective is: Ensure the user sees the notification. Allow the user to get on with using the site smoothly after that. Don't p*ss off your users. This seems simple, but implementations often break the objectives! For example: Model ...


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There is certainly value in ensuring continuity between an organisation's print material and website. For one thing, if a customer goes to a link promoted on a leaflet and the resulting website looks completely different, the experience feels disjointed and lacks credibility. It's important for a brand to have a consistent customer experience across all ...


2

It'll be hard to suggest how to consolidate two interfaces without seeing them first. Your question is a bit more of action consolidation - to which the answer is yes, this is possible: You can provide a two column view, one for users one for groups, multi-select list in each, and allow drag & drop between them, both ways. Something similar to this ...


0

Instead of wasting all that space for a static help box, how about having true context-sensitive help? Add a help icon next to things that you feel the user may need help with, and when they click or hover on it, show the help on a popup. Like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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"Overlays and lightboxes are by design meant to convey a new page that’s laid on top of the of previous page. It should therefore come as no surprise that users perceive these as separate pages and expect the browser back button to bring them back to the original page. Alas, during testing, the vast majority of user-initiated overlays at the tested site did ...


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Rethink and optmise labeling I think you should start by rethinking the label "what is this?" as it has a number of flaws: The three most common mistakes website labels should avoid are: Ambiguity Superfluity Repetition source: Information architecture: labelling for websites This label lacks any form of description which ...


1

As above this is pretty dependant on your audience and brand but if your research indicates that colour is a large part of the purchasing decision something like this could be an effective way of putting that front and centre http://rflx.bjornborg.com/


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Why not just split your navigation area (like the header) in half. Left-align one brand, right-align the other brand, and have the navigation effects appear when you click on the brand's png/logo. [supersweet-cookies] <click for menu click for menu>[deliciousdank cookies] [ ...


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If you want a logical way to display it, I'll go trough that And by the way, care about typo size if you go responsive, that's quite low here.


1

How about showing the values for other departments under the editable value for your own department? (A system admin would need to specify which departments each user could see beyond their own.)


0

I'd say no, as you are already compromised by screensize and content you have to present. Mobile OS seems to understand that by choosing to not implement the scroll bar in their browser. A solution to your problem could be anchors within your content and a scroll script to smooth it out so you won't be dealing with more/other confusion. Hope it helps. Good ...


2

If you're doing responsive design well, then you're showing appropriate layouts, images, and content for the dimensions of the device viewing the page. This doesn't mean shrinking everything for smaller devices. Instead, it's most often necessary to server different layouts, different images, and sometimes different content for different devices. So the ...


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If the text is being rendered smaller than 7-9 pixels high, it will make just about any font illegible. As there simply isn't enough space to fit the shapes within the pixel grid. If you can serve a vector based version of the text, either as a SVG file or using HTML. You can then control the size of the font independently of the image. Alternatively you ...


3

UX as a term and discipline is somewhat new. Prior to it being called UX it was often call HCI (Human Computer Interaction). Today, now, aside from recent grads, most UX professionals do not have a User Experience Degree. The degrees and experience they do have can very wildly. Graphic Design (maybe lean towards UI Design) Industrial Design (also UI ...


0

I think I will go with the links (method 2) instead of ajax, but combined with this approach. So instead of scrollbars in the left and right columns, I can paginate those panes with the thumbnails. This way I do not have to worry about positioning scrollbars when a new page loads. When the page loads, I can just set the correct page that the thumbnail is ...


1

I would use "Search offices..." The search icon() is fairly universal and gives a visual cue as to what the text area is without first having to scan to the end of the text area to see a button. The text content (Search offices) is a clear explanation of the action to be taken. The ellipsis (...) indicates that there is something more to do there which ...


3

Oh no, not this again. Users scroll. I've always had this discussion with people when they ask: "If we hide information underneath the fold, will they know that there is something there?" What is the first thing that people do when they land on a page? They try to discover, and one way they do that is by scrolling. If a user cannot scroll, the page will ...


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The answer to your primary question is: no, you should not force or emulate a scroll bar on mobile devices. Explanation Mobile platforms already have a scroll bar in the interface. However, it becomes visible only when a user is scrolling. If you introduce an element that nobody else is using, you are creating an expectation for users to see this element ...


1

Scrollbars provide three real benefits: 1. Scrolling Although this was their initial primary purpose, it was also never the only way to scroll, as users could use page up / page down or spacebar / shift + spacebar. it has largely become obsolete for users with mouse wheels, or some touch scrolling. 2. Position Scrollbars give an indication of where in ...


1

The idea of having two ‘baskets’, one for paid products and another for free items, seems too complicated to me. You’d be asking the user to maintain two separate groups of products and making the transaction harder. A customer wouldn't be expected to carry two baskets around a shop in the ‘real world’. Instead, I'd present the free items and the paid items ...


0

Before a selection is made: All items should have a clear price label, when the item is free of charge then in lieu of price tag, explicitly mention that the item in question is free along side a £0.00 price tag*. *During the selection process clearly indicate the number of elements that have been added to the basket to provide adequate feedback. After ...


0

There are a number of things I would say about this. Firstly, I don't think you need to worry about the linguistics - whether you call it a basket, trolley, cart, handbag, trug, low-loader... the issue is always about what is 'not seen' by the user. For them, putting a free item into some sort of collection makes no sense ("If it's free, why can't I just ...


1

1. Limit the different types of tags as much as possible Make sure each of the different tag types in your system add value. If different tag types add obvious value to the end user then they will use them. 2. Tags should be optional Your system should work without requiring users to tag anything at all. Tags are optional bits of data that enhance user ...


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Tags have all been learnt. There has been no tag symbols in common use (as a tag) for more than 10 years. That shows that tag symbols will be learnt if your service is popular enough. Of course the challenge is in getting your service to be popular in the first place. Assuming you would like to go with what already makes sense (I'd recommend this route), ...


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If there is an input field for tags on your website I will suggest: Tags with nothing before it = tags Tags with @ = people Users do not learn any other symbol, they learn the @-symbol on facebook and twitter. And all the other tags without any symbol are just tags.


0

In strict UX terms, I think an in-page back button would only be a reasonable solution to navigate between pages in a single article (and, even then, I would question why the article has been broken up in that way) or a stage in a multi-page process. An alternative solution might be a breadcrumb (either historical or structural) to alert users to the ...


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I think there are the following things to consider: Does "going deeper" in a certain navigation tab result in loading a new page or does the information just load up inside of the already opened page? If it's the former, a "back"-button would result in performing the same step as the browsers' back button, making it slightly unnecessary Are your ...


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Browser back button is not navigation tool for users to get back to the pervious screen. I an not fully understand the layout of your navigation, but the breadcrumb is always a best practice to help users get back to the previous screen.


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Are you comparing an old design to a new one? If so, and the variance is so little, stick to the old design. This is because you haven't fully tested the variances over a long period of time, and therefore if your new design is not obviously better, then you're risking a long-term dropoff for no measured gains: Tyler Roehmholdt, Web Marketing Manager at ...


2

I'm also building an Angular app at the moment and have some experience with this problem. I also have someone on the team who isn't really aware of what's going on with Angular who I can show the UI to on a regular basis. Often times I change things and show him to see his reaction. When I tried showing the template and allowing values to populate when ...


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In design school I learned that one should not bold the colon as it is not what one is trying to bring emphasis to. Regarding italics, it seems the rule is determined by which style guide one adheres to. I would generally go with italicizing a colon after and italicized word. More on that: ...


1

It's not uncommon to release a less than perfect product as long as you plan on fixing the bugs you know about and thoroughly test it. Ensure that these bugs don't hinder the user or they will simply navigate away from your website. If your images are in the wrong place and create issues for navigation then that could be worse than not having a mobile ...



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