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0

Seems like more a graphic design question other than UX. Colour is something that might be the choice of your client and it is very likely that he/they will have a lot of say about it. I would not make colour changes without their consent as I've often experienced that the first thing people will comment about a design is how they like/dislike a colour. As ...


2

The more cruft you can cut, the more efficient you can be in conveying your message.


0

I would suggest showing the remaining time to the right of the title if it is something that needs to be shown. If most people finish their action of reserving hardware in time then maybe it isn't even required to show at all until there is only 5 minutes left or something. (this would need to be usability tested)


2

What a great question, Niklas. I'm a huge fan of minimalism so I took a chance to write an elaborate answer. First, I beg to differ: the art movement and the design style are not the same thing. “Minimalism” as an eponymous art movement has formed in 60s, after the WWII, taking it’s roots in various precessing art movements such as Constructivism, ...


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Advantages - Minimalist Web Designs Have Faster Download Speeds Easy Maintenance People Do Not Like Pop-Ups Helps the Focus on Content Convert Better White Space Helps Your Website “Breathe” Easier Navigation Fewer Server Resources Less Maintenance Easier Responsive Web Design


2

How about a single toggle between EDIT and DONE ? http://codepen.io/run-time/pen/yyJMKQ Hopefully you will be able to inform the user when changing their data soon. For future reference, I like how Google doesn't make the user explicitly commit changes and instead offers an easy way to go back...


0

Material Design concept can probably help you. Its principle of layout by priority action which principal behavior is to have shadow between layout to show user what is over what help to differentiate object and add affordance http://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html So add little shadow at your button make is interactive by ...


0

I have tried using columns for a long texts when page was viewed on a wide monitor (over 1000px). It looked good but there were problems when columns were longer than the height of the monitor. Reader have to scroll to read one column to the end and then scroll back up to start reading the next column. This isn't a problem in printed media because the whole ...


0

It should be placed between the lead text and the images. This insures that The user sees it when he/she goes to scroll down, It is in a general non-distracting area of the app, and It is in the centre of the app, where the user will look first.


0

Since this is targeting smartphones only there is really no such thing as peripheral vision. Regardless of where you put the ad it is pretty much going to get in the way of why the user is there in the first place so I would try and empathize with the user and let them know why the ad is there while encouraging without demanding that they click it. If ...


2

First of all, ads should always be placed on peripheral vision, never at the place where a user will directly look. Second, please if possible disable ads when a user views your blog on mobile. Your fill rates might go down on account of poor CTR. Have a look at this award wining blog writer: http://www.matthewwoodward.co.uk/ He has ads placed in ...


1

Current Password without a doubt. The typing clarification isn't necessary, and as general rule, if it doesn't make it better, discard it. Consider: That kind of form (password changing) is the same in almost every site. Also it's placed in the same section (edit profile, settings, etc). Inside a text input, specially a password input, to add the "Type ...


1

with number 50, they're not all features...they are functions. You don't have to show all functions of your products in one page, you have a whole website to do this. Back to features, usually most of products show no more than 3 features...range that people would remember about product before they use it. "Ah, this product A has ABC, APQ and AYZ, let's ...


0

One option I have seen used (depending on these icons size) is a small picture of a mouse (basically a vertically extended oval with a division on the top for the two buttons) within each image icon.


0

If controls float with users' scrolling, it can be irritating, specifically in the case of image-heavy services that tend to overload their users with visual content. I prefer sharing buttons to appear on hover, they tend to steal too much attention from the content and should be an opt-in. Hovering an image (video component etc) when you need to operate ...


0

As you move into multiple media (web to phone) creating transportable content is more and more important. Content management can mean a lot but one is creating content that you can publish to many formats. HTML, CHM, PDF, HTML5, XPS ...... In the Microsoft WPF desktop world there is a format FlowDocument that is a pain to create but presents nicely and ...


4

A few suggestions: 1. Make the Label Visually Part of the Button Labels are usually part of a button 2. Add a Light Border (optional) Highlights without necessarily adding depth 3. Group the Buttons Together Comfortably Make it feel like a group of buttons, each of equal importance 4. Use a Bolder Font Weight The icons are quite chunky, and ...


0

I am really bad person to answer this as I hate both social media and "listicles", but the benefit of "pop up" is simple enough. They save space. Basically, if your site has lots of separate items you want people to share separately, it becomes desirable for every item to have separate sharing option without more than one being visible at a time. So if you ...


3

I agree with both Long and DesignerAnalyst that a bit of styling makes them pop more as buttons. While I like the icons in your edited version, I would suggest adding the text below the icon, for those who may not know what the icon means. Icons are great when their meanings are obvious, but I program in JQuery and Javascript everyday, and didn't ...


0

These experiments, [...] show that people are more likely to purchase [...] when offered a limited array of 6 choices rather than a more extensive array of 24 or 30 choices. Moreover, participants actually reported greater subsequent satisfaction with their selections [...] when their original set of options had been limited. Implications for future ...


13

The problem is it's not flat enough Are they icons or buttons? This is a common problem with flat design (see other answers) but one possible solution I haven't seen here yet is to remove information until the only viable option is to click. Think tiles. ...And at this point it should also become obvious that </> never was a suitable icon.


0

This article answers this very well - [WEB AIM - Skip Navigation] Some key points: Providing visible links at the top of the page The key is to make sure the link is one of the first items that screen readers hear and that keyboard users tab to. Otherwise, users may not realize there is a "skip navigation" link there at all, and may waste time trying ...


2

You could also give a textual clue You could change "more information" to something more specific


5

material design is good but they're not flat perfectly. I recommend you this, my ideal flat button p/s : if you want people consider something is a button, you need provide them "label" and "icon".With these two elements, most of users will know "ah, there's a button, let's click"


8

How about using a visual cue that users are most likely used to: an underline? Below is an example with solid underline and a dashed one.


4

People are going to find it extremely hard to scan a list of 50 items, particularly if their presentation involves a less than 3-7 word description. The tools you should consider (both, by the way, trace back to our working memory, which is cognition's biggest bottleneck): Clustering Divide features into logical groups, and even into sub groups. This will ...


1

It's one application but acts as a pack of different tools. How many tools? Does each tool have features that relate to it? You could try grouping the features by tool functionality, if that's the case. Another way is to pick the top features, and give more space to explain and demonstrate and then list the lesser features in one column. Do you really ...


44

The problem with your buttons is that they are not raised above the background, so they don't seem clickable. I highly recommend the Material Design for details on how to choose between flat buttons and raised buttons, with exhaustive do's and don'ts. http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/buttons.html#buttons-flat-raised-buttons


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On a mobile device, the current design trend uses this. Users have become familiar with the touch method to drill down for further information without having to be explicitly told to do so. Also, a "pointer" on a mobile device is redundant since there is never any other input device other than your fingers. Keep the simplicity and elegance of your ...


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i thought of something like showing the first skill and let the user figure it out himself, that the others are clickable / tapable aswell (sorry I din't have much time on my hands to do this, but it may help) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

I would NOT use two different contact forms. Hearing you talk about a "quick and easy" contact form accessible on every page in addition to the "full" (a.k.a not quick and easy) contact form makes me ask the question, Why wouldn't users always want the quick and easy option?


0

I recently conducted a few usability studies and 2 of 4 people clicked the logo in the upper left corner to reset everything they were doing and get back to the "Home Page" one of them didn't even realized he had done it when I asked him why he clicked the upper left corner of the page. I don't think it is necessary to call it "Home" but I do think that ...


4

StackExchange itself allows for a user to discover the total family or community of websites through a number of cross-pollination opportunities. Navbar / Masthead toggle: Make your users aware xxx exists within a larger context Sidebar: Related content from one site to another based on context. Content pages: Contextually provide opportunities to ...


1

Well, if you have a limited set of options, you could opt for something like Google's action button in the new Inbox app. The user would have to press one button (the icon representing 'doing something'). Pressing the icon will give you the options: having lunch in a meeting teaching preparing a lecture ...in the form of icons (optionally with ...


2

From UX perspective, everything should be designed to cater to user needs. Main user need in case of personal websites is getting a holistic idea on a person who created it. Main objective? In most cases, hiring that person (given they match the need). Conversion point would be a viewer contacting the author. The most efficient way to transmit the ...


1

Why would the two extremes be mutually exclusive? I'm imagining a conservative, professional personal site with clear, well-organized lists of articles and references; then a gallery of high quality demonstrations of skill and creativity. The UX challenge would be to draw visitors to your gallery content without disrupting the professionalism of your home ...


0

There are generally two ways of looking at responsive we design. make a simple one level navigation, which is easy to scale down. Make a separate set of pages for phone sizes. With the simple set-up there is not much glitz or excitement so the entire site will be somewhat bland as compared to a multi use site where you are free to do some really cool ...


0

It is a long standard that every top level link should present a page with the name of the link and that page should present the next level of sub links. This continues for each level. The content on those pages should contain and overview of of the pages each link will present A bread crumb trail below the nav bar is also very good for people who prefer ...


0

Here are some options. a horizontal top nav bar can be almost any size so if you were to size the tags even twice the size of say a 12px font you will have a very small nav bar. Since most people currently use at least 768px high screens that isn't much. Placing it at the top and giving it a fixed position means it is always available no matter how long ...


2

Usually this comes down to space. If you have the space, two buttons makes more sense and is easier to implement. A single button is bit more confusing because you don't know which action will happen first.


0

I agree with Zach's answer. You can see a demo of these two navigation patterns in action here: Toggle menu (AKA Accordion) Overlay navigation


3

In my experience, I've noticed that this is something used mostly by younger designers. In all honesty, I was guilty of it too in my youth (ha). When I've talked to younger designers about it, and reflecting on my own thinking, the reason seems to be two-fold: when we're younger, it's easier to read text that doesn't have as high of a contrast than it is ...


1

I absolutely agree with the other answers, that grey to black can help distinguish the importance of information. Nevertheless, In my experience: an unreadable grey usually comes from (definitely not best in class) graphic-designers who think that light-grey looks better than black. Simple as that. It's about the aesthetic in photoshop and not the end user.


0

Why not both? Consider these two scenarios: User has decided to add a few new players. They then want to generate a new team with those players in the roster. They don't care so much about the existing teams, because they were generated before the new changes. User is looking for a specific team. They want to know if it exists. They go through the list, ...


0

The question is actually simpler: Does the player list require interaction from the user (i.e selecting players) or are the big lists just for display purposes? Button placement depends on the users flow. In the case of a typical form for example, the flow is this: input required data > button indicates the action to take when complete Does the user have ...


2

There is one quite solid reason for keeping language in the URL: data tracking. If tracking potential users and their breakdown by region is important for you (and in case of business, SaaS and e-commerce it is always important), it will be easier for you to set up the tracking and easier for various tools to track the content, campaigns and conversion if ...


15

Assuming you handle the changing between language versions (as in the example of your first bullet point - sending a page) in a reasonable manner, then yes, you should consider having the language in your URL, but for a reason you've not mentioned here. Note: This generally gets referred to as 'language/region' because, more often, the two letter codes are ...


1

Yes always, because people tend to share links mostly with people speaking the same language. Especially distinction like en-US and en-GB will less likely alienate visitors. In special cases the same product or service may have different names in different languages.


4

It could have also been done because the other two options are preferred. For the example you gave, perhaps paying with a credit card or paypal only took 2% off the top of the payment while paying through Amazon might have taken 5% or more. It would be beneficial to the site owner (but not the user) if the user went through the trouble of making a new ...


2

Sometimes this is done for speed / scale. Only code is loaded for what is considered the primary options. When you click the more then more stuff is downloaded and more code is loaded. I get this is UX and the UX answer is don't want to wait for more. The reality is that is takes time to transfer data and load code.



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