New answers tagged

1

Although I do not have an example of your layout, I would personally choose top aligned in this case. This will probably give the most visual order and harmony, especially since your paragraph block text is also left aligned (meaning you already have an unconsistent visual area on the right). Compare:


5

First, I'm assuming that they meant that the styling of the block around all the footer content (in particular, its background colour, borders, etc) should span the width of the screen - not that the text containers within the footer should be 1-column full-width and therefore insanely wide on wide devices. That'd be bad design because the measure of the ...


2

Since this seems to be a web client, you could, if you cannot totally redesign the UI (as suggested by Adriano Repetti above), consider switching stylesheets according to the selected language. So you define a custom layout of your radio buttons which will only be used for display in french or German.


7

It doesn't. They probably should have stated that it's the most usual design pattern. Design patterns help people navigate unknown content, so when most sites use footers that span the page to anchor the content, users get used to the idea of when they see the horizontal divider with a bunch of links, they have probably hit the end of the page. Familiarity ...


9

That's kind of oldschool. We like to say "Never touch a running system" but violations against this doctrine are the fuel of progress. Personally, I have also used a 2 column website where the footer was only displayed at the left (ca. 40% width) site and no one had a problem with it. The reason why this is done seem to be the familiarity. But I also have ...


3

I'll answer your sub-questions below and I'll give examples related to your question Examples: Do you ever experience that you've get curious on a Facebook video (for example) that has many likes/shares/views and then clicked on it to figure it out why? Imagine a Youtube video without a views count or a like and dislike result I'm really sure that a user ...


1

Cristobal, the Behavior section of the material design you referred to, provides a clear explanation of when to use dialogues: https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/dialogs.html#dialogs-behavior The dialog types listed here don’t seem to refer to the one you are considering, since it requires more than just (1) becoming aware of urgent information, ...


0

I agree with you: I doubt counters were ever useful in any way to users. What purpose did they serve? Did they bring more readers somehow? What I'd do in your situation is compare the analytics between now and before you removed the counters. Granted, it sounds like you've made multiple changes, so more visitors can't be directly linked to the removal of ...


1

Neither of those option sound like an ideal experience for the user. A couple things to consider: You can't prevent a user from navigating. If they don't want to wait, users can just leave, refresh the page, etc. (Expect users to be impatient and circumvent your controls.) If you develop this as a SPA (Single Page Application) you can allow the user to ...


7

Honestly, "Wantlist" sounds a little bit weird as I have never seen it around. "Wishlist" and "Favorites" are more common rather than "Wantlist". Other than that "Wantlist" or "Wishlist" are more used for the online stores where users can add goods to wishlists and buy those goods later. I`d stick with "Save to Favorites" or even would implement old good ...


0

"the instructor said that extremely good answers will consider both the perspective of the web developer AND the perspective of a user" -- ignoring the possible differentiation between the "web designer" and the "web developer", who might have some clashes of interest -- I am wondering what kind of "web designer perspective" should be part of the answer. ...


3

Under what circumstances would you NOT want a clean, sleek and minimalist website design? Both questions have one target at the end and that is the Users. It highly depends on they type of users of your website and their willingness to change. Here are two good examples: A) Wikipedia: It is a highly content oriented website and the design is almost the ...


4

What you're talking about is highly subjective. For example, you are probably used to reading text on a screen/website. Maybe the target audience of Christianity.SE isn't. Maybe they're used to reading a book. (The book?) Point is - for you, their text instils a certain feeling. For them, they might look at ux.se and think "wow, what a clinical and cold ...


0

You should use type-ahead when You know which option you are going to select. For example, you are likely to know product (in an e-commerce site) that you are searching. Number of items are so huge that a drop-down may end up having a scroll bar. You also want to show categorization such as example below Otherwise show drop-down, if Number of items ...


2

As a general practice searchable Dropdowns are used when there are a lot of Dropdown options or the Options are Categorized. It makes it easier to search and select the Option required. Whereas simple dropdowns can be used when the options are very few like 3-5. Another thing to consider is the Context of the user, typeahead in dropdown menus are good if ...


0

as per my experience you don't need to repeat the navigation bar links in footer if there is no additional information or category you want to display then. Then also if you have to keep it there then just drop the contact information with address, phone,email i.e. kinda contact form in footer. For small website footer is not the important but what your ...


1

I, too, used to think that teams and employee culture is not really required on a product website as my primary user doesn't care about who made this. But, then, our analytics show that people have been clicking on team and jobs pages, which tells us that we also have an audience that is looking out to working with us. To serve that audience with the ...


1

There is no good way to implement a CAPTCHA. They're bad, really bad, for usability. The latest Google text CAPTCHA to be used before this picture puzzle was apparently easier to solve by bots than humans. I know I could spend dozens of tries before succeeding. Up to 40% of users allegedly failed to solve these when they were taken out (though I've lost the ...


4

Captcha is inherently not user-friendly, as it is a barrier to content that has no relevance on the user experience. Trying to roll your own captcha process is going to not achieve what you are trying to accomplish, for a few reasons: Users already have a defined mental model of what to expect when using captcha. This is due to the widespread use of ...


2

You could test your users, or review other sites, especially your competitors and see what they do. Make a spreadsheet and examine your results. If everyone: on-line merchants,banks, and other sites all do the same thing - then that would be a good choice as it would be the industry standard. The two choices I see most often (correct me if I'm wrong) are: ...


0

Depends. If what you are logged into is blocked from those not signed in, then you should take them to a login page or form overlay. If people can still view the content, such as this page, then you should just log them out with some indication that this has taken place.


0

It should inform the user they were logged out successfully and provide a way to easily log back in. This could be a link back to the login form or the login form can be present. The login prices should be within two clicks.


1

One way to encourage people to follow your social media is to have contents that fit your user groups. Content strategy is always heart of social media. Most of people would follow BuzzFeed on Facebook because they have great amazing feeds. They know who their audiences are. You might try to have a free content or contest or webinars on your Facebook and ...


-1

I agree with the comment above about creating a good typographic design and all your readers will benefit. My problem with removing italics is that in doing so you are also ignoring the standards set out for proper document creation. Italics are to be used when referencing titles of works, foreign words/technical terms/unfamiliar words (though you can also ...


0

Answering your question, The best practice used by tech giants such as google/Facebook/twitter is giving a screen to create or edit the form. Modal might work quick but I guess form creation and editing has been on screen since ages and changing that practice might not entertain the Layman. For Layman, modal=error/information or some thing with an OK ...


1

I've got a lot of value out of putting create/edit interfaces in with the rest of the page content. Typically what I'd do is slide down the create/edit interface when the create/edit button is clicked, and slide it back up again when changes are saved. Fiddle here: https://jsfiddle.net/hr3mhufh/2/ Pros of displaying inline: No need to reload the page ...


0

What about an "edit panel" that is displayed to the right of the content? The fields in the edit panel would be automatically populated with whatever record is currently selected. I'm assuming the content is a grid / list of records to be edited.


3

If you're looking for user friendly, then browser's back button should suffice, it's a known and expected behavior, and for one level navigation, it's what most users will look for. Now, if you want to keep context, you could use a modal window, but that will also depend on the content you have for those services and also the kind of behavior you're looking ...


0

Are the users going to check out several services? If so going back and forth can be cumbersome. Maybe you could use a modal window with a close window. You could even allow the users to navigate between services with arrows or thumbnails. If they aren't gonna check several I wouldn't bother with a back button, I would rely on the menu and the ...


1

You can use "breadcrumbs" which is very common and useful. It takes less space(unless you style it heavily) and users can easily navigate to various pages.


2

I would not show more than a paragraph of data in a modal window. Modals can be a real pain to navigate, especially for trackball users or ones with mobility issues. Any click outside of the window tends to close it, which leads to going back and reopening it. And if you control for that, then the user has to find the link to manually close it. Additionally, ...


1

Use progressive disclosure. Only show the user what they need to see when they need to see it. Provide only the relevant info for the character lore with a button to reveal more. Keep everything in the same modal window.


2

Two reasons. First, Keeping the background dark allows you to focus on what's important--the video. Second, a bright background causes your eye to close down making other elements in view appear darker, thus making the video more difficult to watch and see the details; particularly in dark areas.


0

A very good question and I would say that you are very keen about all the small details used in design. Here is the best example I think I can give, Take the Sky as background and Moon and stars as video, Moon is sometimes visible in day but stars are not. Even though the moon is visible, it's not so pleasant as much as it's in night. I would say a video ...


0

It seems like you are looking for an 'attention' icon, which if you do a google image search you'll find that the hazard symbol is generally used for this type of message type. I think the exclamation mark is softened by the fact that it is wrapped inside a triangle. If you could have some animation for the icon, a hand being waved about would be an ...


2

First off, the circle with exclamation point does have compelling advantages: does not take up much real estate universally understood draws attention (which is the point in general) An analogy of traffic signs comes to mind. Commonly understood, and most of them would also work pretty well in black and white or greyscale. Interestingly, the most ...


0

First of all the (i) icon suggestion is a great alternative and the one I usually reach for. However, I think a lot of this depends on the context of the design. Often you may not need an explicit icon and you can call out this type of information by offsetting it from the page in some other way (space, shading, typography, etc.) Another convention that ...


0

People are very opinionated on exclamation points. Some don't mind them, while others are harassed by them, similar to you. However, iconography is all about familiarity. The idea is to convey a idea with a simple image, so part of that means relying on convention and what people are used to. In this case, you're basically talking about "caution" and the ...


9

The next alternative to ! would be an informative i. It's not so loud. Give it a red circle as background and it says what you want. Also a yellow triangle (like the background of some exclamation points) but with another character in it would be a great alternative. That said, I think an exclamation point is the sign you are looking for. An information ...


0

I'd like to provide an option C: have things pre-populated / autofilled, with no additional button, and when users want to edit / correct the autofilled content, they simply click into the text field to update it. No having the additional button simplifies your UI, and users still can get the convenience of not typing again if it's already correct, or ...


8

Yes, the Equalities Act 2010 (previously the Disability Discrimination Act) is such a law in the UK. And it has been used before for prosecuting companies offering poor accessibility (generally for things like offers only being available to fully-sighted people who browse a website with mouse, so users with screenreaders, or only using keyboard can't ...


2

I can't comment yet, but just wanted to mention that about three years ago we ran an internal review of our organisation's various communication channels. One of the surprising results was that the great majority of staff in non-executive positions wanted us to include photographs of all executives and higher level staff in all our organisational charts. ...


2

I think that the majority of these sites are usually owned by venture capitalists and entrepreneurs looking to sell the site/company/app or raise capital from investors. In my career of web development the only companies that ask me to put the founders and the management on a page are those who are start-up corporations backed by investors looking to raise ...


5

Option B Empowers the User, Option A makes work for them Summing up the positives and negatives: Option A offers either the positive experience of seeing a correctly auto-filled form, or the negative experience of seeing something that is incorrect and having to undo it to redo it correctly. Option B offers either the neutral experience of simply filling ...


0

I always tell people that, if you are asking the question about a piece of content, then it is one, some, or all of the things you mention and does not belong.


0

If you do not simply want to tell them "no", you could suggest to make the company BS part longer. Let them add some key milestones of the company. Then, after you have a nice long writeup, it will "obviously be too long to fit on the product page". You make a separate page for it and put a nice little unobtrusive link on your product page. Aside from that, ...


2

Just my 2€: Number of subscribers I could not care less, either way. I understand that some companies removed this metric because when your numbers are getting smaller it is a bad sign. Anything claiming the best in the industry That claim is just stupid (or, to put it more friendly, it is pure marketing), as it's not objectively possible to pick out a ...


4

Given that your marker is going to be placed next to an article I'm assuming that its function will be to draw user attention. Generally speaking you don't want to draw user attention to regularities in your system but rather rarer events which in your case are the free articles. So that would be my preferred choice. I also think that free articles is what ...


5

Our company has such an "About Us" page in that shows all the employees' names with their photos. When I first started it was a great cheat sheet to help me remember the names of some 60 people. If all you want is a functioning piece of software, why are you going to the "About Us" page? By your reasoning there should be no job openings on any company web ...


3

It's not for you. It's for the employees! A little recognition for them. It shows that the company is proud to declare that these are the individuals fulfilling these roles. Like the credits after a movie — you may not sit and watch them, but they're always going to be there.



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