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I think with any naming conventions, consistency, familiarity and logic are your best friends. The problem with the word "Generate" is not much the term, but the lack of context around it. "Generate New Report" makes more sense than "Generate" or "New". But keep in mind that once users know what "Generate" means, they probably don't need to be reminded that ...


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Don't waste space or create confusion When you duplicate information, you make the user look at it twice. This creates some disorientation. You can treat the top categories like tabs then expose their sub-categories at the top portion of your left nav. This has the benefit of encouraging subcategory discovery and providing a sense of place within the ...


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It's bad practice when your user is human. When your user is a virtual framebuffer, it's different. In automated testing we often need to work with windows of specific sizes to ensure that elements and events and interactions are being captured and processed in a consistent manner. It is extremely inconvenient to get the operating system to change ...


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Under normal circumstances I would say don't show progress bars for completed processes, especially if you are showing a list of jobs in various states of progress. It should be easy to quickly scan the list and identify the major categories of in-process: not started, in progress, completed, and if applicable also paused and failed. It is much easier to do ...


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Your first image feels like a gallery: each icon has a label (and it's not clear that images are clickable) You could simply try to move the labels inside the buttons (even with you first set of icons, it should be enough). This way, it should feel more like a button. After re-reading, it appears to belong to @Dom propositions


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You could try using an accordion instead of tabs (here are some pros and cons), but it won't always work. Can't say that I see a good way of integrating tabs into the sidebar. As you mentioned,it doesn't look very good, and for a good reason - if all your objects have the exact same structure, it doesn't make a lot of sense to repeat it for each leaf in the ...


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So if I understand correctly, you have a website which lists places to be activities to do. Is it crowd-sourced? Is there any benefit of inviting users to contribute? Or your model considers users only as consumers? This is important because that is how you'd decide what elements should be on the front page. Let us have a look at two websites. 1. Zomato (A ...


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If your site is primarely about 'events' then you could help the user by 'clustering' your events and offer 'search entry points' depending on the two most relevant pieces of information probably all events have in common and the user is also aware of: time and space. This would enable users to search for events and activities in two ways, even if they had ...


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I think the Google design (homepage with just a searchfield) is bold, and maybe too bold for anything besides Google. So I'd put content on the front page. What comes to my mind? frequent searches (only successful ones: some hits, user selected at least one) (shows examples of what works, including search syntax) maybe some categories (shows what is ...


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I think the iPhone/iPod strategy of aggregating apps provides a good solution to solving this problem. Essentially you allow users to create a group by stacking items (up to a certain number of items), and perhaps also allow them to create 'supergroups' that are stacks of groups. However, if you want to provide an infinite number of items for a user then ...


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I think it really depends on how often you are going to have to do this, otherwise it is no point in creating a custom control for a very specific purpose that doesn't actually get used very much at all. One thing I thought of it to create a calendar-like widget that allows the user to click a start date and then an end date for the range, such that a ...


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I'd probably separate this out into two separate views: Viewing the date range data, and creating/editing date ranges. The latter might use an accordion-style setup to create blocks for the dates and create some visual/logical separation: ...where the former would present the chart data with a date range selector and a link to the editor where one could ...


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Having considered my experiences from more recent projects, I believe that adopting or creating a design/development framework is the most efficient and effective way of communication design specifications with front end developers. I think the popularity of bootstrap related development frameworks, and the emergence of Google Material Design related ...


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In my opinion if you can understand any percentage based info graphic you can understand that what she is trying to convey is that on a scale of 1 - 10 or 1 - 100 that is where she ranks herself. I think this is very helpful to the recruiter or interviewer because they will be able to look at the resume right away and tell if this person is a good fit for ...


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Granted screen resolutions and the like have probably moved on since this question was asked but here's what I currently understand: Most desktop screens are full HD (1920px x 1080px) with 4k becoming more common (3840px × 2160px), laptops are usually 768 x 1366px (some have HD screens, and then there is the macbook pro). On top of that there are a wide ...


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In current trend The system should speak the users’ language, with words, phrases and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order. and when you use English always keep the letters on right side. because obviously icons will be the main attraction. ...


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The best example I've seen for this kind of demonstration comes from Bret Victor: http://worrydream.com/#!/LearnableProgramming http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/ Both pages are rather long, but as you read through the articles there are many cool examples that have inline videos and interactive graphics that you can scrub through to see the cause ...


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If most popular brands are not more than 5 or 6 items, then show the alphabetic order below but add a search bar to filter Brand names Always label each section with good text so user knows what he is doing Here are my visual solutions


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Yes. The best approach I could think "out of the box" would be to: Show the most popular brand/categories based on evidence in order to increase the chance that users find what they want without further search. Show them in alphabetical order for better scannability. Add a "More..." link and redirect to a page to see them all including a filter (as ...


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Assuming that your definition of relevance is the same as your users and Assuming that relevance becomes less accurate as you display more and more results then I would certainly give the user an option of displaying the options alphabetically. I would consider to have the link state what comes next and let the users switch back to order by relevance. ...


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My rule of thumb (which pretty much merges with @DA01's comment), is "Do as much as you can, but don't do more than needed". Maybe, if you wanted to give each platform its different design guidelines to appeal everybody, you could simply make a native app (do as much as you can). They tend to be a better choice for users, rather than accessing a website, ...


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Forget the "platform wars" and make the application user friendly from a touch perspective. The most important aspect you must try to achieve is to deliver a seamless experience across multiple platforms (make your app look and feel the same as much as you can on all platforms). As I see your application is not a very complicated so that shouldn't be so ...


4

Why not style the Email Sign-up differently than other nav items to indicate there's a hidden bar that will accordion open on click. Bonus: styling it different gives it more of a CTA feel that draws the user's attention to it. And don't forget to autofocus the name field for accessibility and keyboard users :) Email sign-up closed Email sign-up open ...


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EDIT: Based on comment that this is the only utility-nav element that works this way... It's a bit confusing to put an email sign-up form (like for a newsletter) above everything else. Seems like a way to trick people into signing up when they simply want to log in to the site - not a good way to win customer trust. More importantly, putting the form up ...


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If the arrow is to the right of the "Email Signup" link, it should point towards the link to call attention to it: Email Signup <-- Then, once clicked the arrow should point to the form, so as to indicate to the user where to look. Email Signup ^ Apologies in advance for my crude, text-only examples.


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I feel like it should point down initially and then flip up once clicked to indicate that it can be clicked again to hide the email bar. Edit: I think of it as sliding the page down (down arrow) to reveal the bar, then back up (up arrow) to re-hide the bar.


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I would try something like GMail tags. You have a filter and the list of checkboxes inside a scroll area Other good option is something like Pocket Chrome plugin You have a filter and the selected items become a tag


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I had to face same problem a few days ago, and came with this solution ! In my cases list weren't that long so I used a tag system so user can have a list of the items that he/she selected.


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I think a side-by-side list widget would be appropriate for this situation. It goes by many names. See: Name for widget with side-by-side available/selected listboxes? Also, you should provide a search box to dynamically filter the list of available items as the user types.


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This is where UX is being tasked to fix something that isn't fixable at the UX level. I'd go as far to say this is where a back end system is unfairly asking a user to make decisions that they shouldn't have to. If the issue is that people enter items they sell under a different name than what's already in the system, then the proper solution would be a ...


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Your two suggested solutions represent two very different types of interfaces. The list approach uses a "conversation" metaphor, where the user indirectly "talks" to the application, while the second approach uses a "model-world" metaphor, where the user can directly interact with domain objects (in your case "cards" and "decks"). Using a model-world ...


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Yes, there is a recommended way, but not a consistent one Unfortunately, that recommended way is probably not what you're expecting. It's not a fixed layout (i.e. put buttons after the image, or in a console to the right). Instead, it's a design approach that involves figuring out how you want to direct user flow across your content. Typically, you ...


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I'd recommend to go with boxes first, probably your amount of "decks" will increase with time, so you could actually add the feature to select both views in a future upgrade. Boxes fits perfect for little amounts of items, but eventually a user will find more useful to select from a list. I also noticed the boxes have a star, is that a "favorite star" to ...


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Landing Page Generally: 1. Page shown to the user visiting the site for the first time. 2. Page shown to the user when the user is visiting your site via some other source. 3. "Home Page" and "Landing Page" could be considered as one. Home Page Generally: 1. Page appears after clicking "Home" tab on the site. 2. Page appearing right after "Landing Page". ...


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We have a similar situation on our learning site. I will tell you what we have done here. The moment URL is entered, we have a page that asks for login details. And we call it Home page. The default whenever a user visits the site. So its a home page for us and the users. The page that appears after login, is the "Landing Page". Its a page after the ...


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It doesn't matter as long as your team all agrees on terminology. But, generally, the 'home' page is where a user would go if they selected the 'home' option from the menu.


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Probably correct. Although it isn't really relevant for your site. A landing page is a page user sees when coming to the site from somewhere else. Typically this a special page shown on first visit or when coming from a specific source such as an advertising campaign. The main point here is to show the user the info relevant to the reason you think he is on ...


1

Some good answers here, but my experience gives me a different one: no, marketing is not the closest. The closest is product management, at least how it's defined today. That said, a little background. I started as a tech journalist, moved into QA, then PM and UX work. Today I'm a PM/UX Designer. I got into UX out of necessity, but also because all UX ...


0

It's a good question. No, there's no good reason that it's a problem. Take a look at how Invision does it; they do it with the text instead of the icon. DA01 is right, it shouldn't be too distracting. What banking sites do is have a pop-up when you've got a minute left before you're logged out, which works very well. Google Calendar does something similar ...


1

UX as a discipline is about anticipating and influencing people's behavior. You can come at that from just about any angle. Most commonly, you're either a designer, developer, researcher, or occasionally marketer. Wherever you come from, you'll be called on to impact business and marketing goals. That's the clear and present danger activities. Branding is ...


1

As a UX professional, I talked recently with a New Media director and we discovered with pleasure how our skills actually complemented each other, and to me I see a whole new breed of designers and concepts coming to light. Whike there are some gaps in understanding fully what each does, I'm noticing many marketing people are now looking at the discipline ...


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I don't think most websites are trending away from accordions towards carousels. Sites are trending away from carousels, and they are also trending away from accordions (if I were to speculate, perhaps at a slower rate). Disadvantages You asked specifically for potential disadvantages of using accordions instead of carousels, so: If you need to present ...


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With multiple types of content, it might be nicer to have tabs or vertically distinct sections, since with either the multiple carousels or the drop down, you're going to have a lot of potentially diverse content all showing up in the same place. On the other hand, if clients have a few products that account for 90% of their sales, an accordion style ...


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Based on what you've told us, it seems like there are three primary routes to the add/edit workflow for customers: Global Nav → Add/Edit Customer Customer List → Add/Edit Customer Customer List → Individual Customer → Edit Customer Regardless of route or status, I think the window should use one pattern that's used globally. If you're creating a new ...


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As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


2

The answer is: it depends. Imagine for a moment that your application is an invoice builder. Within the invoice you have multiple line items of goods or services that you will bill to the client. The fine folks at the accounting department build and manage these invoices. My personal design would involve confirming the deletion of an entire invoice but ...


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Split layouts are great visually, however, when it comes to content, split layout are tough. The one you posted doesn't allow for scrolling the page = you have to place all content within that split layout. If will of course work better when there is not much content to start with. However, keep in mind that websites usually grow in size and content. Hence, ...


1

The reason why it's not a good ux design element is because it makes a webpage look like a financial TV channel. People see that sliding text and it links to their visual association of NEWS! READ ME! LOOK HERE!! NEWS! Etc. Arhhh, get me outta here! It's been done to death - so much so, that people will automatically click away after a second seeing it ...


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Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


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My question is, should I go through with it and after some time examine user behaviour with some analytics tool, with risk of losing potential clients? Or should I give it up and stick to establised layout design? Ask yourself: "Who is your target audience? And will they care enough about how you designed your portfolio to make it worth your time?" First ...



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