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First, I'd check the assumption that your target audience is stressed. In the situation that you describe of learning something difficult, there are many emotions that your users might be feeling. They could be feeling stressed. They could be feeling resigned. They could be annoyed that they have to do something that they don't think is worthwhile. ...


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This a great question. Taking into consideration the emotional journey is crucial to creating an exceptional experience. Anxiety and security are the two emotions you want to manage. These two are the big friction generators and often result in abandonment. The good news is both can be addressed in design. We can't eliminate all friction but we can work to ...


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https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ecg.close5 Install this app and check it out. It is a classifieds app with a similar use case. They have just added options like - within 5 miles, 10 miles, 15 miles, etc. Similarly, you can divide your results based on region, and at the same time display the number of items found in each division. For ...


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The flow you're describing is a user trying to buy an iPhone. He want local results first, but will consider driving a bit further away as well. First thing that comes to mind is don't filter by location, sort by distance. However, I think sorting by price will be an overwhelming preference here, so that's out. Seeing as the process is one-directional, ...


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I think your approach is a bit convoluted, you could simply ask the user to add locations and/or within certain ranges. For example: or some quick mock using your own site: or you could use ranges or whatever, just be direct and concise and try not to confuse the user with if else conditionals, that is something you need to take care in your backend, ...


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As for myself, as soon as the image started animating I lost track of the text in your question and was barely able to finish reading it. It's also a reason I installed adblock, which I disable on most sites but as soon as I see anything animated or view obstructing on the page, I just put it on again (and if it's not an ad, I explicitly block the source ...


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They are called User Interface Design Patterns (or simply UI Patterns) Searching for this on the web will give enough resources. One of the first you will come across is ui-patterns.com where this page shows a list of patterns with an explanation and examples.


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Well, the first one that comes to mind is the Glossary of UI Terminology by Microsoft, but you have the Android Glossary or if you have an Apple developer ID, you can log to https://idmsa.apple.com and download their glossaries in XML format. They all differ in contents and organization of their content, and also they call some things differently, but ...


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You could also have a sticky element that expands into a form when clicked rather than redirecting to a new page.


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I think this is a great idea; it saves space, lets the user get to it when desired, and increases engagement. To answer your questions regarding justification, simply look at Stack Exchange sites. Nearly everywhere you navigate to in the interface, the "Ask a Question" button persists. Something similar on your site should be effective, if implemented ...


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One idea is to use a series of horizontally aligned dropdown lists for your Location breadcrumb. When the user selects a location item, you dynamically create the next dropdown list to the right of it. You may be able to use this as an example or inspiration for your final approach: http://getbootstrap.com/components/#btn-dropdowns-split Edit: I just ...


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If I understand your platform correctly, it sounds like the concierge service is an add-on to the base services your marketplace provides. It is important to let the user know about this service early on, but you have a some options for doing so. Let the user know prior to creating a project If the concierge service is a large enough feature of its own, ...


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I would have a compare type view at the beginning letting them view the details of each service before committing to filling out all their project details. this lets them see that there are two distinct routes and the pros/cons of each. It also allows you to direct users to whichever you prefer by highlighting benefits of the preferred service. Something ...


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I think you have answered your own question by saying the user does not know its there until they click on it. Also that is if they do click on the drop down or side menu. I think if the user doesn't know it's there then it might as well not be there. The tabs will provide more visibility and they will take up more real estate but I don't see that as a huge ...


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I would go for something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note that: You show the user all his options The user can clearly see that the option on the right side have the best price. With the text "Currently selected price" you give the user the impression that HE are selecting the PRICE, not that the ...


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Many websites utilize "pricing windows" (unofficial term) to segregate what price applies to what service. I have created a basic mockup for you based on your question: Examples: Soundcloud GoDaddy


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In this case, the primary content is not being placed below the footer, the primary content (pricing information) is being placed above the rest of the page content using the position:fixed property. Per MDN: Do not leave space for the element. Instead, position it at a specified position relative to the screen's viewport and don't move it when ...


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The price bar is not placed below the footer - it's pinned to the bottom of the browser window. On the page that I checked - the 12" Macbook - it took me 14 turns of my scroll wheel to get to the footer of the page, and the price bar was visible the whole time. This means that I could have begun my purchase at any point, wherever I was on the page.


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This was most likely a JavaScript bug (Try disabling plugins or using another browser) Going through the same configuration screen, the price banner is fixed to the bottom of the browser window. Unless of course you are using a monitor in portrait mode or have a screen large enough to display the whole page.


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If you look around all these sales blogs, you'll realize that the general rule is that, you won't make a sale until an average of 8 attempt/follow up... or the rule of advertising where they say you have to see an advertisement 6 times before it sticks (actual number may be different. I forgot the exact number off the top of my head). They obviously can't ...


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Your layout is making users think WAY to much On the surface your layout follows a classic Z-pattern for the eye: Z-patterns are commonly used and can be effective. But to communicate a single message the layout has to follow a narrative. Here's where it starts to go wrong... (Follow along with the numbers in the screenshot above) The Z-pattern ...


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I intended to express a user who is surprised about the sudden high engagement of his audience. Does the image that you use portray someone who is expressing this emotion? Don't you want that person to be positively happy about it? Does the language and visual styling reinforce that message? Should it be in the affirmative tone with bolder (and/or ...


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To be honest, the emotion that communicates the picture, at least to me, is of an outrageously shocked angry person. This is something I discussed in another question: if you're going to use emotions, make sure they're unmistakably understandable. With the above being said, the eye goes directly to the angry face, and there's no explanation at all at why is ...


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I am not sure I completely understand your question but I think the two options are: wrap the text on multiple lines by using a multi-line input field truncate the text if it's longer than a maximum size and add a signifier for that. I have seen the three dots (...) used a lot.


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The problem of responsive design and optimal resolution of web page is old and the old fashioned way of setting the best resolution for your web page so it can be viewed on many monitors with various sizes is to use the average resolution between monitors with different sizes which is 1024 x 768. Example: .warraper { width: 1024px; margin: 0 auto; // ...


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You can say you are planning to make promotions for some articles and you need to know which one they want to be promoted, and ask them to vote for it. The better way to encourage clients to like/dislike the proposals may be to ask them during waiting time. If they have nothing to do, they would probably enjoy to use their wasted time to fill a survey.


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Screen sizes on desktops might be getting bigger, but more than 50% of web usage is now through smart phones where real estate is at a premium. 2-column designs are impractical for phones, and people may want a consistent experience across multiple devices/screens (or as consistent as it can be)


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I think your question is why you don't see left-hand navigation by default any more. I'd say this mainly a trend--perhaps a good one. There are many trends these days and two of them are a) hamburger menus and b) single column page layouts. This article isn't in-depth, but one of many you can find out there that talk a bit more about this: ...


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There's one thing I've learned from Reddit, Yik Yak, Stack Exchange, and any other platform with visible metadata: scores increase engagement. You receive no significant incentive from participating, other than a number—yet psychologically we want to beat others. As long as it fits your platform, this might be a great way to increase involvement.


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There is a problem for dyslexic readers by using extremely high contrast, but it has been greatly exagerated and propagated to the poin of myth (see this seminal report, which nevertheless recommends "to provide sufficient contrast between elements of a page" and "use a dark text on a pale background"). There's also a trend of abuses using unduly light grey ...


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I would suggest that horizontal text is more readable than text on separate lines. Read | This Sentence | Now | Please vs. Now Please Read This Sentence My eyes would rather move in a straight line than zig-zag.


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Every website has different needs, thus different approaches are perfectly acceptable. Ecommerce sites for example often have top AND left menus. Heck, some even have top, left and right. If you are going to a nice left menu because resolutions are giving you such nice real estate to work with, maybe make it responsive to jump back to a top menu for smaller ...


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As Golden Krishna says bes tinterface is no interface. So ask the user the localisation of the meeting and ask him the time of this meeting. Take into account or ask him if it is local time. Ask from where he comes and specifies him automatically the time in two formats its real localisation and the time of the localisation meeting with a table with all ...


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This study http://uxpajournal.org/the-effects-of-parallax-scrolling-on-user-experience-in-web-design/ found that two of the users in the PS test group reported feeling motion sickness when using the parallax site. One user felt so nauseous that she had to cut short the time using the site. With this in mind, it's recommended that extensive testing is carried ...


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Welcome to the site, 67172! There's one conventional pattern showing relations involving tables, which is usually called master-detail. This is restricted to a single list of items and details for the selected item (which might be a table again). Obviously, this is too simple for your case. You'll need to be creative yourself. My first question is about ...


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I have never designed with something like a television in mind, so you bring up a great question. For instance, is there any kind of standardization among TV sets for displaying pixels? Even if it expands beyond 1920x1080 in pixels, does it display websites at that resolution or do handle things at 2x (or even 3x, 4x, etc.)? I would expect that even with ...


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A good solution would be to scale your website depending on the resolution. I suggest creating a div for your site then adjust the width using percentage depending on the resolution. Consider using ranges. e.g. if viewport width < 1500, site width = 70% 1440x900 | body |----------| | | |----------| | | |---site---| | | ...


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You should think of each device you expect your website to be viewed on individually so you can make sure your site will be viewed properly.


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Your question is relevant and what I feel is you should never consider a particular fixed width / resolution while designing because you will never know when and where your site will be accessed. So what I think is it is better to give 100% width so that it will display at least neatly (not very much perfectly) but it will be acceptable. Also if you want to ...


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The problem here as you correctly mentioned is that users are confused. Its because they might confuse with booking the ticket rather than checking the availability of the flights. Most of the use cases are departure and return or day of flight. Your start date and end date is confused with the start of journey and return. Proper labeling is required to ...


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The comment by Marjan Venema on the original question is the most correct. If making your page wider means that your text/content is going to be too wide (like Wikipedia), then you should cap it at that width. You can still have other parts of the page, such as backgrounds/header/footer go full-width, but sites that stretch out the text so it's difficult to ...


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It seems like your interface layout is going to be very similar to most booking sites in regards to the calendar selection. From what you've described it sounds like you just need to label and communicate clearly to the user that the dates being selected will result in a broad search, not an exact match. The word "scan" can be a little misleading. To better ...



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