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72

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


19

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


18

For any select list of over a couple dozen options, free-text search with autocomplete support is the only sane option. This is a common pattern seen on real estate sites (Zillow, Redfin, etc) and travel sites (AirBnb, Kayak, any airline, etc.) Kayak shown below. Fred Meyer (big-box retailer) has a 'Select Store' search box to solve this - requesting you ...


11

Apple removed scrollbars from appearing, unless in use, from viewports in 2011 with the release of Lion, immediately sparking multiple articles about how to get them back. The usability rationale and merit of this can still be debated today. Not showing it until it is needed is a clean design and does not clutter the display, but the user must figure out ...


10

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


6

Notwithstanding the familiarization aspect from almost every other website, linking to the about page has a couple of serious issues. Firstly, if you link it to the about page, then you still need a link to the important home page. So now you need another prominent home logo or home menu item. This would add clutter, complexity and potentially confuse. ...


6

Deprecated Social Proof Back in time users didn't have any accessible indicator of the popularity of a page, "SEO" didn't exist. Social networks didn't exist. Users had not a clear way to determine the popularity of a web. Someone could see a 3500 users visits indicator and think "oh pretty good!", because there wasn't a number or scale that users could ...


4

Perhaps a stopwatch icon with the time counting down under.... It could actually change colors from green to yellow to red as the sale is winding down. If you want a minimalist approach you can simply use text such as : sale ends in 00:31 mins (for example ) Any of the above methods will do, no reason to overcomplicate the interface.


4

Add a 'confirmation' tab last, after 'submit' (and change 'submit' text to 'summary'), so the user knows there's another section to go before they're done. It's odd for user to be on the last step in tabbed checkouts, but not be done.


4

It's a pull quote You're asking about pull quotes. Wikipedia explains its main purposes: A pull quote (also known as a lift-out pull quote) is a key phrase, quotation, or excerpt that has been pulled from an article and used as a graphic element, serving to entice readers into the article or to highlight a key topic. (Emphasis added.) So the answer to ...


3

Your page gives everything equal weighting, and this is why it looks like a summary page - your instincts are correct. Pick some stuff to highlight, such as what they have bought and how much. The summary information you have here is good. My previous user testing has shown that customers really do read it and use it for correction. For that reason I don't ...


3

You should consider that your checkout funnel is too long. ( so many steps in your progress bar. Think about combining or eliminating of some steps ) , this may scary users + too many opportunities for user to leave funnel w/o converting.


3

You should not do this for a couple of reasons: first, as has been said before, users are used to clicking on the logo to go to the home page. This phenomenon called baby duck symptom means that users stick to things that they already know. Changing where the logo links would also be a violation of the "Consistency and Standards" Heuristic. (Users should not ...


2

I think its more like 'trained behaviour', repeat a pattern enough until it is accepted, kinda like the hamburger icon. (although it provides lower discoverability, it has its place it the world. Another way of looking at it, is that the landing page is in part the about page: looking at the home page should definitly give you clues of the information ...


2

It's common to place a view switcher in the top bar (eg a settings cog icon). Floating Action Buttons (FABs) are not commonly used to switch views. FABs should represent the essential and primary action or purpose of a page, and that is rarely "switch views". You may want to refer to the resources in this question for more reading on how to use a FAB ...


2

The simplest solution I can think of is a numerical text input followed by a drop down for unit size - something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

Using an iframe will result in a disjointed and potentially confusing experience that will inhibit conversion such that users are likely to abandon the process before trust really becomes an issue. Even if you style your site to just look just like the other site in an effort to make the alien content look more natural, it will just add to the confusion. ...


2

Why do web designers still choose to use this? Same reason you still get emails from Nigeria explaining to you how some deposed leader has a bazillion dollars they want to deposit in your bank account. People are gullible. Or rather, enough people are gullible to make the ploy work. Does that hold true for 'fake web counters'? Probably not. As you ...


2

Not a full answer, but your approach #1 is wrong, as you likely guessed. Bank of America has a similar page when transferring money between accounts or to a friend's account. You pick the from account, the to account, the total amount, the date of the transfer, then hit next. Then you're on the "review everything" page. Once you click "complete transfer", ...


2

As mentioned in the answer linked by @DasBeasto, a good solution might be an auto-completing text field. The user only needs to start typing the name of the location, and the text box will start filtering it down. However, this really only works for users who already happen to know where this location is exactly located. If the user is searching for a ...


2

This is something the web community needs to get used to. But right now, we're looking for a way to make the community get used to real time loading. To do that, we'll have to condition users not to click a button (sounds like reversed reallity, doesn't it?). How it's done right now Example from Stackexchange: Example from Twitter: UX Stackexchange, ...


2

Web Counters, particularly the original <img src="/cgi-bin/webcounter.pl?pageId" /> variety have largely fallen off the map, mostly because (a) they're inaccurate in some cases (easy to double-count or miscount visitors because of proxy caching, and artificial increases from web-engines crawling the page), (b) many sites offer a mobile app, where the ...


1

Technically speaking, prompts and pop ups at some point in time, had issues of inconsistency across browsers. However, one does see the change and great deal of improvement on this front offerred by prominent UI frameworks for the web. I have used forms placed inside a Bootstrap modal for a web application and it shows consistent behavior on the desktops ...


1

Most of the major styleguides advocate a very limited use of pop-ups, or modals. This bit from the iOS guide is typical: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/MobileHIG/Modal.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40006556-CH64-SW1. Perhaps you can collect the information in a separate screen of the application. If it's a very ...


1

I would also suggest you make the box red rather than green. Green gives off the feeling it is completed successfully, IMO red would imply more action is required.


1

Is there a very good reason why you are putting the confirmation page after the payment details page? Normally, one confirms their email address and shipping details, followed by the payment details (card numbers have checksums to guard against typos, negating any need for additional validation). Furthermore, most banks require some form of 2-factor ...


1

It is not something that I have seen. One thing to keep in mind is that if you implement an uncommon feature on your site then you're asking users to learn a new mechanic and are increasing their cognitive load (perhaps unnecessarily). If it's only 2 categories, why not just have them both expanded from the start? If there were numerous categories I could ...


1

I think the bigger question here is, how long is the checkout experience? When I say that, I mean how long the whole process is: From loading times, to input fields, to even the perception of the process is (if the page is longer than need being, people will walk away). It doesn't matter whether you use single vs multiple pages, but what matters is how ...


1

I think it depends entirely on the site in question. I would imagine that in many cases it's being used to illustrate a selling point or feature of the product or service in an easy to understand way. I'm sure nobody (especially those with technical knowledge) is going to believe the numbers are 100% accurate, but it certainly would describe the service ...



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