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109

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


38

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


14

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


8

I like the way Facebook and other show lists of people. A possibility would be: No selection: One city selected: Two cities: More than two: Hover to see selection without opening (maybe with something more elegant than a title attribute): *Finally, if all options are checked:


7

I've implemented such services at the request of clients and I currently work with a company that offers it as part of their software. In the right circumstances, it's a highly successful feature. Here's what I can tell you. Call me when you're ready to talk No one wants to sit on hold, get bounced from one department to another, or deal with some gateway ...


6

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


4

Lose the breadcrumbs ... ... and you are fine : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups As @DA01 said: Given the left menu is a tree menu, is there really a need for breadcrumbs? A tree menu is, essentially, vertical breadcrumbs


4

A simple resolution would be to show a simple descriptive text which tells them what to do i.e. they need to atleast upload two images to continue. Here is a quick wire frame for that. Until the user doesn't add the required number of images keep the continue\save button disabled.


4

Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


3

Instead of showing an empty list, show one with two placeholders that need to be filled before continuing - this shows the user that you're expecting at least two images. As real images are added, remove the placeholders.


3

This pattern has been used in gaming such as selecting the hardness of the game or for simple controls. ( easy - medium- hard) If there is Left - Center - Right arrangement, i think that it will increase some factors, especially reduced error and speed. If your project needs to be used in smaller screens, having horizontal arrangement will not be the ...


3

I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


3

Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


3

I don't think most websites are trending away from accordions towards carousels. Sites are trending away from carousels, and they are also trending away from accordions (if I were to speculate, perhaps at a slower rate). Disadvantages You asked specifically for potential disadvantages of using accordions instead of carousels, so: If you need to present ...


2

Split layouts are great visually, however, when it comes to content, split layout are tough. The one you posted doesn't allow for scrolling the page = you have to place all content within that split layout. If will of course work better when there is not much content to start with. However, keep in mind that websites usually grow in size and content. Hence, ...


2

Best practice for "download" buttons is don't make them flashy or look like spam. We're all used to fake download buttons. Make it clean. I'd recommend you use flat design for it so that it stands out from all of the 90's era buttons that are still all over the web to get you to download trojans.


2

No one should not solely rely on the browsers back button. Why? Because Smart phones on average are growing at a faster rate than humans hand sizes. Look at where these back buttons typically are. Top right (general) Iphone standard view (bottom left) Iphone 6 horizontal view (top left) Now lets take a look at how users hold their devices ...


2

If you have to handle lots of data, in your case decision history, you could add a load more option. Not sure if there is a better way, but I would also like to suggest a different way. I hope it is possible within your concept. You could add checkpoints at important decisions, reducing the amount of choices you present to your user. I do have to note I ...


2

If you are going to compare with Trello and Asana, we shall start it with their approaches in usage. Trello is a generic tool and it is not designed specific for projects or anything else. All the column, board, card, etc.. are flexible to convert to in another usage. Therefore, Trello can not be named as a specifically designed for project or task ...


2

Trello does actually allow the user to choose whether or not to keep the list of boards visible or to open and close it as needed (see the "Always keep this menu open" link at the bottom of that list). I don't know if your other example, Asana, provides that option. User freedom is the key here. Some users in some contexts might not want to keep that list ...


2

Its a nice question! I agree there is confusion among many people and drawing a line between all the branches is difficult. Reason being all the branches mentioned overlaps at one point or other. The answer actually lies in the names but due to their overlapping nature people do get confused. Even the companies while writing job descriptions. Understand, ...


2

Disable the non-active combobox. Leave it visible, but grayed out, so that only the selected one is interactive. But can I ask why it's split into radio buttons with comboboxes? What kind of options is the user actually picking here?


2

It's about them, not you The design logic goes something like this: Sales calls can be time intensive and unpredictable since different customers will have different needs, and call load can vary a lot with time of day, advertising campaigns, etc. Most businesses don't have the luxury of hiring excess staff to sit around waiting for calls. Labor is often ...


2

Assuming the number is greater than what you can show at a given time i would favor infinite or a looping pattern. However I would make sure to give them some contextual clue of the state of the system. Let them know that they are going to loop back around to the begining. I dislike carousels where I think haven't I seen that before and realized it was ...


2

Reuters articles are probably written to serve both print and web and they don't have a rewrite-for-web process in place. CNN's markup strikes me as dated in many respects (note it's XHTML, not HMTL5 - not that there's anything wrong with that), possibly an artifact of an older CMS or other technology. Many of these outlets still publish in print and/or ...


2

Smashing Magazine published an article on mobile wayfinding that I think is pretty helpful: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/10/13/wayfinding-for-the-mobile-web/ None of those solutions are wrong, but given the choice, I'd probably use the "nested doll" approach as my starting point. It's a familiar pattern on both iOS and Android and would eliminate ...


2

My question is, should I go through with it and after some time examine user behaviour with some analytics tool, with risk of losing potential clients? Or should I give it up and stick to establised layout design? Ask yourself: "Who is your target audience? And will they care enough about how you designed your portfolio to make it worth your time?" First ...


2

The answer is: it depends. Imagine for a moment that your application is an invoice builder. Within the invoice you have multiple line items of goods or services that you will bill to the client. The fine folks at the accounting department build and manage these invoices. My personal design would involve confirming the deletion of an entire invoice but ...


1

Link rewards to experience goals Gamification should be inextricably linked to UX. It should not, most of the time, be fun for fun's sake (that can be a brand strategy). What I mean by that is simply that the rewards should be linked to key experience goals. The granularity of those goals should drive the gamification strategy. Take SE as a superb ...


1

I opted to implement a mix between the provided answers. There are now three states: 0 images have been added: 1 image has been added: 2 images have been added: Now there is always a placeholder. The placeholder is the same size as the other grid items and is always at the end of the list so the interface will not change drastically after ...



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