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48

It's become standard because everyone does it. Everyone does it because it's nice to have a 'home' link but it's not something that needs to clutter the menu, either. Hence the idea to just make the logo link to the home page. Not sure if anyone can answer where this was first seen. But I recall doing it close to 2 decades ago so I think its been around ...


46

Where was this first seen This practice dates back at least to the earliest days of image hyperlinks. For example, the Internet Archive's earliest snapshot of Yahoo's home page from October 1996 has a clickable Yahoo! logo. Why has it become an industry standard? 1. Convention Conventions are self-perpetuating. Given the ubiquity of this practice, ...


13

There's no official pattern name for it but the NN/g termed it as "False Floors". They've written an article on it and have discussed how this practice leads to bad UX as it does not naturally encourage the users to scroll. Good designs shouldn't need an arrow to tell users to scroll. To quote from the article: When pages of any size offer little content ...


9

I think you're on a classic designer dilemma, and addressing the issues you mention is of foremost importance. First of all, the classic design failure approach: I need to give several different mockups to the client so he can pick the one he like. WHAT?!?!?! You're basically telling your client: "listen, I don't give a damn, I have no idea what you ...


8

Something I do which I believe is more relevant, is instead of using ambiguous percentages I use years, relative to my career. I still use a sort of 'bar graph', but the numbers have context in relation to the length of time I've been working: The numbers across the top are the years of my career (2000 - 2015) and each skill is represented as a ...


6

As the first stage of development. I need to give several different mockups to the client so he can pick the one he like This is the 'traditional' way to handle 'graphic design'. It's not a good way to handle user experience design or web design. If the goal is to handle figuring out the 'look and feel' and 'branding' then I'd suggest the first step ...


6

Relying solely on mouseover isn't enough. You'll need to find a way to communicate to users that the div is clickable so they will point the mouse at it. The mouseover change will be helpful as a confirmation at that point. Look at how other sites accomplish this. A textual call to action will make your div look clickable. Or making it look like a link ...


6

I have always heard them called "splash screens" (especially on mobile). I think the traditional splash screen doesn't include the down arrow but this site includes many examples that include them. http://line25.com/articles/web-design-trend-showcase-splash-screen-revival Modern examples of splash screens are built right into the main page, filling the ...


4

Firstly, and unfortunately for you, I don't think the client has unreasonable expectations. What failed is the conversation between you and the client that voices those expectations. Most likely the client didn't know what they needed to ask for, which is where your expertise is supposed to come in (as the provider of development services). I might be wrong ...


4

I don't think shadow on a button is old design if used elegantly and sparingly. You can see here in Googles Material Design they use "raised" buttons with shadow to show depth. https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/buttons.html#buttons-flat-raised-buttons


4

Scrolling pattern and navigation largely depends on the information architecture and content strategy of your website. The page scroll UI pattern has been largely used to showcase features of a product and I think it has been misused in this way. In most cases, the features are not peers but are related/dependent on each other. It seems page section ...


3

I think it varies with the amount of data you wish to display. Let's take line charts for example - if you have only one or two lines describing your data, I think it becomes relevant to see the grid (and does not cause much clutter) as it helps to see the reference values. e.g. Seeing that the blue line just went over the '50' line grid is pretty easy to ...


3

I would simply separate it a little bit from the group and put a subtle divider in between. White space is a powerful tool for grouping.


3

A progress bar kind of risk estimation can be used in this case so that the user can be provided with the percentage of risk in a visual form. More details can be provided to the user once they click the percentage displayed above the progress bar.


3

Your situation is one most designers/developers have gone through once (at least some kind of disagreement with a client). So don’t worry! This is a typical example of what’s so important about good communication between you and your client. Not just to get clear what your client wants, but let them be aware of where their wishes come from and what ...


3

The four Divs on your homepage could be treated as Cards. By popular convention, you can create an action panel underneath your card and include buttons or links for actions such as "more details" or "share". download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

The answer to this question is simple, and is the answer for pretty much any "why don't we do it this way" question: You should do what makes sense for your users to digest your content in the most effective way. This may mean a left-hand nav for your app, but a one-size-fits-all model will not be effective for all users across all applications. Your best ...


2

There is a commonly held belief that static speedometer-style gauges are bad for getting a concept across easily or efficiently on a screen based business dashboard. This seems to have to do with the data to ink ratio and the ease with which people compare angles vs length of parallel lines. e.g. refs: Not Gauges Again! and If gauge charts are bad, why do ...


2

Besides being visually pleasing and interesting, the speedometer-style graphic also adds a third dimension (space, i.e. the length of the arc), in which the information is encoded. (The first two dimensions being: the numeric digit(s), and the color.)


2

The only reason to do it for SEO purposes is to increase the number of web pages. That's a bad UX reason, and that's typically why big brands avoid it. Then again, big brands have SEO handled. So many don't need to worry about it.


2

You mention "I think it will create cognitive load for the user" and then say you want buttons not to look like buttons.... I think you'll need to: a) specify a little: is this ONLY for desktops? are you ABSOLUTELY sure nobody will use a touch device to visit your site/app? And if not: how do you plan to do what you want on touch devices? b) use elements ...


2

The sticky header should contain tools or information that are so important for the website that you need to access them from everywhere at any given time. This could be the search and their settings on Google, your money amount on an online banking website or current running popular livestreams on Twitch while searching for something to watch. Facebook ...


2

1. Are objective reasons that would make this font choice sub-optimal in terms of user experience? This is pulled from the Web Accessibility in Mind website: "Trebuchet is an attractive font, but it has subtle curved embellishments that may decrease overall readability for long passages of text. The curve at the bottom of the lower-case "L" helps to ...


2

I believe the simplest answer to the primary question is based on the following logic: If it didn't link to the home page, then where else? If it didn't link anywhere, wouldn't that be a waste? It's desirable to hyperlink anything that can logically and unambiguously be linked in the context. Therefore I would say it is no accident of ...


2

From a technical standpoint, you'd use javascript: onbeforeunload When they close the window, first prompt them to check in (or discard) their checkout. From a UX standpoint, I'd strongly argue that you never check in automatically. Check in should always be a user-triggered event. There's just no way to know if they forgot vs. they abandoned it. If you ...


2

If you have more options than can be easily shown, a "more" link may be easier to understand than using arrows download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups As to placeholder values for dates. using "dd-mm-yyyy" would be preferable than using a real date for international users. In North America, we're used to the "mm-dd-yyyy" ...


1

Designing in browser is a potent method. It is a bit more work than sketching away in photoshop, but its definitely worth it. Building an interactive prototype means you give your designs a new depth. Its no longer a static PNG or JEPG, people can interact with it, explore it and get a clear idea of what the app or the site could do for their business. But ...


1

If you do decide to go with gridlines, you must consider a few issues: Screen size is important - lots of grid lines close together on a small screen will be far more confusing than helpful. Besides, if the screen is small enough (i.e. anything mobile) your users will probably be able to check easily against the relevant axis. Perhaps have a rule that ...


1

I can agree with all the information that is given on not using the gauges. But there's one user related question: Does the user know what the minimum and maximum risk number is? Is it a percentage and does everyone know if 50% is acceptable? If they don't know, the colours and even the gauge might be a good addition to make sure everyone knows what the ...


1

I have seen horizontal navs with a great many options in them and they can be made to work fairly effectively The example I have here is from "maplin.co.uk" - an electronics store that has many "departments" each with it's own set of 'sub departments':



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