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124

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


41

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


17

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble ...


17

This is where UX is being tasked to fix something that isn't fixable at the UX level. I'd go as far to say this is where a back end system is unfairly asking a user to make decisions that they shouldn't have to. If the issue is that people enter items they sell under a different name than what's already in the system, then the proper solution would be a ...


10

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


10

I would try something like GMail tags. You have a filter and the list of checkboxes inside a scroll area Other good option is something like Pocket Chrome plugin You have a filter and the selected items become a tag


4

Personal opinion: Tickers are good, as stated above, when the amount of space you have is defined (eg the ticker on a TV news channel). It's good because you can read a summary of the news quickly, as the TV presenter is going through a news story in detail. It also has the advantage that, because it's (usually) with the sound on, you can read the ticker and ...


4

Probably correct. Although it isn't really relevant for your site. A landing page is a page user sees when coming to the site from somewhere else. Typically this a special page shown on first visit or when coming from a specific source such as an advertising campaign. The main point here is to show the user the info relevant to the reason you think he is on ...


4

I don't think most websites are trending away from accordions towards carousels. Sites are trending away from carousels, and they are also trending away from accordions (if I were to speculate, perhaps at a slower rate). Disadvantages You asked specifically for potential disadvantages of using accordions instead of carousels, so: If you need to present ...


4

Why not style the Email Sign-up differently than other nav items to indicate there's a hidden bar that will accordion open on click. Bonus: styling it different gives it more of a CTA feel that draws the user's attention to it. And don't forget to autofocus the name field for accessibility and keyboard users :) Email sign-up closed Email sign-up open ...


3

I had to face same problem a few days ago, and came with this solution ! In my cases list weren't that long so I used a tag system so user can have a list of the items that he/she selected.


3

So if I understand correctly, you have a website which lists places to be activities to do. Is it crowd-sourced? Is there any benefit of inviting users to contribute? Or your model considers users only as consumers? This is important because that is how you'd decide what elements should be on the front page. Let us have a look at two websites. 1. Zomato (A ...


2

Smashing Magazine published an article on mobile wayfinding that I think is pretty helpful: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/10/13/wayfinding-for-the-mobile-web/ None of those solutions are wrong, but given the choice, I'd probably use the "nested doll" approach as my starting point. It's a familiar pattern on both iOS and Android and would eliminate ...


2

Split layouts are great visually, however, when it comes to content, split layout are tough. The one you posted doesn't allow for scrolling the page = you have to place all content within that split layout. If will of course work better when there is not much content to start with. However, keep in mind that websites usually grow in size and content. Hence, ...


2

The answer is: it depends. Imagine for a moment that your application is an invoice builder. Within the invoice you have multiple line items of goods or services that you will bill to the client. The fine folks at the accounting department build and manage these invoices. My personal design would involve confirming the deletion of an entire invoice but ...


2

My question is, should I go through with it and after some time examine user behaviour with some analytics tool, with risk of losing potential clients? Or should I give it up and stick to establised layout design? Ask yourself: "Who is your target audience? And will they care enough about how you designed your portfolio to make it worth your time?" First ...


2

Landing Page Generally: 1. Page shown to the user visiting the site for the first time. 2. Page shown to the user when the user is visiting your site via some other source. 3. "Home Page" and "Landing Page" could be considered as one. Home Page Generally: 1. Page appears after clicking "Home" tab on the site. 2. Page appearing right after "Landing Page". ...


2

EDIT: Based on comment that this is the only utility-nav element that works this way... It's a bit confusing to put an email sign-up form (like for a newsletter) above everything else. Seems like a way to trick people into signing up when they simply want to log in to the site - not a good way to win customer trust. More importantly, putting the form up ...


1

If your site is primarely about 'events' then you could help the user by 'clustering' your events and offer 'search entry points' depending on the two most relevant pieces of information probably all events have in common and the user is also aware of: time and space. This would enable users to search for events and activities in two ways, even if they had ...


1

I think the Google design (homepage with just a searchfield) is bold, and maybe too bold for anything besides Google. So I'd put content on the front page. What comes to my mind? frequent searches (only successful ones: some hits, user selected at least one) (shows examples of what works, including search syntax) maybe some categories (shows what is ...


1

I'd probably separate this out into two separate views: Viewing the date range data, and creating/editing date ranges. The latter might use an accordion-style setup to create blocks for the dates and create some visual/logical separation: ...where the former would present the chart data with a date range selector and a link to the editor where one could ...


1

The best example I've seen for this kind of demonstration comes from Bret Victor: http://worrydream.com/#!/LearnableProgramming http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/ Both pages are rather long, but as you read through the articles there are many cool examples that have inline videos and interactive graphics that you can scrub through to see the cause ...


1

Assuming that your definition of relevance is the same as your users and Assuming that relevance becomes less accurate as you display more and more results then I would certainly give the user an option of displaying the options alphabetically. I would consider to have the link state what comes next and let the users switch back to order by relevance. ...


1

Forget the "platform wars" and make the application user friendly from a touch perspective. The most important aspect you must try to achieve is to deliver a seamless experience across multiple platforms (make your app look and feel the same as much as you can on all platforms). As I see your application is not a very complicated so that shouldn't be so ...


1

If the arrow is to the right of the "Email Signup" link, it should point towards the link to call attention to it: Email Signup <-- Then, once clicked the arrow should point to the form, so as to indicate to the user where to look. Email Signup ^ Apologies in advance for my crude, text-only examples.


1

The reason why it's not a good ux design element is because it makes a webpage look like a financial TV channel. People see that sliding text and it links to their visual association of NEWS! READ ME! LOOK HERE!! NEWS! Etc. Arhhh, get me outta here! It's been done to death - so much so, that people will automatically click away after a second seeing it ...


1

Tickers are good for times where you have very limited vertical space (multiple tickers on some TV channels) or very limited space in general (back of a police car, like the previous answer). However, tickers have one big drawback - they dictate the reading speed. Someone who reads fast has to wait for the ticker to display the new word and someone who ...


1

Some good answers here, but my experience gives me a different one: no, marketing is not the closest. The closest is product management, at least how it's defined today. That said, a little background. I started as a tech journalist, moved into QA, then PM and UX work. Today I'm a PM/UX Designer. I got into UX out of necessity, but also because all UX ...


1

UX as a discipline is about anticipating and influencing people's behavior. You can come at that from just about any angle. Most commonly, you're either a designer, developer, researcher, or occasionally marketer. Wherever you come from, you'll be called on to impact business and marketing goals. That's the clear and present danger activities. Branding is ...


1

As a UX professional, I talked recently with a New Media director and we discovered with pleasure how our skills actually complemented each other, and to me I see a whole new breed of designers and concepts coming to light. Whike there are some gaps in understanding fully what each does, I'm noticing many marketing people are now looking at the discipline ...



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