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43

A Facebook or Google+ sign-in method can actually encourage people to sign-up at all. Most users value the uncomplicated experience they get when signing up via Google+ or Facebook. Hiding this option behind another click will make this valuable option invisible and prevent sign-ups by "lazy" users.


9

According to Hick's Law, the more options a user is faced with; the harder it will be for them to make a decision quickly. For this reason, I would suggest the single button as on the homepage,as at this stage the user is making the decision of what they want to do. If they decide they want to sign up, the user can then be faced with the sign up options on ...


6

To answer this question (as well as many other on UX) we have to start with user stories. Story A. User requires frequent access to navigation elements and these elements are in the header. Then, yes, it's better to fix the header and don't let it go with the scrolling. Story B. Critical information is displayed in the header. Then it's better to keep it ...


5

In short: Both are non-user friendly. . Math for computers... The RGB color model specifies the intensity of red, green, and blue on a scale of 0 to 255, with 0 (zero) indicating the minimum intensity. The settings of the three colors are converted to a single integer value by using this formula: RGB value= Red + (Green*256) + (Blue*256*256) Most ...


5

Split the project and have two websites Absolutely to avoid, primary for maintenance. Administrators may switch between the two (same as users with multiple roles) but here you will pay highest price for any new addition/change (and if you pay this then your customers and your users will also pay). Give the users who have 'roles' in both teams a ...


4

You should not do this. Users know about the back button. "The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links)". Jakob Nielsen in 1999. Or a Firefox study in 2010: "Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day ...


4

Yes, it's not something made for User Experience (on contrary) but to improve security. Imagine this situation. You're accessing one secure site, home page is not secure (it uses HTTP protocol) to greatly reduce server CPU usage (because homepage is hitted very often by random users and search engines or because it contains non-critical material). You ...


4

I actually like the second option of showing Google, FB sign in options directly. Nowadays most users have such accounts and knowing that 'getting - in' process is just one click away encourages users to click on one of those options. With first option, you might lose some users right at the gate. I think Hicks law (as pointed out by Thomad Adcock) is not ...


3

Which one is better and why? And how does frequency setting design in website view and mobile view? Among the choices you have given (slider and drop-down), drop-down is far better than the slider design (regardless of website or mobile) due to these problems with your slider 1) Just by looking at your slider I cannot make out which different ...


3

What qualifies as a good UI implementation for desktop and mobile differs slightly. It also depends on the context in question. User probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference between 15 minutes or 17 minutes, 30 seconds or 1 minute notification. I would do away with free text input box and replace with a drop down to limit the choice. The selection ...


3

WordPress has something similar to Adriano's suggestion, where you can switch between multiple sites on the toolbar of the dashboard The 'My Sites' link shows the dropdown menu for switching between sites. The link next to the home button (Group 1 in this example) takes you back to the dashboard for group 1. If you changed to Group 2 on the 'My Sites' menu, ...


3

The main problem with nested menus is that as UI objects they are somewhat feeble. Their task is to appear for a short period of time and disappear once user made a selection. From this perspective, asking user to select multilayered menus is an awful task as menus tend to disappear on a wrong move of the mouse. I think a better option is to make nested ...


3

In a comment you say you're asking for male/female simply so you can address them correctly. I interpret that to mean you're corresponding with them as "Dear Mr Lastname" or "Dear Ms Lastname." So you could ask for that specific information. Here in the US we sometimes see registration forms asking users to choose "Mr" or "Ms" as a title, though these days ...


3

I wouldn't say it is always a bad UI design, but scrolling is one of those things that should not be counter-intuitive and behave in a way the user does not expect. On a touch device, for example reverse scrolling feels natural (as you would drag paper UP to read DOWN. However with a desktop environment we have decades of training to tell us: Moving the ...


3

I prefer the variant which already shows all the options separate, like it's done on Stack Exchange: While the second one immediately shows the visitor how they can sign up, the first one just appears to make an excess step, there's no need in those forewords, considering you're going to implement all those different sign up ways. I'd even say that ...


2

Have the user agree separately to each term and condition you specifically want them to be aware of: Label1 [Textbox] Label2 [Textbox] Terms and Conditions [Textarea] [] I will not upload any copyrighted material to this service [] I promise to be respectful to other users [] I am aware that all my usage data will be sold to the Russian mafia [Submit] By ...


2

I have answered a similar question before. http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/85487/57766 If this data is crucial, and you have to ask, use "Gender". Biological sex is too sensitive as a subject and you might steer some of the TA away if you use it.


2

Same person? Ideally, but nearly impossible to pull off as nearly any software project of even moderate size requires a rather diverse team. Same entity? Absolutely. The ability to create a great UX is as much about the back end as it is about the front end. This is true both for pure UI work (consumer facing UI vs. admin facing UI) as well as the product ...


1

Given the picture you provided, I would expect the large date text ("Sun, 25 Oct 2015") as well as any changes in the Date Picker and Filter By to return to the values they were when the page was loaded. I would, however, not expect the table sort toggles to be reset. This is because of your use of white space and proximity as well as font style, the "reset ...


1

There are several reasons to not add a tooltip that says 'Click...': It adds no reason for the user to take an action. It provides no context. They can click anywhere on the screen at any time. Why should the be interested in clicking that particular link? What is special about it? It's non-standard approach for prompting a user to take an action on a ...


1

You are asking a question about sex/gender initially, so I'll answer that first. To begin, what is the point of the data? How will you and your company use this data? For example, will it help identify what types of advertisements to display? Anyhow, it's always good to start with understanding why you are doing something in the first place. This will help ...


1

Before choosing between them, you should think of the best possible version of each one. Eg: Text Box You could let the user type freely but also offer some default options to make them easier for them (Google Calendar does this) In the case the possible values are not too much you could offer an spinner Slider I suggest to read this N.Nielsen ...


1

What @DasBeasto said in the comments. A vertical bar in interface design is typically used as a visual separator between two groups of content. The separator tends not to imply "and". Here's an example from our company's app UI We used a separator in denote slight differences between the importance of the items in the navigation. Placing more emphasis on ...


1

It's a typographic element that divides two sections of text. In the context of logos, that's less of a UX question and more of a Graphic Design question--specifically a question for your branding team. If that branding team is you, then it's your call. :)


1

I think there may be a couple of other reasons for the change in font size in addition to those listed. I don't think it's necessarily age related. Previously web designers were in complete control. In my experience, we do more user testing now, which means that designers get to hear feedback such as "I can barely read that article" or "My sight's not ...



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