Hot answers tagged

93

Another reason kind of related to some of the aforementioned ones probably has something to do with establishing Character. These pages, when done well, can communicate a good deal about the culture and people who work at the company. Are the C-level folks blazer-wearing middle-aged men? Or are they 20- and 30-somethings with tattoos and goofy photos? As ...


68

I think the comment "ego, empathy, content?" by @midas deserves some elaboration, because it is actually a pretty good answer to the question: Ego: it is our company, and putting my face to it shows people that I am the top dog and the boss of all these people. Empathy: this is who we are (not just a piece of software), get to know us and you'll believe ...


59

Different audiences want different things. You're assuming these pages are for average customers: Why would users even care about the people working there? I just want a working piece of software and thats good...right? ...but those aren't the only people viewing a company's website. A well-run website design process begins with an audit of all a ...


33

Because people do business with people, not with faceless algorithms and the marketing presentation of any given product needs to reflect that. If your product faced a robot, it would just be raw code (like mark-up for an search engine spider) but your product doesn't - it faces a human being who needs to be satisfied on a human level; faces and the ...


15

On our clients CPA Accounting website, "Meet The Firm" is the 2nd most visited page on the site, right after the home page. They use it as a recruiting tool. Are these the type of people I want to: Work for as an employee Can I trust these guys with my sensitive tax data


12

It can create confidence in your company, by showing that it has humans running it behind the scenes. I find faceless websites in some ways untrustworthy, as you can never tell if its just a one man band behind the scene. I guess someone could fake the about page but usually the biographies on about pages link to LinkedIn or Twitter to show a real human is ...


9

The next alternative to ! would be an informative i. It's not so loud. Give it a red circle as background and it says what you want. Also a yellow triangle (like the background of some exclamation points) but with another character in it would be a great alternative. That said, I think an exclamation point is the sign you are looking for. An information ...


9

That's kind of oldschool. We like to say "Never touch a running system" but violations against this doctrine are the fuel of progress. Personally, I have also used a 2 column website where the footer was only displayed at the left (ca. 40% width) site and no one had a problem with it. The reason why this is done seem to be the familiarity. But I also have ...


8

Let users tell the story This is a very common situation. The user will choose a photo that represents the story they want to tell, but the story will develop sequentially. For example, let's say the user creates "My Wedding Album", and s/he uses a photo of the groom and the bride happily married. Quite possibly, this will be a photo in the middle of the ...


8

Yes, the Equalities Act 2010 (previously the Disability Discrimination Act) is such a law in the UK. And it has been used before for prosecuting companies offering poor accessibility (generally for things like offers only being available to fully-sighted people who browse a website with mouse, so users with screenreaders, or only using keyboard can't ...


7

Honestly, "Wantlist" sounds a little bit weird as I have never seen it around. "Wishlist" and "Favorites" are more common rather than "Wantlist". Other than that "Wantlist" or "Wishlist" are more used for the online stores where users can add goods to wishlists and buy those goods later. I`d stick with "Save to Favorites" or even would implement old good ...


7

It doesn't. They probably should have stated that it's the most usual design pattern. Design patterns help people navigate unknown content, so when most sites use footers that span the page to anchor the content, users get used to the idea of when they see the horizontal divider with a bunch of links, they have probably hit the end of the page. Familiarity ...


6

First, I'm assuming that they meant that the styling of the block around all the footer content (in particular, its background colour, borders, etc) should span the width of the screen - not that the text containers within the footer should be 1-column full-width and therefore insanely wide on wide devices. That'd be bad design because the measure of the ...


5

Our company has such an "About Us" page in that shows all the employees' names with their photos. When I first started it was a great cheat sheet to help me remember the names of some 60 people. If all you want is a functioning piece of software, why are you going to the "About Us" page? By your reasoning there should be no job openings on any company web ...


5

Option B Empowers the User, Option A makes work for them Summing up the positives and negatives: Option A offers either the positive experience of seeing a correctly auto-filled form, or the negative experience of seeing something that is incorrect and having to undo it to redo it correctly. Option B offers either the neutral experience of simply filling ...


4

Given that your marker is going to be placed next to an article I'm assuming that its function will be to draw user attention. Generally speaking you don't want to draw user attention to regularities in your system but rather rarer events which in your case are the free articles. So that would be my preferred choice. I also think that free articles is what ...


4

Captcha is inherently not user-friendly, as it is a barrier to content that has no relevance on the user experience. Trying to roll your own captcha process is going to not achieve what you are trying to accomplish, for a few reasons: Users already have a defined mental model of what to expect when using captcha. This is due to the widespread use of ...


4

What you're talking about is highly subjective. For example, you are probably used to reading text on a screen/website. Maybe the target audience of Christianity.SE isn't. Maybe they're used to reading a book. (The book?) Point is - for you, their text instils a certain feeling. For them, they might look at ux.se and think "wow, what a clinical and cold ...


4

Although I do not have an example of your layout, I would personally choose top aligned in this case. This will probably give the most visual order and harmony, especially since your paragraph block text is also left aligned (meaning you already have an unconsistent visual area on the right). Compare:


3

If you're looking for user friendly, then browser's back button should suffice, it's a known and expected behavior, and for one level navigation, it's what most users will look for. Now, if you want to keep context, you could use a modal window, but that will also depend on the content you have for those services and also the kind of behavior you're looking ...


3

It's not for you. It's for the employees! A little recognition for them. It shows that the company is proud to declare that these are the individuals fulfilling these roles. Like the credits after a movie — you may not sit and watch them, but they're always going to be there.


3

TLDR: Users feel an enhanced sense of trust in a company, after seeing the "people behind the words." (Provided that these people look trustworthy, which with a professional photograph is relatively easy to consistently "create") An About Us page is very useful to journalists / the press in general, and key figure photographs could be featured in an ...


3

You are talking about an on-boarding feature. An on-boarding feature is a thing which introduces new users to your system by putting a spotlight on one or more features. the spotlight can include some additional info via a speech bubble, etc. However, after the user has used that feature you no longer show the spotlight. This technique is also useful for ...


3

Under what circumstances would you NOT want a clean, sleek and minimalist website design? Both questions have one target at the end and that is the Users. It highly depends on they type of users of your website and their willingness to change. Here are two good examples: A) Wikipedia: It is a highly content oriented website and the design is almost the ...


3

Since this seems to be a web client, you could, if you cannot totally redesign the UI (as suggested by Adriano Repetti above), consider switching stylesheets according to the selected language. So you define a custom layout of your radio buttons which will only be used for display in french or German.


3

I'll answer your sub-questions below and I'll give examples related to your question Examples: Do you ever experience that you've get curious on a Facebook video (for example) that has many likes/shares/views and then clicked on it to figure it out why? Imagine a Youtube video without a views count or a like and dislike result I'm really sure that a user ...


2

The problems Representing albums with a single picture and using lightbox has some drawback. Breaking users' expectations. They see a thumbnail and expect to see an enlarged version of it. It's a common interaction. Instead, they see completely different picture. They feel frustrated. Please note, the small gallery controls on a periphery (play, next, ...


2

Devin has the right answer for you, start at the beginning. However, one alternative would be to open up to a larger view of the cover and treat it as a cover. Meaning that you would have a nice layout with the title of the Album displayed and any other pertinent info (as if it was a physical book cover). Then the next image would be the first page. The ...


2

Just my 2€: Number of subscribers I could not care less, either way. I understand that some companies removed this metric because when your numbers are getting smaller it is a bad sign. Anything claiming the best in the industry That claim is just stupid (or, to put it more friendly, it is pure marketing), as it's not objectively possible to pick out a ...


2

Two reasons. First, Keeping the background dark allows you to focus on what's important--the video. Second, a bright background causes your eye to close down making other elements in view appear darker, thus making the video more difficult to watch and see the details; particularly in dark areas.



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