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1

It's bad practice to assume every user is familiar with keyboard commands and contextual menus, because many aren't (I know someone who just found out about CTRL + C/V, and he's college-educated and has been using computers for years). While they can benefit UX by streamlining commands, your interface and functionality should be able to stand on its own. ...


2

I agree that we can certainly improve search and a lot can be done to make both the technology and experience efficient and user friendly. With current technologies Given the current state of technology, I think the following should be included in search engines: Auto-suggest Better categorisation. Now, this can go bad if not implemented properly as ...


3

If anyone had an answer that wasn't 'in a book' or 'copy Google' they'd probably keep their lips sealed for exactly the reason your questions alludes to: search is big business and still often a big problem, if you can make it better you can make money. In the interim here's a few things that most websites are missing from their search functionality that ...


-2

You want to create a class for all divs. <div class="box"></div> but for the last div, create an id. <div class="box" id="rightbox"></div> then style them via css .box { //Your styles } #rightbox { // your unique styles for the right box } Make sure that you mark conflicting styles as !important in the ...


3

I would simply separate it a little bit from the group and put a subtle divider in between. White space is a powerful tool for grouping.


1

If you do decide to go with gridlines, you must consider a few issues: Screen size is important - lots of grid lines close together on a small screen will be far more confusing than helpful. Besides, if the screen is small enough (i.e. anything mobile) your users will probably be able to check easily against the relevant axis. Perhaps have a rule that ...


3

I think it varies with the amount of data you wish to display. Let's take line charts for example - if you have only one or two lines describing your data, I think it becomes relevant to see the grid (and does not cause much clutter) as it helps to see the reference values. e.g. Seeing that the blue line just went over the '50' line grid is pretty easy to ...


-1

It can be extremely helpful if: you are familiar with the front and framework being used to create the responsive layouts you understand presentation layer code (HTML, CSS and JS) and have a good understanding of the process your developers are using to make things responsive you are in constant communication with said developers and are open to things ...


0

At my current firm, we normally give the client 3 different designs, each design with a mock-up of mobile + desktop. We work with manufacturers most of the time and to be honest, our clients rarely know what they want until we show it to them. The most useful part of making a mock-up for mobile, tablet, desktop is that you have a set point you want to end ...


0

Professionally in our e-commerce app, we typically mockup mobile, tablet and desktop. When designing please be aware that your content will stack when utilizing any responsive frameworks(bootstrap, foundation, etc). We typically leave out large desktop mockups since our max-width is set to 992px due to cart restrictions and to maintain alignment and ...


3

A progress bar kind of risk estimation can be used in this case so that the user can be provided with the percentage of risk in a visual form. More details can be provided to the user once they click the percentage displayed above the progress bar.


1

I can agree with all the information that is given on not using the gauges. But there's one user related question: Does the user know what the minimum and maximum risk number is? Is it a percentage and does everyone know if 50% is acceptable? If they don't know, the colours and even the gauge might be a good addition to make sure everyone knows what the ...


2

There is a commonly held belief that static speedometer-style gauges are bad for getting a concept across easily or efficiently on a screen based business dashboard. This seems to have to do with the data to ink ratio and the ease with which people compare angles vs length of parallel lines. e.g. refs: Not Gauges Again! and If gauge charts are bad, why do ...


2

Besides being visually pleasing and interesting, the speedometer-style graphic also adds a third dimension (space, i.e. the length of the arc), in which the information is encoded. (The first two dimensions being: the numeric digit(s), and the color.)


2

Accessible checkboxes usually require two operations to control: first the user needs to 'focus' the checkbox (usually by using the 'tab' key to move through the interface until they reach the right control) and then they need to change the state of the checkbox (usually using the 'space' key). Sighted users will skip through the page using visual cues such ...



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