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The scrollable “flipper” for one important reason. When in that format, it shows relationship to other data points (the years before and after) and this helps to focus the user’s mind in a time-based thought process, which is the desired cognitive state for recalling and asserting this type of information. Users lose focus or forget what they’re doing; ...


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You’ve got quite a bit of unused real estate. I would skinny-up the campaign list and make it the main column and create a right-hand column with the an h2 title ”Members” listing the top ten most popular/active/last-logged-in (whatever) members and have a link that says “Show all” at the bottom of the list. This should be relatively short and leave another ...


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In the process of developing a new app (releasing next week), we ran into this exact problem. We originally included a date picker, but went back to the drawing board because we realized we didn't ask the right question. For us, it was straight text inputs, no pickers or options. So, apologies, but you're not asking the right question either. What is the ...


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I prefer the scroll-able in iOS. A key UX principle is to be consistent with industry standards. Jakob Nielsen had this on his famous 10 usability heuristics for UI design (see "follow platform conventions" Furthermore Most of the time for current dates and birth dates the user wont do much scrolling. You can also put multiple wheels if your date ranges are ...


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Scrolling from 2015 to some older years can be a pain, I suggest a two digit (not four) entry field. It is the fastest way, and the first two digits in a birth year are unneeded.


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I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


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The issues with using gestures in mobile sites is more of a developmental limitation, in my opinion. In the event of an error, you risk losing essential functionality if a gesture is key in navigating throughout a site. We see gestures in apps because they are developed for specific devices using the method that is made FOR that device (i.e. Swift, etc). ...


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The requirements are: Brief and concise, to catch the sense in a fast way Minimal, as it's not the full notification view Clickable to reveal the details I think you should be less wordy and focus user on the important information only. Offer # isn't for humans, it's for computer. Highlight the numbers only and make them readable with monospaced ...


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In my opinion. I think you should use following three altogether: Conditional Coloring View Details Link 3- Link all text or box to the details as well without giving them default coloring of links. Because: User can better/quicker understand with conditional coloring View link does not acquire much real estate but it will make user think that there ...


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GitHub does this quite well. When you're in a repo, the search field is set to search that repo with the option to change it to 'global'. When you're on a global page it defaults to global search, with the option to change it to 'users', 'help', etc.


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What about a single field search with some options close by (checkbox or listbox "search in flagged only") ? If you don't have too many entries it can be a good solution. Anyway if you have multiple research field (but I woulnd't recommand it) you should indicate clearly what the search is about "Research in flagged only" in the field. (look at google page) ...


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Some good answers above but some could be problematic. See the following: Things to avoid and best practice: Firstly, in your examples the first option is better - blue is well known as an actionable link (just look around this stackexchange page!) so having the page you're on as blue wouldn't be ideal. However, putting the current page link in Bold (or ...


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Your UI designer will make a colour scheme, which usually defines the colour of a clickable item. It might be contextual, and it would probably need a hover state colour as well. But as Tohster has said, relying on colour alone is an accessibility problem. There needs to be an additional cue, and you have to leave it up to your UI designer to make it for ...


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Separate the UX concern from the implementation concern From the UX perspective, what you are looking for is a placeholder. Placeholders are by definition non selectable. Your real problem is how to implement the placeholder in a non-selectable way. That is beyond the scope of UX stackexchange, but this stackoverflow question shows a way to do it. ...


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None of the above Colored fonts are used widely and varyingly in interfaces nowadays so it's not a good idea to rely only on color to differentiate clickable elements. This is especially true for navigation elements (versus, for example, inline links) Color-only approaches present accessibility problems for the color-blind. Alternatives There are ...


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One way could be to place a little [x] next to the select element download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Clicking that [x] will act as select none you can see it in action in my yadcf plugin showcaes (next to each column filter - including select elements) Another way is to do something similar to select2 plugin ...


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you can use a plugin like Chosen http://harvesthq.github.io/chosen/



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