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You could either describe it in a nutshell on the page where the oauth click happens or you could use link to a new page where it's described in detail. I would advice against a mandatory popup window as you can't be sure that all users are interested in the description (as a lot of users might already know the pros and cons of oauth) - and popups in ...


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As the W3C page says, the cursor means "help is available". Since it is contextual (it has to be, since it's directly attached to the mouse cursor and therefore is representational of whatever the cursor is pointing at), there are essentially two possibilities: The help is immediately shown along with the cursor (for example in the form of a tool tip), in ...


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Interesting question. On this website I've found some interesting data (links to original reports are on the website): Blue Fountain Media saw a 42% increase in sales after adding the VeriSign symbol in their "Request a Quote page" (A/B test). VeriSign prepared a case study showing a 30% increase in conversions for Central Reservation Service, an online ...


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Most website will have users and login process if nothing else. Without an SSL certificate it is very difficult to ensure the security of the usernames and passwords transferred - in fact it would be best to assume it does not. Additionally even if you only have publicly displayed content your users would have no assurance that the content hadn't been ...


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Whilst obviously important to protect sensitive data, SSL certificates can provide an alternative service for site owners. If you consider a SSL purely as an element in interface design, it is something that users quickly recognise and trust. This immediately creates a positive reaction when viewing the site. Users are constantly informed about online ...


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Sites which are read only shouldn't need such measures to gain trust, but there are measures of trust outside of browser indicators. For example, installing Avast anti-virus shows trust indicators as a tick mark on search results. How they decide who is trustworthy and who isn't is a wide ranging question and beyond the scope of this question. If you are ...


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The relevant WCAG 2.0 guideline is 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions: Labels or instructions are provided when content requires user input. (Level A) A possible technique to achieve this is G167: Using an adjacent button to label the purpose of a field: When a button invokes a function on an input field, has a clear text label, and is rendered adjacent ...


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Generally speaking, it is a bad thing to omit a label for the reasons you state. However, the search box is a slightly different edge case here. In general it is the first form on the page and screenreader users will often jump to the first button on the page (the 'search' button) and then shift+tab (or whatever shortcut key they use) to move over to the ...


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There is an official aria-label attribute that seems to do what you're looking for. You would probably label the input field like this: <input name="q" aria-label="Search query"> I haven't been able to find out whether or not screen readers support it.



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