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4

I'm going to interpret your question as "UX: can anyone show me whether it works?" The best example would be the $300,000,000 button. In short, an ecommerce website was designed to ask users' to register before purchasing. By changing this to allow customers to purchase without registering, the company earned $300,000,000 more that year. And $15m of that ...


1

Where possible definitely the first I would say. The user pressed log out; the action they requested was only to log out, not to go to a different page. Logging in/out and going to different pages is a fairly common problem I encounter online. As you say though it might not be a publicly accessible page. On such systems then you have to send them ...


1

There are several good solutions to this but each good solution must Clearly inform the user that he has been logged out. Afford him the ability to log back in. Navigate to other areas of the site. Whether the user is to be redirected to the home page; a page which allows users to navigate to other areas( example: the apple 404 page ); the current page ...


1

When I log out from gmail it is usually to log in to a different work account. I think most people expect log out to go to a place where they can clearly see that nobody is logged in anymore and how to log back in especially if logging out was a mistake (think undo) Consider a page that does nothing else but log in to the system. If the user logs out or ...


1

You need to inform the user that there action was successful, which is more important than on which page that happens. Hopefully you have a global control on every page that allows users to log out from any page. When the user have successfully logged out, you could inform them in a modal dialogue that they are successfully logged out. That's their main ...


2

This effect is not very common really and it violates some pretty fundamental UX guidelines. The principle of least astonishment states that your interface should behave as the user expects it to based on their experiences and expectations, ie. you shouldn't hijack very common and established interaction paradigms unless you have very good reason to do so. ...


0

I think the simplest answer is how much time are you willing to devote to this one portion of your website? The second question is about the clientele that you're serving. The answer to those two questions will be a starting point. If you have lots of time and your clientele is not savvy then do separate pages. If your time is short and your clientele is ...


3

I'm going to answer this from the perspective of a webmaster who is familiar with the error codes that your web app should produce. A 404 Not found error is a very general error for the case when a URL was entered that cannot be parsed. You may not know what area of the site the user was looking for. There may even be nonsense in the URL like ...


-2

No. It can be a security risk to do so, and for the example you give isn't really appropriate anyway. If I try to find a particular meeting - even from a direct link - and it doesn't exist, why throw an error in my face? I'd much prefer a site that displayed a basic "This meeting doesn't exist" message, and then displayed a list of other meetings, for ...


26

The first problem with having multiple 404 pages, each dedicated to a particular area is that you assume users were in the right part of the website at the point when they fell on to the 404. Bearing in mind that many links come from search engines and not necessarily from within the website, then I don't think you can guarantee that a dedicated 404 is ...


0

I agree with Vitaly, the 404 page shouldn't be an end to the users route it should give them help on why this page might not be here and relevent ways to procceed. In your example, suggesting things like "Is this the meeting you are looking for?" then listing relevent results helps the using keep moving forward rather than backtracking


4

I designed a 404 page sometime back with a function you might find interesting. it was using a recommendation engine module suggesting products the user might like and what they previously viewed. not sure what kind of website you are asking this in context to, but a golden rule i stick to is never to bring the user to a dead end.


8

Treat a 404 page like an error message, which it basically is. A good error message offers the users way to overcome the problem. In your example, a 404 for meetings could offer possible matches for meetings, a 404 for recordings could offer recordings, and the same for documents. The possible solutions are different for each type of entity, and the reasons ...


4

I have not worked in the New Zealand market, so I can not speak specifically to that context, but I will include a few notes on the core principle that you are attempting to overcome -- Localization. Aspects of localization include technical aspects of the local market, making the product behave appropriately in the national market, and addressing specific ...


1

For accessibility sake (WCAG standards): As opposed to what Google or SE does, you really should include underline in order to provide a visual way to distinguish links from non-links. Don't use colours to convey meaning. (1/4 people are colourblind) Some things you could consider are perhaps using clever typography and make each entry more human ...


1

I understand why you’re asking this question but unless it is underlined or has different color users will not distinguish links from non-links. I would use navy, muted green, or brown with medium gray for non-link texts. Avoid using highly saturated colors. Use slightly different color for mouse-over. No underline for link heavy website.



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