New answers tagged

0

TL;DR: no. Transactions are more or less complex process which can either be committed (thus changing the state of the system) or rolled back (thus restoring the original state of the system). The challenge typically faced in "web" based interfaces is that the HTTP protocol, on which the web is built, is stateless, i.e. a "basic" web server cannot ...


0

If background use is important, provide a pop out button that opens a new, small player window. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This also might be a use case for other implementations such as a browser extension.


1

You could add a suggestion for the user to pin the tab to the left most side of the browser. I believe there's an option on Chrome to do this. Now, as a web app developer, if the audio in your app cuts out if the user switches tabs, it is not intended behaviour, since tabs are meant to exist to multi-task. If this is a limitation by the browser itself, try ...


1

One more reason: The user might not actually be using a mobile device currently, but might just have been following a link posted by someone using the mobile site. (Of course, this only applies if your site actually has different URLs for mobile and "desktop".)


0

One interesting aspect of this button is, at least where I have seen it, an anonymous vote. I think there is a reason why this element works better than a normal button when in an anonymous setting. I think part of it is it's novelty but I think it's more about people associating "like"-type buttons with their twitter/google/reddit/facebook accounts. I think ...


1

Yes, You can use a Bluetooth keyboard with most mobile, and some smart phones allows the display to be sent to a TV or monitor. So you don't know if a smart phone is being used with a small touch screen. Also mobile versions of sites often have bugs in them..... (For example the mobile version of gmail stopped working on my smart phone for a few weeks.)...


1

I think some people have over-analysed this question. The answer in my view is always 'no' and there are 2 simple reasons for this: If it's a repsonsive website then there's effectively no such thing as a 'desktop version' which negates the question. The responsive layout should work in a way where elements are rendered appropriately to the device but it's ...


1

Yes it is necessary. Having Desktop site is good if the mobile site is not working in any case or if the user is unable to get the exact flow of activities. Now a days as mobile users are increasing, every site should be responsive enough which will remove this option of "Desktop site". Now if a particular site is made separately for mobile and desktop (...


1

I think this is done when a site's desktop version is well established, and they are "grafting on" a very different mobile site, perhaps developed by a different team. Either because the website Is The Product and is extremely well evolved and tuned, with many internal stakeholders, and they can't afford to break stuff (think Amazon or Yahoo homepage)... ...


8

Steve Krug's opinion In Don't Make Me Think, Revisited, Chapter 10 deals with mobile usability. Steve Krugg states the following (emphasis mine): Always provide a link to the "full" Web site. No matter how fabulous and complete your mobile site is, you do need to give users the option of viewing the non-mobile version, especially if it has features and ...


1

As others have said, the trend originally came about because of the way full sites were ported to mobile devices. Early on, people were taking established sites and scrunching them down to work with the mobile technology and save on bandwidth. This meant changes in resolution, orientation, and browser capabilities. Features would often be removed along with ...


1

Possibly not even if there's a difference between your sites. At least if your user-agent handling works properly. Example: SE on Android mobile has a "full site" link at the bottom. I only realised that when I went looking for it to post this answer. The browser's own menu option for "request dekstop site" is easier to find for two reasons: the menu is ...


4

Yes, If desktop users are shown a different version of the site. This is a usability issue. I have seen so many sites that do not display properly on small screens or that do not serve the same content. (usually 'quickmenus'/reduced to content allegedly 90% of users want, not me!)


4

Why did this trend come about? For developing websites there are three major approaches toward how they are developed*: Responsive Web Design Adaptive Web Design Separate "Desktop" and "Mobile" sites Responsive Web Design (RWD) is where a site is designed in a way that it changes to fit whatever screen size it is rendered on. From a technological ...


111

It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


1

I agree with @JonStory where if you have both sites, there is no reason to not offer the option of visiting the full desktop site. Especially if technologies are potentially in place that mobile cannot utilize (Java, Flash). On modern sites with Mobile-First development, there is potentially no reason to have a desktop site (ex: Bootstrap sites generally). ...


10

Well sometimes the mobile version of the site lacks content that is only available in the desktop version. This is often done to save bandwith (lower quality of images or exclude some elements completely) and eliminate visual clutter. Users might want to see that content from their mobile devices, so providing an link to the desktop or full site is suggested....


58

Personally, I think such an option is essential. For two reasons: Users might be accustomed to the desktop interface. For example, a user that is used to access the website through a desktop can have a really hard time finding the controls he is accustomed to in the mobile version. This is bad if the user wants to use the mobile version just once (e.g. ...


3

It was mostly used for "m.websites" (ex: m.cnn.com) which are already off trends and slowly fading away. m.website are basically the same copy of your website with a different URL. You will be feeding content to 2 websites at the same time ex: m.cnn.com and cnn.com have duplicates in content with different screen optimisation. The m.website has many ...


18

I turn my phone sideways and it has higher resolution than my desktop. When you optimize for 320x480, and a tiny device comes along with over 2500x1400, there are going to be issues. The mobile version of most sites almost invariably is the worst UX. (--Worst UX for me, personally. I mean, obviously there are people who like the mobile versions, which is ...


20

Primary Reasons for Desktop site's necessity can be summarized in 3 bullet points: Compatibility Issues Providing Limited Working Features (while still working on full feature roll out) Redirecting for alternative Rich Experience The trend came about with the advent and early popularity stage of mobile sites ~10-12 years ago, because most mobile sites ...


1

One very straight-forward way to do this is akin to how StackOverflow handles the review queue. Every so often, a random "experimental" question is asked - the correct answer for which is predetermined. If they get it correct, then you know they are serious and paying attention. If not, then perhaps you give them x number of tries before handling the non-...


1

Your definition of seriousness is actually quite hard to measure, since you are defining it as whether the user has read the question properly or understood it. It is almost impossible to know whether someone has read the question properly unless the only way you can complete the question correctly is by following the question exactly and interpreting it ...


3

I think you should combine 2 measures: subjective and objective. You should then make analysis based on both. Here is a proposition: Subjective questionnaire - post task After the users fill in the forms, just ask them whether the answers they gave were correct. If the user says, "No, I just filled them to get rid of the task," ask him/her to specify which ...


4

One thing you have to take into consideration is if parts of the form is auto-populated, i.e. when asking for basic information such as name, email etc. All these fields might be filled out instantly and at the same time. So, in order to measure the way you want, do not ask fot that kind of "standard information". And finally but perhaps most important of ...


5

I think it there's no 100% method to determine was a user serious upon filling the form. A user may fill some fields seriously, but some fields - not seriously. Moreover, some fields are more important, some - less. For every field on your form define an importance level (1 - less important, 2 - more important, 3 - even more important, etc) for this field, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included