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98

It strikes me that you probably should have researched your userbase before building the site. But hey, you're in this situation now so you need to deal with it as you find it. I am not surprised that hospitals / academic institutions are using IE7. Performing an entire refresh of the OS, browers, hardware etc. is a very costly exercise, so you'll likely ...


39

I came up with another way to handle this scenario which is more clear in cases with arbitrary jumps. 1. Show links below the text input to quickly convey how the bidding system works by listing valid choices which can be chosen with a single click right from the start. 2. Update valid choices as the user types or clicks The user can either type 68 or ...


35

Windows Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if you use it (or any other browser) to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Ref: Windows XP support has ended It is safe to address this to IT of the hospital that they need to upgrade to at least IE 9 due to safety reasons.


29

The short answer to the high level UX question here is -- it depends -- so here are a few cases why a company like discourse might choose to put click counters next to their hyperlinks along with things to watch out for... I'm new here what does everyone else click? Sometimes when I visit a new restaurant I'll ask the waiter what most people order. This ...


28

I recently was playing around with a new type of pager control that only uses numbers and doesn't require any localization (next, previous, last, first, all function without any words required in the UI) I modified it slightly to work in your case here. The idea is to be really clear to the user up front that they can't just type anything they want because ...


27

The first problem with having multiple 404 pages, each dedicated to a particular area is that you assume users were in the right part of the website at the point when they fell on to the 404. Bearing in mind that many links come from search engines and not necessarily from within the website, then I don't think you can guarantee that a dedicated 404 is ...


25

Don't blame the user for their situation. This is not about who's right, and what's correct. The last thing you want to do, from a UX perspective, is judge your users. A modal dialog telling them to upgrade is the ultimate form of self-righteousness. They are not you, it is not their responsibility to know about browsers and stuff. You may feel like it is, ...


22

Harry Brignull has an interesting post about adding artificial delays to increase perceived value which was inspired by a Hacker News post about locksmiths and their theatrics. In a nutshell: Purposefully adding a delay to a service may increase perceived value. In this case, the trivially longer time that it takes to "like" could possibly give the ...


18

Though I know you are not a fan of using the standard * as a way to highlight mandatory form fields ,I would strongly urge you reconsider your decision .The reason being that having the * (in front of the label or field) has become some what of a de-facto standard with regards to a form field being mandatory and coming up with a new design might just confuse ...


18

If this is an administrator function for a multiple-choice quiz, I would make it clear to the user that a correct answer is required, and allow the addition of one or more decoy answers. (Choose your own terminology for "decoy answer".) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The application itself would randomise the ...


18

When the user clicks to play, you simply overlay a message saying 'This video has no sound', and the user clicks to accept this and start the video. For example, this recent video on the BBC website: In addition, where there may be sound but no voice-over, and the user might be expecting it, your message would be 'There is no commentary on this video'. ...


16

If I get spammed because I was "foolish" enough to leave my e-mail address, then stupid me. If I get spammed just for visiting a website, then - how can I put this politely? I'd be pretty darn peeved. If I knew a site's owners were employing such practices, I'd avoid them like the plague. If I found out I was contacted because I just happened to visit a ...


16

HTTP error codes are primarily useful for support and debugging. In the early days of the internet, almost all users were technical, and so having them made a lot of sense. Today, it still makes sense having them visible, but that should not be the only information that you provide. Explain it like a human for the rest of the world to understand what ...


16

According to, literally, the first result when you google discourse click count, Jeff Atwood defends the click counter as a valuable signal for users to determine if a link is worth clicking: The purpose of links is to be clicked, their entire existence is predicated on being clicked at some point, and showing the click data gives you, THE READER, ...


15

No, don't close one when you open another. The reason for this is that the whole screen will start jumping around all over the place when you start closing accordions programatically. For instance - if the user selects item Four from your example they would expect the accordion to open from that point on the screen, but because Item 1 would close at the ...


13

Would it not be more appropriate to make the label describe that it is a contact field and ask the user to add one or more of the appropriate type? This makes the form also expandable to future forms of contact in the future (sms, or mailing address for example) or multiples of both phone and/or email. In this screen we have pre-populated the first 2 sets ...


13

A typeface is a distinct design of glyphs, a font is a specific variant therof, consisting of a full set of glyphs. Helvetica is a typeface, as is Courier. They are different typefaces, and by definition different fonts. Helvetica condensed bold is a font, as is Helvetica italic. They both belong to the Helvetica typeface, but they are different fonts.


13

You need to clearly communicate in a non visual sense the fact that the menu has sub menu items. When thinking about the problem like this it turns out that you aren't restricted to just output text as you can also use the text in the tags and attributes. For visually impaired users you should be thinking in text, not images (this is actually very good ...


12

From your description, it doesn't matter whether they know what a clipboard is. All that matters is that you can explain to them that they can press a button to copy the content so that they can later paste it into something else. I would bet that 95%+ of computer users know how to copy and paste, so just go with that.


12

I think the best explanation I have found was in this article which explains how fonts constitute a typeface. To quote the article A typeface is a family of fonts (very often by the same designer). Within a typeface there will be fonts of varying weights or other variations. E.g., light, bold, semi-bold, condensed, italic, etc. Each such variation ...


11

The issue is selection. On the desktop we usually select an item and then act on it. On the web, we act on the item without selecting it first - either that, or selection is implied by mouseover (which doesn't let us "select" multiple items). So, whenever we need to select an item explicitly before activating it, or when we need to perform multiple selection ...


11

These kind of access issues are usually addressed with 'roles' everyone logs in through the same link, with a unique to the individual ID. Then each ID is given specific privileges (or roles). All your students have the student role, all the teachers the teacher role, etc.


11

You know, I've read a lot of arguments on whether or not a site should allow for those who disable Javascript, and I've come to one conclusion: don't do it. Javascript has become a standard of the web I decided one day to disable Javascript and see if Facebook would function at all. It did not. This is because Facebook is run on Javascript (for the most ...


11

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


10

I've come across the same question a while ago and my company relayed on my opinion to solve the same problem, but I wasn't able to find hard data to use as a starting point. However, I found a paper by Raluca Budiu and Jakob Nielsen from the University of Cincinnati (http://uc.edu) about Usability of Mobile Websites. The page 79 mentions very briefly a ...


10

I suggest using microformats instead of "tel:" in your markup, and let the browser handle it. Power users can install a plugin or user script if their browser does not natively turn phone numbers to links to re-format the microdata or show new items in the context menu to handle that data (E.g.: "import into address book," "call directly" and so on).


10

Treat a 404 page like an error message, which it basically is. A good error message offers the users way to overcome the problem. In your example, a 404 for meetings could offer possible matches for meetings, a 404 for recordings could offer recordings, and the same for documents. The possible solutions are different for each type of entity, and the reasons ...


9

Jakob Nilsen about "Return to Top" Links: Yes, "return to top" can be avoided, because the exact same functionality is provided by simply dragging the scrollbar to the top of the page. It's almost always better to rely on a single, generic interaction technique so that users don't have to ponder the choice between two alternate interaction ...


9

You have had some great inputs but in my experience , they key thing which most UX recruiters and UX hiring managers look for is the process with which you have achieved with your end goal. While you can go with a number of different approaches with regards to how to showcase your content (slideshows, carousals, lightboxes) the end result is often not the ...


9

The Statistics Recent statistics shows that about 1.3% of web users have their Javascript turned off. For the Guardian newspaper, an average of 2,200,000 visits a day translates to around 28,600 visitors without javascript, which I would worry about had I worked for the Guardian. You may find in your own analytics that the percent is smaller (or possibly ...



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