Hot answers tagged

112

It is necessary if you have different versions of the website for Desktop and Mobile. For example, a lot of websites scrap out features that might get too complicated to be operated on Mobile. For example, Facebook's Mobile version does not feature all of its settings. It is also possible that a large tablet which can process a webpage faster like a ...


110

It strikes me that you probably should have researched your userbase before building the site. But hey, you're in this situation now so you need to deal with it as you find it. I am not surprised that hospitals / academic institutions are using IE7. Performing an entire refresh of the OS, browers, hardware etc. is a very costly exercise, so you'll likely ...


76

I'd go with a color that'll always retain stark contrast. I'd also avoid venturing too far outside of the styles that that users are generally familiar with. Because you're working in an atypical style, if you deviate and use unfamiliar elements you may risk confusing a percentage of your users. Here's what i think i'd recommend.


75

If your app is the same as your website, then why have an app? As a mobile user, it drives me crazy how every single website tries to convince me to download a dedicated app, which often turns out to be nothing more than the same web functionality repackaged. This adds no user experience benefit at all. I'm sure the company in question thinks it is a ...


66

I would go with something in the shade of the background, but have a more red text in the alert. You can add a border in the shade of the text to make it stand out as an error more, as well.


59

Personally, I think such an option is essential. For two reasons: Users might be accustomed to the desktop interface. For example, a user that is used to access the website through a desktop can have a really hard time finding the controls he is accustomed to in the mobile version. This is bad if the user wants to use the mobile version just once (e.g. ...


44

I came up with another way to handle this scenario which is more clear in cases with arbitrary jumps. 1. Show links below the text input to quickly convey how the bidding system works by listing valid choices which can be chosen with a single click right from the start. 2. Update valid choices as the user types or clicks The user can either type 68 or ...


43

A bright yellow background with black text would work well. Fits the colour scheme of a warning sign.


40

Windows Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if you use it (or any other browser) to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Ref: Windows XP support has ended It is safe to address this to IT of the hospital that they need to upgrade to at least IE 9 due to safety reasons.


35

Harry Brignull has an interesting post about adding artificial delays to increase perceived value which was inspired by a Hacker News post about locksmiths and their theatrics. In a nutshell: Purposefully adding a delay to a service may increase perceived value. In this case, the trivially longer time that it takes to "like" could possibly give the ...


30

The short answer to the high level UX question here is -- it depends -- so here are a few cases why a company like discourse might choose to put click counters next to their hyperlinks along with things to watch out for... I'm new here what does everyone else click? Sometimes when I visit a new restaurant I'll ask the waiter what most people order. This ...


29

I recently was playing around with a new type of pager control that only uses numbers and doesn't require any localization (next, previous, last, first, all function without any words required in the UI) I modified it slightly to work in your case here. The idea is to be really clear to the user up front that they can't just type anything they want because ...


28

The first problem with having multiple 404 pages, each dedicated to a particular area is that you assume users were in the right part of the website at the point when they fell on to the 404. Bearing in mind that many links come from search engines and not necessarily from within the website, then I don't think you can guarantee that a dedicated 404 is ...


27

Don't blame the user for their situation. This is not about who's right, and what's correct. The last thing you want to do, from a UX perspective, is judge your users. A modal dialog telling them to upgrade is self-righteous. By expecting your users to know or care about such things as browsers or operating systems you're judging them, and that's how it will ...


22

The standard color for error messages is red, see this question : One important point to understand is that using conventional colors for errors is important because they make the errors more noticeable. User being annoyed by the color of error message is lot less of a problem than user not being able to complete the form because they didn't ...


20

Primary Reasons for Desktop site's necessity can be summarized in 3 bullet points: Compatibility Issues Providing Limited Working Features (while still working on full feature roll out) Redirecting for alternative Rich Experience The trend came about with the advent and early popularity stage of mobile sites ~10-12 years ago, because most mobile sites ...


19

You might try adding a white border, then play with the background color. The one color that communicates 'something is wrong' louder than red is the color of death, black.


18

Though I know you are not a fan of using the standard * as a way to highlight mandatory form fields ,I would strongly urge you reconsider your decision .The reason being that having the * (in front of the label or field) has become some what of a de-facto standard with regards to a form field being mandatory and coming up with a new design might just confuse ...


18

If this is an administrator function for a multiple-choice quiz, I would make it clear to the user that a correct answer is required, and allow the addition of one or more decoy answers. (Choose your own terminology for "decoy answer".) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The application itself would randomise the ...


18

HTTP error codes are primarily useful for support and debugging. In the early days of the internet, almost all users were technical, and so having them made a lot of sense. Today, it still makes sense having them visible, but that should not be the only information that you provide. Explain it like a human for the rest of the world to understand what ...


18

When the user clicks to play, you simply overlay a message saying 'This video has no sound', and the user clicks to accept this and start the video. For example, this recent video on the BBC website: In addition, where there may be sound but no voice-over, and the user might be expecting it, your message would be 'There is no commentary on this video'. ...


18

I turn my phone sideways and it has higher resolution than my desktop. When you optimize for 320x480, and a tiny device comes along with over 2500x1400, there are going to be issues. The mobile version of most sites almost invariably is the worst UX. (--Worst UX for me, personally. I mean, obviously there are people who like the mobile versions, which is ...


17

If I get spammed because I was "foolish" enough to leave my e-mail address, then stupid me. If I get spammed just for visiting a website, then - how can I put this politely? I'd be pretty darn peeved. If I knew a site's owners were employing such practices, I'd avoid them like the plague. If I found out I was contacted because I just happened to visit a ...


17

According to, literally, the first result when you google discourse click count, Jeff Atwood defends the click counter as a valuable signal for users to determine if a link is worth clicking: The purpose of links is to be clicked, their entire existence is predicated on being clicked at some point, and showing the click data gives you, THE READER, ...


17

That's an accessibility nightmare! Try reversing your error message styles: Red text on a white background.


16

You know, I've read a lot of arguments on whether or not a site should allow for those who disable Javascript, and I've come to one conclusion: don't do it. Javascript has become a standard of the web I decided one day to disable Javascript and see if Facebook would function at all. It did not. This is because Facebook is run on Javascript (for the most ...


15

No, don't close one when you open another. The reason for this is that the whole screen will start jumping around all over the place when you start closing accordions programatically. For instance - if the user selects item Four from your example they would expect the accordion to open from that point on the screen, but because Item 1 would close at the ...


15

As a page loads on Pinterest and Facebook they both show solid blocks where regular content will show up. Handling a page load this way provides better feedback than just a loading message/animation. In the case of Pinterest, they calculate the dominant image color and set that as the block loading color. Facebook simply shows a blue block and thick solid ...


14

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


13

Would it not be more appropriate to make the label describe that it is a contact field and ask the user to add one or more of the appropriate type? This makes the form also expandable to future forms of contact in the future (sms, or mailing address for example) or multiples of both phone and/or email. In this screen we have pre-populated the first 2 sets ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible