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0

I hope this answers your question. I like how Visual Studio has an error list with Errors, Warnings, and Messages. When you click on any of the categories, they toggle visibility. For example, if you only care about Errors and Warning but not Messages, you click Messages to hide them. They have three levels but you could easily do something like that with ...


0

How about one tab for each object you want to create?


0

The user may be completely missing the checkbox and text, since it fades into the footer of your modal. There is nothing calling attention to it. I would try two distinct buttons for saving: "Save and Add Another" and "Save and Close" (or just "Save").


0

Regardless of current stats, what direction will they move going forward? Inevitably, mobile use will continue to increase. Therefore, it makes a whole lot of sense to think about mobile first. The other advantage of mobile-first is it makes it that more obvious as to what truly isn't needed in the UI--mobile or desktop.


2

the question is IMO fairly broad, so my answer will probably reflect this First of all, separate applications per platform are not déclassé, they live side by side and the choice for one or the other really is about the purpose & needs of the application + the performance that you want to get, full native app vs. web app will have a huuugeee difference ...


1

There is just one context where I found this a useful feature, and that was in the context of a game. I had a playing area the player was interacting with using the mouse. On that playing area were objects with text labels. Sometimes the player meant to click an object, but marked the text in the label instead. This was bad because it was not what the user ...


25

There are such people as "selection readers". I am one of them. I (for some reason consciously unknown to me) have a tendency to select text while I'm reading it. Sites that stop me from doing so make me very sad and mess up my user experience. I also completely disagree with the point in what is currently the top answer. Those things that pop up whenever ...


4

Messing around with standard application features (eg selecting text in a browser) is a bad idea in almost every instance ... the user expects to perform whatever action they've done. They can't, because you've broken it - ergo you've failed to meet user expectations. Simple as that. Personal rule of thumb: In all cases, disabling highlighting of text is ...


70

There's an easy way to approach user-select: none, and that is to ask a single question: Would selecting the text be the primary/secondary interaction a user would intend if touching the screen there, or would it be a hindrance to the task they were trying to carry out? Image Carousels (love them or hate them) are a fantastic example of this. In a touch ...


8

There are many contexts in which it is good UX, and many where it is bad UX - there's no one-size-fits all answer. As you flag in your question a button or action that when clicked highlights the text isn't good UX, and there are likely to be very few circumstances when a user should need to highlight that text. However bodies of text shouldn't be disabled ...


61

In general, you shouldn't use it globally. Oftentimes, users select some text, maybe to highlight something to show a part of the text to a friend, to copy text or to mark the text just to be able to read it better (which I do when the text is pretty wide and it's hard to follow the text wrap in the sentence). However, there are really good examples where ...


12

Not being able to select text is the most annoying anti user-friendly css property there is right now in modern websites. Reasons: Lets not try to act as if our website is something it isn't. It's not a mobile app and the reason you cannot select text in an application is because it is not inside a text-box and therefor is not supposed to be selected for ...


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Thanks to everyone who commented. I ended up injecting the same javascript which had stopped working, to the page.


2

The simplest solution I can think of is a numerical text input followed by a drop down for unit size - something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

If that's a responsive design, you will probably move the sidebar into a collapsed panel. In such case, tabs or accordion in the rightside content area are actually a better idea than trying to fit them into the sidebar. Consider such flow: User opens sidebar User chooses object Sidebar is automaticaly collapsed User sees the chosen object and already ...


0

Adding to ThaSaleni, you could separate the list into two parts. "Oscar Awards" at the top and "Oscar Nominees" below that, this way it would be easier to find what the awarded movies are.


0

I really like toggle switches for this. They are easy to understand, indicate the current view, and are visually differentiated from buttons, tabs, and other kinds of nav. One challenge is that Material guidelines suggest toggles be used to indicate "On" and "Off" for a particular setting. Sometimes, switching views conforms to this, as in my example, ...


0

You could try showing only a link/button at first. Clicking on it will show the members input and move the focus on it. (somewhat related, you could allow users to add multiple members at once by separating them with a comma)


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I think it's a question of marking the required and optional fields better. Also: the title 'members' needs to be phrased 'add members' since this is what the user will be doing. here's a comp:


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Along the lines of the first answer -- the link to Order Details points to the product detail page, which has a full description, reviews, specs, etc., AND a button to Buy/Download. Your table is sort of like an order-confirmation, or wish list. See example below The table serves as a record of items ordered or purchased. As for the Review link, is ...


1

I would link the Order ID to the Order Details page. Just seems logical to me. I think I would want the link to act the way you describe item 8 - Access. I'm not sure why you would need to go to a product description page after you have purchased the item. In theory, you know what you have purchased. However, I would also assume that from the page that ...


2

I would avoid it...for now Because... The grid icon is as uncommunicative as the hamburger icon. The hamburger vaguely communicates a menu list, just as the grid vaguely communicates a matrix of icons. In terms of communciative design both are problematic because they presume the user knows the UI layout of the underlying menu and can relate that ...


2

It's common to place a view switcher in the top bar (eg a settings cog icon). Floating Action Buttons (FABs) are not commonly used to switch views. FABs should represent the essential and primary action or purpose of a page, and that is rarely "switch views". You may want to refer to the resources in this question for more reading on how to use a FAB ...


14

BURGER VS GRID - same or different context? I think the burger and the grid generally have different meanings, though they're not formalized anywhere yet (at least, it's not widely known like ISO or W3 standards). The burger menu usually is more about navigating content within a context. You're on a website and navigate to different subsections of the ...


13

Edit People should read this article about the hamburger menu. I rest my case: the hamburger menu does NOT work. Big companies like Facebook and NBC have found it to be true and they've changed from burger navicon to a TAB BAR, a tab bar with icons + words seems to give the best conversion rates. My example of Facebook was not nonsense, they did change ...


3

I think this particular icon is known as the "App Drawer Icon" If I am not wrong, the trend started with the app drawer icon acting as the launcher for apps on Android and Blackberry, particularly on Nexus and Samsung mobile phones (in early days) Since then, it has been adopted as a launcher icon for a list of apps. Edit (based on my comments and other ...


4

The images themselves tell you what format the menu will have. In these cases, grid layout that is common amongst web applications today, in the case of the three lines, that's usually a menu with a list style of some sort. I think 4 dots is definitely overkill, you can get the point across with 3. It has little to do with the content and more to do with ...



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