Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

well, roundness of buttons comes from the Contour Bias concept: Contour Bias is a well-studied theory that shows that humans prefer rounded objects and choices over angled ones. The more angled, the more that human brains reacted with activity in the brain associated with fear and flight. in theory, your 50% rounded button should work better, and ...


1

Yes, I agree. Not being able to open a link in a new tab/window is a bad UX practice. In addition, not using URLs prevents users from bookmarking the page. It also prevents users from being able to navigate by adjusting the URL (for example, going back to a root path). Now with JavaScript frameworks like Backbone, Ember, and Angular, it's really easy to ...


0

If I understand your platform correctly, it sounds like the concierge service is an add-on to the base services your marketplace provides. It is important to let the user know about this service early on, but you have a some options for doing so. Let the user know prior to creating a project If the concierge service is a large enough feature of its own, ...


0

I would have a compare type view at the beginning letting them view the details of each service before committing to filling out all their project details. this lets them see that there are two distinct routes and the pros/cons of each. It also allows you to direct users to whichever you prefer by highlighting benefits of the preferred service. Something ...


2

You could look into other kinds of components, like accordions and carousels to show more content without resorting to modals. Accordions work well for expanding list entries to show more detail. You might also consider a toggle switch to change between a detail view and a summary view. As John S mentions, be cautious of using modals. They are best reserved ...


3

Are these actual windows? Can you arrange them, stack them as you please and size them as you please? Dock them? You're not actually building windows if you're only building a big modal that covers up your entire screen and forces the user to hit "x". At that point the question is - "Is putting a giant modal that covers up all navigation and context a good ...


2

Here are a couple things I would try... 1. In-line editing with some safeguards Making changes to an item directly in the list is nice since it provides context, however, consider making the list read-only until the user specifically clicks an "Edit" button. This will help highlight that the user is making the desired change to the right row and allow ...


1

I'd treat the entire graphs as buttons, something like this: this way, you provide some degree of information to the user and make your element the trigger of an action, saving space as well as steps in your process. Of course you would need to test, but I think this approach will greatly reduce any cognitive dissonance by adding a quick eye scan ...


0

There is a concept called "micro charts". These type of controls are both interactive and informational. I suggest you google it up.


0

Personally I would use the tab format you preferred - but on top of the graph not below. I certainly don't go much on the drop down as I think this hides the options and graphs available (as you have to click to view them). What I would suggest is that if you have a live system then try to AB test it and see which gives the most number of different graph ...


0

You can say you are planning to make promotions for some articles and you need to know which one they want to be promoted, and ask them to vote for it. The better way to encourage clients to like/dislike the proposals may be to ask them during waiting time. If they have nothing to do, they would probably enjoy to use their wasted time to fill a survey.


1

There's one thing I've learned from Reddit, Yik Yak, Stack Exchange, and any other platform with visible metadata: scores increase engagement. You receive no significant incentive from participating, other than a number—yet psychologically we want to beat others. As long as it fits your platform, this might be a great way to increase involvement.


2

The questions being asked are yes/no questions. The appropriate UI control to use in a yes/no aka Boolean configuration setting or question would be a checkbox. [x] List this property publicly. [x] Show this property on my home page. Both (a) and (b) choices are potentially confusing to a user and should not be framed using a 'radio' UI control at all. ...


52

Neither. Settings are different from questions. This may seem obvious, but it drives a difference in UX design. Yes and No may be reasonable answers to a question: Are you a muggle? Yes / No However, in your case you are really asking the user to make a setting. For settings, don't make the user think too much: Describe what the radio button does ...


0

Based on the example question provided here are a couple considerations that may help you make a decision. Scaling Example A removes the bulk of the question from the answer choices and puts it above them, this makes question have less width but more height. So if you intend to make this application scale to mobile devices this would be preferable as it ...


9

As you mentioned if the option B doesn't include the question I would go with A) because the question is simply enough to admit a Yes/No answer, plus the explanation next to the option is the expected and not something that really needs to be cleared before the user accept, the question already states the final consequence. Also you could use an alternative ...


2

You could convert the radio select into a check box and provide a tool tip with additional information about the option (i.e. public = visible on homepage)


2

Is the application specifically for taxi companies? Further to that is the app for drivers receiving jobs? If so, using location based jobs can make this process simpler. The operator only sees jobs relevant to them. As an aside, the UI contains elements not used by the operator. If they are not needed, remove them. Otherwise, could I get more info on the ...


0

Here's my suggestion: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Basically you have a list with everything and an inline label to show the movies which actually got the awards.


3

Welcome to the site, 67172! There's one conventional pattern showing relations involving tables, which is usually called master-detail. This is restricted to a single list of items and details for the selected item (which might be a table again). Obviously, this is too simple for your case. You'll need to be creative yourself. My first question is about ...


0

How about showing the link to the log in form as a button "log in to comment" instead of the input field? Then, to make it user friendly, store the current link in a session, have the user log in (or register) and redirect to the page where he wanted to place a comment Makes the process very clear.


1

How about you make the form a little larger and show both login info & create form fields into the same dialog? So: Check if user is authenticated upon clicking on the "Create" button If logged in, just show input fields in dialog If not logged in, show login fields in top section and the create form at the bottom section of the dialog That way ...


2

As a user I'd expect to be asked to login before the input dialog is shown. If I'm shown the input dialog I expect the login to be unnecessary, and if otherwise I'd consider it as a violation of the principle of least astonishment.



Top 50 recent answers are included