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I would recommend sticking with Bootstrap as it is more design-agnostic. Use it as a starting point framework and build it to your design specification. Material Design is strong in it's statement about how everything should look, feel, and work. This is great for google to create consistency across it's products but likely not a fit for you unless you want ...


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Material design provides the following benefits for web apps: It is a comprehensive UX + style framework, so it can speed up both design and development. It promotes responsive, multi-client user interfaces, in the sense that keyboard + mouse is a first class input method alongside touch and voice. So if you need your web app to work with mobile/tablets ...


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Essentially the Material Design is a visual language developed for mobile and tablets. The very essence of it is "touch". Don't think its a good choice for web apps.


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I personally do not like material design on the web. If you look at http://inbox.google.com, they have used material design, but I believe it is confusing to get around and also a lot of space is wasted. It is frustrating when simple task like opening a folder requires an extra click. It is just not meant for desktop platforms to be used with a mouse (well ...


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The trust is not built at the logi form but before! It takes into account the presentation of content, footer of your site and some associations verifying the authenticity. Depends on business you are operating, one of the biggest trust building factor can be simple login form with links to your public domain content. Like contact details with real address. ...


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You should ask if the brand name and product name create any untrustworth-ness to user perception. If you clarify brand or product name has not any trustworthy issue, you can try to give "reasoning" or "promises" at the context of login form. "We won't post something to your facebook wall, we promise" - can be nice for facebook social login. "We don't ...


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It would help if you changed your test to include a landing page with information. This page can lead to use to a signup process or an account creation. An informed user will make informed decisions.


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You could ask yourself if it is required to create a login screen. If there is no need to signin (for example the functionality is not really restricted to a person or can be accessed using a public account) then forget the login screen. If a login is really required then leave a message on the page what happens with the information. For example state that ...


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It may be helpful to have a description on the bottom to help the user understand what the product is. Even if you have already explained - it helps the user confirm they are logging into the correct service. Another idea - you could create a private policy to ensure your users feel safe.


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It looks abit crowded because you are showing all the information on the same screen at the same time. the screen shot isn't clear but it looks like you could replace the sequence of the same fields with an add button. Try to think in terms of when the user will need to use which block of information, and show clear navigation on how the user can pull out ...


1

Forget about CRUD This answer may help explain why CRUD is helpful as a programming pattern but not very helpful as a UX pattern: Form design for CRUD actions Page titles are useful for: Informing (or reminding) users about the purpose of the page. Providing users with an orientation of where they are in the application/site. Providing an entry point ...


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As a guideline, a good title is what you want visually-impaired people to hear first (via a screenreader) when the page loads. So yeah - "New post" is good, but for editing a post you'd put something like "editing [post name]". Essentially, the title should reflect the purpose of the page.


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I would suggest looking into a few of these design guides. Googles Material Design: http://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html Bootstrap: http://getbootstrap.com/ Either one is going to give you 'clean' web ready out of the box.


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My advice is: test it. "New {object name}" is a quite standard structure, but it's not necessarily the best option. As always, the answer depends on many factors (e.g. context, type of user, conventions, etc.).


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A1, B1, C1. But shouldn't the keyboard be flipped vertically? Here's what I would expect to see serving the purpose, without further knowledge of your usage... Too, I would expect a Back button.


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One of the major problems with online form design is that many of us try to simulate a printed form, assuming it is effective because it is familiar to the customer. As I'm sure you are aware, Luke Wroblewski has done some excellent research on online form design (Link to one of his articles is here: http://static.lukew.com/webforms_lukew.pdf) Even though ...


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A grid structure layout, using the amount of columns which will help you group your form elements accordingly. Mandatory fields should be marked and tab ↹ index should follow a sequence that users follow when they will fill this form


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Yes. The terms you're looking for are: Lazy loading images. This refers to the technique of loading images after the initial page load, to improve the perception of speed. Image placeholders are the block elements you refer to which represent the images while they're being loaded. This technique is occasionally referred to as 'greeking' but that's an ...


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If you think about the purpose of a wizard, it is really there to ensure that the user is able to complete a complex workflow accurately without missing any crucial steps. This fine if the process is does not need to be carried out frequently, and that there are not a lot of other irrelevant or optional steps involved. If you create a wizard that contains ...


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The correct Information Architecture term is a multi-dimensional hierarchy. Common websites that have that kind of structure are webshops (or Wikipedia). Search Webshops all rely heavily on the search functionality. I don't know if a search functionality is possible or useful within your web application, but it might provide the users with a fast way to ...


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One significant consideration is that scrollbars are typically hidden in Mac OS X. So, for example, you may want to provide additional hints to the users for views that are scrollable. Another consideration is the availability of smart-zoom in Safari web browser. Your testing should include ensuring the correct positioning of elements when users perform the ...


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Check box lists would be the answer; based on Microsoft guideline for desktop app which you could use it for web app somehow: Standard multiple-selection lists have exactly the same appearance as single-selection lists, so there is no visual clue that a list box supports multiple selection. Because users have to discover this ability, this list pattern is ...


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You've received a fairly decent collection of answers here but it's definitely worth adding just one more book: Undercover User Experience Design by Cennydd Bowles and James Box It's really an incredible introduction to UX. As well as great examples and strategic implementation options it is extremely focused on UX on a shoestring so is ideal for companies ...


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I think you should consider the fact that mobile devices are driving user interfaces and often the evolution of the desktop user experience as well. This because the big market players realise that users spend more time looking and interacting with their mobile handset more then their desktop. Apple and Microsoft recent efforts are into blending their ...


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If, for some reason, you know that a significant portion of your users will be using Safari for Mac, then it might be okay to design for that specific browser. In general though, it's a pretty universally agreed upon best practice to not design for a browser (unless it's something like a browser-specific extension). A few things to consider: You never ...


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I have came across few interfaces which use java script overlay window to display enlarged images. These overlay windows carry controls to navigate forward and back but lack a CLOSE button. You cannot close by clicking outside the image (on overlay windows itself) and there is no CROSS or Close button to click. You can close overlay mode by clicking on the ...


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I strongly recommend replacing the icon with a button that says Refresh. Reasons: User experience is more important than layout consistency. Even if you are using icons elsewhere, in this case if Refresh is the right micro-interaction, then use it. The form flows from left to right. This is a good, natural flow: user enter the start date, then end ...


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What about simply swapping the icon for a button with the text "Update chart" ?


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You can add an overlay on the graph if the data and filters mismatch prompting user to refresh / reload / load the graph again. However it does not end there. I wonder if users are expecting the graph to refresh when they select the second value. How your application behaves in other similar scenarios? Are actions auto triggered on selection or there are ...


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Establish a UX strategy The application has been actively developed for 10+ years. Unfortunately, there hasn't been much focus on UX when building the application. Shifting focus from a development led process to a UX led process is no easy undertaking particularly when your application has been actively developed for more than 10 years! So you ...


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I guess there are a few different things you want to find out, and I think for me UX is about asking the right questions rather than trying to find the solution, simply because you can find the right solution for the wrong problem and not end up better off than where you started from. So in order of priority: Find out what you know - you mentioned that ...



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