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Today we see those suites and know they are by Adobe, Google, etc because they include their company name when marketing. Google mail, Adobe flash, etc etc. But before that the companies built a name for themselves. This allowed them to leverage their brand identity to increase utilization rates of their apps. It also had the benefit of building the ...


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Is it possible for you to track the answers that are most frequently being viewed? That would help in informing what sorts of questions users are searching the answer for most frequently. Additionally, it would help inform what part of the product needs to be improved in order to increase usability.


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I don't mean to offend, but it sounds to me like you might be going at it the wrong way. You've already done some testing and put your finger on the problem: "it tends to confuse people who are looking for a traditional browsing experience." That you've come that far is great. Now it seems you've decided the design is fine, but the users' expectations ...


1

Make the default state of the box include a default address - even if it is totally unrelated to the user. A visitor may not see a blank box as an "incorrect" state, so they may not know to "fix" it by entering their address - but they will see an address that is not their own as "incorrect" and will change it to the correct address. If your solution allows ...


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It really depends on your goals. IF you are collecting addresses for marketing purposes then of course encouraging a complete address is quite useful. If you do not REQUIRE the address for marketing then a system where you would require the user to self-refine the data would be handy. For example: have them enter stat/province first should remove a large ...


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Similar to @DesignerAnalyst but using a colour / intensity gradient approach allows space for explanatory text, an aesthetically simpler UI (which according to Nielsen heuristics does matter). Appropriate scale will avoid color blindness issues. Also the larger and simpler features are easier to scan. Which is probably valuable in supporting the likely user ...


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I have a suggestion that uses less words. This solution reduces clutter and makes comparison much more easy. You can use a tooltip to show the description of each symbol. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I think a slider that has stepped values should work reasonably well on a mobile device too, especially if you don't have to be very precise with the distance. The end points can be a minimum distance, and the maximal value can be everywhere.


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You can use a numeric stepper. The user may enter the value with the keyboard, or use the up/down arrows. The default value should be empty (no distance filter). EDIT : See comment by @FodderZone download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Placing buttons at the bottom are better as the thumbs or fingers could reach them easily - supports one hand operation too..


1

I like the way Ghost does it. This is the 'New Post' screen: In the right (in your case it's a full width button), you see 'Save Draft'. If you click on the arrow next to it, you'll see: If you click on 'Publish Now', the button has changed: In your case, you could do that with 'Public' and 'Private'. I'd prefer to make the default 'Public'. Just ...


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From these screenshots, there are 3 functions in that part of your app. List of meetings, with search functionnality Meeting creation, with several steps Inviting people Apparently this menu is displayed on the list/search page? (I will assume so in the rest of the answer) A few points, not really ordered: It is not clear where we are. The title ...


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A few things about your question and some next steps: User Experience Experts are just people that swallow their pride & know to ask their users / customers. I'd like to think my experience gives me a solid base for presenting better-than-average first-shots, but I know that users ultimately control the direction of my work. I wouldn't necessarily ...


2

It's not about whether or not to follow trends just because Facebook has done it. No doubt, Facebook has likely done loads of user research on what is more intuitive for most of their users. Source: How does something become "common knowledge"? You should do your own research to see what makes the most sense. In your case, the best way to ...


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I guess you should use the first option including items filtered by only two tabs : - My pasts events - All (default view) In this last one you should include all the available events and those user participates to (this case assumes a different design from all the availables for instance different colors and/or a personal calendar view).


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I've just thought about this way: or this way: It sounds far more explicit.


1

How about this? Group is not redundant and also in line with the options.


-3

I would also suggest you carefully consider the order of the values. Ordering values from 10 to 1 (instead of from 1 to 10) leads users to give an higher average rating (you can find more informations in this answer I wrote a couple of days ago). You may also want to have a look at the primacy effect: a cognitive bias that results in a subject ...


2

Avoid abstracting the label from the control wherever possible. That is, avoid separating the control and the label that describes the control's state because that forces the user to look in two different places in order to understand what's going on. Instead combine them so that the control clearly describes its own state. In this particular situation, I ...


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Slightly off topic - The nicest feature I've seen on this kind of site (if it allows online 'discussion') is an 'Ignore' Button so that users can choose to ignore the postings of a particular user (their posts then show afterwards as 'Ignored User'). This adds a "pre-reporting" stage so that users who post content which could end up producing more heated ...


1

One book I'm going through now is Interactive Design by Andy Pratt & Jason Nunes. It focuses on UX in general, but introduces you to UX practices and methods through real-life examples, which in turn gets you thinking about how to consider it in your own application. It covers some design principles, such as Affordance" and gives concrete examples of ...


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I am not a big fan of the "5 star" rating type of systems because... What on earth is a 3 star? What does that mean? Instead, I am a fan of the "It works well" or "It doesn't." Reason why I say that is because pay attention when you ask someone a question along the lines of "what do you think of this book" or "are the servers fast for your website ...


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Depending on the questions asked, rating values can become quite burdensome in terms of cognitive load. When the user is asked to rate a property of your system, they are generally not asked for a precise measure, but an estimate or a perceived value. Can you always confidently tell the difference between something rated 2/10 and 3/10? What about 7/10 and ...


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Sparling and Sen did research on rating systems titled "Rating: How Difficult is It?" trying to answer the question of how to choose the right scale (Like [unary], Thumbs Up/Down [binary], 5 Stars, Slider 100 points). You have to weigh the time it takes for each scale to be understood, interacted with, and then satisfaction. Really great paper. In short, ...


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One approach that tackles the problem, perhaps counterintuitively, is to use a slider. The user actually has infinite (or near-infinite) granularity, but without having to make an agonizing decision between 7 and 8. Visually, this option is very simple, as there is only a single line with a single button. If you absolutely need the data to be on an 11-point ...


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If you do want the granularity of a 10-point scale, have you considered using half stars? This gives the compactness of having 5 options, with the granularity of 10.


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To avoid the "somewhere in the middle"-answers one could also use a four point scale, which makes responses more accurate on for-votes and against-votes. This is especially useful if you want to make it very clear if users like or dislike a statement. While survey research scales may range from two to ten points or more, researchers have generally ...


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10 seems quite a wide range for what is essentially a 'do I like this' poll. Does it really make a difference if Fifteen people rate Availability at 7 and Thirty people rate it at 8? I'm not sure you really need that much accuracy in such a subjective poll. Why not use a standard 5-point Likert scale? (Image from the Wikipedia article.)


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You must have a clearly marked exit (Jakob Nielsen - Usability Engineering). You should have two buttons labeled "OK" and "Cancel". Do NOT add an "X", to avoid confusion.


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Where budget is zero and actuals is zero then the difference (delta) should be zero! There is no difference between 0 and 0. Where budget is zero and actuals is high then the difference (delta) I think it looks great by stating 'Infinity %'. It is truthful, concise, meaningful, elegant, non-symbolic, not cryptic. Good framework, have a biscuit! Where ...



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