Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

65

Context is important here. Sound feedback can be very useful when people need or expect it. The ATM. That annoying credit card pad that only accepts a button push every 3rd time at the pharmacy check out line. A cash register. And maybe it can be important for your web site, but realize that that is a very atypical behavior and not something your users are ...


62

You're looking at the problem from the wrong angle. A user could also open a different browser, or use a second device, which means you can't rely on the idea of opening tabs(and preventing it), nor on IP address. Your solution needs to be server-side. Signing them out would just annoy them. Either make it so your website show them the same game no matter ...


60

You could try to use a short description of the actual cause, e.g. no budget


43

On any site is is not ideal to break a user's expectations. As a user expects to be able to navigate the internet with tabs in their browser, you shouldn't break it.


42

Corners on a picture of a face (which most people will choose as an avatar) are not just unnecessary visual noise, they may make the image harder for us to process. Things with rounded edges are considered easier on the eye than things with sharp edges. Circles are easier for the visual system to process, so generate less cognitive load. However, many of us ...


40

10 seems quite a wide range for what is essentially a 'do I like this' poll. Does it really make a difference if Fifteen people rate Availability at 7 and Thirty people rate it at 8? I'm not sure you really need that much accuracy in such a subjective poll. Why not use a standard 5-point Likert scale? (Image from the Wikipedia article.)


30

This is what I think. If you look at an image, all you need is the centre most area of it to understand what it is about. If the centre of the image is removed, it becomes really hard for us to understand what the image is about, whereas if the corners are removed and the centre is preserved, we can still figure out what the image was about. The above is ...


27

A common solution for table cells that are not available or applicable in certain situations (such as your %Δ for a budget of 0) is to use the placeholder text n/a (or N/A).


24

It is a kind of a design. People basically got bored from the squared ones, so I believe twitter came up with the round ones and then people found them attractive and not boring anymore. Reference: On the flip side, because this shape is so common it can sometimes be seen as boring or plain. Also, on the other flip side when the community gets bored ...


24

I would disable but add a count-down timer or some kind of indication that they will be able to close the ad at some point. YouTube has done this well with their "skip ad" countdown: This gives positive feedback that acknowledges that you have taken away control from the user (which they do not like) but that you'll give it back really soon. I would ...


23

There are a number of other ways you can look at as well The walk-through approach : The walk-through approach walks your users through the app like how Google does it. Its also called the joyriding approach. To quote this article The “joyriding” approach walks the user through the features of an app or highlights the key features. It’s great ...


16

Compare reading patterns. They are based on Gestalt principle of proximity. It's better to slightly re-organize months, i.e. your second choice.


16

There are couple of user bases to consider here. The hacker who is genuinely trying to hack your site by doing some kind of script injection or by trying to make your site run some malicious JavaScript The clueless newbie who is not sure what goes into a form or who just migrated from an old system where he used to enter search queries to retrieve data ...


16

One approach that tackles the problem, perhaps counterintuitively, is to use a slider. The user actually has infinite (or near-infinite) granularity, but without having to make an agonizing decision between 7 and 8. Visually, this option is very simple, as there is only a single line with a single button. If you absolutely need the data to be on an 11-point ...


15

I would ordinarily not offer an opinion here (as I am just barely worthy to read this site), but I would remind everyone that while the vast majority of users are sighted, introducing sounds can interfere with visually impaired users. If you do add sound (which I think is an excellent idea), please make sure that you include a way for those with difficulties ...


13

Following the great work of Anders Taxboe who has categorized different types of UI elements in a classification which is easy to understand and easy to follow. At the very highest level he uses the following labels. It may look odd in the beginning, but going through each category, it makes the UI Design World quite understandable: Reference: UI ...


12

You can't plant a tree in Australia while in France. What you are asking here is the same as asking: I have two rooms on two different floors; Only one room has a telephone installed; How can I make the telephone ring in the other room. In other words: A web app functionality is limited to the scope in which it is implemented (the browser). You have ...


12

Google hangout has the same requirement as your application. You cannot do two hangouts at the same time. Yet Google does not shock the user by disconnecting the first call when a second call is attempted. Instead, you see an error message in the second call's window. Why don't you try the same approach?


12

You could use an exclamation mark icon that shows a tooltip on hover to explain exactly, what it means and what is missing / what value is bad: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


12

To avoid the "somewhere in the middle"-answers one could also use a four point scale, which makes responses more accurate on for-votes and against-votes. This is especially useful if you want to make it very clear if users like or dislike a statement. While survey research scales may range from two to ten points or more, researchers have generally ...


11

No, don't do such a thing automatically. It goes against two very important principles of usability: don't surprise the user, and let the user feel in control. Typing in a different language is a problem users have to solve in many situations. Therefore, everybody who has to type in a second language has already chosen an application-independent solution ...


11

Although it has become quite common that overlays close on an outside click, it brings some usability flaws if you don't offer the close button: Users that are new to the internet might be confused or feel lost when they can't find the close button (my mother, for example) On (some android (?)) tablets, these overlays still don‘t seem to work really well, ...


11

You might consider having a word with the users and ask what they think they should see, though be careful, their initial reaction might be 'zero', which is DEFINITELY not right in any mathematical sense. I personally would leave the output blank, or perhaps use the term 'undefined'. If they really want to see a symbol, then I think you could safely put the ...


9

Sound effects are a type of attraction to the user, true. But take care of the following things while implementing sound: The sound should be pleasant, which means it should not be annoying or irritating. Different people have different preferences. Be aware of that. People working working at offices prefer silence. If a user opens your website and a sound ...


8

It's probably not necessary, that is becoming more and more of a standard for overlays. But if it does become a problem with users, it won't hurt to put a little 'x' in the top right corner - it's out of the way and everyone understands that is close.


7

In general, "dashboards" that consist of lots of visual charts/graphs/dials/gauges: are something management LOVES are rarely all that useful At most, I'd suggest looking at color as a strong indicator of status. At least that has some typical relevance (uh oh, it's red! Who do I yell at!?) Beyond that, though, stick with communicating data rather than ...


7

I like both ideas, although I'm leaning more towards the second design because it better illustrates the idea of fullness (of schedule) which is what you're trying to convey. In the first design, the days with more tasks are more prominent than the ones with less tasks, which is the opposite of what the user is going to be looking for (less busy days). If ...


7

While a good color scheme will help the key thing to note here is contrast for enhanced readability. To quote this article from eyemagzine Light grey text on a white background and small text size both lead to an increased orbicularis oculi activity and decreased blinking. These two conditions are related to text quality, and we would expect to ...


7

This is how I would try and do it.. I would also color code the numbers so that if you have a good mark it's green, but if you aren't doing so well then it would be orange like this... You could just do something in your code like if (PERCENTAGE <= 30) { makeColorOrange(); } if (PERCENTAGE > 30 || PERCENTAGE < 50) { makeColorYellow(); } else ...


7

A stacked group with the face of the last submitter is what I would consider. With the ability to expand the stack and see all involved.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible