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70

There's an easy way to approach user-select: none, and that is to ask a single question: Would selecting the text be the primary/secondary interaction a user would intend if touching the screen there, or would it be a hindrance to the task they were trying to carry out? Image Carousels (love them or hate them) are a fantastic example of this. In a touch ...


61

In general, you shouldn't use it globally. Oftentimes, users select some text, maybe to highlight something to show a part of the text to a friend, to copy text or to mark the text just to be able to read it better (which I do when the text is pretty wide and it's hard to follow the text wrap in the sentence). However, there are really good examples where ...


53

Neither. Settings are different from questions. This may seem obvious, but it drives a difference in UX design. Yes and No may be reasonable answers to a question: Are you a muggle? Yes / No However, in your case you are really asking the user to make a setting. For settings, don't make the user think too much: Describe what the radio button does ...


30

Issues You are right about the use of color. Users are unlikely to remember what it means if you have 8 states. It also creates problems for color blind users. Using a legend is not great because it forces the eye to dart around the screen. It also doesn't solve the color blind issue. 300 items will be difficult to navigate, so careful cell design ...


28

The first problem with having multiple 404 pages, each dedicated to a particular area is that you assume users were in the right part of the website at the point when they fell on to the 404. Bearing in mind that many links come from search engines and not necessarily from within the website, then I don't think you can guarantee that a dedicated 404 is ...


25

There are such people as "selection readers". I am one of them. I (for some reason consciously unknown to me) have a tendency to select text while I'm reading it. Sites that stop me from doing so make me very sad and mess up my user experience. I also completely disagree with the point in what is currently the top answer. Those things that pop up whenever ...


24

It's good to keep buttons in the same place. Here is a use case that could be pretty common. Let's say a user wants to just quickly glance at the additional information for the meeting. It's easier for the user to put the mouse in one location and click to expand (and retract), as opposed to clicking, expanding, moving the mouse to the new button location, ...


14

BURGER VS GRID - same or different context? I think the burger and the grid generally have different meanings, though they're not formalized anywhere yet (at least, it's not widely known like ISO or W3 standards). The burger menu usually is more about navigating content within a context. You're on a website and navigate to different subsections of the ...


13

Edit People should read this article about the hamburger menu. I rest my case: the hamburger menu does NOT work. Big companies like Facebook and NBC have found it to be true and they've changed from burger navicon to a TAB BAR, a tab bar with icons + words seems to give the best conversion rates. My example of Facebook was not nonsense, they did change ...


12

Not being able to select text is the most annoying anti user-friendly css property there is right now in modern websites. Reasons: Lets not try to act as if our website is something it isn't. It's not a mobile app and the reason you cannot select text in an application is because it is not inside a text-box and therefor is not supposed to be selected for ...


11

Proper feedback is one of the most important parts of creating good, intuitive UX. Leaving it be would provide very little feedback and may cause confusion among your users. From my experience in UX testing, the majority of users don't retain the information presented on many "one time" notifications, so its likely that this won't be the most successful ...


11

Treat a 404 page like an error message, which it basically is. A good error message offers the users way to overcome the problem. In your example, a 404 for meetings could offer possible matches for meetings, a 404 for recordings could offer recordings, and the same for documents. The possible solutions are different for each type of entity, and the reasons ...


11

Map of the manufacturing site You could consider having a map of the manufacturing site with location of machines: This will help provide context and streamline the process of operating the machines. Below is just an example ( limited number of machines). If you want to scale things up you can user architectural plans with more graphical emphasis. ...


11

Saying 'a user will get used to it' is really a design excuse: people may not be willing to take the chance of just clicking on your icon to see what happens. Not used these apps, but Google Ventures uses a good technique where the labels for the icons are shown onMouseOver. I'd recommend that as a good way to teach people what your icons mean without the ...


10

The focus state should be more obvious than the hover state A mouse over or :hover state is a more direct interaction (i.e. the user is controlling the mouse cursor directly over the button they want to click) The :focus state, on the other hand, requires a separate scan of the entire page in order to determine which component is currently being targeted. ...


10

You should (although it may be hidden in some scenarios). There are two things to consider: Mobile first You are basing your design on the current presentation - that's a reasonable thing to do, so long you remember that the presentation might change on other devices, like, say, a mobile phone. On a mobile phone the tabs may be collapsed under a menu, in ...


10

As you mentioned if the option B doesn't include the question I would go with A) because the question is simply enough to admit a Yes/No answer, plus the explanation next to the option is the expected and not something that really needs to be cleared before the user accept, the question already states the final consequence. Also you could use an alternative ...


8

There are many contexts in which it is good UX, and many where it is bad UX - there's no one-size-fits all answer. As you flag in your question a button or action that when clicked highlights the text isn't good UX, and there are likely to be very few circumstances when a user should need to highlight that text. However bodies of text shouldn't be disabled ...


6

For text, it's because of how many words/characters per line are comfortable to read - much research has been done and many blogs written... For images (think Facebook), if they were wider, they would get higher as well and you couldn't see much content without scrolling. I believe multi-column designs have been tried, users didn't know how to navigate ...


6

Material design provides the following benefits for web apps: It is a comprehensive UX + style framework, so it can speed up both design and development. It promotes responsive, multi-client user interfaces, in the sense that keyboard + mouse is a first class input method alongside touch and voice. So if you need your web app to work with mobile/tablets ...


5

Usability shouldn't be looked at in terms of 'will it be acceptable to do x', if you know doing something is bad and you're looking for excuses to do it then you really shouldn't be doing it. Usability should be approached in terms of 'what advantages does doing x have?'. Disabling the back button...what does it give you? I am struggling to think of any ...


5

If you want a logical way to display it, I'll go trough that And by the way, care about typo size if you go responsive, that's quite low here.


5

It's best not to reload during a signup process, but sometimes it can't be avoided. There are many signup processes for even very mature sites (e.g. gmail, ebay, etc) which involve page reloads. What issues need to be addressed? Page loads create cognitive disruption to users. While you're filling in a form, the page becomes your universe so a reload ...


5

well, roundness of buttons comes from the Contour Bias concept: Contour Bias is a well-studied theory that shows that humans prefer rounded objects and choices over angled ones. The more angled, the more that human brains reacted with activity in the brain associated with fear and flight. in theory, your 50% rounded button should work better, and ...


4

Add an info icon next to the name and display a popup, on hover or click, to display any extra information. Scott


4

Between those options I would suggest radio buttons, since you only want to allow for a single selection. O - At or Over Retirement Age O - Under Retirement Age O - Both If you use check boxes, people may wind up checking the top 2 instead of/in addition to "both".


4

I designed a 404 page sometime back with a function you might find interesting. it was using a recommendation engine module suggesting products the user might like and what they previously viewed. not sure what kind of website you are asking this in context to, but a golden rule i stick to is never to bring the user to a dead end.


4

You need to better understand the current user journey and identify main user pain points. testing and feedback from users could provide an initial point of reference here. Determine the severity of these pain points and their scale ( who is impacted and how. This will help you create an improved user journey with those users who suffer the most in mind. ...


4

Honestly, as long as your :hover state & :focus state are very clearly showing exactly which item will have action the taken on it, I can't see any reason to style them separately. :focus is essentially a keyboard hover. The previous answer is correct in saying that a :focus element should contain a box around it, but as long as the outline property ...


4

Text label The text label has the advantage over an icon as being more easily understood. That is, if the copy is clear enough. You can be quite sure what action will trigger when you press 'Settings' for example. Icon But icons on the other hand, can be very ambiguous. A 'wrench' for example could mean all kinds of things 'Building tools', 'Settings', ...



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