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11

Saying 'a user will get used to it' is really a design excuse: people may not be willing to take the chance of just clicking on your icon to see what happens. Not used these apps, but Google Ventures uses a good technique where the labels for the icons are shown onMouseOver. I'd recommend that as a good way to teach people what your icons mean without the ...


5

well, roundness of buttons comes from the Contour Bias concept: Contour Bias is a well-studied theory that shows that humans prefer rounded objects and choices over angled ones. The more angled, the more that human brains reacted with activity in the brain associated with fear and flight. in theory, your 50% rounded button should work better, and ...


4

Text label The text label has the advantage over an icon as being more easily understood. That is, if the copy is clear enough. You can be quite sure what action will trigger when you press 'Settings' for example. Icon But icons on the other hand, can be very ambiguous. A 'wrench' for example could mean all kinds of things 'Building tools', 'Settings', ...


3

It depends on the icons & the functionality Like with any icons that don't have labels, it can work really well if all the icons are super transparent. Good all-time examples are Add, Search, Settings, Menu, or Home. As the functionality gets more complicated, usability problems might arise. Hover captions might help with that, but keep in mind they're ...


3

The four Divs on your homepage could be treated as Cards. By popular convention, you can create an action panel underneath your card and include buttons or links for actions such as "more details" or "share". download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

From a technical standpoint, you'd use javascript: onbeforeunload When they close the window, first prompt them to check in (or discard) their checkout. From a UX standpoint, I'd strongly argue that you never check in automatically. Check in should always be a user-triggered event. There's just no way to know if they forgot vs. they abandoned it. If you ...


2

If I was the user, I would expect to get presented with a create game screen, if I stay on that screen for 5 seconds or 5 days it shouldn't matter, when I press the create game button it should be respected and the game actually created. However, if I leave the create game screen and try to go back, it should check for games again before presenting me the ...


2

I believe that this is well covered by the Forgiving Format pattern. In a nutshell, it says that various dividers and separators might make it easier for a user to read the number and to double-check that the number is indeed correct, but the input field must be smart enough to also accept it without dividers, or with different types of dividers - dots, ...


1

Solve the problem with a dialog Here's how it could work: you run a check for available games once again, when the user clicks the "Submit" button — no matter how long it took him to fill in the form. If at that point there's another game available, you present him with a dialog: "Meanwhile, another game has become available. Would you like to join it?" ...


1

Thinks will go wrong; users will go on holiday; computers with crush; users will die (or just get a new job). Therefore anther user MUST be able to do their work when an item is left checked out. So there must be a way to get a checkout undone. This could be by having an “admin” user with the power to undo checkouts, or by allow any user to undo a ...


1

Leaving it checked out to the user sounds an acceptable solution if there may be a reason they left it checked out. One option could be to give any user the ability to unlock files but stress that the user that has it checked out would lose any changes by doing so. Another option would be for users to flag that they want something unlocked, this then ...


1

The grid sounds like the safest thing to do. What you have there is quite fine and I have seen it in a lot of applications, so I won't give you suggestions for that. I will instead provide you with some more daring alternatives that cross into the realm of data visualization. The data you have there involves factories, products and resources. I don't know ...


1

Parallelism between your platforms is a valuable thing. It helps you in your design process, makes documentation easier, helps users move from one platform to the other, and may increase your sales. It sounds like your desktop "where am I" doesn't function automatically as it does for your mobile app. If it's easy to upgrade your desktop functionality to ...


1

These comments about modal dialogs "interrupting workflow" are silly and naive. If you build your parent screen and modal dialogs as symbiotic parts of the overall task process, there is no interruption. All complex operations have to be broken down into steps or "consumable chunks of task" no matter how you build the design for simplicity. Modals work ...



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