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5

If it were me, and we're only talking about images, I would start with a file size limit in the 2.5MB - 3MB range and see how well that goes. My basis for this size range is: the most popular smartphone models will take photos in the 2MB - 3.5MB range taking photos of receipts and/or certificates will result in less data than your typical family or ...


4

Assuming that you are targeting Android and iOS devices, you should try to use icons that are already known to users and popular among the Android/iOS ecosystem. For web, you could use Material Design Lite or Polymer to do the same. You can see a list of icons following Material Design for Android here. Now, if you have any icon that is not accurately ...


3

The following are guidelines that I typically use when making this decision. Tables are good when comparing data points across records/sorting/filtering. Use a table display when: it is important to be able to visually compare values from several different records (e.g. which address records are from Spain, order records by users' last name) you'd like ...


2

We're running a web application and are coming across the same question. Here are some considerations: There is a cost to storing larger files (disk space on a cloud repository or having to move to a larger physical server). That cost may be outweighed by the time spent addressing complaints by users (particularly novice or elderly users) who may have ...


2

There's a very good read from Aurora Bedford on icon usability: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/icon-usability/ and there's a section arguing that "icons need a text label": To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all icons face, a text label must be present alongside an icon to clarify its meaning in that particular context. (And even if you’re ...


2

I've asked Your questions to our lead ux tester and she answered the next: That is a very good idea - and also proved to be useful - to let the user turn on textual controls or function titles alongside icons on their wish and that is even better when this 'help' switch is available on every page consistently at the same place - but if You put it ...


2

This seems like a case where you could employ progressive disclosure to hide some of the elements until they're needed. For instance, you could hide the filter controls by default, revealing them when users make the decision to "filter." (Usually that decision is represented by a button or dropdown control.) download bmml source – Wireframes ...


2

You could try an 'affordance', which is more like a bucket fill type indicator. Something that indicates approximately, by a visual mark, of how filled the archive cabinet could be. Check the Attachment 1 for a quick mockup. Now, somethings to note are: 1) Since as you rightly said, archive holds unimportant things. Hence its not super important to the user ...


1

You might do two versions and A/B test them to compare the user reception and content results. One with confirmation checkbox (additional step) that blocks the 'Submit' action. Second one could be sth simplified, like this: It's clear call to action and should raise the awareness of the newcomer but would not block the flow of the frequent user.


1

The best solution is typically option 3. Say the screen holds roughly 10 items, on page load send out the request for those 10 items and the 10 items immediately proceeding them (20 total). Then when the user scrolls past your first 10 items send the request for the third set of 10 items and load those in. This way the user will always have a buffer as they ...


1

I'm not normally an advocate for browser sniffing but this is one case where it may be highly useful. If you sniff out the browser (say Safari on iOS) you can display a message positioned correctly and give a directional arrow to indicate that the user can add to their home screen. Now doing this all the time and blocking part of the precious Real estate ...


1

You could add a suggestion for the user to pin the tab to the left most side of the browser. I believe there's an option on Chrome to do this. Now, as a web app developer, if the audio in your app cuts out if the user switches tabs, it is not intended behaviour, since tabs are meant to exist to multi-task. If this is a limitation by the browser itself, try ...


1

You're overthinking this problem. It's one thing if you're forced to decide between a 5MB or 5GB limit, it's another when it's between 10MB or 20MB. The truth is, storing static files is extremely cheap nowadays. If it's costing you a lot of money, you're likely doing it wrong. Don't get me wrong, this is a question I've asked myself numerous times, only ...


1

I'm sorry but icons simply aren't the primary content here. Icons are nice. Labels are good. Good labels are critical. If there are so many buttons or controls that it's a struggle to include the accompanying text, then it's the structure of the layout that's at fault not the inclusion of the labels. Take a step back. Lets say the labels are non negotiable ...


1

I think you should go with help-mode switch because a lot of users are going to use it when they get lost and more advance users would understand the icons as longest is good iconography. Don't rely in first screen tutorials because it is been prove people skip those all the time. no matter how many animations you add they don't work trust me Force touch ...


1

I can relate this to how Windows shows/manages wi-fi connections. How about showing it like this:


1

Try to stick with the mobile-os standards. On Android, long-pressing an ActionBar/Toolbar icon will show the label as a small pop-up in every app that uses the default ActionBar/Toolbar. I can't speak for iOS, but most apps on iOS i know use a permanently visible label below the icon. Please do not try to create a layout that fits different OS's if you want ...


1

If you need more space to show labels for the actions then I think it would be best to have less actions visible at one time and give them each enough space. This would mean being very clever in two ways Knowing what actions the user is most likely going to use to have them visible (this might be different for different users, and might even change over ...


1

One solution would be to add undo buttons to every action. That way, users would become comfortable experimenting, with pushing buttons they don't fully understand. Once they tap something, the app would demonstrate the effects of that action, and give the user a better understanding than any tooltip would. At that point, if the button did what they want, ...



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