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4

It's best not to reload during a signup process, but sometimes it can't be avoided. There are many signup processes for even very mature sites (e.g. gmail, ebay, etc) which involve page reloads. What issues need to be addressed? Page loads create cognitive disruption to users. While you're filling in a form, the page becomes your universe so a reload ...


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Material design provides the following benefits for web apps: It is a comprehensive UX + style framework, so it can speed up both design and development. It promotes responsive, multi-client user interfaces, in the sense that keyboard + mouse is a first class input method alongside touch and voice. So if you need your web app to work with mobile/tablets ...


3

Yes. The terms you're looking for are: Lazy loading images. This refers to the technique of loading images after the initial page load, to improve the perception of speed. Image placeholders are the block elements you refer to which represent the images while they're being loaded. This technique is occasionally referred to as 'greeking' but that's an ...


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The trust is not built at the logi form but before! It takes into account the presentation of content, footer of your site and some associations verifying the authenticity. Depends on business you are operating, one of the biggest trust building factor can be simple login form with links to your public domain content. Like contact details with real address. ...


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Smashing Magazine published an article on mobile wayfinding that I think is pretty helpful: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/10/13/wayfinding-for-the-mobile-web/ None of those solutions are wrong, but given the choice, I'd probably use the "nested doll" approach as my starting point. It's a familiar pattern on both iOS and Android and would eliminate ...


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There's a comprehensive topic on this here: Fluid Video With regards to the right and wrongs of UX/UI, my opinion would be the needs of the video to be shown to the user and how visible it would be in an extremely small view port.


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I would recommend sticking with Bootstrap as it is more design-agnostic. Use it as a starting point framework and build it to your design specification. Material Design is strong in it's statement about how everything should look, feel, and work. This is great for google to create consistency across it's products but likely not a fit for you unless you want ...


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I would suggest looking into a few of these design guides. Googles Material Design: http://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html Bootstrap: http://getbootstrap.com/ Either one is going to give you 'clean' web ready out of the box.


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Forget about CRUD This answer may help explain why CRUD is helpful as a programming pattern but not very helpful as a UX pattern: Form design for CRUD actions Page titles are useful for: Informing (or reminding) users about the purpose of the page. Providing users with an orientation of where they are in the application/site. Providing an entry point ...


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My advice is: test it. "New {object name}" is a quite standard structure, but it's not necessarily the best option. As always, the answer depends on many factors (e.g. context, type of user, conventions, etc.).


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A1, B1, C1. But shouldn't the keyboard be flipped vertically? Here's what I would expect to see serving the purpose, without further knowledge of your usage... Too, I would expect a Back button.


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If you think about the purpose of a wizard, it is really there to ensure that the user is able to complete a complex workflow accurately without missing any crucial steps. This fine if the process is does not need to be carried out frequently, and that there are not a lot of other irrelevant or optional steps involved. If you create a wizard that contains ...


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The correct Information Architecture term is a multi-dimensional hierarchy. Common websites that have that kind of structure are webshops (or Wikipedia). Search Webshops all rely heavily on the search functionality. I don't know if a search functionality is possible or useful within your web application, but it might provide the users with a fast way to ...


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One significant consideration is that scrollbars are typically hidden in Mac OS X. So, for example, you may want to provide additional hints to the users for views that are scrollable. Another consideration is the availability of smart-zoom in Safari web browser. Your testing should include ensuring the correct positioning of elements when users perform the ...


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One of the major problems with online form design is that many of us try to simulate a printed form, assuming it is effective because it is familiar to the customer. As I'm sure you are aware, Luke Wroblewski has done some excellent research on online form design (Link to one of his articles is here: http://static.lukew.com/webforms_lukew.pdf) Even though ...


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Check box lists would be the answer; based on Microsoft guideline for desktop app which you could use it for web app somehow: Standard multiple-selection lists have exactly the same appearance as single-selection lists, so there is no visual clue that a list box supports multiple selection. Because users have to discover this ability, this list pattern is ...



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