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59

You could try to use a short description of the actual cause, e.g. no budget


39

10 seems quite a wide range for what is essentially a 'do I like this' poll. Does it really make a difference if Fifteen people rate Availability at 7 and Thirty people rate it at 8? I'm not sure you really need that much accuracy in such a subjective poll. Why not use a standard 5-point Likert scale? (Image from the Wikipedia article.)


27

A common solution for table cells that are not available or applicable in certain situations (such as your %Δ for a budget of 0) is to use the placeholder text n/a (or N/A).


16

One approach that tackles the problem, perhaps counterintuitively, is to use a slider. The user actually has infinite (or near-infinite) granularity, but without having to make an agonizing decision between 7 and 8. Visually, this option is very simple, as there is only a single line with a single button. If you absolutely need the data to be on an 11-point ...


12

You could use an exclamation mark icon that shows a tooltip on hover to explain exactly, what it means and what is missing / what value is bad: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


12

To avoid the "somewhere in the middle"-answers one could also use a four point scale, which makes responses more accurate on for-votes and against-votes. This is especially useful if you want to make it very clear if users like or dislike a statement. While survey research scales may range from two to ten points or more, researchers have generally ...


10

You might consider having a word with the users and ask what they think they should see, though be careful, their initial reaction might be 'zero', which is DEFINITELY not right in any mathematical sense. I personally would leave the output blank, or perhaps use the term 'undefined'. If they really want to see a symbol, then I think you could safely put the ...


7

Sparling and Sen did research on rating systems titled "Rating: How Difficult is It?" trying to answer the question of how to choose the right scale (Like [unary], Thumbs Up/Down [binary], 5 Stars, Slider 100 points). You have to weigh the time it takes for each scale to be understood, interacted with, and then satisfaction. Really great paper. In short, ...


6

The first thing that comes to mind for me is the little inline arrows you see in stock tickers. The arrow indicates whether the actual value is above or below the forecast, and you can still use a gradient from yellow to red to indicate how far away the actual value is from the forecast.


6

Most spreadsheets (OpenOffice Calc, Microsoft Office Excel, and Google Spreadsheet) will handle these cases displaying a non-blocking error akin to "division by zero": I think this is the best behaviour, because it does fill the field with something meaningful to the user, but at the same time it doesn't "stand out" too much and compromise the overall ...


5

If you do want the granularity of a 10-point scale, have you considered using half stars? This gives the compactness of having 5 options, with the granularity of 10.


5

The arrow idea is quite nice, but it gives a direction, which isn't really relevant to your use case. Since you only care about where the value is, not the direction it has moved. What about a simple icon with a midpoint and a dot? You can colour them or leave them black.


4

Agreed with Rumi - use your current window. As far as I see it there are two basic solutions you could use: live preview or preview on request. Live preview With this, you have a permanent preview pane in your window, preferably above the fold or at least in the same area as the edit pane. Whenever the user makes a change in the fom you live-update the ...


4

There is no reason to open it somewhere else. Your window is an endless canvas, open it there. This also probably solves the users' problem much better: they want the information on paycheck to be present while editing salary, but having to switch to a new window, commit the needed information to working memory and come back to the original editing window is ...


4

You need to consider the form-factor the users will be using and also avoid latency between questions. Displaying sequentially can reduce the "clutter" and would work better in many situations such as smaller screens, but should be done dynamically client side if possible to get near instant transitions. Loading new content from the server on every press ...


3

From a user perspective, I would prefer a blank cell, if it is clear that this cell is computed by dividing Budget by actual. Background: Adding a long text adds a lot of noise to the grid, especially when no budgets are frequent. You might add a tooltip like excels blue green info mark, which shows "could not be computed, because the budget is zero"), but ...


3

I've designed both formats of quiz. Which one is better depends on the situation. Both formats tend to be equally doable from a technical standpoint. Situations where I've found all questions on one page to be better: When the user is allowed to answer the questions in any order When information from one question helps the user answer another question ...


2

Like in accounting, red may more closely signify negative. Consider using shades of black for positive and shades of red for negative. This has worked well in my reporting for relaying the information to the user. See how this sheet visually communicates through these colors... User Experience Reading List - 2013 v.3 Of course you don't want there to ...


2

Either: Give a cause - a couple of words stating why the calculation cannot be made. Use an error string - as other have mentioned, take examples from Google sheets and Excel. Check the result - when you do the calculation, if the result is NaN or Infinity, display N/A instead. Add a help link - a small '(why?)' or '(learn more)' next to the error that ...


2

It hasn't as much got something to do with whether "people like it or not". It's not a "certain percentage that likes it" or doesn't. It's about location awareness. By jumping to the content instantly, it might as well be a really quickly loaded new page. The user wouldn't know the difference. By scrolling slowly to the bottom of the page you show that, ...


1

Depending on the questions asked, rating values can become quite burdensome in terms of cognitive load. When the user is asked to rate a property of your system, they are generally not asked for a precise measure, but an estimate or a perceived value. Can you always confidently tell the difference between something rated 2/10 and 3/10? What about 7/10 and ...


1

You must have a clearly marked exit (Jakob Nielsen - Usability Engineering). You should have two buttons labeled "OK" and "Cancel". Do NOT add an "X", to avoid confusion.


1

I would use some small-styled text saying "DIV0" or "INF" / "∞", in a gray shaded box background with some negative space around that. It should look like an icon to show it's not a typed or calculated value like the rest. But the message can still be read clearly so that the relevance of the problem is apparent without having to understand some generic ...


1

Just because the medium changes doesn't mean visual balance no longer applies. Because web apps are in a browser and browser sizes vary depending on the user, it is a bit different when comparing it to print media, where the designer knows explicitly the dimensions of the final product. Design is not an exact science, but setting appropriate css rules with ...


1

The best approach is to support both leave the decision as an option to the test writer. Some teachers prefer one over the other. Some teachers also may want to control whether or not the student can navigate to previous questions.


1

Pimcore CMS has an example how to solve this. Instead of opening the preview of a page into a new browser tab or window, it has it's own tab (it's build on ExtJs) where the page is loaded into an iFrame (see the image). I doubt users use this very often though, in edit mode the page is already shown as a "real page" but with inputs and drag and drop stuff. I ...


1

I think given the description, you are probably better off adding some filtering/sort function to the header row of the table and using them to return a result set. This probably gives you the most flexibility and you can customize the behaviour to more specific use cases. So for example, if you were trying to search for a name (it can be first or last name ...


1

One book I'm going through now is Interactive Design by Andy Pratt & Jason Nunes. It focuses on UX in general, but introduces you to UX practices and methods through real-life examples, which in turn gets you thinking about how to consider it in your own application. It covers some design principles, such as Affordance" and gives concrete examples of ...


1

Unless users should be allowed to arbitrarily create new codes through the same interface you'll want the interface to provide the available codes to the user, either a full list of all available codes or through a full or partial auto-complete functionality (like assigning tags to questions here in the stack exchange.) Unless there is need for extended ...


1

Your example solution requires the admin to remember a list of relevant codes & what they mean/who they are linked to. I don't know about your specific users, but most people are not very good at recalling number codes. If the list of code is short enough, consider displaying a table of these code. download bmml source – Wireframes created ...



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