Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

It's good to keep buttons in the same place. Here is a use case that could be pretty common. Let's say a user wants to just quickly glance at the additional information for the meeting. It's easier for the user to put the mouse in one location and click to expand (and retract), as opposed to clicking, expanding, moving the mouse to the new button location, ...


8

The focus state should be more obvious than the hover state A mouse over or :hover state is a more direct interaction (i.e. the user is controlling the mouse cursor directly over the button they want to click) The :focus state, on the other hand, requires a separate scan of the entire page in order to determine which component is currently being targeted. ...


5

If you want a logical way to display it, I'll go trough that And by the way, care about typo size if you go responsive, that's quite low here.


3

Honestly, as long as your :hover state & :focus state are very clearly showing exactly which item will have action the taken on it, I can't see any reason to style them separately. :focus is essentially a keyboard hover. The previous answer is correct in saying that a :focus element should contain a box around it, but as long as the outline property ...


2

It sounds like what you are doing is probably the best thing you can do given the situation. Just show it as soon as you can and hope it isn't one of the crappy slow pages. You have to show something in 1 second or less and I would say a light colored static text is sufficient. Loading table of contents...


2

You're running into a common problem with displaying content when there isn't yet a lot of content. However, it's less of a problem being a corporate site as you don't have as much risk of losing your customer. If you approach the problem from a utility perspective, and ask yourself what will make the page / site more efficient for a user, I think you'll ...


1

This has been well implemented on a few sites by showing the original text, and the offering a button to translate the text with a well chosen icon (typically a globe). Once translated, there should be a button to "untranslate" the text as well. Here's an example of the buttons: This usually is done using the Google Translate API, but I'm sure there ...


1

Your best bet is to start collecting data. If you can observe actual users, great. If not, simulate this using hallway testing. Go to somebody in your office with a single monitor. See how they perform the task. Now try the same with people with multiple monitor setup. Do you see any difference in their workflow? How different is single vs dual monitors? ...


1

Microsoft's Ribbons are an interesting example. In Office 2013, there's a button at the bottom of the ribbon to close it (A), and no button to bring it back immediately (there is a button next to the minimize button that opens a menu to select how the ribbon should behave however). Instead. you need to click one of the tabs to temporarily open the ribbon, ...


1

In general you don't want your controls to move. All generalities in UX are subject to the specific context and workflow of the user, but it's a good baseline. Digging a little deeper into the reasoning behind hiding the information, you need to consider the user looking at this screen. The information hidden within the collapsable area doesn't seem ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible