New answers tagged

1

How about: Formatting SD card will erase existing data. Continue with erasure?


1

Add another paragraph after the warning that your data may not be retrievable: Warning: formatting is not an authorized method of destroying classified or confidential data such as old passwords, naughty photos, or your credit card number. (What would I recommend? (a) contact a reputable data destruction service, (b) read the government standards for ...


2

The question is not so much about what the OS is doing, as clarifying the assumptions that naive users are making about what the OS is doing. How about ... Formatting this card will allow it to be used for new data storage. Assume you will not be able to recover your old data. Assume that any bad guy that gets this card will be able to recover your old ...


4

Maybe the UX should go in a completely different direction here. Starting with some (always dangerous) assumptions about context: The majority of users landing on this bit of UI are here because they want to re-use the SD card on the same device. They have no intention of removing the SD card, or sharing it with anyone. And many of those users actually ...


1

I think the message is fine. It's not about giving people all the information, or even all the options. Formatting SD card will delete all data on this specific card Serial Number XXXXXXXXX. Data cannot be easily recovered, but may be recovered using some tools with an unknown degree of success depending on how many sectors of this device are altered ...


5

I know the question is about the text, but in addition to others responses, consider that user don't always read what you have written and can click on a single button as a habit/reflex. Consider adding 2 buttons with exact same formatting to force them process the information


5

I would suggest "Data will likely be unrecoverable" as having a clear meaning that is unlikely to materially mislead anyone. While it is true that the likelihood of data being truly unrecoverable if nothing is done with the cartridge following the format might not be as high as the adverb "likely" would suggest, few if any users will care about the odds in ...


1

I wouldn't add Data cannot be recovered I would add it only in the case of a full erase (in case you have the option available to your users). An other issue is with Continue ? I believe you than give "Yes" and "No" as choices to your users ? If you do, it probably isn't the best practice as it forces the user to read the whole message to know ...


28

I see no problem with the message that other suggestions completely solve. Formatting SD card will delete all data. Data cannot be recovered. Continue? Data cannot be recovered gives a very good sense of urgency, and speaks well to the target audience who at this juncture needs to know the likely worst case scenario. Even though the data can be ...


14

Really good question. I've thought about this inaccuracy (although in a security, not UX context) and had to explain to several colleagues that most "delete" options (yes, even formatting a drive) are not secure and that the data is quite often recoverable. I have never found it difficult, nor has anyone failed to understand, that the way to think about ...


122

"Recovered" is a poor choice of words here. All that app is trying to do is warn people that the action is not reversible and they can't simply hit cancel or undo and all their files will be returned. A better solution would be: Formatting SD card will delete all data. This action cannot be undone. Continue? This is more direct to the point that you ...


0

Option #3, "a passive warning" would be good in that it does not get in the way of the user, however I would suggest not simply putting an easy-to-ignore text warning nearby. Put the warning where the danger is. Style the button itself: Include a warning sign icon (like this one from font awesome) Use ominous anchor text, like "Download code sample" Use ...


3

What if, similar to option 3, whenever a user first enters the download area, a modal window pops over and the background area is blurred/darkened so it is not accessible. The modal window could contain your warning message along with a prominent "I understand the risks" button which clears the warning window and grants the user full access to the download ...


0

The end user is a cyber security professional. 99% of times the end user is aware of the type of files they are about to download. I would not make their lifes harder by having them to click two times: download>continue. Idea with the checkbox not to repeat the question solves the problem of unnecessary two clicks, however you're loosing a chance to ...


8

There are two important things I could read through: 1) 99% users do not have trouble 2) Explicit warning message is needed So considering both cases, you could go with Option 4, but additionally have a check box in the modal pop-up, that could say "I am aware of this. Do not show me this warning next time" or something of the likes. A regular user could ...



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