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6

This is a common UX situation Most users 'self police' and do not need warnings or guidance. You have few heavy users who need to be [gently warned/dissuaded] to avoid waste or abuse. You have isolated cases of abusive users. This heavily skewed distribution of users is very common in lot of applications (cell phone usage, all you can eat buffets, ...


5

This is known as "microcopy" in the UX world. A couple of good resources include http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/06/17/five-ways-prevent-bad-microcopy/ Nielsen-Norman group has a number of articles and training conferences on writing for the web: http://www.nngroup.com/topic/writing-web/ One of the big problems with form fields and validation, ...


3

You need to find a general tone that is appropriate given your users and the level of risk you want to protect them from. The right tone will be the one that your users find appropriate. They might resent your not warning them enough if one of their actions results in a big loss for instance and they feel they would have proceeded differently, had they been ...


2

It's simple really. They are all alerts, dialogs, modals, etc. Warning is the type of the alert along with Error, Information, and many more.


2

You answered your own question! :) I think you should allow users to sign up without JavaScript. Users want an easy experience, they don't want to follow steps like how to enable JavaScript - they just want to sign up, do want they need to do and they're done. It's simply too much work to enable JavaScript. So I think the solution you gave in your answer ...


1

Given that the user cannot proceed unless he/she performs an action/set of actions, the use of a constant reminder is a good play. Also supporting your text content with icons is a good strategy that will assist those users who tend to skip text content. For the actual content, I would suggest be precise and to the point. An Example: In order to use our ...


1

Best way has fulfill two needs: Explain the user error Stop the error from occurring This is best done with an alert, typically. The language you use is up to you. I'd suggest something like "D'oh! You already have [taskname]" But be aware of the usability challenges associated with it. Does the alert offer a way to retain the data, meaning return to ...


1

As a general rule, you should avoid presenting users with lots of fields at once (all on one screen). It is daunting for a user to be faced with this (unless they are a call centre data entry employee or similar). You need to break the form up into small, manageable tasks that are presented in a logical order. When you break up the form there will be less ...


1

Just make them clear. Like "Please enter a phone number" for a missing required. Or "Please enter a valid phone number. The phone number you have entered is too short." Tell the user exactly what is required. It is also best to validate before submission with JavaScript and give them instant feedback. Show the error message right near the input field, and ...



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