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136

Yes. There is a very simple, effective heuristic that adjusts to the preference of each user. Place a check box in the warning message dialog that says: Don't show this message again Which can be improved further by stating where that dialog can be reenabled.


60

These are Confirmation messages - Windows have a fairly detailed page on their guidelines. The whole of that page is pretty useful but here's some excerpts (emphasis mine): Confirmations are most useful when the action requires the user to make a relevant and distinct choice that can't be made later. That choice often involves some element of risk that ...


27

I'm surprised nobody brought up the Mac OS X shut down dialog. It presents you with an "Are you sure?" window, but has a timer so that if the user walks away, expecting the computer to have shut down, it will while still allowing the user time to cancel.


14

There are 3 cases. The destructive action Do you want to delete this file? Don't. Just do the action, and display a confirmation snackbar (non-blocking small widget somewhere where it is visible but not in the way of operating) that allows to cancel (then, either delay the action, or make sure you can revert it easily). The question can only be ...


8

I'm a big proponent of not showing messages blocking users from doing what they intended to do. The UX solution with confirmation popups came from the Stone Age of computer UX practices. It originates from a correct assumption that if we have a critical resource, we should not let users damage it by an accident. However, an accident is called that way ...


7

This is a common UX situation Most users 'self police' and do not need warnings or guidance. You have few heavy users who need to be [gently warned/dissuaded] to avoid waste or abuse. You have isolated cases of abusive users. This heavily skewed distribution of users is very common in lot of applications (cell phone usage, all you can eat buffets, ...


2

As a UX designer, it's our job to help the user in accomplishing their task. I would recommend the approach of encouraging the user towards the more effective tool as oppose to discouraging them from using the other. Are the two machines always paired? If your machine can detect the pairing, you can consider redirecting or provide instructions for the user ...


2

It's simple really. They are all alerts, dialogs, modals, etc. Warning is the type of the alert along with Error, Information, and many more.


2

You may want to notify your users that this is a potential issue with their built-in browser pop-up blockers. For instance, Gmail uses this error message after a new window has failed to open: "Grrr! A popup blocker may be preventing the application from opening the page. If you have a popup blocker, try disabling it to open the window." If you include ...


1

Cost-effective structural integrity The full depth step provides the hinge point for both sides of the ladder as well as rigidity to prevent twisting at those hinges when the user approaches the top. The only type of brace that would provide the same rigidity would require cross braces and could still function as a step for those determined to hurt ...


1

Given that the user cannot proceed unless he/she performs an action/set of actions, the use of a constant reminder is a good play. Also supporting your text content with icons is a good strategy that will assist those users who tend to skip text content. For the actual content, I would suggest be precise and to the point. An Example: In order to use our ...


1

Best way has fulfill two needs: Explain the user error Stop the error from occurring This is best done with an alert, typically. The language you use is up to you. I'd suggest something like "D'oh! You already have [taskname]" But be aware of the usability challenges associated with it. Does the alert offer a way to retain the data, meaning return to ...



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