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12

Playing sounds can be useful when showing error messages, information dialog boxes etc. However... It is not the responsibility of your application to force the user to hear these sounds. This is something that must be configurable by the user, and since most operating systems already have such a configuration possibility, I see no added value in creating ...


7

You asked for an example of an implementation: Wordpress warns the user when it's likely they misspelled their email address. Like you said, this does feel like an error and not a 'soft error'. I agree with @Franchesca that you can use this, but should go for a less threatening color than red. But I wouldn't go for blue. I think orange is a better ...


5

The first question you should ask yourself is: How many users are woking with sound enabled? And how many of them are listening to music (surely with headphones)? I just asked around in my office (28 persons in my room), and only 4 of them have the sound enabled and each of them are listening to music. What I want to say: If we take the numbers of my quick ...


5

Playing a sound is useful when there's a chance that the user will miss the notification from the application. For example, Skype play a sound everytime you receive a message. Otherwise, there's also the flashy icon that helps the user to notice the message. So, in my opinion the best thing would be use both visual and sound notification. Remember also to ...


4

I don't see anything wrong with this in principle. Anything that helps the user avoid mistakes is good. If you avoid all the trappings of error messages, such as exclamation marks and red writing then this could work. Perhaps use a question mark and a more neutral colour (blue?). Just make sure that the validation you are using doesn't have too many false ...


3

You need to find a general tone that is appropriate given your users and the level of risk you want to protect them from. The right tone will be the one that your users find appropriate. They might resent your not warning them enough if one of their actions results in a big loss for instance and they feel they would have proceeded differently, had they been ...


3

In order to spur users to action, I would put the solution directly in their face. Tell them about heartbleed (in a calm manner) and offer them the option to change the password immediately. Why ask them to navigate all the way to wherever they can reset their password when you can bring the form to them. Wait for them to log in, and give them a simple ...


2

I would recommend playing a sound only when the user's attention is necessary. An example of that is the way Facebook makes a short beep when there's a new notification. A really compelling example of audio notification is the Podio collaboration tool, which make a pleasant and somewhat addictive "pop" sound when you receive a notification that someone in ...


2

We took the transparent approach and posted a notification inside our application for all administrators - we told them we WERE running the affected version of OpenSSL, we told them what we did, when we did it and why. We also told them there is no indication of anything untoward but due to the nature of Heartbleed this is expected though we did still spend ...


2

I see two options: Obfuscation, for example on Windows if you want to be able to mess with System Files you first need to know how to get a few menus deep and uncheck the box. (Which then also has a pop up almost identical to the one in your post.) A reset button, if it is possible for you to include a 'Reset to Default' then you could write a test that ...


1

If you should warn users is determined by your moral disposition on the subject and if it will work has too many variables such as the wording of the warning, the design and the frequency. As far as research, the most applicable would be split testing your users, in their environment with the definition of excessive use in relation to the users. With that ...


1

What level of security required is not a UX question. Rather it is a threat modelling exercise that will tell you how much you should demand the user changes their password. Once you have determined the degree of risk then what do you want to drive? A rational decision based on the risks. Users can do that providing they are not confused. Examples below ...


1

In my opinion, it shouldn't play a sound in this case because the user already have a visual feedback and it may be annoying for the user to hear a sound every time we close a document.I think that it should play a sound only if the user still don't understand (for example if he continues to click on the close button), or if the error can't be shown in a ...



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