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23

How about: not making the text flash, but the background. This will improve readability of the text itself. work with an "animation" so that the background does not flip on/off but gradually fades in and out.


21

What about reseting to the safe behavior after an appropriate interval? For example, cars have some features that you are allowed to leave 'on' across restarts, but others (e.g. cruise control, seat heaters) must be re-enabled every time you start the car. In your system you could re-enable the security measures when they log out, if they're really that ...


21

Annoying user experiences are broken user experiences, well intentioned or not. Why the struggle in the workflow? Why do the users (think they need to) turn off security? Can they do something they aren't otherwise able to do? Why shouldn't they do what they do? Should they be able to turn off the security? Is there a permissioning solution? ...


19

This may be a case of the more you make users work, the less they try. I believe when confronted with a task, like trying to understand some content on a page, users do a quick estimate on whether the effort will be worth it or not. Too often we present users with extensive content and clicking just to tell them something that they already know or don’t ...


17

You really have but one option: accept that your users are human, and likely not to read your warning. Making it bigger or more annoying won't help you force people to read your warning, it will just make your software more annoying to use. Instead, you should deal with the real issue: there is no undo! In my view, that is the usability issue here. I'd ...


17

It really depends on the nature of the equipment and the seriousness of the alert. Does a high temperature mean that over ten years, this particular piece of equipment will fail to weigh out precisely 1.2 kilograms of potatoes, and instead perhaps will weigh out 1.21 kilograms of potatoes? In that case, I would say blinking red text is perhaps overkill. ...


17

I would recommend clearly going with an approach which clearly calls out the the potential impact of the action they are going to provide and require them to provide a second level of confirmation. The second level of confirmation can be perhaps done by using a checkbox (like how you have in terms and condition boxes) and then only enabling the delete or ...


17

Common patterns to indicate draggability: Drag handles This goes towards affordance. Users need to be able to recognize something can be dragged just by looking at it. A "grippy surface" is a common metaphor for this. Cursor A grab-hand makes sense as well as the arrows (move) cursor. Currently grab is Webkit-only. Also note that some devices don't have a ...


12

Something I have seen code syntax highlighters do is to indicate long lines of code by changing the color of text that exceeds the limit, something like the below: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The advantage of this method is that it takes up no additional space. However, it doesn't give any indication of how ...


12

Playing sounds can be useful when showing error messages, information dialog boxes etc. However... It is not the responsibility of your application to force the user to hear these sounds. This is something that must be configurable by the user, and since most operating systems already have such a configuration possibility, I see no added value in creating ...


11

The way I read it the free input will filter a list dynamically as the user types. In the case that a user enters something that doesn't match any of the items that are being filtered then the appropriate place to notify of this is where the user currently has their focus, namely where the filtered results are listed. Simply switch out the list of possible ...


9

Everything you've described is addressed by the principle of least privilege. If there is no legitimate reason for your software to start as a privileged user, have it outright refuse to start (or) demand a configuration that permits it to drop privileges once started. This is courteous behavior, as it prevents your software from becoming an attack surface ...


7

For accessibility reasons I propose to make the alarm state background dark red striped on a lighter red canvas. Additionally have a warning icon which pulses. This way even people with a color vision deficiency will notice that something is wrong because the background has diagonal stripes in another shade than the background and an icon that is ...


7

I see three main approaches: Hide the flow. Display "service not available" page on selecting the flow. Disable the flow with some indication (tooltip, information ("i") icon). There are advantages and disadvantages to all approaches. The main drawback to the first is that if someone comes to the site expecting to find the flow but can't see it then ...


7

Other than the obvious answer: "re-write your app so it supports common user actions better" You could try manipulating the browser history using new development techniques (usually outside the scope of a UX answer). Otherwise, a JavaScript alert will only fire after the users have tried to leave the page for any reason, which might be confusing to them. ...


7

You asked for an example of an implementation: Wordpress warns the user when it's likely they misspelled their email address. Like you said, this does feel like an error and not a 'soft error'. I agree with @Franchesca that you can use this, but should go for a less threatening color than red. But I wouldn't go for blue. I think orange is a better ...


6

As far as I remember, this is because of well-known Hot Coffee Lawsuit against McDonalds. Judge Robert H. Scott who presided over this case stated: ...knowing the risk of harm, the evidence and testimony would indicate that McDonald’s consciously made no serious effort to warn its consumers by placing just the most simple, adequate warning on ...


5

Agree that it is better to have an undo mechanism. If that is not possible in your case, including informative text in the button may increase chances that your user would read it since they have to click it (although it would very useful to actually run a usability test for your scenario). If you could customize the message and show extra text if existing ...


5

One way to guide the user would be to style the tags as soon as the users finish typing a tag, thus indicating that the application/system has recognized their tag. For example, when the user types in the tags that you have entered for this question i.e. "user-behavior", "tags", "warnings", this is what people typically do. Instead, try the following. ...


5

Since the soft limit seems to be based on available space and not an actual character count, why don't you just display that visually? Give them a full text box to work with and an overlay that displays the limited space.


5

Flashing is appropriate: human perception is better in detecting changes and movement than static content (sometimes, quite large changes are overseen if the changes are interrupted with something else (change blindness).) Teaching the operators to scan their instruments helps overcome this, but changes and flashing are always getting much more attention. ...


5

How frequently does the "alarmed state" occur? If it occurs too frequently, then the visual cues provided will fail to have the intended effect over time. If it is something that occurs but once on a fateful day, it would be difficult for the user to realize what exactly it implies and act accordingly in time. I believe that if the "alarmed state" is ...


5

Instead of using the clenched fist cursor I would suggest using this instead. or else continue reading. Show it to the user that it's draggable. Like in real life physical Products do. For example the switch on this table lamp here. The grip is enough to tell the user that it's draggable and it can be slided since there is no other reason why to put ...


5

The first question you should ask yourself is: How many users are woking with sound enabled? And how many of them are listening to music (surely with headphones)? I just asked around in my office (28 persons in my room), and only 4 of them have the sound enabled and each of them are listening to music. What I want to say: If we take the numbers of my quick ...


5

Playing a sound is useful when there's a chance that the user will miss the notification from the application. For example, Skype play a sound everytime you receive a message. Otherwise, there's also the flashy icon that helps the user to notice the message. So, in my opinion the best thing would be use both visual and sound notification. Remember also to ...


4

let me start with saying that the count down is wrong from my point of view. The problem I see here is that you count down to 0. This would suggerate the user that he reached the absolute limit. As you just want to indicate a proposed max. that's not what you want. I like the other two ideas - and find the progress bar interesting, though it might e quite ...


4

First consider how often you believe alarmed states to appear and how important the alarm is. It is important not to overload the user with flashing elements (unless there is something drastically wrong!). Also make sure you use them in the correct instance. If users always see the alarmed state and get used to ignoring it, then it fails to be of use ...


4

I don't see anything wrong with this in principle. Anything that helps the user avoid mistakes is good. If you avoid all the trappings of error messages, such as exclamation marks and red writing then this could work. Perhaps use a question mark and a more neutral colour (blue?). Just make sure that the validation you are using doesn't have too many false ...


3

If you want to force the user to read it (and surely annoy the users) you can do the following: Make a Inputbox and only proceed, when the users has typed a summary from your message. Example: Your message here (about overwriting the config) To proceed type the following in the textbox: I understand, that going further will overwrite my configuration and ...


3

Higher pitched sounds about the 1KHz range are more unpleasant and therefore draw more attention and are therefore used more for alerts that need immediate attention. Think of a fire alarm here. Lower pitched toned about the 100Hz range are more pleasant and therefore used more for notification tones. Computer startup sounds are examples. Then, the ...



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