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0

Perhaps small windows in the wall at standing height, so people can look in but people seated at desks do not see out when at work.


0

This would probably be complex, and depending on the implementation, it would have the potential to be annoying. However, I think it might be interesting to explore the concept of a user being able to see via a little "widget" who can hear them at a given time. For example, let's say your cube neighbors down the row (closest to furthest away) are Aaron, ...


17

If you want to avoid the simple and obvious solutions: place signs above the cubicles reminding people to be quiet encourage cubicle dwellers to discourage loud behavior through constant reminders ("Shh!" or "Please keep it down") I suspect the only cultural design cues you could rely on are reverence (church, monastery) or respect (library, courtroom, ...


4

I think this is a cultural/social issue but if you want to solve this problem through design I see two options: Give everyone an enclosed space (office) Take down all cubicle walls If being fully immersed in work without distraction is the most important goal then physically divided spaces are the way to go. If communicating quickly and freely with ...


0

please respect each other and shut up This sounds fine to me. If a colleague is too self-centred to come to this conclusion on their own then they deserve a heavy-handed reminder that other people exist.


1

Fit sound deadening material along the inside of the corridor to absorb sound ? If it actually looks like sound deadening material such as this pyramid foam then it has a dual function 1 a physical component: it absorbs sound. 2 a psychological component: its presence is a reminder that that it's there because of a noise problem


0

I don't know of a particular solution to this problem. The first thing I thought of as a non tech solution was having the equivalent of a shop 'open / close' sign above each cubicle. When a person enters the cubicle they set the sign to occupied (whatever that indicator is) so the person can see who is in.


0

I would make an utility which can be connected to Little Snitch (or similar Linux/Windows notification services). The utility should display the level of desired speech volume (for example as green, yellow and red icons), calculated on the proximity of activated work machines around the user. The closer active coworkers are, the lower should be the ...


14

Print full-size images of people at work similar to what sometimes happens with empty shop hoardings. This would be effective because it's a visual reminder that people are behind the blank cubicle walls whilst preserving the privacy of those working and preventing them from being further distracted (if you had see-through cubicle walls). Some alterations ...


2

You could user a "user" icon for a manually generated document, and a "computer" icon for the automatically generated ones.


-1

Option 2 and 3 are more consistent. Option 1 lacks consistency. As user will be unaware of the checkbox event and then presenting him to choose one more option once he selects the category is a bad idea. User should be aware of the idea that once he selects a check box he has to select a dropdown list. In my view 2, 3 both are good but in providing user with ...


1

Option 1. Design principles There are two design principle behind this recommendation: Progressive disclosure A strategy for managing information complexity in which only necessary or requested information is displayed at any given time. Signal to noise ratio The ratio of relevant to irrelevant information in a display. The highest possible ...


2

I can't find any specific user research data on this topic but there is plenty of tests showing LESS is MORE. Option 3 shows roles and although disabled has a chance of raising questions "Will the Viewer role accidentally get assigned?" (friction) Option 2 removes the role but also raises questions, "I can assign roles to the first 2 but why not the last ...


0

Consider painting the entire face of the outlet area a bright, loud, attention grabbing color. For example, if the train is mostly off-white with deep blue colored seats, a loud orange color underneath the seat would pique their curiosity for a closer look, e.g. "Hey what are all these orange things underneath the seats?". Since it is underneath their seat, ...


0

I've seen stickers on the rear of the seat in front of me on airplanes and found them useful and elegant. I think a well designed sticker is the way to go here. The passenger is sure to see it and it is closest to the moment of need. I think worrying about visual clutter is a distraction and places form before function. Let the need guide, then make the ...


6

You're trying to create a nested master-detail-detail relationship, which is often difficult to accomplish in general. But your main problem here is visual, the relationships aren't visualized well because all three levels share the same BG color, which makes it seem like they're all "top-level". If you give the "details" panes the same BG color as the ...



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