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0

It seems to me like the problem is related to confusion to available actions depending on the interface mode. How about we address that directly. Instead of using a button or drop down menu to implicitly imply its action, how about simply indicating the action directly on the buttons themselves? e.g. "Activate on Device" "Deactivate on Device" or "Update ...


0

Perhaps small windows in the wall at standing height, so people can look in but people seated at desks do not see out when at work.


0

This would probably be complex, and depending on the implementation, it would have the potential to be annoying. However, I think it might be interesting to explore the concept of a user being able to see via a little "widget" who can hear them at a given time. For example, let's say your cube neighbors down the row (closest to furthest away) are Aaron, ...


17

If you want to avoid the simple and obvious solutions: place signs above the cubicles reminding people to be quiet encourage cubicle dwellers to discourage loud behavior through constant reminders ("Shh!" or "Please keep it down") I suspect the only cultural design cues you could rely on are reverence (church, monastery) or respect (library, courtroom, ...


4

I think this is a cultural/social issue but if you want to solve this problem through design I see two options: Give everyone an enclosed space (office) Take down all cubicle walls If being fully immersed in work without distraction is the most important goal then physically divided spaces are the way to go. If communicating quickly and freely with ...


0

please respect each other and shut up This sounds fine to me. If a colleague is too self-centred to come to this conclusion on their own then they deserve a heavy-handed reminder that other people exist.


1

Fit sound deadening material along the inside of the corridor to absorb sound ? If it actually looks like sound deadening material such as this pyramid foam then it has a dual function 1 a physical component: it absorbs sound. 2 a psychological component: its presence is a reminder that that it's there because of a noise problem


0

I don't know of a particular solution to this problem. The first thing I thought of as a non tech solution was having the equivalent of a shop 'open / close' sign above each cubicle. When a person enters the cubicle they set the sign to occupied (whatever that indicator is) so the person can see who is in.


0

I would make an utility which can be connected to Little Snitch (or similar Linux/Windows notification services). The utility should display the level of desired speech volume (for example as green, yellow and red icons), calculated on the proximity of activated work machines around the user. The closer active coworkers are, the lower should be the ...


14

Print full-size images of people at work similar to what sometimes happens with empty shop hoardings. This would be effective because it's a visual reminder that people are behind the blank cubicle walls whilst preserving the privacy of those working and preventing them from being further distracted (if you had see-through cubicle walls). Some alterations ...



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