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2

Very good question actually. I think there are two ways to deal with this: The editor is a dialog box or a separate window. The editor is not a dialog box or separate window. E.g. it's a properties pane on the main window. In the first case it is simple: the user can do all the changes he wants, the changes take effect after he presses OK or Apply. ...


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Who is the target audience for the log viewer? And why would they be looking at the log? Someone who needs to fix an issue needs to see all the information. For someone who wants to check the status before potentially raising the issue with some who will fix it, you could show a lot less detail. You might want to look at a reporting and / or dashboard ...


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If you know for a fact that your users are familiar with the Adobe style - then use it. That knowledge can be acquired from doing surveys on a representative selection of your users. If not, feel free to make improvements of the original design. Good luck!


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I'm not sure if this question really belongs here but I'll answer anyway: For the kind of gallery you're referring to (overlay), I like Fancybox. It looks nice with standard settings, is customizable and easy to use (I've never done any user testing with it though). But I don't think there's any general solution - it really depends on your requirements. ...


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If it's a strict requirement to have horisontal-oriented container, your primary task is to make it understandable for users. You can notice how others cope with this issue: Navigator panel in photo editing software, which contains both the entire image preview and restricted area, see red rectangle: Navigator panel in maps (at left bottom corner): ...


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I have been using Logsaw. It is not a breakthrough in log viewing but offers some features that improve the user experience: you can easily recognize the log levels with an icon (avoiding red and yellow lines combines as in the example above), apply quick filters (hide previous entries to the one selected), define advanced filtering (filtering criteria you ...


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Yes, it’s is a blooper Sounds like a case study of why users typically make poor designers. But while users may not be great solution-finders, they tend to be good problem-identifiers. The first thing you need to do is understand why they want to edit item content in the detail pane of the main window rather than in a separate window. Maybe you can solve ...


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I find a list view with the closest locations first to be more helpful; as you can see your second example is extremely crowded (a search for McDonalds is an extreme example granted) and it is much harder to judge the distance between locations, it might involve zooming and paning around...but you can cut that all out with a list. With the list you can also ...


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On our mobile app the list view does better than the map view. Many people aren't map oriented and have trouble zooming in to click on a pin to figure out what it is and if they want to go there. More often people want to sort and filter their list, find a place, and then confirm the location on a map. Additionally, Map oriented people are generally more ...



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