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Possible Solution Given what you described, After validation is done the user will try to gather missing data but in some situations indicate that it is ok to process without that data (override), and assuming the users are insurance agents rather than lay-people, I would recommend the following process: user enters data from paper into computer program. ...


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To answer this question, you should validate different scenarios that users are trying to change the start date: - By mistake: If a user has already selected start date and end date and noticed they have chosen a wrong start date for their plan, they want to change that to another day, your system must let them to apply this change quickly. The best user ...


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The application that I was recently working on had 10 webpages and each page had about 5 to 10 controls and the validation errors are displayed inline as well as at the end (we call it the "summary" page which displays summary if there are no validation errors) just before subimit. The errors displayed in the summary page is a link to the specific page where ...


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Feedback should be immediate and in-place, so show validation errors inline as soon as the user leaves the field (on blur). You can even show errors while the user is typing except incompleteness because input naturally starts from an incomplete state. For elaboration, see http://www.hulstkamp.com/articles/ux-inline-validation-while-user-enters-value/


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Be wary of what a client asks for as they may not be the best judge of good UX. You should be the authority on that, or defer it to someone who is. My suggestions would be: One option may be to present the user with all the invalid fields again at the end of the process. Or... Validate the fields inline before submit.


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To make long form simpler and faster: Get rid of every single filed that is not crucial for the process (and ask stakeholders also to validate if each field is a must-have, because usually they put all they think is a nice-to-have to the form) Separate it into steps, give progress bar with steps Use autocomplete as much as possible - there is finite number ...


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Separate the UX from the implementation concerns This will help simplify the problem by clarifying priorities and through decomposition. Usually, the first priority with a complex form is to design the optimal user experience. UX makes a huge difference with long forms, so that's why it helps to separate the concern and focus on creating a clear user ...


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Firstly, Always categorize form fields in groups, group similar type of fields first, because categorization reduces cognitive load of user who is filling form. Secondly provide the wizards and break the process into smaller steps. Third, always provide 'Save as draft' feature for such a big forms because if a user is not able to fill form in one sitting ...


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What I use for this kind of scenarios is a simple multi-steps form, where I ask for some specific data, do a quick validation, if correct, enable the continue button and so on until getting to the last screen with the SUBMIT button. Using AJAX, this is a pretty simple task. As for when to send info to database, it depends. For example, since I work with ...


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Your best bet is to use a control similar to the AJAX Accordion instead of the tabs. That way all the fields will be validated within a single page although they will not be all visible (unless all headers are expanded). In the past, I worked on a web application with a similar number of fields, we didn't find any other way to display and validate all the ...


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Plainclothes provided an excellent answer. I want to share some of my findings from usability tests on this exact problem. We have a web app for internal usage and use a mix of border and background color to indicate required fields and error fields. Unlike the * (asterisk), users have to be trained to understand the styling means required. Testing with ...


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It’s always tough hunting for enterprise UX research that’s not horribly out of sync with the transformation of the business. On the one hand, you have to take into account the “consumerization” of the enterprise space. On the other, it’s still not the same set of considerations. So, working from a base of experience* rather ...


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1. Limit inputs to things that are required It should be very clear to your users why they are being asked to input anything on a form. I assume you are already doing this and there are still just too many inputs that different users may want to use on your very large form. In that case, consider putting all required inputs up top and then grouping ...


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Avoid relying solely on a color. Incorporate a thicker border, text variant and/or icon to add emphasis and call attention to the area. Luke's article about Web Application Form Design, UX Matters Label Placement Study and Nielsen's 10 Usability Heuristics are good starting points. Go talk to your users and see what they think. You have the advantage of ...



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