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I'd skip the survey and just do the usability tests. UX pros tend to distrust surveys since you're asking people to recall their behaviors. And people tend to answer questions in not quite honest ways. For example, in your survey, I can try to remember what my top three features are, but I'm not sure what a feature is, and I might not want to admit that I ...


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If you don't know how to make a survey, don't reinvent the wheel. Use an existing survey. That way, your results gain authority ("I used a valid method"), you can compare your result to published results of others who used the same survey, and you save yourself work in general. For a quick and dirty solution, the most common survey would be the SUS. The ...


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You've got the general idea It's a great idea to ask users what they dislike and then to set about proving them right or wrong by conducting a usability test before you spend resources fixing the perceived problem. Users often complain about a symptom without recognizing the underlying design problem. If this is what you intend to do, then your survey is a ...


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The problem with the term "User Experience" compared to "user friendly" is that it is too vague and too comprehensive (and perhaps too technical) for marketing purposes. The criticism (we professionals) raise against the "user friendly" term is exactly what makes it so marketing friendly: 1) We say that "you can't use that term because it only reflects a ...


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Yes the position of icons is critical in buttons especially if you are working multi lingual applications. Having worked on web applications with Arabic as the primary language, I can tell you it is important that the right-to-left culture or vice versa is reflected in all aspects of UI, including placement of icons.


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When I was at Microsoft and we were building the UI component libraries I tried a little experiment, that is, I held back on the DataGrid & Tree Control(s). I wanted to see how the user base would react given well these were expensive controls to make as well. Something interesting happened, ListBoxes, Radio + Checkboxes were starting to be used in some ...


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Credible source: "About Face 3" - Chapter 21 http://www.amazon.com/About-Face-Essentials-Interaction-Design/dp/0470084111


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You can find the definition for UI elements on the link below. Here is how the checkbox and radio buttons are defined. Checkboxes Checkboxes allow the user to select one or more options from a set. It is usually best to present checkboxes in a vertical list. More than one column is acceptable as well if the list is long enough that it might require ...


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I think what you're asking for is a canonical set of definitions/guidelines for standard UI components. To me, a useful set would be: Concise, so readers can refer to it quickly. Precise but not too technical, so that it can be useful for both professionals and lay audiences alike. Comprehensive enough to cover all major controls but not so pedantically ...


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There are a couple of websites that inform you about UI components and patterns. I am listing the most useful ones: 1. Welie A comprehensive list of UI components, principles and patterns segmented into user needs, application needs and context of design. Their library consists of Navigation, Search, Data, Shopping, Input, Feedback and Miscellaneous ...


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I think most of these items are still skeuomorphic elements from a time before the visualized consumer computer: A floppy disk A phone icon A radio button Folders They were helped to accomodate for the big leap into the digital world. Nowadays most of those items are really outdated or bluntly unknown (floppy, the classic phone icon). So that will ...


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It depends on the reason you are using an icon in addition to the Text. In the examples that you have mentioned, I see two different reasons why the icon has been included Icon is being used to visually represent the task. Like you have done for the Shortlist button. Over time users would recognise the icon and not need the supporting text for their ...


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I had a similar situation when I was designing an accordion menu. here you can find the related article. For navigation items such as previous and next I would use the icon based on the direction i want to point. (right placed icon for next, left placed icon for previous). For other cases left aligned icons feels more familiar.


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To me, it depends if it's to perform an action or for the flow. For the flow, you'd want to "point" people in a timeline direction (as with the next button, where the arrow is after the text), where it a "back button" than the arrow would be in front of it, as per convention. The position of "actionable" icons, to me, doesn't seem to affect a whole lot, as ...


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If I understand correctly, a simple "seal of approval" is actually rather detrimental to the idea of user centered design, and especially to the practitioner's merit. Any approval (or disapproval) should be met with rationale; that is how one raises awareness and illustrates skills needed to achieve good products. You can't put that in a stamp. If a Human ...



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