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Since toggle buttons are essentially just differently-styled checkboxes, it makes sense to use the same access key, which is normally Spacebar. (Here's an example of another toolkit's toggle button, which also uses Spacebar: Oracle JET.) Depending on your UI toolkit and the particular grouping of controls in your UI, the arrow keys may be used to move to ...


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Yes, because you can't know how "fast" the user is in reading these. A user shouldn't be forced to see the messages until your timer has ran out, he should be given the option to close them as fast as he wants to.


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Success messages should automatically fade out and disappear, because success is what the user will expect so we should not force them to manually dismiss it. The others message types will be of interest to the user, because they will not be expecting them. Ideally the user will correct whatever is wrong before continuing in the solution. The user can ...


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This question already has been asked earlier and this should clear your doubt. It shares two perspectives where it can be useful and sometimes totally unnecessary defeating the purpose of the alert. Why do error and success messages have a close button? However, I personally feel that the close button would be necessary in cases where the alert is ...


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I feel like there could be a barrier in how the org is set up initially. For me UX should be considered in all decisions regarding product but most companies validate a new product or features strictly through product managers or c-suite. UX isn't valued at that point even though it should really be driving the product. We're treated as passengers not ...


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There are probably two main schools of thought behind this, but again it depends on how applicable it is to your website or service. One school of thought is about consistency when providing navigation for users. You may find that some top and side navigation are duplicated exactly, some have more or less content, but they maintain the same structure/...


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In the Kanban process, who is doing the actual work, how much collaboration is needed, or even the size/complexity of the work is not terribly important. People will naturally collaborate when they see that a task is not moving on the board. The strength of the Kanban is to allow the team to easily visualize where a particular item is at a given time. If ...


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If you have the creative authority to rename that option. You could simply rename it to Unsubscribe. You could also use Facebook's alternative to naming the option as Deactivate Account. Where in, your account is inactive but can be reactivated by logging in. In the case you do not have the creative authority to rename that option, a simple message saying: ...


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As a user if I'm choosing to delete my account I'm expecting to do just that. If in the service I had saved various projects with info in each, pictures, attachments etc. Then I'm expecting that these would be deleted. This does present a bit of a weird UX scenario as you really want to show the user a clear confirmation that the action took place but ...


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3. If you're not deleting things, don't say you're deleting things. But this begs the question: why can't people delete their account? This is terribly user-unfriendly in and of itself. Having a 'roach motel' where it's very difficult to unsubscribe or delete your account is bad enough... but making it impossible?


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Normally I wouldn't answer my own question, but having asked this question before I had the experience and now having gained some of the experience required to answer the question I thought I'd give it a shot. I believe that if you look at the tasks involved in UX at a conceptual level, you can divide them into a couple of different parts, and there are ...


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We recently did a high level journey that crosses multiple personas and then had "drill down " journey at the persona level. Those Journeys had even further drill down because the journey can reflect a switch in mental models.


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I have recently conducting and learning about Human-Centered Design. PET stands for : Persuasion Emotion Trust All of these element could be understood by following Persuasion Design that contains 6 Principles ( reciprocity, scarcity, authority ,consistency, liking, consensus ). If you look at Airbnb.com, you would notice that they are using at least ...



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