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Although following your suggestion of providing password information when entering a password may make it easier to get the right password (although this is still arguable), it comes at the cost of worse security. If someone needs an easier to remember password, let them choose that, but by you revealing something about their password when entering, you ...


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In my mind UX starts at the idea stage. Does this product improve the lives of potential users/customers? If so, then it's a project I'm interested in undertaking. If not, then the question very quickly becomes: If this product can be very profitable, how can I make it improve the lives of potential users/customers? Frankly the two go hand in ...


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I agree with all the comments that say the difference is a fuzzy one, that most titles in our field are vague, and that a good designer can do either job. The main differentiator in my experience is that UX is a bit more driven by the experience of individual users, and product design is more driven by the idea of users. Product designers make decisions ...


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Trends... There has been a general positive trend over the last 15 years for designers to take on larger and larger scope of responsibilities within the product development process 15 years ago in the "Microsoft" era of formal software development, human-computer interaction, visual design, or information architecture were specific disciplines in design, ...


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This is based on my vision, so I don't know if it's correct. but FOR ME, a Product Designer is in charge of the Product Design, whether it's a material or a digital one. This means that his tasks are more generic, and doesn't need to be a specialist in the disciplines involved in the design of the whole product, but needs to know a bit of them all. A "jack ...


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Here is one approach favored by my End Users, have an underlined option stating 'Clear' when the field already has an icon within (calendar in my example). Having an X clear button within the edit field is good, but coloring it red might mean error after the User types in a text. The common theme across apps/web is to use a lighter grey/grey colored X ...


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Like most titles in our profession, it's fuzzy. I think 'product designer' is partly just a trend/evolution. Though I do see job postings for 'product designers' where they are looking for more full stack designer (if that makes sense). In other words, they're looking for someone that can design the UI, then prototype it.


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This example tested well with all types of users It helps if you try it out yourself by clicking the above link but here are the two things that make the X more intuitive and discoverable as a clear button... Only show the X if there is something to clear Place the X inside the input instead of next to it


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You'll find fields with a little "clear" button in them all over the web. Like this:


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I would say it depends on the scope. For a single text field you could simply use an x such as the one provided by Font Awesome (here) If you are clearing all information from the form it'd be better to use a button that has a different color to the submission button. For instance if the submission button is the color green, a good differentiating color ...


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It would seem to me that the bell icon is fairly common for "notifications/alerts". Not quite sure why it was adopted as such, but one theory could be that bells have historically been tied to either time notifications [(church bells or clock towers)][1], warnings, or event kick-off. Might be a bit more abstracted these days, like showing a floppy disk for a ...


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Three reasons: New information comes onto the page. Information leaves the page Something on the page reacts to the user Whenever one of these three things happens on a page, that's a good time to consider adding an animation to demonstrate What Is Happening/Going to Happen/Has Happened.


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There are many commonalities in the way they all influence the success of the product. User experience is as good as any other architectural concerns - be it security, performance - and in fact they cross cut. Providing a hint on security question enhances user experience of an application and has to be stopping a point before it can become a good enough ...


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Using the physical world, car analogy Wireframe = form and shape of the car, to visualise what and where, kept static in the showroom Prototype = a car that can be taken for a test drive ; post which it would go into production


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I would advise keeping the print button when displayed on mobile/tablet devices, you're assuming that when people print the screen from their devices that they want to get a paper version. It is possible to print to a pdf that saves to their local/cloud storage which is especially useful for booking confirmations, receipts etc. Obviously I can't tell you ...


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The problem here as you correctly mentioned is that users are confused. Its because they might confuse with booking the ticket rather than checking the availability of the flights. Most of the use cases are departure and return or day of flight. Your start date and end date is confused with the start of journey and return. Proper labeling is required to ...


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It seems like your interface layout is going to be very similar to most booking sites in regards to the calendar selection. From what you've described it sounds like you just need to label and communicate clearly to the user that the dates being selected will result in a broad search, not an exact match. The word "scan" can be a little misleading. To better ...



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