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Personally I tend to favor sidebars at typical desktop widths in order to factor out navigation (and other things) to allow the "main" content more vertical space and decrease its width for more readable line length. To do this in a responsive framework you need to transform the sidebar into a top-bar for narrower viewports. For a news oriented site a ...


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Sidebars can be often overlooked due to their history of being advertising heavy. If a lot of the following issues are present in your side bar then it is most likely being ignored (and unnecessary). Has your sidebar remained the exact same for the last 3 months? Does your sidebar exhibit signs of “sidebar creep” ? Was there a time when people ...


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A solution for this would be progressive disclosure where you break it down into steps where after completing the first step only , the user is able to do the second step. To quote the this GoodUI article Progressive Disclosure protects the user from too much irrelevant information. It's a pattern which only shows information gradually if it makes ...


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Tests, tests, tests! A/B testing, User testing, calculating, finding targets, users eye tracking, mouse moves tracks, clicks, actions taken, focus-groups, think-aloud-protocols... Everything else is just empty words and hundred of articles in the net and discussions leading to nowhere.


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This article is on the old side but can maybe point you in the right direction - http://pando.com/2013/10/18/smartphones-are-making-shopping-more-fun/


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This question is a bit vague but take a look at The concept of Gamification. Gamification techniques strive to leverage people's natural desires for socializing, learning, mastery, competition, achievement, status, self-expression, altruism, or closure. Early gamification strategies use rewards for players who accomplish desired tasks or competition to ...


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This is partially anecdotal, but having filled out tons of forms, many that have shipping AND billing addresses, and having had both situations where they are the same and different, you want to make it as easy as possible. My suggestion would be after filling out the billing address offer two buttons: Use Billing Address for Shipping and Enter Shipping ...


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Hide it for all digital subscriptions. Show just the button, ticked by default, for physical products, with the form fields showing up if the user un-ticks the button. If a user has a different billing address and shipping address they are usually looking for 2 sets of forms to fill out. If there is only one, they will find out why. But for most people ...


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Ticked and delivery address folded or greyed/disabled. Because: "Most of the subscriptions are for digital products. However, a few of them may have a print included in the package and we would need a delivery in this case" Most users don't need it - don't show it. Show it only on demand or make it obvious as optional. It makes your form more convenient, ...


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Considering usability and UX, you design for probability and not possibility. However you have to take care of the possibilities too. This is a interesting case, Although I see it as an excellent case for user study, A-B testing etc. but I will make a guess. If most of the content you offer is intended to be consumed by self, chances are the users will ...


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I see that those file types can be classified as text or image files, so it'd be recommended to offer the option to select all the files of one type just with a click. Also it provides better organization (even better if you order them by most used or alphabetically). If the user wants to select by file type, the max amount of clicks needed is 1 so it ...


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It seems that people will most frequently buy a small range of staples combined with a smaller number of long tail good that they buy somewhat repetitively. For example most people will buy milk, bread, cheese, eggs, ground beef, chicken breast, etc. Then people will also buy things kind of unique, like cocounut milk or something, and people will tend to ...


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Having different categories is fine. However, I foresee your users using the search function far more than the navigation because people already have a "shopping list" (might not be a bad idea to implement on the site). They will look for those specific items immediately - might cause them to search immediately for what they want. The key here is to have a ...


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With the surge in mobile/tablet access and the rapid advancements and usage of voice services I would say yes of course. It conveys a smoother user experience and you are always better designing with a forward thinking mind frame


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I believe the advantage of UX professionals is that we can give reasons for our decisions. Everybody has an opinion, a gut feeling or past experience they can draw from. UX professionals also have the backing of proven UI patterns, tons of great literature describing state-of-the-art approaches and why they work, and international standards such as ISO ...



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