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I have recently conducting and learning about Human-Centered Design. PET stands for : Persuasion Emotion Trust All of these element could be understood by following Persuasion Design that contains 6 Principles ( reciprocity, scarcity, authority ,consistency, liking, consensus ). If you look at Airbnb.com, you would notice that they are using at least ...


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Here are a few resources i found helpful when i transitioned from a Product Manager to a UX Manager. These are just the tip of the iceberg, but I hope they help someone else. UX Checklist Lean UX Manifesto (Smashing Magazine) Google design guidelines


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I treat personas as individuals who can have more than one task to accomplish on the site. Therefore, they can each have multiple user flows. I just completed a set of personas, each with 4-5 user flows. For example, one persona needs to register for the site, look up claim information, and dispute a claim. One person, one site visit, three tasks. There ...


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You user is functioning under two separate personas and each persona has a journey. When they switch persona, the journey switches as well. The challenge is designing the functionality. Ideally, each personas set of tasks can puzzle-piece with the other. Usually this is where a new design pattern will emerge.


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Wireframing and prototyping are exceptionally useful and underused tools in the tech world. Website and app wireframes are useful to determine the layout and overall look and feel of each screen or page. Prototyping is an effective tool for validation and as a way to test your development company. Wireframing Wireframing is probably the most well ...


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1) Learn how to anticipate the user flow by interviewing some of your target users and maybe running a card sort exercise with them. Set the key points of the journey down on individual cards and ask your target users to arrange them into an order that makes the most sense for them. 2) Start by duplicating the interface from something similar. Use any ...


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Make it simpler by separating the actions in two side-by-side columns:


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I recommend starting out small and seeing what kind of workload your UXers can reasonably take. A lot depends on how your company operates, the scope of their projects, how much expert industry knowledge they will need to learn, etc. Be sure to define the scope of their duties well. As mentioned in previous (excellent) posts, there is a LOT of ...


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I suggest checking Meetup for UX meetups in your area. This might sound basic, but believe me when I tell you these things are gold. Local job announcements can be made that aren't posted online or aren't easy to search for. Plus you get to learn about UX and talk with other people. And hey, they almost certainly have advice local to your area. And don't be ...


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I guess it depends on your process workflow and team structure. It may mean that because you don't have a linear process (e.g. design --> build --> test) or a team where each member has a specific role (e.g. there might be a person doing business analysis while also designing and coding at the same time - unicorn sighting perhaps!) then you will have to ...


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Don Norman (author of The Design of Everyday Things) has a great quote that seems to cover this: "When a device as simple as a door has to come with an instruction manual — even a one-word manual — then it is a failure, poorly designed." Use gestalt techniques to add a layer of meaning and context to your controls and on-boarding sequences that show ...


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There are ways in which you can manage user's learning curve. It should be noted that a learned user should not feel that the UI is cluttered with information which she no longer needs. Onboarding UI This is a very common recent trend. When user signs up or logs in for the first time, she is shown a help overlay which helps understanding the UI metaphor. ...


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In an ideal world we will design a solution that is so obvious that everybody will instinctively know how to use it. In the real world there are a number of factors that can influence whether additional information will be valuable or not: Frequency. Is this something people will use once or lots of time? Importance. Is there a chance the user will make ...


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For the first time visitors, it is a good practice to tell them what features lies where and how that feature can be used for a pleasant experience. However, it depends on the type of users of your application. If technologically sound people are the target audience, I don't see a need to show description; as they are experienced users and they know what ...


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Well, if you can only change wording, your options are a bit limited, so I'd suggest you clearly define the sorting method. Kind of what you suggest, like "Most Popular", "Highest Rated", "Most Commented" and such. And obviously including the opposite options as well. Sadly, if you can't use any tool to do a choice, you need to include all available ...


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Don't repeat the labels - use the up and down icons along with it: Assuming you are sorting some data - I will suggest you use a table with sort options as: If you are not sorting the data loaded in table, you can always use just the header of the table with sorting options which will appear & disappear after clicking on some element. These ...


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Simple answer: No. Longer answer: The "Requirements Gathering" stage is not about formulating a solution. It is about gathering together the requirements that any proposed solution must satisfy in order to be considered successful. It's like finding out what kinds of food your friends prefer before you look for a restaurant to book. You can then use ...


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Without knowing the full context of your question, I would start off with the lowest common denominator and expand out from there to a maximum of two levels. What I mean could be expressed by the following rules or formulas: w days late (where w = 1 to 6) x weeks, w days late (where x = 1 to 3, w = 1 to 6) y months, x weeks late (where y = 1 to 11, x = 1 ...


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Term "Gathering" suggests that the requirements are already existing, and one just needs to collect them through some means. I guess user/product requirements also already exist, in that there are several possible solutions to meet what the user's expectations are, and you just need to collect them through some means. A good product is not built ...


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Yes, the Equalities Act 2010 (previously the Disability Discrimination Act) is such a law in the UK. And it has been used before for prosecuting companies offering poor accessibility (generally for things like offers only being available to fully-sighted people who browse a website with mouse, so users with screenreaders, or only using keyboard can't ...


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TL;DR: a UX process should include both needs discovery and requirements gathering Question is possibly a bit leading in that assumes some particular UX process and terminology. The following two questions are a razor that may help crystallise differences in activities: Q. UX is about discovering users needs and satisfying them. Is this the same as ...


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It is quite accurate description of a process of collecting the things that are needed: requirement (n.): "things required, a need" gathering (n.): "an assembly of people, act of coming together," gather (v.) "unite, agree, assemble; gather, collect, store up" I don't think hypothesis formulation comes anywhere close to convey the true ...


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At an abstract high level, Requirement Gathering still works, i.e. it doesn't specify how you will gather/discover the requirements nor the process. However, I agree with you that it does not exactly match what we do. I doubt we can come up with an alternative which will go on to become an UX industry terminology.



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