New answers tagged

1

At an abstract high level, Requirement Gathering still works, i.e. it doesn't specify how you will gather/discover the requirements nor the process. However, I agree with you that it does not exactly match what we do. I doubt we can come up with an alternative which will go on to become an UX industry terminology.


4

This can be a tough question for a variety of reasons and depends upon factors such as experience/quality of the designers, experience/quality of developer, and communication. As a developer and a designer I've been on both ends of the spectrum. From a developer's standpoint, I have a project manager who comes to me with a user story that is based on a new ...


4

When all stakeholders have signed off There isn't really a definite answer for this, but the coverall answer is "when all stakeholders are satisfied with whatever part of the system you're working on". (I say this because, depending on your working methods, stakeholders might be signing off on whole sections of a product, or individual components) That ...


2

Speak their language "Wireframe deck": Presentation version of the wireframes you're building for development, tailored to an executive audience who wants to know x about the project. This is a very common term among execs and other "business types" who are familiar with the concept of designing an app or site (but aren't designers or developers). It ...


1

I won't reiterate what the clarification of the deck means as other members have done that for you. But I also recently had to present a "deck" to a potential employer and I ended up creating a 4 page PDF (PowerPoint would also be fine) of the processes I used to get from point A to point B. I started with a defined workflow, then onto low-fidelity ...


1

"deck" is usually business jargon for "powerpoint presentation". Essentially a "deck of slides". In my experience, when someone asks for a "deck of..." it usually means "I gotta show my bosses something pretty in a meeting."


1

As pointed out previously, a deck is simply a collection of slide presented in some particular order (even if it is just mostly random). If he is asking for wireframes and using the term correctly as far as 'industry standards' are concerned, then they won't be interactive in anyway (unless you introduce the interaction through the magic of PowerPoint). ...


14

"Wireframe deck" is not an industry wide term that refers to a specific presentation format. Your best bet would be to seek a definition from the employer, possibly giving them a few examples so as to illustrate that you've thought the problem through and are looking for clarification. Over on EnglishLanguage.SE a similar question was asked: What is a Deck, ...


1

Many people will want to save a copy of a web page that is an invoice / contains a reference number from an online purchase, rather than printing it off or waiting for the email confirmation (particularly older users tend to do this). Perhaps we can remove this option once all users have the expectation that they can always get back to such online data ...


0

Although it is probably not a highly used feature, it is an extremely common and familiar UI pattern between most applications. When right clicking on an image the "Save image as..." option is available as the menu is in the context of the image. Note though that the image element is a child of the whole page element and therefore the "Save as..." option ...


1

To me the difference between a product designer and an UX designer would be that a product designer deals more with the question of what the product should do, while an UX designer deals with the question of how the product should deliver what it does. In other words: product design is about what benefits the product should bring its users - and UX ...


1

Product designer - Designing the product so that it is robust in terms of design able to accommodate various requirements, scenarios, features and user flows. like an ecosystem where stakeholders can expand and optimize the product easily using what's already there. e.g. the product already been designed to accommodate a new module, with minimum redesign ...


1

Good question. These are very closely related in product teams. UX designers will typically conduct user interviews and other various user testing methods to get in the minds of the product users. It's designing with the mind in mind. UX designers should be dependent on users for a design layout. Product designers work closely with ux designers in that ...


0

This is probably not the industry standard definition, but certainly what I understand the job titles to mean: UX designer - someone who applies User-Centred Design (UCD) approach to solving problems relating to user experience (can be in business, technical, design or anything else); generally this will be for a digital product or service, but ...


3

Some recomendations on getting the higher conversion rate with the long forms: Make the labels clear for users. Dont't make them think (a lot), work on the language and tone Group the fields in a logical way. So the users a) focus on some aspect (Address, Contacts, etc.), b) have a rest after filling some set of fields, c) enjoy when some part of ...


5

First, ensure that any data entered by the user is being temporarily saved. It's horrible to go to effort of filling out a long form only to have everything erased because a session timed out or you accidentally left the page. Consider using inline validation and perhaps encouraging statements. They shouldn't be patronizing or too chummy. But showing a ...


3

An icon to the left of a unrelated label is clearly not the way to go. If you got the space for it, the best option would be to provide a label to the filter icon. Essentially, you want a clear distinction between your title and the action, either by different alignment (left, right), size, weight or color (opacity).



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