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You can take a look at http://www.theuxbook.net/ , the book contains the steps, tools and methods used in each step, and detail explanation of them. It's up to practitioners how and to what extent they will use these tools and methods, depending on the product, the organisation they're employed by etc etc. but the book gives a good detail overview of a UX ...


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I do think that there is much that can be learnt from thoughtful application of a quality flexible process. The best practice for this that I have come across is the "User Centred Design" (UCD) approach. The UCD practice is not prescriptive, but supplies enough structure and guidance in order to formulate a beneficial sequence of UX tasks. So the question ...


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I don't think there is an industry standard nor do I believe there should be one. I personally look at User Experience design as a set of tools that I can use dependant on the project I am working on. Some clients won't have enough time or budget for me to do extensive research, therefor I need to adapt my toolkit to what their needs are and what we are ...


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I once worked for a company that had "Czars". Every product had its own Czar, and there were inter-product Czars like a visual Czar, a coding style Czar, etc. Those cross product Czars weren't necessarily the most expert in their area but they were good at communicating and "getting people on board" and achieving consensus. Sounds like a UX Czar could be ...


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The Value of embedding UX Practices UX Integration is key to delivering UX of the product! Embeding UX practices enables a more focused and thorough design process while also offering a strategic view of how a product will evolve. This being said, having this integrated view requires a higher level of UX maturity within an organisation and therefore ...


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What most UX teams are missing is a "UX Sales" person. Most UX people are good at UX. Not as many of us are good at selling UX. I'd call that the 'integration' role. You need an advocate in the organization that acts as the face of the UX team. This is typically a UX Director position of some sort.


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Why UX matters I use two case studies to illustrate two simple and complementary ideas around the importance of UX. 1. Bad UX can kill The case is outlined in the following article: How Lousy Cockpit Design Crashed An Airbus, Killing 228 People Basically, the lack of (progressive) feedback in the control stick UX for the Airbus A330-200 was one of ...


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As with most questions, I guess it depends on the organisation structure and the UX 'capability' or team responsible for implementing UX within the organisation. However, theoretically these are two separate activities in which one relies more heavily on actual UX skills while the other activity requires some degree of UX knowledge. I see it as something ...


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When I want to explain UX to my students I use this example: 'Steve wants to buy a cell phone' then I go through different criteria that affects Steve select a phone. This includes things Steve wants 'to-do' using the cell phone, and objective qualities and subjective qualities that Steve is looking for in such a phone. I use this example to show ...


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You don't need to make it funny There is so many metaphors you could choose to convey what UX means and I don't think you need to make it funny to ensure that your message gets through....to the contrary its a serious matter that any orgnisation should give due attention, so the approach you take matters. You need to trigger Interest A good starting ...


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Call it "Desire Lines" And lead with this image: (I don't know where I originally got this image, and reverse image search is turning up many possibilities.)


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It hasn't been once or twice when UX design has been compared to architecture, people interact with products of both without even thinking about it. Why UX Designers Need to Think like Architects The User – a Thousand-Headed Monster?


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This is an interesting topic which I encounter in my research on UX integration as well. The results of my studies in close collaboration with software development companies clearly showed that there is a lack of agreement and low awareness about UX related roles and responsibilities. Although I agree with the previous answers where what a UX person takes ...


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Gender neutral icons are a unaddressed issue within modern design patterns. The iconization of digital interfaces has occurred out of screen real estate with insufficient thought applied to user/cultural interpretation. There is some good work going on at the noun project to address this. https://thenounproject.com/term/gender-neutral/132954/ Notice ...


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Wireframes are best for focusing the discussion around the 'form' of the design, whereas prototypes are best for focusing the discussion around the 'function' of the design. Of course, given the amount of overlap in the different tools and methodologies, you'll find that the terms are interchangeable, but regardless of the term, you should understand what it ...


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While there is nothing that specifically makes this icon of a person male or female, there is a tendency in our current culture to assume a "generic" image of a person is male unless it has various markers to mark it as specifically female. To play off the other person's answer where they gave several answers that implied the image could represent "both ...


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We need to consider the context in this case: If this infographic is used discuss the number of people who hate their internet service provider, then the info-graphic does not need to have an visual indication of the gender. I think this graphic without any context would be termed UNISEX. If a subject like bathrooms, Breast/Prostate cancer or any other ...


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There is enough ambiguity here that labeling and context are necessary It doesn't matter whether 30%, 50% or 70% of users think this is male (vs female or gender-neutral). There is enough ambiguity here that the infographic will fail to communicate gender effectively so context and labeling are necessary to make it effective. This Nielsen article ...


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Good UX analysts have solid technical skills. Great UX analysts also have experience ...and experience in almost any field transcends quantitative analysis. So yes, I think this is absolutely within the scope of UX analysis. There are many concepts in UX that are better conveyed qualitatively or in principle than by hard analysis. For example: This ...


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It is absolutely within the scope of a UX practitioner's skill set to collect qualitative (i.e., subjective) data. As to if it is in the contract's scope, with your client, is different. In my mind, how can we make an informed decision without loading a prototype onto both devices and performing an A/B test. The question is unclear as to why this isn't ...



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