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1

The old - attention grabber Of all low-level visual 'features' (colour, size, etc.) that our brain processes, motion (ie, animation) is the most attention grabbing one. See this quote from chapter 2 (What we can easily see) of Visual Thinking for Design, Ware 2008: The web designer now has the ability to create web pages that crawl, jiggle, and flash. ...


0

I like to use animation to communicate where things are located. For example on page load show the navigation open but then animate the minimize feature so the user knows where to find the nav when they need it.


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Alternate approaches:- 1) You can think of showing summary of changes in a popup confirm dialog, when user click 'Submit' button. 2) Or mark modified fields(background color or border color), and show old value during mouseover in a tooltip. Above approaches satisfies both requirements :- 1) Uncluttered Modify UI without third column to show previous ...


2

I Studied Human Factors in grad school. In my personal experience, which may or may not be representative, the UX circle of a Venn diagram is mostly encompassed by the HF circle. The primary difference is that I learned very little about visual design, and a lot about biological/cognitive processes affecting perception and movement. We covered the same ...


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Short answer: They are meaningless corporate titles applied to people with similar (apparent) skills. They're the same. Long answer: 1- How do human factor specialists and user experience designers differ? It all depends on what definitions you ultimately settle on. I have held both titles of "Human Factors [something]" and "User Experience ...


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Human factors is about getting things done effectively and efficiently. User experience is about getting things done effectively, efficiently and effortlessly. If the human factors engineers in aviation only learned from crashes, that would be a major difference to usability engineers and UX designers who try to anticipate possibly problematic design ...


3

User experience specialists have to be human factors specialists. User experience is (mostly) human experience. Its what the user lives during a precise activity, and what he lives is a combination of differents perceptions (feelings, emotions, meanings, ...) wich are the consequences of differents factors, including human factors. User experience is what ...


1

Testing is as expensive as you want to make it. Pay for usability consultants and participant compensation, sure that would start to become expensive. Take interactive or paper prototypes to a local cafe and shout a few participants a free coffee. Cheap in comparison. It always comes down to what you are looking to test (fidelity, complexity, etc) and ...


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Have you tried UsabilityHub? Its tests allow you to expose a living person to your design, and after five seconds they're asked various questions about it. You can also make flow tests, where they're asked to navigate through your design, or tests where they decide which version looks better. It's cheap - it has a free plan, where you "pay" for your tests ...


3

Print out the screen on plain white paper using a color printer. Put the paper in an opaque folder. Walk out to the desk of the lowest tech person in the office. Ask them to look at something for you. Open the folder, facing them... count to five... close the folder. Then, with all your colleagues within earshot, have the lowest tech person in your ...


3

Whether they have a right to do so is purely a political/corporate org/process question. Whether they should or not is entirely dependent on their abilities/expertise. In either case, the challenge is how do you handle it as the UX person? Some suggestions: always have business partner input formatted in the form of a user story if possible. The idea is ...


1

Well if you look at Product Owner's (PO's) role from the SCRUM perspective, it's the PO job to write stories that indicate what users wants to do and why, then prioritize the list of stories and provide additional requirements as needed. In terms of how the user's goal is accomplished, which includes the UI & technology, that's really not the PO's job. ...



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