Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

36

Start working on your 10,000 hours any way you can. That means reading up on material concerning the field, diving in and applying for a job, hacking away at something as a hobby, keeping up with industry developments, paying attention to the thought leaders (eg. Jakob Nielsen, Jared Spool, Steve Krug, etc) and asking lots of questions. So I'd expect to see ...


33

I mocked up a version of the form in HTML that I think improves a couple of things (but not all, because I'm not you and don't know your specific domain issues): http://newlyminted.handcraft.com/ Some of the changes I made: Group related fields. First name, middle name and last name are part of the same flow, so group them together visually. Same goes ...


28

UCD ∈ UX Put another way, user-centred design is a method (or process) to achieving good user experience. Here is an example UCD design flow using SAP (note arrows indicating a process): Source: SAP Design Guild


26

I'm sure different people will have different views on how much or how little wireframes and prototypes overlap. What follows is how I approach the two: If you are considering an application or a website, and you look at the page level for example, a wireframe and a prototype are superficially the same things, from a physical perspective. They can both be ...


25

You're here! This is the right place! You can answer real people's real questions about real situations and needing real answers, - maybe with just real ideas, or with real mock-ups and real designs! All manner of problems and challenges are raised here - take a look at previous questions (especially the unaccepted/unanswered ones) or watch the new ones ...


17

I say: 'I help companies make their software easier to use. Websites too.' And then if they look as if they're remotely interested after that point I move on to say something that most people identify with and that is: 'I bet you've come across software or a website that is really awkward or annoying to use - well I help companies make them more enjoyable ...


16

User experience involves the entire workflow of a system. It includes how the pages are laid out, but it also includes things like how pages interact with each other. It also includes aspects of the process that aren't inherently screens. For example, if you have an eCommerce system, user experience would also include how and when emails are sent out ...


16

I have not done coding Well, then I'd say you don't have HTML and CSS skills. That's not a deal breaker. But I'd much rather have you be honest about it then try to fake your way through some CSS questions during the interview. State "I understand the basics and am eager to learn more, but haven't actually done front end development work". Can you ...


15

This can definitely be a delicate issue, and also one that I've encountered before. It's all too tempting for everyone to want to jump in and suggest the design (and yes my DE does this all the time). Designing is fun, and who wouldn't want to help, right? How I've successfully deflected this individual's suggestions was by pointing out to the team (in the ...


15

This question bothers me. Like, a lot. Really! Taking a step back, the question is all wrong. It is not a matter of how many people you need in a UX team, but how many of your team are on board with working towards the user experience. If the answer is not Everyone!, then probably you need an evangelist to make everyone else realise that they are all a part ...


15

After some years of fighting I got used to it. There are various ways to struggle with it, you can play as an authority often saying "no", or actually "NO!", but you will lose your followers, because there are always decisive people who will maintain that they know better. You can try to establish processes, but there are going to be people who will not ...


14

User Experience is a cross over field in that to do it well you can't be purely technical nor purely focused on artistic and human factors. You have to have skills from all sides and understand the interplay between them. When talking about websites and applications, to be good at UX you need to understand development and its related technologies. But you ...


11

Your story sounds similar to my case( I am not the first UX hire but I am the first guy whom they have hired who has had formal education in UX as such). Anyway here is what I would focus on: Find out who are the key stakeholders in the company who are interested in user experience: This is really important as you would need the support of atleast someone ...


11

UXD describes what's designed (the experience). UCD describes the process (starting with user research and validated through artefacts like personas). In practice, most UX designers try to work in a user-centered way, but that's not always easy to achieve under commercial constraints, especially when the user and the customer are not actually the same person ...


11

They say that "too many cooks spoil the soup" and while there's some truth to that, I think the proper saying is actually "too many opinionated people that think they are cooks spoil the soup" is more appropriate. So, yes, having too many uninformed opinions can be a bad thing (design by committee) but having multiple informed opinions isn't necessarily bad, ...


10

The best and fastest way to learn is to wireframe. Make up a project and create a wireframe. Or make a wireframe of an existing site. Nothing beats practice for learning.


10

The basics of UX work can be done by almost anyone willing to spend some time and effort learning how. Steve Krug's "Rocket Surgery Made Easy" shows that well. However that doesn't mean that everyone is a UX expert. Think of UX like painting a picture. Anyone can paint, and almost everyone can paint something decent with a little time and effort put ...


10

It doesn't make any sense to measure a UX designer's progress at making wireframes. Wireframes are just a way to communicate with other people and can take many forms, from sketches to mockups to "interactive" wireframes produced with software like Axure. Their purpose is to represent ideas in a form that can be discussed with stakeholders, team members and ...


10

You should not require users to sign in, if you wish to maximise revenue. This is the topic of Jared Spool's famous article The $300 Million Button: The designers fixed the problem simply. They took away the Register button. In its place, they put a Continue button with a simple message: "You do not need to create an account to make purchases on our ...


9

This might be relevant for you: 5 tips on sketching user interfaces: Draw box-elements with four separate lines — do not try to draw them with one continuous stroke. Use drop shadow to distinguish graphical elements. Use a thick sharpie to focus on loose form rather than details. Get your arm off the paper: you'll draw with your shoulder rather ...


9

Yes. (My Ph.D., for example, relates strongly to UX, although it is in cognitive science / computer science.) There are a lot of ways to come at UX. Pick one that interests you, and start looking at professors who are doing work in that area. Look at papers they are writing and research they are leading. Read conference proceedings and figure out who is ...


9

Many others have attempted to define the roles within user experience, but there are no hard boundaries. Jesse James Garret descibes in his book The elements of User Experience (See overview) includes Usability as part of the Strategy Plane, although I'm sure he would agree that as in so many situations, the components of user experience do not fit neatly ...


9

Are Dark Patterns Unethical? Users will not knowingly choose something against their own interests –they will not voluntarily select a poorer user experience than they otherwise could get. Dark design patterns by definition encourage users to act against their own interest and thus necessarily involve trickery, exploitation, deception, and dishonesty. These ...


9

It's a good but difficult question, without any universally good solution. However I will try to give you some things that you can do to help with this. Firstly, recognise that the role of a UX designer is to say no a lot of the time. That doesn't mean that you say "no" whenever someone suggests something that you don't particularly like. Secondly, you ...


9

Take a step back and think about what you want to know. It's where they studied, what their qualification is, and what they studied. Internationally, there is a surprising amount of variation here with many countries using the same words but have different meanings. So the result is that you should stick to generic terms that encompass all the options. ...


9

I'd say no. Some languages have names like "Dirk van Boxtel" or "Sophie van der Pol". Notice how the words in between are not capitalized.


8

They are asking one question, but they mean another. What they mean is: I don't trust you. Can you show me that someone else said this? Someone who published a book or study or something? Engineers have ancient tomes that describe programming patterns and standards. They would like design to be the same. They want to see you have read books. Get a ...


8

I run a design agency and have helped countless startups designing their websites and products. Here is my advice whether you get someone from India, China or locally to do it. 1. Figure out if design is part of your overall strategy or whether you simply need a presence. With this I mean figure out how important design is to whatever you are launching. ...


8

Mostly agree with what Rahul said - but I'd like to especially emphasise one thing. Practice doing user experience work. Practice it a lot. Reading blogs, books, papers, and courses are all great. But knowing how to apply that knowledge is a different thing. The real learning comes when you try and apply your knowledge, make mistakes, and fix 'em. You ...


8

I agree with Rahul, some very good points there. Having a solid background as a developer helps me a lot during my work as a user experience designer (I used to develop websites, but quickly moved to UXD). You know the techniques (and their limitations) you work with. In my opinion this helps you design (technically) realistic products that are possible ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible