Hot answers tagged

95

There is no problem to work as a UX/UI designer, as choosing color is just a minor part of the usability process. There are lots of other activities that the UX-er should do, like usability testing, checking analytics, conducting A/B tests, writing reports. Choosing color is more like visual designers work. People often are confused between the two ...


54

I've been doing front-end work for a decade, and I have deuteranopia or deuteranomaly (red-green color blindness). It has never been a problem. I largely rely on color codes and location/proximity on color picker UIs to identify colors. When doing a design from scratch, I will often look at pre-existing palettes for inspiration. I will also use an ...


44

Start working on your 10,000 hours any way you can. That means reading up on material concerning the field, diving in and applying for a job, hacking away at something as a hobby, keeping up with industry developments, paying attention to the thought leaders (eg. Jakob Nielsen, Jared Spool, Steve Krug, etc) and asking lots of questions. So I'd expect to see ...


40

I'm sure different people will have different views on how much or how little wireframes and prototypes overlap. What follows is how I approach the two: If you are considering an application or a website, and you look at the page level for example, a wireframe and a prototype are superficially the same things, from a physical perspective. They can both be ...


33

I mocked up a version of the form in HTML that I think improves a couple of things (but not all, because I'm not you and don't know your specific domain issues): http://newlyminted.handcraft.com/ Some of the changes I made: Group related fields. First name, middle name and last name are part of the same flow, so group them together visually. Same goes ...


30

There is enough ambiguity here that labeling and context are necessary It doesn't matter whether 30%, 50% or 70% of users think this is male (vs female or gender-neutral). There is enough ambiguity here that the infographic will fail to communicate gender effectively so context and labeling are necessary to make it effective. This Nielsen article ...


29

UCD ∈ UX Put another way, user-centred design is a method (or process) to achieving good user experience. Here is an example UCD design flow using SAP (note arrows indicating a process): Source: SAP Design Guild


25

You're here! This is the right place! You can answer real people's real questions about real situations and needing real answers, - maybe with just real ideas, or with real mock-ups and real designs! All manner of problems and challenges are raised here - take a look at previous questions (especially the unaccepted/unanswered ones) or watch the new ones ...


23

Limitations are limiting Everyone here is very nice, but they're dodging one important point: Being a color-blind UXD will limit your ability to be an all-in-one product designer. Everyone has their limits. Unlike you, I do not have a solid engineering background. I work closely with a software architect throughout the discovery phase of a product or ...


19

I find it glaring that the sound of the letter 'X' (ex) is the same as the opening sound in experience, whereas the letter 'E' sounds like the start of international. So I think that sound-wise, UX is closer to User Experience than UE. Just to support this: Extra large is marked 'XL' and not 'EL'. Also, the sound of UE (U-yi) reminds of GUI (Gu-yi) and ...


17

I say: 'I help companies make their software easier to use. Websites too.' And then if they look as if they're remotely interested after that point I move on to say something that most people identify with and that is: 'I bet you've come across software or a website that is really awkward or annoying to use - well I help companies make them more enjoyable ...


17

I have not done coding Well, then I'd say you don't have HTML and CSS skills. That's not a deal breaker. But I'd much rather have you be honest about it then try to fake your way through some CSS questions during the interview. State "I understand the basics and am eager to learn more, but haven't actually done front end development work". Can you ...


16

User experience involves the entire workflow of a system. It includes how the pages are laid out, but it also includes things like how pages interact with each other. It also includes aspects of the process that aren't inherently screens. For example, if you have an eCommerce system, user experience would also include how and when emails are sent out ...


16

After some years of fighting I got used to it. There are various ways to struggle with it, you can play as an authority often saying "no", or actually "NO!", but you will lose your followers, because there are always decisive people who will maintain that they know better. You can try to establish processes, but there are going to be people who will not ...


15

This can definitely be a delicate issue, and also one that I've encountered before. It's all too tempting for everyone to want to jump in and suggest the design (and yes my DE does this all the time). Designing is fun, and who wouldn't want to help, right? How I've successfully deflected this individual's suggestions was by pointing out to the team (in the ...


15

This question bothers me. Like, a lot. Really! Taking a step back, the question is all wrong. It is not a matter of how many people you need in a UX team, but how many of your team are on board with working towards the user experience. If the answer is not Everyone!, then probably you need an evangelist to make everyone else realise that they are all a part ...


14

User Experience is a cross over field in that to do it well you can't be purely technical nor purely focused on artistic and human factors. You have to have skills from all sides and understand the interplay between them. When talking about websites and applications, to be good at UX you need to understand development and its related technologies. But you ...


14

"Wireframe deck" is not an industry wide term that refers to a specific presentation format. Your best bet would be to seek a definition from the employer, possibly giving them a few examples so as to illustrate that you've thought the problem through and are looking for clarification. Over on EnglishLanguage.SE a similar question was asked: What is a Deck, ...


13

I agree with Rahul, some very good points there. Having a solid background as a developer helps me a lot during my work as a user experience designer (I used to develop websites, but quickly moved to UXD). You know the techniques (and their limitations) you work with. In my opinion this helps you design (technically) realistic products that are possible ...


13

The basics of UX work can be done by almost anyone willing to spend some time and effort learning how. Steve Krug's "Rocket Surgery Made Easy" shows that well. However that doesn't mean that everyone is a UX expert. Think of UX like painting a picture. Anyone can paint, and almost everyone can paint something decent with a little time and effort put ...


13

Color blindness may hinder your ability to produce some visual designs and maybe some parts of a 'pretty' UI, as color goes a long way to aesthetic appeal, BUT, as a UX designer I would go so far as to say that you can use color blindness to your advantage. Around 8% of men and .5% of women are color blind, and as a UX designer, it is our job to make sure ...


12

Your story sounds similar to my case( I am not the first UX hire but I am the first guy whom they have hired who has had formal education in UX as such). Anyway here is what I would focus on: Find out who are the key stakeholders in the company who are interested in user experience: This is really important as you would need the support of atleast someone ...


11

From Wikipedia: User experience (UX) is about how a person feels about using a product, system or service. User experience highlights the experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human-computer interaction and product ownership, but it also includes a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use ...


11

You should not require users to sign in, if you wish to maximise revenue. This is the topic of Jared Spool's famous article The $300 Million Button: The designers fixed the problem simply. They took away the Register button. In its place, they put a Continue button with a simple message: "You do not need to create an account to make purchases on our ...


11

UXD describes what's designed (the experience). UCD describes the process (starting with user research and validated through artefacts like personas). In practice, most UX designers try to work in a user-centered way, but that's not always easy to achieve under commercial constraints, especially when the user and the customer are not actually the same person ...


10

They are asking one question, but they mean another. What they mean is: I don't trust you. Can you show me that someone else said this? Someone who published a book or study or something? Engineers have ancient tomes that describe programming patterns and standards. They would like design to be the same. They want to see you have read books. Get a ...


10

The best and fastest way to learn is to wireframe. Make up a project and create a wireframe. Or make a wireframe of an existing site. Nothing beats practice for learning.


10

It doesn't make any sense to measure a UX designer's progress at making wireframes. Wireframes are just a way to communicate with other people and can take many forms, from sketches to mockups to "interactive" wireframes produced with software like Axure. Their purpose is to represent ideas in a form that can be discussed with stakeholders, team members and ...


10

You have had some great inputs but in my experience , they key thing which most UX recruiters and UX hiring managers look for is the process with which you have achieved with your end goal. While you can go with a number of different approaches with regards to how to showcase your content (slideshows, carousals, lightboxes) the end result is often not the ...


10

Good question but a ticky one to answer :). Here would be my inputs considering I just broke into the HCI field a couple of years back or so: Understand that HCI is not about just graphic design or Information architecture or interaction design or user research. You could work as a developer and still have an active interest in human computer interactions ...



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