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62

People read from left to right and from top to bottom. Chat applications normally place texts from top to bottom. The newest chats placed at the bottom. Placing the input at the bottom, therefore, is logical. Edit With this answer I didn't mean ALL people. For example, Arabic is read from right to left. But considering this websites' audience and the OPs ...


58

</textarea> placeholder="Enter your next post here!"> <textarea name="postText" rows="3" </div> top. to put the input at the it would make sense from bottom to top, read a chat window In a world where we <div class="post">


44

Short answer You can't design for them. It can be that your design is bad, or that people really cannot concentrate on the task due to their internal reasons, explained below in the long version. If you have successfully determined that it is the second case, nothing in your design can change how people tick internally. An easier to use application will ...


33

To know if the tooltip should be closable by the user, we should know when it gets displayed. As a mouse-over: no, it is hidden, when the user moves away. On some event: How would it get closed otherwise? Time is not a good option as it would a break accessibility guidelines. Click in text line: Not necessary, but I would provide this option as ...


32

Probably the most well-known example of such "self-learning UI" is Microsoft Office 2003. They called it 'adaptive menu', see image below. The menu behavior was almost the same as you described. Besides re-organizing items, they also hid rare ones to maintain a reasonable number of items in a default collapsed view. My experience showed that most ...


20

Grey buttons can still be used, provided you can give enough indication that the button is indeed not disabled. You could have a darker font color, like this: Even then, this approach is not recommended. Seconding Pasha's thoughts, such an attempt to make grey buttons seem "non-disabled" might still not be convincing to all users. Unless you're bent on ...


20

Fulfilling user expectations is a fine goal, but it’ll only get you so far. Unexpected results are not themselves bad. Sometimes they are even delightful (“Surprise!”). However, unexpected things in a UI are a sign of a usability problem. To resolve conflicts between kinds of consistency, you need to analyze the situation for the impacts of violating ...


17

Three possible solutions I can see: One Hire a barista to man the coffee machine daily, justify the cost by explaining each employee saves 5+ minutes per day not making coffee. Two Develop a disposable stirrer/steam nozzle made of high temperature plastic, you need to connect one to use the steamer and it detaches and is used for stirring the drink then ...


17

I strongly advise AGAINST multiple columns, because this breaks the eye flow and work flow. However, grouping multiple inputs in the same line by logic, can be a usability+++, and will save you a lot of space. Here I made a quick example of what I mean: In addition, you can: Reduce the number of input fields to a minimum (hide optional fields in an ...


15

(Fill in the curly braces { } below with whatever fits.) Hiya kids! My job's making websites fun. Who can name a website? [Open the website if there's a computer available. Have a local kids' site ready if none of the kids respond. If no computer is available, make a large paper prototype ahead of time.] [The following should explain information ...


12

Do not rely on hover state for affordance. Don't make it a puzzle for me to figure out what I can click on or not, just show me. Also, tablets and other touch centric devices don't have a hover state at all. Grey buttons next to colored buttons of the same shape tell me that they're disabled and not available at this point. Greying out items that are ...


12

I would opine that this is like asking how tires could be improved in such a way as to not get dirty after driving through mud. With currently available technology and physics being what they are, I have to say this is a behavioral issue rather than a design issue with the wand itself. Your user experience can be improved by providing a pre-mixed sanitary ...


12

I think there are some other ways of dealing with scrolling and modelling complex forms that will yield better results than just trying to squash all the fields onto one screen. Ways that will lessen the obviousness of scrolling, or remove it altogether as well as making white-space more manageable and less obvious. I would advise considering the following ...


12

In design, the visual center is the perceived center of an artifact and not the actual center. The visual center of any page is just slightly above and to the right of the actual (mathematical) center. This tends to be the natural placement of visual focus, and is also sometimes referred to as museum height. Reference: The Principles of Design ...


11

They say that "too many cooks spoil the soup" and while there's some truth to that, I think the proper saying is actually "too many opinionated people that think they are cooks spoil the soup" is more appropriate. So, yes, having too many uninformed opinions can be a bad thing (design by committee) but having multiple informed opinions isn't necessarily bad, ...


10

I agree with your colleagues. Any good coffee shop will keep two clean, wet cloths (bar towels) by the station, one for cleaning the machine and one for wiping the steam wand. Cleaning and purging the steam wand after is essentially barista 101; if you don't know to do that and have no one around to guide you, you probably shouldn't be operating a ...


8

I think it depends how your icons looks currently; if it doesn't fit new guidelines then Yes it's worth changing. Users's impression of your icon is important. Here are the icon guidelines for iOS7 Apple HIG – App Icon iOS7 app icon guidelines For the best results, enlist the help of a professional graphic designer. Use universal imagery that people will ...


7

Task flows are a tool to help us think through the design before a feature is actually developed. They allow us to interject the user into the flow of the application and determine if the conceptual model agrees with the user model. Task flow is in relation to the activity flow within the application. Customer journey maps are documents that ...


7

Using grey buttons is not a bad idea! Grey buttons show the user that items are secondary actions compared to the primary action (which is orange). If you add another color say blue into the mix it may confuse the user as to which button is the primary action. For example, my company uses light grey buttons to show a secondary action and a dark blue for ...


7

Do not change what the user enters. Do not assume parts, split into parts, or assemble from parts Present the user with an example how their name will be used Example letter we might send to you: Dear john dOE, It is a great pleasure to hear from you again after all this time ... or We will address packages to you like this: Mrs. ...


7

If available, you should prefer the share action provider shown in the second example. It was added in Android 4.0 (API 14) as part of the Action Bar, and it's been backported to Android 2.1 (API 7) as part of the support library. This method is quicker and easier for users. The share button can remain on the screen at all times, and the most recently used ...


7

User testing should give more objective results. Anyway, my suggestion to complex form is to provide visual indicator of current field, see image. It allows: to have more concentration on a current field and to return to work faster after interruption or break. The same approach you could see in Excel, which is edge case of complex form, as ...


7

When multiple messages are ordered in order of writing, it is natural to put the latest one at the bottom. This mimics how physical writing works - imagine a long paper sheet or a guestbook where people come by from time to time and leave a note. Everyone would write their note just under the last note, and it would end up automatically ordered from oldest ...


7

The whole point of breaking tasks into seperate menus is that the user can find the task more quickly and in fewer clicks. As well as grouping being predictable making initial discovery quicker, consistent groups/locations are remembered far easier during repetition or subsequent visits. Designers like the look of the hamburger because it is less cluttered, ...


7

The thing with tooltips (as with everything else on screen) is that it increases cognitive load and requires to be processed (read) by the user. So the general question to ask is: does the user need (or want) to see the tooltip permanently, or should be allowed to close it? Is the tooltip really helpful or trivial? I'd say that tooltips in general need ...


6

Particular low-contrast ratios (text color to background color) can be an accessibility flag--so maybe avoid light yellow on white for some code--but otherwise, I can't see how syntax highlighting via color would be in any other way any sort of accessibility issue. As you point out, without it, it's actually less accessible for people such as yourself. As ...


6

Unless you are displaying a time with location information, I would just display it consistently in the local time zone. Example 1: Check-ins This is an example of where you WOULD want to show it in the specific timezone. If you are displaying check-ins on a map. You would want to show the times in the relevant timezone. However, if you are a trying to ...


6

There are two things that I can think of that might address this. One is to simply make the wand self cleaning or easier to clean (maybe hydrophobic). If option one isn't possible then option two would be to make it look more objectionable when it's not clean (color the wand to make the dried milk more obvious), hopefully prompting users to clean it more ...


6

Hiring a UX designer is great first move: you focus on the user aspect, on his needs, on his behavior, on his expectations, as a website user, and not merely as a website viewer. That's a good decision. You're definitely not back to square one. The UX designer showed you that you need to introduce a level of abstraction in your interface. Users don't care ...


6

I don't see it as more than logical. If the text is displayed in the main window from top to bottom, then the input box for your reply is on the bottom, because that's where your text will end up. While in another situation, like a comment thread on a blog, the most recent entry can be on top. Then the input field for new entries is above that, again, ...



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