New answers tagged

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I find the top view better, but the bottom one is sometimes used by users with multiple monitors. Why not re-designing into a panels layout (like Visual Studio) so the user can decide which one suits him better? At the end everyone has a different preference...


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These guys did a thorough research and came up with the Design Tools Survey You should find all your answers here : http://tools.subtraction.com/


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It's Depend. let's say if you can handle a simple styling or toggling with CSS, then don't use JS instead. simple css will do the job. But in case you having complicated web app: Almost all modern web apps are heavily depend on front-end technologies which designed by AngularJS, BackboneJS and etc. it's almost impossible you give a good experience ...


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I believe a suitable message can be: Javascript is turned OFF in your browser. For the optimal site experience, we highly recommend you switch Javascript ON. Know more here: Turn On Javascript for Chrome. This helps in the following manner: It suggests the user that the website highly depends on Javascript. If it's turned off, the user will know ...


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"Tools", in the context of an image editing application, are typically local operations. That is, they are actions that the user does by clicking (or pressing) on the canvas (e.g. draw, select, erase, zoom). It's generally understood that you select a tool, and that the selected tool governs how the user interacts directly with the canvas. On the other ...


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If 'Advanced Settings', sits under 'Tools', then you could use the gear icon for Tools and the three dot icon for advanced settings (...) It's kind of like opening the toolbar, and then you can dig deeper into the toolset if you want. I think any kind of 'expand' type icon could work here. You don't really need to find an icon for advanced settings, just ...


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The terminology you are using is incorrect. Instead of terming Image Processing functions consisting of Hue, Saturation, Contrast, Brightness, etc as Advanced Settings, a better option is to name it Edit or Tune Image. Why? Because major photo editing apps do this. Instagram and Snapseed both use an Edit icon for tuning the image with image processing ...


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The problem with this is that if User A loses their phone or has it stolen, they would no longer be able to log into your app on their replacement device. Plus, the same user having multiple devices is becoming more and more common. Is there a reason why you can't just use email & password? Even if you need to collect all that info at least once, can't ...


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I think you have the answer yourself, when you say These buttons look like tabs Simply make them look as what they are, BUTTONS, and then you can use regular button states to communicate statuses such as active, selected, disabled or neutral. Using the UI for other elements than those you actually use will always bring problems, going from dfficulties ...


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Stepping back a bit, I think your problem might be that of mixing UI metaphors. In desktop applications, tabs are used to select one-of-many pages. Your UI offers freely composable options, which are usually associated with checkboxes. So adding a checkbox to the label would make things closer to the usual some-of-many selections in other applications. ...


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Avoid using solely color to communicate information One the principles of web accessibility is "Ensure color is not the sole means of communicating information." While two colors may look very different to a designer's eye, someone with color vision deficiency may perceive them as nearly the same - check your colors against each other with a Contrast ...


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What about the term "active user"? In forums we have many panels that list the "active" users who are always users that are currently "online" or "logged-in". Best of luck!


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Correct me if I'm wrong. But what you really care about is distinguishing someone who is not a logged in user from those who are. Because once you're logged in, all of those other roles apply. The distinction is "visitor" a "visitor" is a non-logged in user. Everyone else is well "Authenticated"


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Actives You could use the slang actives to describe users that are currently active in your application. This draws on the similar practice in the military of asking how many hostiles / friendlies are in an area.


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"Onymous" is the antonym of anonymous, so I guess that's an (obscure) option. I would say that "member" is the name of a role of a user, and not a type of user. "Subject" is also a candidate, as per https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4989063/what-is-the-meaning-of-subject-vs-user-vs-principal-in-a-security-context


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Since these terms are for your internal documentation, it's most important to be clear and unambiguous. And I don't think a single word will be good enough. I usually use "authorized user" or "signed-in user" and "anonymous user" for that reason.


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In retail sites, signed in users are sometomes called as hot customers and guest users as cold customers.


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Online This means "logged in member". E.g. member1 is online. It's better to use "online"/"offline" rather than just "member". "Member" can be a position e.g.[pic:mbr_1] mbr_1 ** ONLINE ** MEMBER[pic:] refers to the avatar. Position examples are "Member", "Admin", "Banned until ", "Banned permanently"...


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You could, with proper explanation call an user who is logged in an "inlogee" (I'm not an native english speaker ;-) )


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In the past we've used live user to mean a user who is currently signed in. (As opposed to an active user: somebody who has signed in recently, but isn't necessarily signed in right now.)


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There is no commonly used single-word term for this, so I would suggest avoiding inventing one or picking an obscure one, as this is only likely to confuse anyone who isn't familiar with your terminology (e.g. new members of your team, third parties you subcontract to, etc). "Authenticated user" is the usual term for this, so I'd suggest using it.


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When describing website functionality, you can usually use "Member" to imply a logged-in user. While someone could technically be a member but not logged in, this is unlikely to be relevant to your discussions. While not logged in, they are effectively seeing the "guest" view of the site. I think this is clear: On the home page, a member will have a ...


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It's difficulf because you may have end users who use the system in very different ways including users who manage other users. I'd suggest something like either Current or Actor


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Edit: Actually "Active" might be the best. You wouldn't really refer to "active" guests, but you do have "active" members. This is what Slack uses and Google also uses 'activity' to refer to log of signing in and out of Google accounts. Original answer: Effectively you're looking for an adjective for your Members. I'd say "Online" is best. It's the ...


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Authenticated For example: Windows user groups have defined names one of which is Authenticated. The Authenticated Users identity Any user accessing the system through a logon process has the Authenticated Users identity. This identity allows access to shared resources within the domain, such as files in a shared folder that should be accessible ...


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We might need more context to help you answer your question. You might be challenged to find a single word, so I can give you two words - Account holder, or User Account.


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I have seen this kind of question on here before. This is the difference between Quantitative and Qualitative research. High level information, such as what makes your users happy, is largely opinion based. For opinion based data to have any credibility you need to collect them in large quantities - A small sample may have their own biases and so may skew ...


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Asking closed questions is not optimal, for the reasons pointed out by Kristian - they skew the results. I think Adrian has a point too, since getting feature-specific feedback might be a better fit for a survey. Moderation It is the interviewer's job to moderate the discussion, to keep the focus. I think this is partly what you wanted/needed to accomplish,...


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One approach that can be useful for getting a meaningful response is to ask the user to place their response on a sliding scale between two options that have the same level of "goodness" or "badness", but different balance, then ask them if they think the change or idea is broadly good or bad. The best way I can explain this is by showing how I'd do it in a ...


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When you ask leading question you are biasing the responses because you "prime" the users to answer you in a particular direction. When you ask "Is clicking on this button difficult for you to complete a task?" it is more likely that the user will say that it is infact more difficult to click this button. The point of asking not leading questions is to see ...


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I don't think there would be a paper on this, but an obvious example to consider would be the client/customer and vendor situation. Some people argue that using the word customer reinforces a professional relationship and therefore reduces the appearance of 'friendliness', and hence sometimes the term client is used to put them at a higher status in a ...



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