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We did this classification for our educational website. As suggested by everyone, it's best to ask the user directly. However, it's important to let them know what you mean exactly by different levels of understanding. Just putting "Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced" would be vague. We gave a one line explanation of what we meant by different levels of ...


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Like mentioned in the earlier answer, the simplest way is to ask the user. But there are ways to identify users' expertise before a survey, and frame questions accordingly. The explanation of these methods will take you step by step to my suggestion at the end of this answer, that derives a probable way to evaluate users' expertise during a survey. Brief ...


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As Jonas said, the easiest way would be to just ask the users directly, especially since it is a survey. It may be in your interest to break your question down to specific areas of the website to be more granular. It may also help to phrase your questions/answers to fit in a Likert scale. Examples would be How comfortable are you with _____. (0 to 5) How ...


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If there is just one user on IE8 there is a need. That does not mean you should. You need to evaluate the IE8 need of your user base. Is it 1 user or 10%. Is that 1 user critical? If you don't support IE8 you are going to lose some users that either cannot or will not upgrade. Is the cost of IE8 support worth the value in retaining those few ...


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It really depends on when the problem is, if you are not happy with the 'look and feel' of the ui then you need to work with the users to find out what they want/need form the ui - shown them what you have done and many try some low fidelity paper prototypes. Don't be afraid to print out you ui let them draw in it. If you are not happy with Glade+gtk as a ...


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There is a need if a) a significant percentage of your user base uses IE8 b) business is not OK with forcing these users to use a different browser c) Business is OK with the cost overhead with code upkeep to support IE8


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Change is hard especially for large organizations I worked at Microsoft almost a decade ago running Windows XP with gigabytes of RAM while the rest of the world was hanging on to much earlier versions of Windows including Windows NT because it did what they needed and required less resources. I found it interesting that 10 years after using the first ...


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Depends. I face this decision almost every day. Sometimes is easier, sometimes is harder, but there are certain rules that can help. Like Tohster says, demographics plays a big role, and as a matter of fact is the keyword in this decision. However, I kind of disagree with the figures of that netmarketshare link. First, because they're nowhere close to ...


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Your source for browser market share is based on the visits to that web site alone and nothing else. It does not account for worldwide or country-wide usage. Do not base anything on their site stats alone. Which browsers you support is based on who visits your web site and nothing else. I have several theatre web sites where the predominant visitor uses ...


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Probably yes, but it depends on your app objectives Netmarketshare maintains a running survey of Web browser client market shares here: Desktop browser market share As of May 2015, IE8 still accounts for almost 15% of desktop browser clients so most developers would choose to support it for general apps. Of course, this changes as you consider the ...


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Any user will never sign up if he does not know what is there in the website for him. In case you think your site is too complex that a user will not be able to identify the complete potential; you can use an optional tutorial after the user signs up.


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While the accepted answer seems to be "don't ask" -- the researcher in me wants to improve the corpus of knowledge in the world. If you were hypothetically providing a quality of service that would genuinely be improved be asking for this information, a way could be as follows: Optional Checkbox What's in the checkbox list is what makes it interesting: ...


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Abiding by most of the above comments/answers on sensitivities let us say, we decide to ask and use it for only appropriate purposes. Therefore if the question is how to frame the question, it goes like: write two things unique and great about your ethnicity Of course I would mention that this is completely optional for the user to answer this and that ...


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I'm a fan of using a dashed underline to indicate a tooltip.


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A tool-tip is not the UI you are looking for As you correctly state tooltip is suitable for information on a specific item. Not the intent of the whole UI. What you want to do is present an option for "in-line help" on the UI here are ideas on how to do this include interactive callout, embedded text or icon download bmml source – Wireframes ...


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In this case, what I feel is, let the user feel comfortable while using the app. So as stated by both the friends above, Next button should be placed. However I would like to suggest small change here. Enable the Next button only after user selects the country. So the scenario will be : List of countries will be shown, user will tap on any one of the ...


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Agree with point raised by Krishna, let the user select despite the prior detection of the location. In addition to that I would add the concept of "highlight" or "focus". If the a location has been detected, bring that option (e.g. United Kingdom) up in the list, or make sure that the focus of the scrollable list is on that specific country so that the ...


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Let the user select the country. This will bring consistency to the UI without losing anything at all. If you add next button this will increase a tap which is same as selecting the country from the list. The biggest advantage you gain from this approach is that you will have consistency in the UI and user will already know from his experience with prior ...


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I think the light color on hover in the first example is better and more fast and simple to use. The second one could really be confuse, and you should not have to click on each line (I didn't even noticed at first the I each line was clickable). I suggest a simple solution, just show the edit/delete buttons (or icons) on the hover state. The table, in this ...


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You could simply make a mix of your client's request and your proposed option: just use icons and numbers. The money values alone will create an element of interest so people will probably click those elements to get more info. Then you can expand the element on click to display more info or even use it as an engagement element, like "how did you get X ...


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Since the client wants the three values always visible, the last option is in the right direction. You should however make sure that you pay attention to a few things: Information hierarchy: Make sure the data you are displaying is sized and placed correctly in the top bar. Currently the font size of two of your numbers is larger than the logo and and one ...



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