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1

We used to have the same problem in my office. (Although we have 2 separate recycling bins and 1 garbage bin) There was only 2 post-it notes above the bins but no one bothered to pay attention. Now we added a much better sign and I think it helps because it tells everyone exactly what goes in each bin. For example, it say "No soiled paper" in the paper ...


0

I have seen a few examples of behavioural modification that make use of the 'norm' - for example: you could try putting up a poster that says something like "98.5% of people sort their trash correctly" Alternatively, you could (and I hate this word) 'Gameify' it by posting some stats for correct recycling bin contents like: "last week we sent 2 bags of ...


1

It is definitely good to consider the customer/user experience as a continuous and evolving metric, so taking samples or measurements at different points in time is the best way to gauge the direction and magnitude of the change. I don't know that there is a specific name or terminology for this, because I don't think you should necessarily see it as a ...


0

I think a good way to engage and motivate people is to give them some kind of incentive to recycle. Maybe add a sign that says "it's been X days since we successfully recycled" and whenever trash ends up in the recycling the number goes back down to 0. Or maybe see if it's possible to add an official office rule that recycling is mandatory. Here in NYC ...


4

In About Face it is suggested that the average user does not understand boolean logic. That's because in common language AND and OR have different meaning than they have in boolean algebra. For example, if I want all users whose age equals 15 or 30, I could say: "give me all users whose age is 15 and 30." It's pretty clear to a programmer that that and is ...


2

There's rather a lot in this article - and it's rather heavy going psychology: but the bottom line is that most people are rather rubbish at formal logic and deductive and inductive thinking: It's based on experiments called the 'Wason Verification Task' ...


1

At work we have two identical white bins right next to one another. The only difference is one uses a black colored bin bag and the other a clear bag. Clear bag is associated with recycling by convention, so we've never had any issues of anyone making a mistake. We also have recycling symbols dotted around to make people aware that we do indeed recycle. ...


2

Make milestones. Once a certain amount of recycling is done, everyone at the office gets a beer. Anything on those lines should or might help a bit.


0

This is all about human psychology. "if people like something they also like to see its growth"-like a plant . so we need to add some gamification to the recycle bin and then your staff actually start liking it(ya start like your recycle bin ) . my solution is just train your staff minds with some new things every day . they have to eagerly wait to see and ...


0

Your proposal looks like an emergency solution: "My apartment is burning; How can I improve firemen efficiency?". Another view would be to prevent the apartment from burning in the first place... Therefore, I would suggest a two steps approach: First, a solution similar to yours, to help users as soon as possible. (You could lead some interviews or ...


5

A different approach perhaps: make users of the bins 'agree' to what they are putting inside them. Imagine the below is the lid of the bin, with the OK 'button' being the handle to open the bin. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


16

Place empty cans and bottles on a table instead There is only one way to stop all people from putting trash in a recycle bin and that is by not having a recycle bin. This might mean more recyclable items go in the trash but I think most people will learn the system with a few cans and bottles on a table close by with a sign that says, "Please put empty ...


0

Identify and care are separate. The standard symbol for recycle is And the standard color is green. As for care need to educate people on the value of recycle. Meeting, flyer, one on one? If you can just get a few advocates that will speak out when someone uses recycle for trash hopefully a recycle culture will build. Especially if you can get some ...


2

The ideal UX solution is that you handle the recycling separation on the back end. For your particular problem: They are simply two bins, with the same color ...start my differentiating them by color... that are hidden in a cabinet. ...and consider not hiding them in a cabinet. Outside of the cabinet are two doors, one door saying ...


1

I think this is a fundamental problem with Recycle Bins, as long as you put them near to Trash Bins, people are going to throw trash inside them. That's because recycle bins are always associated with trash bins, we haven't been able to successfully separate the two in people's minds so far. I think the only solution would be to put the Recycle Bin in a ...


6

I think an aspect that hasn't been discussed are social dynamics, particularly, how can we use social indicators to incentivize behavioral change. A nice parallel is how hotels have nudged people to reuse towels. Simply stating that by reusing one's towel is better for the environment had a nominal effect. What had a larger impact was stating that X% of ...


2

This is more than a reading issue. You are trying to change people's behavior. This break room recycling can - is it for bottles (plastic/glass) only? Do you have other bins for paper elsewhere? Changing the shape of the access hole to the can might get people to stop and think - especially if the hole is inconveniently small for regular refuse, but works ...


2

Opening Hmmm interesting UX question. I usually assume UX will be about websites... but this is completely valid, too! Color Code It You guys had it right when you were color coding things. My suggestion would be to make the trash can red. Of course, red means "stop" or "danger" to us so you'll [hopefully] find that people will hesitate before using the ...


1

Do people understand what is considered trash and then what gets recycled? I swear every place is different in what it recycles (glass? plastic? paper? compost? glass without labels? etc.) I would first make sure there were instructions on what needed to be recycled - then I would mark the recycled can in green or blue.


1

I would try taking off the door from the trash cabinet but not the recycle bin cabinet door, making it less steps it will take them to throw the trash. You could also just change the position of your trash and recycle bins. Seems like you have more traffic direction on the recycle bin side.


1

Another thing that might work is to use tabs which mark the Summary Stats rectangle... then automatically switch context over to Specific Stats as needed in your example above but leaving a clear way back for the user...


3

You would need to test it out but I believe that one of these buttons would more clearly communicate the described action to the user...


0

Labeling the button "back" may be general but that's the appropriate label. From your description, "Summary stats" and "Charts" are not related with each other. In this case you can consider a separation between them like the below. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups In these cases the user will know that ...


0

I am feeling lucky : How about a simple arrow icons (<) on the right hand side or as an icon on the left (Back icon) Specific Stats . Nicely done visually. Instead of even writing Back. I feel its pretty clear even if users did this once. I think "Back to Summary" is ok. (are you having space and visual clutter issues then my suggestion is don't try ...


-1

I would suggest a pop-over that has a 'close' button for the detail view. Otherwise, if it's purely desktop, could hovering the table data expose the detail info?


4

I agree with Ranjan's answer that you want to see the website as close to reality as possible. Thus keeping the user profile and logout link in tact and add a topbar as indication that you're in an impersonating mode. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You can give the impersonating user a clear explanation on how ...


0

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Here is another approach that is common enough for you to consider implementing as well. Start with a empty table that has an input box to edit the column heading (perhaps with some text to indicate that you can enter and edit the content. Once you have entered in a value and ...


2

Having implemented this feature a few times, I have found the cleanest solution to be "exec" instead of "sudo". Steps: Power user logs in. Power user accesses "login as" feature. Power user types Target user username. Power user clicks submit button. Page boots, sees Target user in session, execute Auth::login(target). App now behaves as though Target ...


8

For administrator or testing mode, the testers usually want to be able to see the website as closely as possible to the user's point of view. One way to do this is to just highlight the top nave bar a different color (like red or green) so that the tester knows the browser is in impersonation mode, but all everything else is the same so they are seeing ...


7

Type of impersonation Interesting question! how exactly this might look will depend on the aim of impersonation and the relationship between the impersonator and impersonated. Few questions might be helpful in devising the right approach: For example, is the impersonation feature required for social networking product or for an enterprise solution? Is it ...


4

I would do this through the combination of a pretty obvious UI state change and a change in wording. For example, if your header is normally white when you're logged in as you, change it to bright orange to indicate a difference in status. Similarly, you could also just stick a bar over the top of the UI like this. As for the wording, maybe something like ...


1

I think you should not limit yourself to specific tools. Generally speaking you should pick a tool that allows you to : Work quickly Work Efficiently Produce results with the right level of details Allows you to share and print documents easily. For me Mindjet Mind-manager seemed to tick few of these boxes but was not an option at my workplace so I had ...


0

I typically use PowerPoint (or Google Slides) to build both, mostly because it's easy to use and as Zaxbit said, it's faster to use what you know. However, these are typically small enough sites that I can fit all of the pages on a standard slide. I would imagine dedicated software could better handle larger sites and help you to organize versus PowerPoint ...



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