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Bookmarks arent dead,as the internet is growing and the most important media to us is constantly changing, Users ESPECIALLY mobile ones,might feel that the websites they use ,show them the most relevant things when they ask for them or expect them anyways. Google has a watch again tab in youtube and facebook posts become irrelevant in days. Most ...


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It's most likely beneficial The information about the other users serves a few great goals: it creates the sense that the platform is well inhabited, which is great, especially when the platform is starting out; it builds the feeling of scarcity, and therefore, urgency in buying decision — which is great for sales (if this factor is irritating enough to ...


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As i already mentioned in my comment, the simple answer is just It's worth noting that the user might have a different opinion about his own experience than his usage data reveals. Maybe some people see them self as Facebook expert even tho they never visited the security settings while other see themself as Facebook intermediate even tho they submitted ...


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1. Same B2C product with small customizations / a few additional features for B2B - Provide menu on the same page. I guess this is what you are looking for. I have also provided two other business scenarios. 2. Same product but more features/ extensive tool kit / premiere services - A link on home page that redirects to professionals/Business page ...


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The last option you mentioned "A completely separate, professional-focused website" would seem the least desirable, as it would not be very flexible/scalable in response to additional professional categories being identified in the future. A "modal" on a web site does not seem like good practice. A combination of the remainder of what you suggested may be ...


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First think about the possible outcome, how you will use that data? We don't just categorize people for fun but for a reason, finding out your reason to do it will help to create the solution more than any best-practices.


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Asking them is a very good and easy way to go. If you can't or are not sure on how much you can rely on their answers, measure their behaviour with Google Analytics, frequency and funnel/goal completions. I have specific goals per user type to measure how well they know the site, and get them from our own Control Panel or from MixPanel ei. how many posts ...


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A few quick comments about categorizing users by skill or performance level. Perpetual-intermediate users. In his book About Face, Alan Cooper talks about the perpetual intermediate. He argues that there is no such thing as an expert—in the long run. Websites and software are always changing, and so experts necessarily slide down the learning curve as ...


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You are seeking a question (or questions), within the context of a survey, to determine the "experience" of users with a specific web site. You have expressed an aversion to self-reporting and frequency of use type measurements. You would like a "standardised" instrument. You appear to want to "test" the users' experience, rather than allow them to ...


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I don't know of any tools to determine level of user "type". Sure, asking them to describe their expertise level is fine, but it shouldn't be trusted; just like customers know what they want, not how to get there, users know their expertise, but not what the expertise actually means. As someone who came from QA, I have four classifications for users: ...


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How about a remote usability test? You can combine user tasks with qualitative feedback. First, find some test users. You could pay a recruiting service, put an intercept message on a web page, or send out a link to your contacts. Depending on who you are targeting, you will likely need to provide an incentive to encourage participation. Then, use a ...


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This is a tough one. In any case you need to know certain properties of the web application before you can classify skill. Ask yourself if this is a user only survey, where we won't ask IT-Pros or developers of the application. The Second thing to ask is level of complexity. Is this a simple straight forward app where there is only one way to complete each ...


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We did this classification for our educational website. As suggested by everyone, it's best to ask the user directly. However, it's important to let them know what you mean exactly by different levels of understanding. Just putting "Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced" would be vague. We gave a one line explanation of what we meant by different levels of ...


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Like mentioned in the earlier answer, the simplest way is to ask the user. But there are ways to identify users' expertise before a survey, and frame questions accordingly. The explanation of these methods will take you step by step to my suggestion at the end of this answer, that derives a probable way to evaluate users' expertise during a survey. Brief ...



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