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108

Make sure that you focus on goals. Don't ask what your users want or need in terms of functionality or form. Find out what they need (or want) to achieve .. that way the parameters you use to define and solve the problem will be much clearer and focused. Questions to ask your users might run along the lines of; what they need to achieve. how they ...


57

You want your users to use your service. Your users want to use the service but they need to invest first (i.e. time to upgrade their browser). Ideas: First of all be nice and show an empathic message, e.g. like Apple does if you run a browser that's not supported by iCloud Tell them why it's worth investing the time (list benefits, preview what they can ...


54

Updated Answer - March 2013 Since this answer was posted on November 2012, Google has discontinued this plugin. While it might still work as of today (March, 2014) there is no guarantee of it working in the future. As of January 2014, support for Chrome Frame is discontinued: http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2013/06/chrome-frame-discontinued.html Given ...


38

You might want to briefly try explaining the value of upgrading, while promoting the action with positive language, and demoting the negative action with not exactly negative language, but just less positive. You also need to provide information for those who are unable to upgrade (for example corporate restrictions may prevent use of anything except IE6), ...


32

I had a customer a few years back who had gone through several stages of improvements to the way their system worked. Initially they managed everything in Excel and it kind of worked, but it started getting a bit bloated and rather out of hand - well you can imagine the problems! Then they got a team of developers in-house to improve the situation. How? ...


30

Good question. I can only offer my opinion, no research. In my opinion, it seems as though doing this is mixing 2 separate actions on one element (i've done it myself in the past). I've come to the conclusion that the navigation click action on the "Services" item should be removed. You will face further problems when people use touch screens. E.g. when ...


23

You could do what this GIANT Austrailian company did and charge an extra "tax" for old browsers in compensation for having to support them Kogan.com 'It appears you or your system administrator has been in a coma for over 5 years and you are still using IE7.' It begins, before going on to break the news about the costs. 'To help make the internet a ...


19

This may be a case of the more you make users work, the less they try. I believe when confronted with a task, like trying to understand some content on a page, users do a quick estimate on whether the effort will be worth it or not. Too often we present users with extensive content and clicking just to tell them something that they already know or don’t ...


19

High password entropy protects against brute forcing passwords. It does not protect against any other attack against passwords. Your first task should be to ensure that the passwords will not get stolen from your servers and that you have proper timeouts. With regard to password policies my stance is as follows: Do not store passwords in plain text. If you ...


15

I've come across this before and the following image illustrates just part of the problem: I've found that one way to find out what a user actually needs is to really understand the user's requirements, to the point where you can put yourself in their shoes and ask yourself "What would I need in this position?"* The other thing I've found that helps is ...


14

I would suggest using a standardised notification at the top of every page. That way you can show any notification you like, or nothing (most of the time). It has become widely used, and you can design it to be very noticeable if you wish. Some examples:


14

I see three areas in which condoms experience can be improved: Application - for some people it may be difficult to apply a condom, especially if it's a very first time they use it (so that they don't know how to apply it) or she has long nails, which may cause perforation. Improving this part of condom use experience could be quite important. Sexual ...


11

There are several things to consider here: firstly is the way human beings create passworsds: Firstly, users will just append a 1 or an ! to their favourite insecure dictionary password, or capitalise the first letter. This is a human trait called satificing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satisficing#Decision_making). This human behaviour of aiding memory ...


10

This is not the definite answer, but perhaps you can try to think of the difference between UI/UX and front-end development as the difference between design and implementation. The problem is that UX designers tend to come from either a graphic design or software development background, and so there are naturally overlaps between their role and that of a ...


10

You need to distinguish between levels of negative behaviour and respond accordingly. Spammers Spammers or people posting clearly abusive content should be permanently banned without any warning. It is also useful if your site requires users to achieve some level reputation before they can do something to spam other users. This should be something that ...


10

Simply differentiating between the top and bottom of the rolled-up condom would really improve the UX in my opinion. It can be difficult, especially in the low light environment these products are commonly used, to see which side is the entrance (see image below). If the condom is the wrong way around it won't roll on. Condoms are often stored for some time ...


10

A good rule of thumb is that you should only-when-necessary corner users into one action. Ask: "Can the user explore and perform other tasks without this input?" Because popups (I'll call them modals here) inhibit interactivity with other elements on the page, this rule of thumb applies. So unless updating the status is essential to some immediate part of ...


9

The only way that you will ever understand what people need it to first understand them and their problem. There isn't any magic formula or set of steps to go through to do this, but any steps that you can take which help you see their problems from different perspectives will help. That is the reason that most successful software is written by people ...


9

You aren't as likely to discover their needs by analyzing their reactions to something that you've built. I agree with codeinthehole - research that independently of your ideas. Some questions that might be helpful: What's a random day in their life like? When / where do they use tools similar to yours? What do they need to know beforehand in order to ...


8

You are responsible for the security of your site! Not your users. That’s why you determine how high security level on passwords your site requirements demand. If its $pecial Ch@racters, Num83r5, length of password, UPPER CASE or lower case. You decide, not your users. They shouldn’t determine security level against dictionary lookup password attacks – you ...


7

You can't rely on anyone reading them, and if you can do without them, you should. Recommended read: Designing for People Who Have Better Things To Do With Their Lives by Joel Spolsky


7

How are you warning your users before the point of sale? Some text along the lines of "Your current browser is not fully compatible for use with this site. To get the maximum productivity/effectiveness, one of these browsers is recommended" is the easiest/most common tactic, sounds like what you're doing. There are a number of javascript-based overlays that ...


7

Redirect them to the scaled-up mobile-version of the website and display a heading on top, saying they can use the full-version when they decide to upgrade their browser. I think this is better than outright refusing to serve them as bounce-rate when met with a "brick-wall" (upgrade your browser to proceed) will be far higher. Scaled-up, mobile web-sites ...


7

There are two aspects here to consider : You cannot always expect your users to provide perfect inputs : While there are ways to restrict users from making obvious mistakes like entering alphabetical characters in a number only field or entering a invalid email id, you cannot force users to use a specific format for everything as users will surely make ...


6

Users don’t read messages boxes and it’s our own dang fault for over-using and misusing them. Too often message boxes are used to try to make up for design flaws, enforce security, or educate the users. It doesn't work. The result is message boxes are frequently irrelevant, uninformative, or incomprehensible. They “cry wolf” most of the time so users ignore ...


6

Go and sit with them. There is no way of understanding user needs without actually sitting with them for several weeks and listening in to their work, watching them, engaging with what they are actually doing as part of their job. You can get on with your own work at the same time, workign on other stuff, but being there and observing over a period that lets ...


6

You might not be Google, but the fundamental principles of search remain the same: users are looking for a specific piece of information, and want to find it as quickly as possible. Due to the relevance in search results delivered by the market leading search engines, users expect to get the result they are looking for on the first page of results and will ...


6

Minimalist design is a part of it...or more accurately most modern devices like smartphones would be horrifically ugly and busy if every sensor were labled as such. At a quick glance my Nexus 4 would have the following labels: Rear Camera Flash Headphone Rear Speaker Front Speaker Front camera Proximity Sensor Sim card Slot Sim card Slot Eject Volume ...


6

Often if you need to need a big error message because the user can't see what to do then there is a problem with the interface its self. If the user needs to select an application then the applications need to look like they can be selected. Avoid a visual representation that looks like a standard table and has some form of select-ability - if it's multiple ...


6

You answered yourself in your question: you already have users who have shown you that there are OS behaviors that they haven't yet discovered. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't use the OS's behaviors, standards, and conventions. It simply means that you can't rely on using those as the only way for users to interact with your application. In your ...



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