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5

Seventy characters sounds about right to me. Some people have very long names. Some cultures in general have very long names. If you've not come across it already go read Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Names — it applies just as much to UX folk ;-)


0

Quoting a respected member of the User Experience community I can recommend some things to further enhance user experience. Note: I think the form already is very clear and probably user friendly. resource article link Not splitting first and last name is tricky on a back-end level. The application might want to address the user just by it's first or ...


4

How about this: Intro text adds nothing Name is not essential to create account, or at least make it one field Re-enter email is redundant The way you aligned labels is not optimal New password? I don't have any existing password at this point, am I? Choose one colour for your links that is not red and not the same colour your headers have Consider ...


0

I think the size of the UX changes should reflect their scope. If the developer option is something like "now you can change the background color!", then the "normal way" is totally fine, as it's not a big change. Option 1 makes sense if the "Developer's area" is totally separate from "Profile options", and has a similarly scope for changes. This seems ...


2

I would say you're thinking the wrong way 'round. Requirements first is waterfall design. And it's a surefire way to make something on budget and on time that everyone will hate and noone will use. Of course, even if you see your first implementation as nothing more than a starting point, you need something to get started. But a list of requirements locks ...


7

I am wary of any solution where the user has to remember that inputting x really means y. If the "infinite" or "unlimited" state can't be unambiguously represented by the spinner control I would consider using another one specifically for the "unlimited mapping" use case. Perhaps have another checkbox for unlimited that, when selected, disables / greys out ...


0

For now I have decided to design a Journey based solution for this task. I will be using numbered steps, with a "Step 1 of 9" as the first page focus, accompanied by a flat design progress bar to quickly show the progress along the journey. Each step will be able to use swipes to navigate between the steps, with a button included to jump to top-level ...


0

I think you should distinguish between the registration and buying the product. I suggest to keep only the necessary fields that will enable you to communicate with your users following a successful registration (for example in order to upgrade their account). It's known that as the number of form fields increases, conversion rates decrease-see the graph ...


0

If you have some kind of touchpoint with these users, reach out to them directly. You can directly email them with a personalized email (not just a mail merge!) to ask them if they are interested in providing feedback. If others in your organization have such touch points and a good relationship with users, they might be better suited to sending out your ...


1

I assume that you want to increase the registration rate, so I suggest to keep only the necessary fields that will enable you to communicate with your users following a successful registration (for example in order to upgrade their account). It's known that as the number of form fields increases, conversion rates decrease-see the graph below. I recommend ...


1

You can choose to set a primary and secondary call to action. Example from LinkedIn: This provides a single and obvious confirmation action the user can take without the disrupting concern for accessibility, cultural bias and decision confusion which can come from splitting the options by colour alone. Also, how it is written in the example above is ...


-1

In areas the read left to right, having the continuation or move forward button on the right, and the go back/abandon button on the left is popular. There are example for and against. Windows in particular is an offender as the Cancel button is on the right, or in whatever position the developer felt like. Red or green both have pros and cons discussed by ...



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