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6

Mike Cohn provides a great template for user stories which is used throughout the industry. As a type of user, I want some goal so that some reason. As a customer, I want to pay my bill online so that I do not have to mail it in. As a developer, I want unit tests in place so that I can verify my code is functional. As an enterprise card holder, I want ...


4

There are many tools for this task. The closest I'm aware of that explicitly focuses on users story management is sprint.ly. Most issue tracking systems have plugins for this purpose too; the two that I use—Redmine and Jira—both have so-called Agile plugins for tracking user stories and managing story points, burndown charts, etc.


4

There are different schools of thought on this. Their original meaning is "placeholders for conversations". A good way to think about a user story is that it is a reminder to have a conversation with your customer --http://www.agilemodeling.com/artifacts/userStory.htm In this sense yours is a valid user story. Other people refer to the: "As a XXX, ...


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Summary: Scenarios provide context to user stories. Therefore it is never too late. You may discover new stories or realise existing ones are not needed. To explain my answer I'll start with definitions for context. User stories are discreet, structured information that describes a deliverable and testable piece of functionality for a user. (i.e. The cards ...


4

This isn't really a framework issue as much as an overall corporate process issue. The bigger the organization, the more documentation and details it tends to require (which is antithetic to the agile process, but I digress...) That said... I am thinking of defining different components of this framework by establishing patterns in areas such as ...


3

I've seen a lot of different exceptions made like this in agile - called spikes, buckets, non-stories, etc. This is doable - basically it's just an allotment of time. The only place I've seen it get ugly is when you assign an huge number of story points to it to account for the time you're taking to do many tasks, then you have a substantial portion of the ...


3

At my previous company (which liked to consider itself an Agile development company) we used user stories to moderate success. I think calling then suggestions would be a great idea if what you're looking for is simply ideas. The problem we had was that we told everyone the proper form for A User Story and they then resisted the idea of entering anything ...


2

The User Journey is used to map the current journey a typical user might take to reach their goal while highlighting gaps, pain points or frustrations but also opportunities of a better experience, both from the perspective of the user and the business. This is where typically competitor analysis are conducted to redesign a journey free from frustration and ...


2

If you are analysing other products, this is called competitor analysis. If you have found problems with the user experience while evaluating these products, it is simply usability problems in competitor products. In a document, there will be a section called competitor analysis, under which there'll be a section called 'usability issues' (possibly under a ...


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You could mention users current difficulties here in your user journey as this would form part of a reason as to why they would use your system but should not really be your sole focus for the entire user journey, you should include other information. Check out the link below it just covers what user journeys should contain. User Journeys - What they ...


2

We use Confluence, a great tool for user stories! It works like a Wiki, but with richer UI and functionality. Be online Confluence can be used as an intranet and at the same time be accessed outside of the company via Internet. Enable quick collecting of story titles Confluence have built in macros like table of content and other useful ...


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For PowerPoint, I would recommend Keynotopia's templates, available here: http://keynotopia.com/web-prototyping/ For Axure, I would recommend Axutopia's templates, available here: http://axutopia.com/libraries/axure-web-widgets-library/ I included the web app ones specifically, but they have bundles if you prototype other types of apps. Both come with ...


2

Trello is the tool we use. It's a board with lists which contains cards. User stories and sprints We write down the userstories as titles of the cards. When all user stories are collected we subdivide them onto the different lists. The lists stand for the sprints. When we begin with sprint 1, we add soms more list next to it: working on, test and done. ...


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We've used VersionOne at Western Union Business Solutions successfully for several years. It supports all of the features you've mentioned and a lot more.


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Not familiar with Mobile-D, my expertise is more within the Scrum methodology. I think one thing to be aware of is that, being agile, user stories are not completed in a particular phase. They should be living and iterated upon as the organization learns more about the problem area as the project progresses. And based on that, I think the user stories ...


1

User stories are usually small, used as a definition of a requirement. Epics are large user stories, typically ones which are too big to implement in a single iteration and therefore they need to be disaggregated into smaller user stories. I would recommend to create an epic containing multiple user stories. Each user story should be an end to end "piece" ...


1

I don't have experience with this yet, so this might not answer your question fully. But have you looked at job stories? Introduction to Jobs-to-be-done here This article goes into why job stories are better in some cases (and I believe in your case) than user stories. Since you compare it to photoshop and excel, I think you have a system that has many ...


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Checkout https://easybacklog.com/ it's still in beta and while it doesn't exactly hit what you're looking for it does offer a solid structure to agile user stories. I should also say that I haven't used this for a project. I'm still trying to figure out how to help my company make the shift to agile user stories instead of big requirements docs.


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Along the lines of what Karen said, I like to do a full team workshop on user scenarios, which are more open ended and high level than user stories. This way, the full team can participate and contribute. A lot of interesting perspectives and ideas come out of this kind of meeting or workshop. Then, one or two members of the team can take the scenarios and ...


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In the book "Writing Effective Use Cases (Crystal Series for Software Development) from Alistair Cockburn" are some good use case technics and scenarios described. His text-based use case method is very efficient and fast. In addition, I have another link to this topic: http://gatherspace.com/static/use_case_example.html



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