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When I worked for a newspaper I know we had rules around how far you could push an image beyond it's native resolution, 20% larger was the threshold if I recall correctly. However it depended on the size of the image and subject matter to an extent. I was told that the smaller the image the more a person has to concentrate on the image and more likely they ...


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I saw a research on how to use users feedbacks (i.e. comments) in appstore/googleplay as a starting point for usability studies. This was presented in IEEE requirements engineering conference. Will post the link here if I find the paper.


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(what to ask to get the needs?): As some other experts previously discussed, I also believe in asking 'why'. This is not unique to UX and has been used decades ago in problem solving in general. Requirement books also highlight this and encourage practitioners to ask at least five whys in order to get to the roots of the issue (for which the customer ...


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There is no standard, but there are standard approaches There are instances where you need to enumerate emotional reactions to a product. For these situations, designers have borrowed from well-known psychometric techniques to get the job done: Because words used to describe emotions/reactions are often subjective, researchers often use an intensity ...


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I think that providing them with a predefined list may be somewhat going against the idea of qualitative evaluation, it's already a step towards the quantitative approach. In qualitative research it's customary not to cage the subjects into a closed set of answers, but to prefer open-ended questions. A standard qualitative process that can help you ...


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I think it depends a little on what kind of users you are targeting. If you want to make it as easy as possible for any user (newbie or professional), look at big search engines like google. They let you search for anything and have an advanced search with many different fields where you users can define what they want to search for and what they don't want ...


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That depends on your research question/s, but is nearly certain to be part of your research methodology. Research method If the evaluation is part of proving/disproving a hypothesis, or more commonly assessing the pros/cons of the resultant design in a thesis that aims to develop a system, then the choice of evaluation method (which you'll have to justify) ...


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You can search the researches of different people related to User experience and Usability on below mentioned platforms, 1. Google Scholars 2. Google research 3. ACM library You can also checkout international conferences old websites like, IndiaHCI, APACHCI etc.


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Great question but hard to nail down The closest thing I've found to The Ultimate Guide to UX Research is UX Stack Exchange itself because of how adaptive, real-time, vibrant, happy, fun, positive and active this community is. ☻ One of my favorite things to do on UX Stack Exchange is browse the history of older questions and answers. The types of ...


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Have you tried http://scholar.google.com/? It's my go-to place for serious academic research papers.


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I would assume there is a plus when you follow one of those pages. Why don't you present one of those benefits to the user as a "reward" for following a certain page? "Follow x and receive updates on your dashboard" "Follow x and receive notifications"


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'Diminishing returns' has been accosted by web developers in forming a plan when user interaction involves any method of registration. Simply put, subtle, coercive methods are better than obstructive practises. What you may gain in the forced method, you'll lose more in annoying people who will leave the page. I would go with the idea that showing the ...


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I completely agree with tohster on this issue. What a great response. I'd post this as a comment, but I don't have enough reputation yet. I've used the "S-T-P" approach, which I see as the core of tohster's solution. That is, Situation Target Proposal Situation Start with the current situation. What are you doing today? How are you doing it? What ...


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Seems like the main difference/difficulty is the extra steps required to see how people interact with it in context up on the wall. Hope you have a budget to design and print giant prototypes! :) I don't think "best practices" change as much as internal workflow. You still need to observe users in context & note what works vs what doesn't, but if the ...


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I've tried to solve this same question in the past. Here's my solution. Keep it short. Direct them to activities. Focus the issue with a choice: "I'm trying to do something that's not currently possible" OR "I'm doing something and the app isn't doing what I expected" Ask about activities: "What were you trying to do when things went wrong?" This changes ...


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There's two issues here to address: getting a proper understanding of what the suggested change is supposed to accomplish, and avoiding resistance or frustration from the customer because "why are you asking me about the problem, when I've already told you what you need to do to fix it?". In my experience it is extremely difficult to resolve this well ...


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Resolve the behavioral stumbling block You make a key observation that it's hard to get users to backtrack from a specific suggestion ("I want this button!") that they are psychologically anchored on. I agree. You can use reason and charm to get a user off a fixation on a specific UX suggestion, but the effort involved in doing that can result in ...


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I'm sure this is going to upset several people but here it goes. I personally believe that this is not a user issue. A user is not going to have insightful UX requirements and this is the reason that there is a need for your expertise. Even the most educated people, which have used computers for 20+ years, struggle with computers and the internet as a ...


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There are a variety of user interview techniques to extract more insightful requirements. I am a big fan of Contextual Inquiry in my opinion this is a great way to extract requirements and insight into the users needs that you may not get from a typical Q/A session. The core premise of Contextual Inquiry is very simple: go where the customer works, ...


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This won't fully answer your question since you already included part of the answer in your question :) For the part where the user (or the client in some cases) insists on "But I WANT a BUTTON", I have some useful techniques: I re-confirm the user/client problem. I shift him/her from proposing solution to identifying the problem. This may require a lot ...



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