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0

I would consider this user-centered design, in that you studied past solutions, created a solution, and tested it through a prototype with users. However, instead of collecting first-person responses to whether the users found the gesture satisfactory, I think your results would be more genuine if you instead measured the user success rate of the gesture. ...


0

In addition, you should determine more precisely what you mean by "understand them more". Differents methods leads you to differents observations. If you're looking for needs, I think too that the previous link will answer most of your questions. If you want to understand their behaviors or preferences with your application, you might choose user testing ...


4

I am lazy and this has been done before, so I highly encourage you to read this: http://hci.stanford.edu/courses/dsummer/handouts/NeedFinding.pdf I think it answers all your questions. To summarize: Find your users: the average user, the extreme user, the casual user, the expert on the subject ... Ask questions: Be as open-ended as possible Let the ...


2

I Studied Human Factors in grad school. In my personal experience, which may or may not be representative, the UX circle of a Venn diagram is mostly encompassed by the HF circle. The primary difference is that I learned very little about visual design, and a lot about biological/cognitive processes affecting perception and movement. We covered the same ...


6

Short answer: They are meaningless corporate titles applied to people with similar (apparent) skills. They're the same. Long answer: 1- How do human factor specialists and user experience designers differ? It all depends on what definitions you ultimately settle on. I have held both titles of "Human Factors [something]" and "User Experience ...


3

Human factors is about getting things done effectively and efficiently. User experience is about getting things done effectively, efficiently and effortlessly. If the human factors engineers in aviation only learned from crashes, that would be a major difference to usability engineers and UX designers who try to anticipate possibly problematic design ...


3

User experience specialists have to be human factors specialists. User experience is (mostly) human experience. Its what the user lives during a precise activity, and what he lives is a combination of differents perceptions (feelings, emotions, meanings, ...) wich are the consequences of differents factors, including human factors. User experience is what ...


0

Five things spring to mind: Analysing any product usage metrics that you have available. Did they use / not-use the product in certain ways. Did none of the customers who left use feature X, but those who continued did? Did they never get past a setup process? Something else? Arrange & do face-to-face interviews. I find that this is, by far, the most ...


0

In addition I think its a part of the job to make understand our clients that "user experience" is precisely about "users" and that it implies meeting them.


1

This is not only one questionnaire but differents questionnaires mesuring differents things. Most of them have been tested to be valuable on what they mesure. It meens that you can trust them if you use them as they are. If you think its more precise, you can do some adaptations like replacing "the system" by your product name or replacing "in my job" by ...


-1

The other answers explain why autocorrect is bad. But you are correct about users being really bad at typing their own email address, so here's an alternate solution: Make them enter their email address twice, just like when setting a new password. Even if they are lazy and copy-paste it, hopefully they will at least look at it again and have a chance to ...


1

Depends on How smart is your checking? Relatively speaking a list of typo's is unsophisticated. There are services that can determine the presence of a valid Domain Name record an email server an individual email box Certainly in the case 1 above, if there is no matching Domain Name Record - then an email can not reach the recipient. So in this case ...


1

I wouldn't personally recommend auto correcting the email address' domain name, but you could check it against the "VALID" domain name extension, and for that you need to check it against list of valid domain name extensions which would be an absolute pain, specially nowadays that we have new and totally weird domain name extensions, here is a link to all of ...


0

People sometimes intentionally obscure their contact information online, e.g. by l33t-ing a few characters. One more reason not to do it.


9

Definitely don't silently change the address without telling the user, as this can lead to extreme confusion if it guesses wrong. Instead, you might consider a "Did you mean...?" message underneath the field. This is easily understood by any user who has done a Google search. Mailgun has a service for doing exactly this. They have an online demo. In ...


7

How about an ajax request real-time to check if the submitted domain is valid or not? If it's valid, presume it's right. If you can't find an MX or A record at that domain, state "could not find this domain" or suggest a "did you mean" mined from past records you kept about what users changed the input from and to all the previous times you "could not find ...


2

I think its useful to separate common typing errors from spelling mistakes. auto-correct might not be relevant for correcting domain names as @Simwil suggested because of changes to domain name extensions. This being said, if we are looking solely at auto-correcting typing errors this would enhance the overall user experience and minimise user frustration by ...


2

Autocorrect is somewhat invasive, and sometimes doesn't let user understand what was the typo or notice it at all. I would opt for typeahead (autosuggest) dropdown saying "Did you mean correct address?".


67

I would recommend against an auto-correct as domain name extensions are about to change drastically, to the point where an email ending with "sitename.anything" will be valid. Consider an inline check, which means it doesn't cause the frustration of the usual ENTRY > SUBMIT > ERROR MESSAGE > RE-ENTRY > SUBMIT name@company.co [!] Did you mean .com? Asking ...


10

I would lean towards not using Auto-correct in this instance as it can lead to more frustration than presenting an error message. The reason I say this is with the increase of domain names the accuracy of auto-correct becomes less and less. Your example is changing the .con to .com, what if the user's intention was to write .cn or .co? Form field error ...


3

I don't follow the current vendor-specific security-speak, but I can try to list some UX implications related to various security measures for log in dialogs: locking accounts, even temporarily (necessary against brute force password attacks) - link to the support service must be available, email notification to the user should be generated, admins have to ...


0

Agree with first answer. The key is to show that the data will be kept private vs public. I have seen it done by Having separate sections for public and private data. Eg email address. Birthdate etc in private sections


1

The problem with a lock is that is also used to depict a secure connection (HTTPS). Many browsers use the lock for HTTPS. A symbol is effective if is used consistently. Have a link to your security policies and practices. Don't make a general statement your data is secure/safe as if you do get hacked then you have lied. Maybe a key symbol to identify ...


1

If you're only looking to evaluate whether the user's like the gestures then I would have them complete a series of tasks using a prototype and then have a brief interview afterwards asking questions like, which gestures were memorable, which were hard, which worked differently than they expected, were any fun to perform, which did they like the most, etc. ...


1

Get in front of the user I have been working in a distributed team on a global product for 2 years now and user research is a real challenge. But if you can't reach your users your in a rock and a hard place. The experts will tell you do whatever it takes to get in front of your users, demand, sell, trick your way. I have to travel great lengths (physically ...


0

I think you should be able to get a good grasp of a customer's wants, needs, and must haves via email better than any other method. When someone speaks they seldom stop to think about what they are saying and there is a tendency for departing from the subject at hand. If someone must sit still and write about it they are more likely to compose their thoughts ...


0

Interview remotely Remote doesn't mean you can't interview folk. It just means you can't interview folk face-to-face. Interviewing people over Skype, Google Hangouts, etc. is still possible. Failing that (or as well as that) it's also possible to train up people locally to go do some of that research for you. Interview proxies In addition to that look ...


3

Whether they have a right to do so is purely a political/corporate org/process question. Whether they should or not is entirely dependent on their abilities/expertise. In either case, the challenge is how do you handle it as the UX person? Some suggestions: always have business partner input formatted in the form of a user story if possible. The idea is ...


1

Well if you look at Product Owner's (PO's) role from the SCRUM perspective, it's the PO job to write stories that indicate what users wants to do and why, then prioritize the list of stories and provide additional requirements as needed. In terms of how the user's goal is accomplished, which includes the UI & technology, that's really not the PO's job. ...



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