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Your UI designer will make a colour scheme, which usually defines the colour of a clickable item. It might be contextual, and it would probably need a hover state colour as well. But as Tohster has said, relying on colour alone is an accessibility problem. There needs to be an additional cue, and you have to leave it up to your UI designer to make it for ...


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None of the above Colored fonts are used widely and varyingly in interfaces nowadays so it's not a good idea to rely only on color to differentiate clickable elements. This is especially true for navigation elements (versus, for example, inline links) Color-only approaches present accessibility problems for the color-blind. Alternatives There are ...


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Three things that spring to the top of my head: Check that the problem is real with brief ethnographic-style interviews. Look to talk to the potential customers around the problem space the app concepts are intended to solve - rather than asking direct questions about the app itself, or the specific problem. For example if I was asking about something that ...


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Running qualitative and quantitative in parallel like you described above is an interesting idea. In my experience however the benefits from a quantitative study come fom the large sample sizes, tight margins of error, and generalizability. How might you account for trade off between large sample sizes in quantitative studies but the money and time it takes ...


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The terms are often conflated today, but for the discerning: Use case refers more commonly to the procedural steps a user takes to get something done: Example: Knead the flour, add some salt, place in oven, wait 30 minutes. User story attempts to capture the experience narrative of the user. This includes the procedural steps in a use case, but also ...


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There is two scenarios: Is this the address that they know? The best solution is to give them the text area then they can type the first characters and the rest of story... In order to confirm the accuracy of the entered address, you can also give show them a dropped pin in a map view as well (maybe in a next step) Then they should be able to edit the ...


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You can test for the what and how using slightly different tactics and the best part is you'd only need about 5 users per test. Rubin's Handbook of Usability Testing: How to Plan, Design, and Conduct Effective Tests has been a great resource of mine over the years. Also, usability.gov has templates to get you going. Since it sounds like your app is intended ...


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If direct interaction with the test participant is not possible without disrupting their actual work, I've done the following in a similar environment with front-line staff. Pre-shift brief: Prior to their shift, make sure they know what's going on, are comfortable with everything and tell thing things to potentially make mental notes of to report or ...


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Usability Testing ISN'T doing a survey of the users or an ethnographic study. It's testing the software to see whether users can use it (and it doesn't matter that its released software). Exactly the same principals apply with mobile devices as with PCs - except with a mobile device you get a few extra complications about capturing what is going on on ...


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1. Document current user interface: There are features I know to be problematic and needing redesign, and I am also interested in the usability of simple main tasks. This documentation and any assumptions you have will act as a point of reference when going through to the test stage. This being said, conducting usability testing in the workplace ...


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I would also opt to start with a short survey/interview with your users. This will generally give you feedback/information right away. Don't focus on tasks, try to focus on time. I usually try to never go above 15-20 minutes in a test. I find that users get distracted pretty quickly.


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look at how for example facebook handles this: first they show you what the website can and might access and under that it shows you what it cant do. this order is important so the user understands what he accepts when giving you his information and what he doesnt need to worry about when accepting the form. http://i.imgur.com/0Y92Zxo.png sorry this is ...


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You are probably looking at a combination of technics/methodologies to get to a behavorial model: 1. Ethnographic field study (Based on interviewing and observation in situ) two aspects to consider here: A-Descriptions of the scene: Describe the physical aspects of the work environment, including the layout of workstations, desk space and clutter, ...


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For the vast majority of screenshots, designers want users to focus on the browser content, not the browser itself. So for most instances, I think it is better to use a nondescript browser rather than a specifically identifiable browser/OS combination. There are a lot of nondescript browser frames out there...you can use an existing image or you can make ...



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