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1

Correct me if I am wrong, but it appears to be an issue with state management across browser tabs and it appears to be corner case. When you are coding for corner cases, you must make sure that the system does not break. But higher priority must be given to the most common flow. Having said that I would be reluctant to go all the way to monitor state change ...


1

Maybe not the direct answer of your question but i would like to share my thoughts on does it matter part? Everyone is a designer. This was said way before the invention of Internet or PC. The difference of between Product and UX designer is very subjective at this age. There won't be an exact answer. Design always shaped by the needs of the time. ...


0

It matters, as UX designer has more broad responsibilities, researching and testing, while product designer just takes into account visual perception of users, focuses on visual perception of a website or application.


1

In it's simplest form the idea 'progressive data capture' is that you only ask the user for the data you need when you need it. The problem it solves is form abandonment - the more you ask your users is a single go, the more they are likely to give up and go away. I have done some work on an offers site and used this method to capture data from the users: ...


0

1. Get user consent Recording usability sessions should not be a huge concern if you have good security policies in place to protect the information you collect. You must to have your participants agree to the procedure. You can find sample consent form here. 2. Allow the user to provide fake info To further ease concerns that the user may have about ...


3

Keep collecting data until you get to the point where you stop hearing new things. I'd also look at how Ethnography is done in Anthropology as this is where the approach actually comes from: Eg: http://www.discoveranthropology.org.uk/about-anthropology/fieldwork/ethnography.html


1

TLDR: Sample size required is highly dependent on what you're trying to measure and study conditions. In an ideal environment, you need 6 per group for small number of groups for statistical significance. In a more typical study, you probably want 10-12 per group. If you don't care as much about statistical significance, by all means use less. How do you ...


0

User testing needn't be feared or difficult. By establishing very clear goals, the who and how of the test become clear. I have done many tests where I could ask literally anyone and the duration was exactly 5 seconds - this is the '5 second test'. Doing this often throughout the process will produce many lightbulb moments which will mitigate a lot of the ...


3

This is where UX and marketing will come into conflict with each other. The marketing people will correctly claim that it tends to measurably improve revenue, while the UX people will correctly claim that causes potential clients to either leave a site or builds a poor association with the company, which lowers revenue. So how can they both be correct? In ...


1

First, you can think about the psychology of forming habits (Nir Eyal, BJ Fogg's model) that explains that triggering an action into somebody's mind increases the chances of conversion. If you remind people, they are more likely to visit your website. Secondly, I want to quote the study by Freedman and Fraser (see ref below) that explains how people first ...


13

Autocomplete and suggestion features serve different, though similar, purposes. Autocomplete Autocomplete is there to make it faster for you to complete your search. If you for example want to search for "wikipedia puppies", and start typing, you will get an intermediate stage of: You can see that the autocomplete has provided me the option of ...


0

I am programmer learning a bit of UX so I may get beat up by UX purest but I capture metrics on user productivity. If a top performing user asks for a tweak I will take that over a low performing user. I am in an environment where contract data entry use more than one product. Too often a low performing user will state the (my) product is the problem. I ...


0

User Experience isn't about taking exclusive decisions, is about make the overall experience for the majority of users, the best as possible. I will use your use case as an example. Previous version Single text field, coordinates separated by comma. Advantages: copy/paste is smooth Disadvantages: readability New version Two text fields, one per ...


15

You can't please everyone Most changes or additions will leave some people behind. They may catch up later, they may hate you forever. Shoot for net gain in the experience. If you avoid negative feedback, you avoid progress. It helps to keep a destination in your sights. Focus on an established list of goals for the long term vision of the product and the ...


21

Try to distinguish between what users want and how they want it done. Taking your example above, users wanting one vs. two input boxes is all about the how. The what is being able to paste comma-separated coordinate pairs vs. not having to press comma. (Or, for some users, being able to simply press comma rather than having to click a second input box.) In ...


3

Accommodate both! In this case, your users told you exactly what they were missing in the old version (in this example, easy copy/paste). So create a new way that meets both sets of requirements. Generally speaking, say the old way offered Features A and B, and the new way still supported Feature B, lost feature A, but added feature C. Users said they ...


2

The two leading standalone password managers are LastPass and 1Password, so much of the info comes from them or deals with them. Also most of it isn't very recent :) In 2011 LastPass said that a security breach on their service had compromised the data of 1.25 million users. Also in 2011 Stu Helm, who was associated with 1Password, estimated on Quora that ...


1

Yes! This is a huge need. The avatar presented is not only male, but also very "white looking" this has bothered me for a long time and it continues to pop up in MANY places!


0

The most obvious way I can think of would be using an accordion tree view. Like below: Other examples of what I'm referring to can be found here: http://www.jqueryscript.net/tags.php?/tree%20view/


0

This is how Waze does it. Surprised no one has brought it up as it's a good reference. Using mobile phones while driving might be a legal offence in certain countries, therefore it's in your best interest to have a clear UI and stay clear from any legal issues. And Waze does it pretty good. You are either a "passenger" or a "driver". If you are ...


1

1. Positive versus Negative rewards in general Finding data where a company tried using both a negative and positive registration request without changing anything else to compare the data is going to be hard to come by. There are, however, other studies which compare the effects of positive and negative reinforcement. In the old fable the tortoise and ...


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This article states that almost all users scroll down even before the page loads completely. Luke Wroblewski being the ambassador for Mobile First, I think it's a good start in this direction.


1

Users actions speak louder than their words. Have users try both products, tell them to think out loud, but most importantly, look at what they do and how they react to the interface/interaction. You don't need them to tell you why they like product B more than A, find it out yourself. Read more here.


0

Limiting allowed characters in passwords to a sane subset of printable characters is a good idea. More flexibility is not always better. That's why we have speed limits on roads. Frequently, usability is about protecting users from their natural aptitude for shooting themselves in the foot. From a server-side security standpoint, there is no problem in ...


1

The scientific method can be very helpful here. Speculate on what feature(s) people care most about (a hypothesis). Present a choice between products / services that have and don't have those features (an experiment). If you're creative enough you can come up with a large enough list of what it might be that you feel overwhelmed trying to present them ...


2

There are questionnaires created especially to measure and compare the user experience of different products. Off the top of my head I know two, but I would guess there are more. AttrakDif The AttrakDiffTM questionnaire by Hassenzahl et al. (2003), developed together with User Interface Design GmbH, measures subjective assessments concerning pragmatic ...


0

I fully agree with dan's answer, just to answer your questions though. I would be hesitant to change the wording of the survey from test to test. We'll be introducing another source of variance from the different tenses. It might make sense to preface all the questions in the survey with "Imagine you are a new user of this system" to avoid the "this is my ...


1

Yes, unfortunatelly, the restrictions on characters the user can use in the password have sense from the UX perspective. If you're operating a worldwide service, you'd like your users to be able to log from all places of the world. If it's the case, you must take into account, that unfortunatelly, the keyboards are not standarized. Event the layout of the ...



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