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The problem with this kind of issue is that I suspect you would get different answers from different parts of the globe. I suspect (and this is just a suspicion - I have no evidence for this) that populations with US trade interests may favor the .com suffix as it is considered a larger 'global' entity rather than just confined to their country whereas ...


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If at all possible I'd try and observe actual behaviour, rather than ask a question. Because people suck at predicting their own behaviour. For example run a remote usability test with mocked up a google search result around your topic with a mix of .co.uk & .com (or whatever) company names/URLs and see which is clicked most. You also have to remember ...


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For the native iOS apps, the right place for the "close" button (which should probably say "Done") is in the top right corner. Also, consider rethinking your overlays as separate screens, these are much friendlier for the mobile users.


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We prefer a close button on the top right. 90% of the users are right handed and with mobile screens nowadays of 5.5 inches (14 centimeters) you go ahead and try to reach that close button on the top left with your right thumb. Of course you can hold your phone with 2 hands in landscape, which resolves the issue. But you can't expect users to hold their ...


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Edit: I misunderstood your question as it's about 'close button' for a specific page and not the entire application. The most preferred place would be on side opposite to your menu, top corner as Users have that mental model coming from PCs. You wouldn't want to place close button at bottom to avoid accidental presses. Not placing the close button at the ...


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User research is quantitative/qualitative and attitudinal/behavioural . The decision of when to use which UX research method depends on your product stage as well as the factors listed by you. As you already have a significant amount of active users, my first question would be - What app analytics do you already have about the app usage? This falls in the ...


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Good UX ensures that things work in specific contexts for specific users. Things that work on one site for one set of users come with no broad guarantees. See Should You Copy a Famous Site's Design? by Jakob Nielson.


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As i already mentioned in my comment, the simple answer is just It's worth noting that the user might have a different opinion about his own experience than his usage data reveals. Maybe some people see them self as Facebook expert even tho they never visited the security settings while other see themself as Facebook intermediate even tho they submitted ...


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I don't think there's a conclusive detailed study on usage of night/day modes. I have generally seen developers preferring night mode for their editors/IDE. As an example, you can have a look at various types of night mode here - ColorSublime As far as readability is concerned, there are studies which demonstrate that dark colored text on lighter ...


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Aurora Bedford does a great job explaining personas and their creation and application. A key point that may help you is that personas aren't user groups. Essentially they're an average of a set of data points. Think of clothing designers for the mass market. They have to design clothes that can be sold off the shelf, not custom-tailored for each customer. ...


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The best personas should be viewed as actual (albeit fictional) people and not "elastic users". When it comes to large complex systems with numerous user groups, you've nailed the problem on its head. How do you balance having enough personas for capturing variance within members of a diverse user group in your personas with having a handful of salient ...


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User research with limited resources There are some very good UX research techniques which can be used at nearly zero cost and which provide some very useful information. 1. Card sorting Card sorting is a great way to evaluate information architecture. Participants organize topics into categories that make sense to them. Provide a number of cards to test ...


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I have the same problem. Through others I deal with the managers and can't get through to the users. Luckily my boss has a heart for quality and usability. Even though I can't ask if I can observe users while they use the software, I do have the developers around me in the office who made and use the software. We came up with a plan to encode metrics in the ...


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The ideal solutions have been mentioned already: User Interviews & Testing. However, if you must put something tangible out in the wild, you could consider running the A/B tests. One option has the technical change presented, while the other does not. Let the results speak for themselves.


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It's for these problems that it's important to have some sort of User Research done and follow a Goal-driven design approach if possible. This will help you answer some questions like: How does the proposed feature fits in the design requirements? Is this particular feature implemented by someone else and if yes, how are people using it? How are they ...


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Look up the "Locus of Control" part of Shneiderman's "Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design" http://faculty.washington.edu/jtenenbg/courses/360/f04/sessions/schneidermanGoldenRules.html "7. Support internal locus of control. Experienced operators strongly desire the sense that they are in charge of the system and that the system responds to their ...


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Test in Context First, I understand your explanation of the difference between having the choice to use software and not having the choice, but I don't really see how that's going to affect your testing. A user is either using the app to complete a task, or they're not, and you can't really control for all the reasons they might not be using it. Sure, in a ...


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I am assuming that by Enterprise software, you mean software that is deployed on site and not accessible by the cloud. In cases where you can't A/B test with a live audience, you can use a choice test to determine the favourable icon. The choice test is like a simple A/B test but you can use it with your own team or recruit some users from the enterprise ...


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If you have a measure of performance that you can gather, from use of the software to perform a set task, then you can set up an experiment and analyse the results with a "t-test". (some details can be found here.


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I think it is a mistake to categorize your personas by process area. The value of a persona is in creating a quick reference so that everyone on your product team knows WHO the user is. This is why they are typically casual or fun - to make it easier to remember, for example, that 'Bobby Beginner' represents a group of real people who will benefit from extra ...


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Personas do not need to be limited to smaller-scale products. I would argue that they help with prioritizing features/functions that should be redesigned or even dropped from the redesigned product. Additionally, they can serve as communication tools when discussing design decisions with other project team members. I recently conducted user ...


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I'm doing one now. I work for an enterprise software. Our software seems to be at least 10x the size of yours, however, we are very aware of our user types (types because there are different types of users). 1) the IT people who admin the software 2) The actual user 3) People who view, approve, comment, collaborate on the work of the user (call them the ...


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HcaLong participated with a company that made something similar and worked great, maybe you can contact them, can not remember which was the link the study, but you can look inside your web http://preparatumente.com


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Being a web app means that your engineers can change it at any moment. That means you need to be able to update the documentation just as fast. Being a web app means that it will run on multiple browswers. That means that user assistance has to be available in every environment where app might run.


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The "containing" option will likely be more satisfying for users. With that option, they don't need to know how the item starts. Example: "tir" could find both "car tires" and "motorcycle tires". Neither option has much impact on the competitor "misuse" that you mentioned.


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First think about the possible outcome, how you will use that data? We don't just categorize people for fun but for a reason, finding out your reason to do it will help to create the solution more than any best-practices.


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Asking them is a very good and easy way to go. If you can't or are not sure on how much you can rely on their answers, measure their behaviour with Google Analytics, frequency and funnel/goal completions. I have specific goals per user type to measure how well they know the site, and get them from our own Control Panel or from MixPanel ei. how many posts ...


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A few quick comments about categorizing users by skill or performance level. Perpetual-intermediate users. In his book About Face, Alan Cooper talks about the perpetual intermediate. He argues that there is no such thing as an expert—in the long run. Websites and software are always changing, and so experts necessarily slide down the learning curve as ...


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You are seeking a question (or questions), within the context of a survey, to determine the "experience" of users with a specific web site. You have expressed an aversion to self-reporting and frequency of use type measurements. You would like a "standardised" instrument. You appear to want to "test" the users' experience, rather than allow them to ...


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I don't know of any tools to determine level of user "type". Sure, asking them to describe their expertise level is fine, but it shouldn't be trusted; just like customers know what they want, not how to get there, users know their expertise, but not what the expertise actually means. As someone who came from QA, I have four classifications for users: ...


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How about a remote usability test? You can combine user tasks with qualitative feedback. First, find some test users. You could pay a recruiting service, put an intercept message on a web page, or send out a link to your contacts. Depending on who you are targeting, you will likely need to provide an incentive to encourage participation. Then, use a ...


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This is a tough one. In any case you need to know certain properties of the web application before you can classify skill. Ask yourself if this is a user only survey, where we won't ask IT-Pros or developers of the application. The Second thing to ask is level of complexity. Is this a simple straight forward app where there is only one way to complete each ...


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We did this classification for our educational website. As suggested by everyone, it's best to ask the user directly. However, it's important to let them know what you mean exactly by different levels of understanding. Just putting "Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced" would be vague. We gave a one line explanation of what we meant by different levels of ...


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Like mentioned in the earlier answer, the simplest way is to ask the user. But there are ways to identify users' expertise before a survey, and frame questions accordingly. The explanation of these methods will take you step by step to my suggestion at the end of this answer, that derives a probable way to evaluate users' expertise during a survey. Brief ...


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I'm not sure what the benefit would be of going to a 3rd party environment to get generalized feedback from an unspecified population. If you product is already live, solicit user feedback and run a/b tests to learn about user preferences from those who are coming to the site. If the product is not live, get something live as quickly as possible (can be very ...


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Many of the modern sites are using coach marks which walk you through the basics. Google is using it when it redesign its applications (Gmail, Photos) and when it launched Inbox. It shows up when you first login to the service. When you complete the guide you no longer see it but you have the option to relaunch it in some way or another.


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From my experience users doesn’t read manuals from start to finish. They often find themselves in a solution where they can’t complete their task by their own or by asking a colleague. So when creating a manual we need to address this task based thinking. Which media to use is often irrelevant, more important it that the manual resolve the task at hand ...


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In my opinion I would leave it as is and let the users choose (I would think more would use google than twitter anyway), but if you want to do it that way I see a couple ways you could do it: Just tell the user your preferred option Have google as the default option showing, then under a dropdown panel of sorts have alternative options (twitter, fb, etc.) ...



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