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My experience with ecommerce: Use big buttons [45-60px heigth] with the company visual; if is a Windows 8 desktop application, use the windows store default button, the user will know that is app button and not an ad button; avoid using other buttons near this and avoid ads near it; keep things clear around the button and the content, it is a flow, the ...


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Best practice for "download" buttons is don't make them flashy or look like spam. We're all used to fake download buttons. Make it clean. I'd recommend you use flat design for it so that it stands out from all of the 90's era buttons that are still all over the web to get you to download trojans.


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We're facing this exact issue with our B2B customers with a new app release next week. We're releasing an MVP mPOS. Instant gratification, or more specifically dead simple functionality that can be easily reproduced (and is rewarding in that it does what the B2B customer needs), isn't difficult for this user type. In fact, it's infinitely easier because hey, ...


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Since it is related to "deleting" a record, I would say do not keep the option upfront. Until the user "hard presses" the record to be deleted. The trash icon appears upon hard press and there you go. Hard press to bring the Trash Icon And the confirmation appears in line , Sure or No, cancel.


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I would suggest this, I'm not a fan of modal boxes or interrupting the users interaction with the current screen.


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WCAG guideline 2.1 (Compliance level A - highest) states: Make all functionality available from a keyboard. If the function of the button and the dropdown trigger is different, users must be able to access both. So first "A" then "B" is the answer. Then comes guideline 2.4.7 which state that each should have its own focus indicator. I think your ...


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Actually it should be "C" Reason: When you hit the Tab button the focus should be on the Primary Area, as mentioned by Alexey as well. But the focus should shift to another button on hitting Tab again and not on the secondary area. There is no need for focus to go on Secondary area. Because when the focus is on Primary, hitting ENTER should display the ...


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The problem with the "split button" is that it is not just one control but that it is presented as one. I've seen people pressing the button while expecting opening the menu. Since they are seperate controls my first impression was to focus on A when pressing the tab key, and focus on B when pressing tab again. But I agree with @AlexeyKolchenko that it ...


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Double edged sword I'm afraid, guerilla testing is great for UX practitioners with little or no budget, but is exceptionally poor when trying to recruit and brief participants, given your remote location I think you're going to really struggle. Remote surveys could work for you on a cost & (again) remote level, engagement is still an issue.


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Very often, users will request what they believe to be possible, unaware of the real costs and economics involved. I've had the same people ask for things that would tax the state of the art in artificial intelligence, then express astonishment that it was possible to produce output sorted in various orders. The question of how often something will be ...


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Customer: I want to print a report with X. Then I want a web form so that Mike can upload this data. Analyst: It is the same data? Could we just present Mike's group with a screen with X data? Customer: You can do that? Really! That would save a lot of work Analyst: And it will save us to code a new report and a form with all the data validation, errors, ...


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Have you thought about conducting a survey as well? It can be very useful to do it before interviews, because you will be able to reach more people and gather more data. People will provide more honest feedback since there is no pressure and less stress. This data will give you a base for your interviews. Since you already will have some information, in ...


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I'm curious about your research design. Your control group should have the identical experience but without the treatment. In other words, the only difference between the 2 groups should be whether or not they receive the recommendations. You are potentially creating a confound by only giving the behavioral questions to the experimental group. Just asking ...


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To be brief as possible: Not all users know exactly what they need because most of their requests are made for the sake of convenience.


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I think this classic software engineering image is worth adding in. It's not just a problem with the customer - you get confusion everywhere. Plus it's not even really a UX job to figure it out. My experience has been that it is where decent project managers are worth huge amounts from the time saved by clearing out the confusion and being able to talk ...


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I'd like to extend on Digital Chris' answer, which referenced the XY problem. It actually extends even further into a linguistic issue. The user and developer come from different points of view. They naturally develop different languages to describe what they need. In an ideal world, everyone would use objective terms for quantifying wants and needs, but ...


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Many answers here describe the problems with user/customer requests so I think i shouldn't repeat why you should do finding out what users realy need. I just want to give a hint how to do it: What users realy need is called requirements. And its the job of every engineer (or - should be) to find out what these requirements are, because users can't ...


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Why is important to focus on user needs as opposed to requests? Here's an example of what we faced. The Product Team came to the Development Team and asked for a survey form to be built in order to collect data. The Development Team specifically asked if the Product Team planned on making any future surveys. They said no. The Development Team decided to ...


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User requests are usually formed based on what the user perceives to be a solution to their problem. The thing is, their solution may not be the best solution, and in fact, it may not even solve their problem at all. Many questions on StackExchange are asking how to fix a partial solution, rather than asking for a better solution to the actual problem they ...


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Simply because that's your job to create a solution that answers user needs, and it's expected you know better than they do, otherwise they would get your job. I guess I should begin by saying that listening to their requests can be a good thing. Because users aren't complete idiots, they're well aware of their problems and needs seeing how they've been ...


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Internal surveys will generally receive a 30-40% response rate or more on average, compared to an average 10-15% response rate for external surveys. Source So naturally what you are trying to do is to get as close to that as possible or maybe even beat it. Heres some ways I like to do it. Offer some sort of reward. In grad school small coffee gift ...


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It is definitely good to consider the customer/user experience as a continuous and evolving metric, so taking samples or measurements at different points in time is the best way to gauge the direction and magnitude of the change. I don't know that there is a specific name or terminology for this, because I don't think you should necessarily see it as a ...


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There are two issues that make focusing on user requests at face value problematic. The first is known as The Einstellung Effect This is a negative effect of pattern-following on finding optimal solutions: Einstellung is the development of a mechanized state of mind. Often called a problem solving set, Einstellung refers to a person's ...


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The list you showed is designed for items that are quickly/easily recognized like the days of the week. Survey questions aren't that type of content. Don't make users scan a list, find the question, read the question in the list, find the corresponding button, check the button's state, tap the button to change its state, check the button's changed state, ...


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I am a software designer and run into this problem all the time. The problem with many non technical people is they don't get abstraction. They truly cannot step back and articulate the functional requirement. Their perception is I have a problem I need this button. When they are asked to describe the problem they either can't or won't. The people least ...


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My anecdote: We were bulding a new version of a computerized machine. One requirement was to boot it in 30 seconds. We failed it by orders of magnitude. It created a big outcry. We asked why and heard that they had lost a lot of production time with the last version, because it crashed so often and needed to be rebooted quite frequently. Our new version was ...


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My anecdote: Maybe 25 years ago, I was doing contract work for a municipal Utilities Billing group. The existing package was good, but primary inquiry into customer accounts required too many screens to get many customer questions answered quickly. Since I did almost all troubleshooting over a couple years and I regularly needed some kind of overview into ...


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Let's start with an old one from the Ford's founder: (Although there isn't actually any evidence Ford ever said it. Thanks to user Evil Closet Monkey for the disclaimer.) The UX Designer View Why is it important to know why they want what they think they want?: Simply because as a UX designer you should be the one designing the best solution and in ...


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As engineers we were given the example of the newly-opened office tower block. It was fitted with 3 lifts. As the tenants filled the building complaints arrived that the office workers were having to wait too long for the lift. Cue expensive consultants to revise the lifts' queuing algorithm. No reduction in complaints. Cue assessment of building an ...


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Here are two examples, one online and one offline 1. Train arrivals Subway passengers frustrated with waiting for trains routinely ask for more trains on the track. For metropolitan transit agencies globally, this is obviously a very expensive request. Analysis of passenger needs reveals that the uncertainty around the wait is as important as the ...


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Toggle buttons are an interesting alternative to radio buttons and in this particular case it would look very similar to what you have and would take just about the same amount of space. In that respect there would be little difference. One of the differences would be that the toggle button is a bigger target than the radio button. Of course toggle buttons ...


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If you've seen The Simpsons episode "Oh Brother, Where Art Thou," you should remember what happened when Homer's half-brother gave him free reign over designing a car "for the average schmuck." The end result was expensive and looked ridiculous and didn't truly meet the user's needs, even though it had all the features he wanted. If the company truly ...


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Users are bad at asking for what they need and great at asking for what they want. Anecdotal evidence from my own recent experience: We have a department that asked for a button that would generate a PDF report about some data. A few months later they asked for the report in the form of a spreadsheet. A few months after that they asked for additional ...


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We've tried many, many wordings, but in the end, these are the ones that work best for finding things to improve in the UX: "Help us improve, tell us what we should change to make this (app/screen/option/process) more useful and easy to use." and "Help us improve: what problems did you have with this (app/screen/option) that prevented you from ...


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Simply because there are probably a multitude of things that you don't know and can make assumptions about, but that would defeat the purpose of being 'lean' in the sense of getting straight down to the point and provide a minimal viable product that you can build and test. It is basically taking a first step and say that of all the possibilities I am ...


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Lean process includes both assumptions and research Knowables, not unknowables, lead to design. This should be self evident. The lean UX process is iterative. When confronted with an unknowable you can either do research on it, or make a testable assumption and verify it (in Lean UX, assumptions get turned into testable hypotheses). Lean process ...


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"Just because you can, doesn't mean you should......" When I'm reviewing substantial amounts of data for criminal analysis purposes, single column data is a significant cause of confusion and delay and ultimately errors. It doesn't matter what iconongraphy is used or what colours are applied. The most accurate method of avoiding confusion remains a two ...


0

Spam them this time. As the final question ask them if it's okay to contact them for involvement in future studies. Compile a pool of folks who are keen to participate. Or...spam them and give them a) a reason why you are doing the study without giving too loch away (they will be more likely to help if it's a good cause) and/or b) give them something in ...


1

I've been employed as a UI designer for various financial used for 10 years. I've (also) settled on use of + and - (green and red respectively). Where space allows, separate into 2 columns. Agree with points made above that direction of arrows can be misinterpreted e.g. Left and right: left=back=out? or left=home=in? e.g. Up and down: contradictory ...


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First off, take a breather my friend! I have recommendations for you. Firstly, identify the market. Who are they selling to? The demographic, the age, novice users or not, gender, etc. Figure out who they are. From that, build your personas (ex: "John doe is a middle aged man who rarely has time to check his desktop computer, and that's why he's always on ...


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Design challenges here: Designing for abstract concepts like accounts and flow is hard. Typically it's best to use words rather than graphics. But sometimes you have to (or are told to :-) use graphics. Financial quantities can be difficult to represent graphically because different currencies have different symbols. Arrows are very commonly used and ...


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could arrow icons still be used as a quick visual reference to indicate movement of funds without actually misguiding users? I think the way you've presented them might be confusing but using them in a different way could be more familiar to what people is used to. Example: Additionally, for money related movements the two pair of most familiar ...


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My bank does not use icons of any kind, actually. It simply prepends a + or a - and colors the number green or red respectively. They are all in one column, which is (by default) sorted by date (newest first). As others have suggested, I would not use just an arrow, for its origin is not clear.


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I've found that arrows without words tend to cause confusion amongst users, especially those that have a color blindness. If you use multiple indicators such as the arrow, color, words, and/or +/- you are meeting user accessibility the best you can. You can do something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


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Showing money as moving in and out of an account is a decision fraught with potential confusion. You might want to do some research about different accounting methods and their history, for context. I found this help document informative. I would say the GNUcash application is an example of terrible user experience for the vast majority of users, but it's ...


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I agree with the idea of '+' and '-' icons going before the numbers as something to consider. With example 2 you're kind of on the right track. The common method in accountancy is to have incoming and outgoing funds in separate columns. However, you don't need an arrow to indicate things and unless you have quite an extravagant one like Matt Obee's (which ...


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You can use the + and the - icons if arrows aren't required. I would probably use ↑ and ↓ if : I had to use arrows I can't write other account movement information. If you really want to use → and ←, you should display the other account from where/ to where the money goes.


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This is perhaps perilously close to an off-topic icon discussion, but I think you could modify the arrow icons to make the outgoing versus incoming direction clearer. Essentially, you need to give context to the arrow: I would continue to use colour as an additional clue.


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Some good answers above but some could be problematic. See the following: Things to avoid and best practice: Firstly, in your examples the first option is better - blue is well known as an actionable link (just look around this stackexchange page!) so having the page you're on as blue wouldn't be ideal. However, putting the current page link in Bold (or ...



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