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I agree with nadyne's answer that you should consult with a lawyer regarding proprietary information regarding the organization and NDA. However, I'd also add that users should sign a usability test consent form. This will be necessary if you are recording the session (audio and/or video). The form should include how the participant's data will be used, ...


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The goal of your persona is not to observe users figuring out to navigate your prototype (that's usability testing). The goal is to create a rich description of a typical (but not too stereotypical) user, that can easily be communicated to the team, for everyone on the team to be able to empathize with your users. If you want to use observations, you would ...


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Unless your website has a statically insignificant number of visitors, I would prefer the results of tracking your website via Google Analytics over any survey. Surveys inherently posses a multitude of problems, foremost low completion rate and high dependence of result based on order of questions, question wording etc. Use real-life tests of your pages ...


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I think this article by Jakob Nielsen can give you a hint: Update added 2014: I keep getting questions like this, so I decided to answer it here. Q: "You mention many times that response time is important, and there are tons of tools to measure response time, but what is an acceptable web based application's response time? What is a user's ...


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First part of my answer is that I don't think you have to choose just 1 type of user to design for, rather you should have a set of users whom you design for and they should have a clear an well informed priority between them. A general structure of priorities is: Purpose What is the purpose of this product/service/project? You need to answer this question ...


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This is a really interesting question. It seems to me there are two contradictory alternatives here; which one applies to you will depend greatly on your product and business model. If there's no specific reason (e.g. aggressive introductory pricing) why those 80% of your users are generating such a disproportionately-poor conversion rate (especially if ...


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In a response to an unrelated but similar question asked earlier today, user funkylaundry brought up a great point: UX is a differentiator for your product. To answer a business question in business lingo, good UX helps you "grow the pie." That is to say, a good experience for an SME user will attract more SMEs (20% revenue of a larger user community/client ...


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You say that these features came from "our team, based on other user needs they have seen in the past." This makes sense, coming up with solutions to problems someone has witnessed, rather than solutions to problems someone imagines. Or, worse yet, features that seem cool. If it were me, I'd verify that those problems exist by observing users as they ...


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I like to think of a great product in terms of a layered cake, and the roles as individual layers this includes Researcher, Information Architect, Content Strategist, Ui Designer, and engineer, to name a few. User experience on the other hand is the actual satisfaction derived by devouring that cake. With that said the success of each product is derived ...


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If you can reach the person prior to 24 hours before the study, then just contact them to cancel. No big deal. If not, you might think about paying them some portion of the compensation they would have received. And, of course, thank them and keep them in mind for future studies (if they might fit into another one).


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You should always start by asking yourself who are your users, what is their operational context and what is their task. There is always an initial assumption in every design, which is then refined and corrected through exposure to users. If you don't have resources to talk to people, you should still be able to find a wealth of information about the goals, ...


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Don't let the word "research" scare you. Field studies and formal usability testing are great, but they're just tools. They're the band saw and the welding torch, perhaps, but still just tools. Hammers and screwdrivers are also tools and, due to their simplicity, probably even more useful. User research means seeking new knowledge about how people use your ...


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If you look at UX Design as an agnostic discipline (the way most of us were taught), the definition becomes clear. I think it is the 'U' that makes it confusing. Saying the word 'user' makes people think of digital product (something rendered on a screen), whereas if you say 'customer' you are actually closer to the truth. We are even considering the removal ...


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The filtering options are placed top corner, horizontally side by side (usually left) when there are only few facets and facet values to show. Sorting options are placed more often right. There are also cases where filters are stacked on top of each other on the left and search results on the right (most typical layout). It is usually the best choice when ...



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