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Are the ads targeted towards new visitors, or in capturing e-mails for existing visitors? Existing visitors will probably be happy to offer feedback on the site, especially if you lower the resistance to something like an inline comment form, rather than send email + receive survey + fill out survey. (It takes more engineering work, sure, but then you don't ...


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I would say you're thinking the wrong way 'round. Requirements first is waterfall design. And it's a surefire way to make something on budget and on time that everyone will hate and noone will use. Of course, even if you see your first implementation as nothing more than a starting point, you need something to get started. But a list of requirements locks ...


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No. If you assign a score, you are saying that the respondent answered the question. Furthermore, you are making inferences about the intent behind the respondent's non-answer by assigning it a score. When analyzing the data, you should only analyze the data that you have. Analyze the data using the responses that you have. In reporting the data, ...


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I don't have any expertise in the area of Likert scales and other questionnaire and survey concepts, but it seems like that would be distorting your data. Here, look: If 100 people took the survey, and 90 of them didn't answer the fourth question, and you assigned "Neutral" by default, then it would appear in your data that most people are just okay ...


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All your 'hard to find login' examples have one thing in common: the login buttons are in the same place. Top right corner. This is an excellent position because it is the norm. Most websites put the login button top right and most users expect the login button top right. Your question is based on the assumption that the buttons are hard to find. I guess ...


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I think it depends on what the company wants their main page to do. For many of these sites there is a lot of content you can access without logging in, so they hook you with that and then reel you in at a later point when you need to create an account for access to additional functionality (even stack exchange does this). Since this part is more important ...


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If the user is the account, then the account can be the top-level environment. In this case, you would get: Form the user's perspective, the UI includes everything he/she can do when logged in. If the user has multiple accounts, the UI can stay the same:


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Of course, you can measure how much time your users spend on each of your app's screen, actions performed by your users, user retention and churn and so on. But it won't tell you the full story, you'll understand the 'what' and not the 'why'. In order to understand the 'why', that is to say, understand how users use you app, I suggest to integrate visual ...


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Going to prefix this with i am a developer first and budding UX person second so some of the terminology may be off here. Putting this in an answer as it may be long, but any little helps i guess and may open up a debate. Maybe we are complicating the user model with the user flow. The current system model is the true system setup because everything is ...


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No method is the best for what you want to accomplish. There are many different methods that you could choose, all of which will provide you with information that you can use to improve your user experience. None of the methods will provide you with perfect information. You could conduct 1:1 interviews with your current users to learn about how they use ...


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If you have some kind of touchpoint with these users, reach out to them directly. You can directly email them with a personalized email (not just a mail merge!) to ask them if they are interested in providing feedback. If others in your organization have such touch points and a good relationship with users, they might be better suited to sending out your ...


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First off: no, I don't think there's any definitive research, because what you should do is dependent on the context of your design. Who are your users? What are you asking them to do in a modal overlay? Is it compelling to them or merely an interruption? Modal overlays are an extremely disruptive design pattern. Abuse of these is rampant, especially when ...


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Semantic differential scale (SDS) To begin with, your example of SDS is incorrect (Love - Like - Indifferent - Dislike - Hate). Essentially, you have amplified a key challenge in differential scales - coming up with a dichotomous pair. SDS pairs A SDS is based on a dichotomous (bi-polar) pair of adjectives. For example: Simple O O O O O Complex ...


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Your main goal is to get feedback early and often as possible. As there are many tools available at your disposal it's usually up to you to determine the best approach for testing which can rely heavily on available resources, deadlines, etc. Each project is unique so your process may (will likely) be different for each one. Due to the speed and lowest ...


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In a nut shell it's called user research. From user research you don't get data but information. The most direct form of user testing are one to one interviews. Find out what they do, why the do it and what they need to do it. Never ask them what they want directly, don't lead the questions and play dumb if they ask you questions about what your company is ...


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Since you mention that the system is very complex and difficult to add analytic tools, you will have to work with what you have, what do you have? One thing you have is web server logs, start there: Pages that are loaded the most, that indicates what is more useful in terms of content or indexes. Time spent per page, that indicates problematic pages, ...


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You might find this article about interviewing users to be helpful. Decide how much you can share with the users. Can you mention that you are reworking the interface? You might find it helpful to be blunt, that you are aware of usability/design issues with the current interface, and are reworking the system. To make sure you focus on the right tasks, would ...


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The technique is called progressive reduction. Basically, it's a hand holding approach to designing interfaces for users. Over time you "reduce" the UI elements in your application as the user naturally learns and understands the system. Thus the interface adapts along with the users knowledge and familiarity with it. This may be the article you came ...


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I think this is the article you are referring to: http://alistapart.com/blog/post/progressive-reductionmodify-your-ui-over-time "The idea behind Progressive Reduction is simple: Usability is a moving target. A user’s understanding of your application improves over time and your application’s interface should adapt to your user."


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"Training Wheels" (as a reference to those extra wheels you can put on a kid's bike to stop it from falling over when the kid is learning to ride) Here's Jakob Nielsen summarising an earlier paper on the topic. (It was originally coined by John Carroll in 1984


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It sounds like you may be looking for "Adaptive Interfaces" (Wikipedia) (not to be confused with Adaptive Layouts). The term covers a broad range of approaches to changing the interface based on the user. It used to be called "Personalisation" in the academic literature in the early 2000's, so there should be some research about it available online. The ...


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On the other hand - in the locked scenario (right image) you actually drag the answering icon to the place where the answering icon is placed in the regular scenario (left image).



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