Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Users actions speak louder than their words. Have users try both products, tell them to think out loud, but most importantly, look at what they do and how they react to the interface/interaction. You don't need them to tell you why they like product B more than A, find it out yourself. Read more here.


0

Limiting allowed characters in passwords to a sane subset of printable characters is a good idea. More flexibility is not always better. That's why we have speed limits on roads. Frequently, usability is about protecting users from their natural aptitude for shooting themselves in the foot. From a server-side security standpoint, there is no problem in ...


1

The scientific method can be very helpful here. Speculate on what feature(s) people care most about (a hypothesis). Present a choice between products / services that have and don't have those features (an experiment). If you're creative enough you can come up with a large enough list of what it might be that you feel overwhelmed trying to present them ...


2

There are questionnaires created especially to measure and compare the user experience of different products. Off the top of my head I know two, but I would guess there are more. AttrakDif The AttrakDiffTM questionnaire by Hassenzahl et al. (2003), developed together with User Interface Design GmbH, measures subjective assessments concerning pragmatic ...


0

I fully agree with dan's answer, just to answer your questions though. I would be hesitant to change the wording of the survey from test to test. We'll be introducing another source of variance from the different tenses. It might make sense to preface all the questions in the survey with "Imagine you are a new user of this system" to avoid the "this is my ...


1

Yes, unfortunatelly, the restrictions on characters the user can use in the password have sense from the UX perspective. If you're operating a worldwide service, you'd like your users to be able to log from all places of the world. If it's the case, you must take into account, that unfortunatelly, the keyboards are not standarized. Event the layout of the ...


0

A few guide lines: Let user enter any character in the ASCII range of 32 (space) to 126 (~) - these should be the same in any character code. Limiting your users to less characters will only frustrate them and force them to choose less secure or harder for them to remember passwords. Characters bellow ASCII 32 (and ASCII 127 = Delete) have specially ...


0

What if it takes two weeks to get the password reset by a letter being sent to my home address and I can’t access my bank on holiday due to their being a character in my password that I can’t type on my iPhone. Will I blame the bank, will I consider changing banks…… What if my back decides at some later stage they wish to use drop down lists to input a ...


2

One problem that I've seen with non-ASCII passwords is that some systems deal with characters and others deal with encoding-specific code points. The "א" character might be represented in different ways depending on encoding, and sometimes the same character may be represented in any of multiple ways ("é" could equally be U00E9 or U0065 U0301). Consider the ...


0

Authentication and security are critical. A security breach will kill you. Do you have any idea what goes on between a keyboard and server? You have normalization, encoding, ambiguities in Unicode, serialization, NAT, man-in-the-middle, and other measures. That is a secure end-to-end transaction that is used for the entire session. Bad guys want to take ...


3

It depends. If you've got reasonably strong control over the password input mechanism (keyboard layouts, software stacks, etc.), then letting users freely input anything they want is a good idea, because it maximizes the available password space. Someone attacking an English-language site probably won't try even obvious things like "كلمة المرور" (which ...


3

It can make sense from a usability and support perspective. If the character isn't possible to type on a keyboard/phone without using alt codes or copy-pasting. Keep in mind that the most active internet enabled devices have touch screens. Your user could create the account from their laptop, then try to access the account with their phone, which isn't ...


28

If a site requires that passwords only contain certain character codes, then a user will be able to enter the password into almost any device which is capable of producing those characters. If the password contains character codes which may be entered on some devices but not on others, then a user who creates a password on a device which could enter the ...


16

I would like to add to DaveAlger's point. I, like many people, create algorithms in order to better remember passwords. I've spoken to many people (in an informal manner) about passwords and I have heard a lot of objections why can't I use a part of my email or my username in my password? why is there a character limit? (affects my algorithm) why can't I ...


85

If the user can type it then it should be allowed in their password. Telling someone what they can and can't use in their password always feels wrong to the user. Passwords are currently the most universal way to authenticate. Preventing users from entering anything is, in essence, telling them who they can or can't be. 1. Any printable character that a ...


0

My instinct suggests that a viral video site would be better served by tagging than categorization as a navigation metaphor. Categories are buckets into which items are placed. Tags are attributes which are assigned to an item. It is implied that an item belongs in one category while that same item might have multiple tags. If you give your authenticated ...


0

First of all: Are you an industrial designer? If not, get one, you'll be eternally grateful you did. With that, you'll cover close to 99% of your needs. Explain him/her the idea and he/she will be able to find the issues with it, let you know the possible workarounds, add improvements, etc. After that, you can build prototypes on paper and/or 3D and do a ...


2

"Designing UX for physical products and finding related articles on the internet is quite difficult." It's probably because you should be searching for Human Factors articles rather than UX articles. I'm generalizing here, but you could say that Human Factors is UX with a broader scope (UX has it's roots in HF/E). HF practitioners study software and ...


1

There wouldn't be anything different between how you design the device or how you design a website/app. Go through the same process. Build personas, get the research in order and test. But how people interact with it will more than likely be different. How do people put the device on? Are they being active with it (running, biking, exercising)? Is it a ...


0

My suggestion would be to go to paper or other UI tool and look at the design of the device in its prototyping stage and relate the functionality of the device to an interface. Using this method it is easy to garner case studies and refine your design of the controls to achieve a usable product. Think how long we had separate play, pause etc.. buttons on ...


0

I get this is a UX site but the answer is technical PDF in a print dialog is what you are accustomed to as that is how it works. The free driver from Adobe is a print driver. PDF is a page rendering. You can select page size and portrait or landscape. Once you load the driver it is available as a printer to all applications (that print). Microsoft ...


1

The logic, or origin, is the option below: "Save as PostScript..." . PostScript is the common language of printers. You print a document by converting it to PostScript and sending it to the printer. (Roughly, like everything else there are other options.) So basically "printing" is "convert to PostScript, then send to printer", naturally someone wanted to ...


3

Based on my own experience on the beginning of printing to PDF, I'd say it was due to the workaround it started with. Many programs like Microsoft Office or browsers didn't include an option to print to PDF till a few years back. When they need for printing to PDF came up other programs (mainly PDF creating tools) were extended to install their own printer ...


1

A tricky question, which is difficult to answer. However, my theory is the following... You are really converting from one format to another. That may be HTML to PDF, DOCX to PDF, MSG to PDF and many more. Therefore, it would really be more understandable for a user if we used this technique today and called it converting document. There are also many free ...


2

Was waiting to see if other people have better approaches, but our team has recently done it this way. Stage 1: Does your vision align with user requirements? Do user shadowing. Talk to good mix of your users, find out what problems they are trying to solve with your product, how they're currently using it in context with other tasks they do outside your ...


2

It sounds like what you want to do is get feedback of a product vision without a working prototype. I think you'll want to figure out some good mediums to communicate this product vision to potential users, and then conduct surveys/1:1 interviews/focus groups (whatever method you think will be best) to get feedback. Some good mediums might be: visual ...


0

Once I, the service provider, get in a 2 way conversation with you, the user, the chances you buying my service increase dramatically. This is from my experience, but there are a lot of studies demonstrating that engaging the user helps. That being said, it's easy to exaggerate with the number of mails, to annoy users. Hell, some users marked as spam the ...


0

Here's something that you can use for a Post mortem program. I am assuming that you are going to reach to a limited number of customers( not thousands atleast): Find their purchase history, and see how frequently they made a purchase. If possible try to find a pattern in their purchase. Check for the client servicing/account management. Talk to the person ...


1

I think you should look at the need rather than the number. The number is often not very relevant. Yes 20 nav links looks crazy however it's generally a symptom of poor information architecture. If you do in fact need 20 links and they are all clearly differentiated from each other and well grouped, it can work. Your question of "do 6 options promote ...


0

WHY? (always a good question to ask) Fist, the immediate issue, for me, is: Why not use a 'hamburger' or icon for saving space on small screens? Is it not needed? Is this personal preference? If it is the later then personal preference should not be the reason for design decisions. The issue may actually be a project (or expectation) management flaw. As a ...


1

There are some general rules and you might know: The magical number seven, plus or minus two (George Miller, 1956) People only remember four items at once (Baddeley 1986 and Cowan 2001) Same with 3, 9, 16 and more... But those are about remember something. What we need is how much options should be available. The answer is: the less the higher the ...


-2

You can ask user enter his phone number, and he also need to enter the verification code you send to that phone. This way is popular in China. Hope it helps.


0

Wow. Good luck. I know that the company I'm working for spends a lot of time and money dealing with just this issue. They have arrangements with CC companies and other secondary companies and they flag location, phone number, address and other points in trying to pinpoint and prevent shipping to thieves. This is not a UX issue. UX is there to enhance the ...


0

To verify a user with utmost security, you should verify the user's identity by having him/her enter their credit card number, and then testing that for being registered, and then testing it against your database, along with all other information. This will work because the the user can only make so many fake accounts (1 per credit card), and the user will ...


0

If you are thinking logic that is adjusted to heuristics, then yes, because this will make a program predictable hence intuitive. But if you mean math logic, then no, it's counter-intuitive.


3

I think what you mean is strongly related with the difference of the mental model of the user on how a system/program works and the experience the user has when expecting the behaviour of his/her mental model. The term "logical" will be defined for each user a little bit different, based on knowledge, tech skills, experiences,... So to make a program ...


0

No I don't have a recent study on this topic - but I think that a positive framing will have a higher conversion rate than a negative framing. Why is that? you GIVE something (more features), rather than DENIE it you don't want people to leave your site with an negative mindset (you can not do this, you can not do that) it's like telling a child :"you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included