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Though there has been a lot of focus on language in the other answers (which is an important consideration), I believe that the key focus should be on heuristics (this Smashing Magazine article provides a great introduction into heuristics). The Default Effect For your question it's very important to consider the default effect, in that people have the ...


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Instead of checkbox you can try with the toggle switches(on/off). Now days most the forms you find this kind of options. Please have a look at the below images to get an idea. ![toggle switch][2]


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In the past, I've had my project manager conduct usability tests with users (who represent the target audience). The PM is familiar enough with the project to know how it works and is able to guide other people through the process of using the site/product, but also removed enough from it to stay objective - because they haven't been as deeply involved as a ...


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Labels for check-boxes should always be phrased in a positive/active way. As a rule of thumb, consider your alternative without the verbs: comments in this post It’s obvious that an empty check-box next to this label means ‘disable’ (or ‘forbid’) and a filled one stands for ‘allow’ (or ‘enable’). You may make it explicit for sure – you may even be ...


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Think of it via the form perspective. Checkboxes are commonly used to add to the existing form (ex: add me to your newsletter, remember me, etc). So in the perspective it should be "add comments to your post" where a check will enable it. Putting disable with a check is kind of contradictory: I'm "adding" a disable? Also to add to what you're asking ...


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Possitive wording The general rule is that positive wording is better in general since it's easier to interpret and tends to be shorter which is always good in checkboxs' labels. Microsoft agrees with these in their guidelines. If it is the case of a blogpost, I think it's not a big deal, since users should later be able to delete the comments and ...


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I would argue that sometimes a business doesn't scale its products. K.I.S.S. is a thing. Representing a clear path to finding what you are offering is key. If search does not produce results that beneefit your users - you don't need it. It's a feature for consideration just like any other feature. Test your navigation, test your content, let users tell you ...


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Agree. Yes, you dont know what a user may be looking for. Phone number, careers, return policy, shipping info, contact info? Also search logs help tell you whats important and what you need to more easily surface. You can improve ia and design with search knowledge


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The answer is, YES Because, who knows about the small e-commerce site's feature? It means that the site might grow as soon with lot of products and categories. We have to keep in our mind that even though small retail site or small company sites, it should be very scalable in terms of easily accessible and user experience. Rather than using pagination or ...


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My question is this: How much margin, if any, should I allow for and where in the calculation should I add it? An error bar makes no sense for individual SUS scores. Presenting grouped average scores then displaying a standard deviation for each group would be sensible. If you're worried about the audience for the results reading too much into small ...


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Some kind of survey with questions like agree or disagree- "I always want to have the latest technology." Or even just outright asking (masked amongst other questions so they dont think there's a free watch up for grabs) "Do you plan to get an apple watch?" - ASAP, in the next few months, in the next year, etc... You should probably be targeting the ...


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After you do what @user71432 suggests in a different answer on this page… Use the frequency-commonality grid to help you decide You could apply the method that Isaacs and Walendowski recommend in Designing from both sides of the screen. It involves looking at both the frequency (how often) and the commonality (how many users) of each control, and then ...


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Your next steps may vary depending on problem which you're trying to solve. Your study shows that some areas are not very important for most of your users and this means that removing/moving those areas (links) to other part of the page won't harm conversion. Also, looking at your bar in header I would suggest to group links by meaning. You can use ...


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Remember what metrics are really used for - to gauge the direction and magnitude of change, not the actual UX. That is to say, all metrics are just different pieces of information that the UX designer can use to try and work out if the design changes introduced have the desired impact on the user experience. However, as with any change, it can also affect ...


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A more advanced user of Google Analytics may know of methods that I am not aware of, but I can speak from my experience here: GA will allow you to (fairly easily) track behaviour trends, including all the things you mention in your question. Some work out of the box, others would require use of the "Event Tracking" tools. However, GA seems to purposely ...


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Your net is too wide An internet average would be totally useless. That's like asking how your income compares to the global average. That wouldn't give you much insight into your quality of life in San Francisco, for instance. Analyze the competition What you want is a reference against a competitive set or some other target set. The type of business or ...


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In a Idle situation, it is always a good practice to go non descriptive as the objective of the capture is mere an assessment of an acceptance level. Just go with the complete submissions against each line Items to conclude on your decision.


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In the scenario you are proposing (drag and drop items from a long list), several factors must be taken into account. Every factor might present potential hurdles to the user. On screen real estate: is the target easy to reach? Check Fitt's Law. List item size. Unwanted scrolling: when reaching the bottom of the screen, the screen will start scrolling ...


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A quick example of one of the possible problems - Suppose, you have a long list or say a visual from editor where all the sections are not being covered on the screen on current resolution of the system, then it will be difficult for the users to select a particular section and reorder them. Specially, when one will realize or need to scroll the mouse along ...


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Use both, but in order Personas are intended to provide a model for user behavior. This may include needs, emotions, perceptions, incentives, and goals. Personas are intended to help designers understand the problem domain before they start designing a solution. Understanding the problem domain before trying to design a solution is considered a basic ...


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The question you are asking doesn't pertain to personas, it pertains to user flows. What the user currently does with existing tools is one set of user flows. What the user would do if using your product as intended is another set of user flows. The persona should be the same for both. Otherwise, as @tonytrucco mentions, you are not inventing a product ...


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So personas are supposed to exist and act as a sort of guidepost for you as you design your product or solution. Typically they're based on real data/feedback but can also be generalized to fit a larger audience. Personas should never co-exist with the final product. That's where you're supposed to perform user testing and verify the validity of your ...


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It seems more like a narrative for a user-test, rather than the narrative for a persona, which are more a general "bio" regarding the user. To me a persona consists of: Name, Picture & Demography Bio Goals Frustrations If you decide to go with proto-personas, don't forget to actually test them with your real audience by qualitative and quantitive ...


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I'm afraid I don't have time to answer this in full right now, but I'll come back to it if I can. I would suggest exploring tools such as usability hub and their offshoot 'peek' before doing a live test. They're pretty helpful. Second I would underline how important it is to observe use as naturally as possible. Note 'observe'. For fundamental usability ...


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It sounds you want to determine what it is better to do: a more or less conducted usability exploration in your project. I tipically choose a more 'relaxed' session with participants and no strict procedures when: I need general feedback of usefulness and usability of early ideas I know who the user is (users like, people from companies that share the ...


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both approaches are OK, but it also depends on your project. For example, if it's an informational site it will be different to an action oriented app, and if it's an action oriented app, it could be very different if it's something casual or an app for extreme users. Also, it all depends on the features, if they're common or very technical, and so on. ...


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I would personally just let them attempt a complete walkthrough as a user and see if they are able to do so. Because when you deploy the platform you will not be able to guide them through, so the best way to see where you fail in user experience development is allowing users to do it themselves. When we were doing similar testing on my platform. We allowed ...


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This is a bad idea. Xabre is right that this makes interfaces more confusing for new users. However, it also harms usability for experienced users. A menu item that is visible can be reached in a single action. When a menu item is hidden, I have to: Stop and think where the item is hidden. Click on the menu to open it. Once the menu is open, find the ...


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That's a clear "NO", as it lowers the discoverability of the system you're trying to make. Design-wise it may look sexy to really minimize it untill nothing's left, but to me it just adds to the confusion. It also seems pointless to add another step which just "gets in the way of doing my job". But hey, don't take my word for it: ...


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This is a very difficult task no doubt and I would agree most schools don't do a great job at presenting all of these options for a student to choose. More the less to do this on a website is a very big task. Here's my thought degrees vs majors doesn't really matter as much. You can do either one. What would help us make buckets to lump similar things ...


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(Just adding to Adit's plan) You have a lot of users, and that's gold . If there's also a strong community behind the app or game you are working on, or you would want to build one, products like UserVoice (https://www.uservoice.com/) or the free tool http://doorbell.io will help you collect feedback and ideas. Basically, your features could be driven by ...


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ACM Digital Library (dl.acm.org) is really helpful when doing focused literature review. For more general research you can access Google Scholar search engine. I also recommend a great tool called Mendeley, that keeps track of your research and uploads all your material to the cloud (also generates the citations...) There are a number of papers on ...


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I've been trying for ten years to use personas and get clients to engage with them, with varying degrees of success. Least success: the Alan Cooper The Inmates are Running the Asylum kind of persona as described by @Rumi P. Clients find them patronising or oversimplified, as a rule. Most success: the type of approach you're talking about. They resonate ...


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I've always thought of personas as a simplified, normalized aggregate of user research. E.g. I have a list of 100 common tasks from interviewing users, the 10 most frequent/important of those end up on the persona document for that group.


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I'd suggest number 3. The typical order would be: Manufacturer - Product Line - Product - Descriptor - Differentiator. Each item appears as an increasingly specific detail to categorise it within the previous element, much like you might use a directory based file path to identify a file on a drive. The identifiers depend on the product and its categories ...


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The best way to do this would be to go out into the field, to watch your target audience in their own environment and to interview them about their current behavior and what they think their future behavior might be in the future. Take some time to analyze and think about each person. You should interview about 3 people, per persona. Focus on behavior ...


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I have always seen it done like #4, I think the idea behind it is to put the differentiating text at the end because it helps keep layout and easier to scan for differences. The first part thats the same keeps in line although the measurements differ, this makes it easier to see that everything else is the same: Epic 13 Shower Stall with Center Drain (33" ...


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What I normally do for my search functions is do ALL of them, just put the more relevant and specific results first, for example. User search: CAR: Results: Car Car Parts Car Tires Tire Care .. Carrots Or if you want to signify to the user the point where you took a bit of abstraction you could just seperate the list like so: Results: Car Car ...


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If there's budget for it, it may make sense for you to shadow a support rep to see their work environment and whether there's something that make them default to this behaviour. It could be as simple as, the details on the customer ticket is not directly accessible for the rep while they're on the support call. Or it can be the customers aren't providing ...


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You can find some good pointers on organizing and developing personas in About Face 4. I am going to summarize it here along with inputs based on my personal experience. Developing and Organizing by Behavioral Patterns You can identifying behavioral variables and then relate them to the subjects. These, in turn, depend on factors like activities, ...


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A very comprehensive answer is called for, and delivered by DAO1. I would like to add the simple answer, which in fact is the driving principal. User interfaces should be driven by purpose. Consider the purpose of the user and stack the architecture in terms of priorities. Simplify by erradicating all non-essential elements. There is a time to read, a ...


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I'll try to answer the more specific points at the end: effects of traffic leaks Well, any link would 'leak traffic'. So for this to be good/bad, it has to be determined if it's really a bad thing to begin with. For instance, a link to twitter. The bad side of that coin is that they link to twitter and are no longer on your site. The good side of that ...


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If it's possible to ask context-based questions, ask this: Thanks for participating in our survey. Please pick which of the two sites you'd like to help us evaluate: [www.website.com] [www.website.co.uk] And adjust the second link to be whatever the local domain extension is. Ideally you'd randomize the position of both links too, because some ...


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Have a look at 'Study: How Searchers Perceive Country Code Top-Level Domains' on Moz.com. Author Eli Schwartz presents some successful approaches to really get at 1. whether users are aware of general TLDs, 2. do users see a particular TLD (.edu specifically) as more trustworthy, 3. can users identify a particular location by the ccTLD used, and 4. can users ...


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The problem with this kind of issue is that I suspect you would get different answers from different parts of the globe. I suspect (and this is just a suspicion - I have no evidence for this) that populations with US trade interests may favor the .com suffix as it is considered a larger 'global' entity rather than just confined to their country whereas ...


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If at all possible I'd try and observe actual behaviour, rather than ask a question. Because people suck at predicting their own behaviour. For example run a remote usability test with mocked up a google search result around your topic with a mix of .co.uk & .com (or whatever) company names/URLs and see which is clicked most. You also have to remember ...



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