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ISO9241-11 defines usability as: "The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction in a specified context of use." You will note that the word simplification is not mentioned at all in this definition. Usability is about: Effectiveness - can users complete tasks, ...


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Valuable metrics are closely linked to goals Good metrics are simply a way of measuring how well something meets goals. You might be able to find a standard list of parameters to measure, but it might be argued that the more generic your metrics, the less value they actually provide. Examples: If a goal is to improve the perceived "performance" of ...


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(I turned my comment into an answer) I don't have any published research for you but the reason we generally don't ask those things in interviews is because interviews tend to be geared towards qualitative research whereas, the questions you mentioned are more quantitative. Usually, in an interview, you are testing a hypothesis (Like "Can the user find how ...


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And Apple uses white background for their videos on website. While using light background colors, make sure you apply shadows to the player so the visual content stands out. Take a loot at the Video Player UX on Pinterest Here are some aspects of dark color


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Try usabilityhub's preference test, or 5-second test (can't really say without knowing more about your project) if you want to gauge messaging. If you complete other tests on the site, you get karma points, which you can then use to fund your own tests. Awesome service.


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What if you made it more of a discussion about business needs and goals? Example: In this screen users can search for X and compare it to Y. We understand this is important to your business because the difference between X and Y is often a place where cost savings can be identified. Do you agree this is an important part of your business? Another example: ...


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Given your situation, any testing that you do will create an extra layer of assumption (i.e. that the managers think like the end-users), which you may need to validate or else it is very likely for you to fall into the trap of designing something that you can sell to the managers but the users won't want to use. So to me it is possible to get useful data ...


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I have always been a little bit critical of the way popular game review websites try to compare games, as least when it comes to the user experience (which I believe 'playability' is a big part of. While there are some quite objective metrics when it comes to graphics (polygon count, fps, etc.), you'll be pressed to find any reasonable comparison for ...


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I agree with you on all but number 3. I feel like the pop-up window asking if you're sure fits the "Permit easy reversal of actions" principle. Attempting to close a file isn't necessarily an error, however if the user has clicked it by accident, it allows them to change their mind. Simple error handling does fit, in a way, but I believe that the second ...


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I agree with Dipak, DesignerAnalyst and Jasmin Javia. However, I don't think any of them have mentioned that you should provide some sort of search functionality, especially because you have a long list of FAQs.


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The FAQ purpose, which is to help users efficiently and effectively use your site, should guide your decision how many and what questions to include. Ommit obvious or trivial questions and include questions that : help users build a correct mental model of your site help them avoid costly mistakes help them perform a task much more quickly prevent ...


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From my perspective, FAQ doesn't affect perception of site because it is just to give clear information related to service provide by the site.If it is possible to shorten the answer as much as possible then there will be no issue having many FAQs. If site is providing service at large scale then it is better approach to clear the difficulties of the user. ...


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Do they affect perception? No. In fact, the user will be grateful to see that you care. Think about it; who comes to your FAQ page? The users who really want to complete something but are not able to do so. And that visitors number would be less compared to those who complete the tasks without any issue - as you are stating that the website is easy to use. ...


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Short Answer It sounds to me like what you want to run is a variation of a closed card sorting exercise. Long Answer I have to admit I'm not the biggest fan of card sorting exercises. However, since you're talking about a global organisation it may be the best way to go, especially if you can run the exercise online (which it sounds like you want to do). ...


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You need to spend a lot of time planning and thinking about what you want to get out of the test. When performing a usability tests you should be looking to gather quantitative and/or qualitative data. As a rule of thumb, in terms of time, a typical usability test can be broken down into three phases: Planning - 45% of time Executing the test - 10% of ...


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As others have said, you shouldn't try influence the user in any certain direction for a usability test. Take a look at this test script, I found it really helpful in terms of framing the usability test and instructing the users to think out loud etc. In terms of analytics/data from your usability test, you could try using Canvas Flip - I haven't used it ...


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If you talk about restricting the time, please take a look at benchmark usability testing. If you want to give valuable insights, let the user talk and let them explain what they see, what they are doing., If I still want user to complete the task "as fast as possible", I'd give them scenarios like this: you have 1 minute to catch the subway, while ...


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Would my presence alter how they are timed? Yes, it would. It's known as the Hawthorne Effect, where subjects change their behavior simply because they are being observed. Measuring Usability has another writeup biases that also mentioned this effect: 9 Biases In Usability Testing. It's not a matter of you necessarily being in the room. The fact that ...



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