New answers tagged

1

The FAQ purpose, which is to help users efficiently and effectively use your site, should guide your decision how many and what questions to include. Ommit obvious or trivial questions and include questions that : help users build a correct mental model of your site help them avoid costly mistakes help them perform a task much more quickly prevent ...


1

From my perspective, FAQ doesn't affect perception of site because it is just to give clear information related to service provide by the site.If it is possible to shorten the answer as much as possible then there will be no issue having many FAQs. If site is providing service at large scale then it is better approach to clear the difficulties of the user. ...


5

Do they affect perception? No. In fact, the user will be grateful to see that you care. Think about it; who comes to your FAQ page? The users who really want to complete something but are not able to do so. And that visitors number would be less compared to those who complete the tasks without any issue - as you are stating that the website is easy to use. ...


0

Short Answer It sounds to me like what you want to run is a variation of a closed card sorting exercise. Long Answer I have to admit I'm not the biggest fan of card sorting exercises. However, since you're talking about a global organisation it may be the best way to go, especially if you can run the exercise online (which it sounds like you want to do). ...


0

You need to spend a lot of time planning and thinking about what you want to get out of the test. When performing a usability tests you should be looking to gather quantitative and/or qualitative data. As a rule of thumb, in terms of time, a typical usability test can be broken down into three phases: Planning - 45% of time Executing the test - 10% of ...


1

As others have said, you shouldn't try influence the user in any certain direction for a usability test. Take a look at this test script, I found it really helpful in terms of framing the usability test and instructing the users to think out loud etc. In terms of analytics/data from your usability test, you could try using Canvas Flip - I haven't used it ...


0

If you talk about restricting the time, please take a look at benchmark usability testing. If you want to give valuable insights, let the user talk and let them explain what they see, what they are doing., If I still want user to complete the task "as fast as possible", I'd give them scenarios like this: you have 1 minute to catch the subway, while ...


1

Would my presence alter how they are timed? Yes, it would. It's known as the Hawthorne Effect, where subjects change their behavior simply because they are being observed. Measuring Usability has another writeup biases that also mentioned this effect: 9 Biases In Usability Testing. It's not a matter of you necessarily being in the room. The fact that ...


0

You can embed Google Analytics into your solution. Some of the analytics will allow you to capture a few things related to human factors and the user experience. However, Google Analytics will not answer any "why" questions (e.g. why did the user do that?) or qualitative questions (e.g. How do you feel about that form?), so Google Analytics should always be ...


0

Depends on how the current site is built. If there is a common include for every page where you can add this new code... I'd argue that 2 days effort would be more than enough. (~16hours) On a really rough legacy site with little consistency this would balloon up to a full week (80hours)


0

A number of things effect development time. Without knowing all the details 70 hours may or may not be reasonable for your specific situation. As Max mentioned, this is not the correct site for this type of question, and since you are really asking for project estimation and not how to address specific programming problems, Stackoverflow is probably not a ...


3

the reason = users clicked on it by accident in the rare cases users want to do it, it is really simple to select all text and press delete on a desktop the idea might need to be revisited for mobile if someone discovers that their users want to delete the text more often than they tap on random buttons by accident


-1

If someone gives you their email address for registration purposes, that is not consent to be spammed with an unwanted mailing list. They only want to be on a mailing list if they explicitly say they want to be on it. As this article, 6 Ways To Improve Your Customers’ Email Opt-in Experience, says: …if you don’t know what makes your company awesome and ...


1

Always. Never. Anything in between. This is a classic testing scenario, where the answer will depend on your testing and tracking results and nothing else. Opinions are a dime a dozen, hard data is a fact. You can change a hero image (or any other image, copy, layout, colors and more as we're at it!) based on promotions, holidays, seasons, geo, cookies, ...


0

This really gets down to the purpose and audience of your hero images. Thankfully, Midas' question in the comments and your answer provides some insight and I feel that maybe you need to change the approach a little. I'm assuming that your site is for a travel agency, tourist destination, or something similar. If it was me, I wouldn't use a single hero ...


0

the aim should be to help to user focus on the content or features on the website, not distract them. the background should take a very low priority in the user cognitive load, like the name "background"


8

I'll just quickly point out three points: It'll look less clean. I mean this both figuratively and literally. Anytime you add more visual information to something it becomes more cluttered. This is why with very data-dense interfaces people often choose for flat design; it alleviates the business a bit. Secondly, some patterns can actually make it look as ...


3

You're probably not going to find data on this, because it's not the kind of things that publishable studies are usually focused on. If you're really lucky, some hyper-productive UXer will have turned some test data into blog post, but even then, the sample size will probably be small. This is a case where you have to make decisions based on the ...


4

Just get started Nothing is constant in the market: Your personas will change over time. The key is to start putting personas to work in your product now, knowing that you'll have another group to address tomorrow. As you assess interview findings, the majority groups will surface. There's always more nuance to be discovered, but don't let "paralysis by ...


2

Like many things in UX, it depends on your solution and how you are creating your persona, e.g. are you researching real users or basing them on roles or job titles? Alan Cooper's book "About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction Design" devotes a whole chapter to persona and the persona creation process (Chapter 5 Modelling Users: Persona and Goals). He ...


7

This phrase occurs again and again in UX: "It depends" It's really dependant on the number of personality facets you need to align to and the depth you want your service to appeal to. You don't need a Persona for each personality trait. Personality traits can be combined into a single persona. I've worked with as few as two to as many as seven.


0

I'm not sure if this is helpful, but here's an article on some user testing done for the Obama campaign. They used pre-filled options. http://kylerush.net/blog/optimization-at-the-obama-campaign-ab-testing/


3

I'm used to the solicitations that prompt a move to a higher level of giving, if I donated, say $100, a year ago, it will say "Won't you please donate $125?" It might then offer my last year amount along with both higher, and a blank space. My example was paper, for repeat donors. In the case of a web page, I'd suggest this approach - Create the amounts ...


3

If the organization wants people to donate freely, without guilt or coercion, and not just because its easy, then having no suggested donation immediately visible is better. I think the organization is looking for donors who are so pleased and satisfied with what the organization is doing that donors find joy in donating money to the organization. This is ...


14

As a potential donor, it always annoys me if I cannot change the suggested amount to my own preference. Don't try to tell me what my charitable donation should be. I don't mind the suggested donation amount being there, but I just wouldn't make the purchase if I couldn't change it or remove it. It also annoys me if I cannot donate to (or buy) things via ...


38

Based on work by Sam Ham with the Galapagos Conservation Fund and elsewhere, and my own unjustified opinion, I'd estimate that you'd take more money from suggested amounts rather than a pick-your-own-amount field. However, it sounds like they're trying to protect the reputation they believe they have with the ticket buyer. They may assume, probably ...


0

Any type of testing you do will be defined by the sample size and methodology that you accept in order to establish your level of confidence for the results. Guerilla testing is to do with the methodology rather than the sample size, although typically you will only do this with a smaller number of participants (surprise volunteers). I think you need to ...


4

It will depend on many variables. As a whole, let's start with Guerrilla Testing concept: Participants are not recruited but are ‘approached’ by those persons conducting the sessions. The sessions themselves are short, typically between 15-30 minutes and are loosely structured around specific key research objectives. The output is typically ...



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