New answers tagged

-1

This article discusses the merits of part of this subject - detecting screen reader usage. It does not cover detection of other assistive technology like adaptive keyboards and alternate point devices, or replacing your CSS style sheets, or activating the high contrast OS visual scheme, etc. https://www.joedolson.com/2014/03/detecting-assistive-technology/ ...


0

The link between color and emotion is imposed by society in different ways for different ages Adults also mapped emotion to color differently from children. The adults were very consistent in their choices of color to associate with emotion: Happy was yellow, Sad was black, and Angry was red. Children, by contrast, chose a range of colors to associate ...


1

I believe this post and this study may help you in this case.


0

User testing, I think the name Usability testing is more correct. You are testing your project to find how usable it is. So, Usability testing it's a name for a variety of tests: task test A/B tests reading/comprehention test, etc Where the subject is the project (app, website, interactive kiosk, paper brochure, instructions leaflet, etc.) User research,...


3

User testing refers for a specific method for evaluation of an interface while user research incorporates a group of methodologies for evaluation of a system/interface that include user testing, interviews, surveys and others. So, user testing is just a type of user research method. User testing - this is one the most used and most valuable methods for ...


1

"User testing" is a bit of a misnomer. It makes it sound like the user's being tested, which can make participants fairly uncomfortable. I prefer the term "usability study," which means the same thing without without those negative connotations. Usability studies are just one of many kinds of user research. The Nielsen Norman Group published this diagram ...


1

Very interesting topic...and question! Have you been doing research as a part of the UX process for a long time now or are you new to this? and where did you learn about Empathy as it relates to research? Empathy is mostly being able to take away your point of view and to be able to take on another's point of view... which is a flexibility and skill set ...


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Yes! It is difficult to say/determine/make a verdict as to when things become necessary or extraneous, but I commend you in thinking this way and wanting to keep things simple. I'd say keep the 'x' until it becomes commonplace to have timed-out notifications without the 'X' even the big organizations include the 'x' I've seen the Facebook notifications ...


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I think no matter what the data heat map looks like (assume we can find one), your user(s) still has trouble to accidently triggers the fold-out function. Jakob Nielsen suggests that using only 5 users to do usability testing is sufficient to find problems (https://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users/). Although you only have ...


0

Ethnography traditionally involves long-term observations of a culture, and Action Research is understood as when you want to invite research into your actual project. I think for your research environment setup, especially if you have a specific project, demographic study, focus group, etc., you are leaning towards Action Research instead of Ethnography.


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There is research out there showing that people are more likely to click a button labeled "Menu" rather than a hamburger icon, but that says little about their motivation. ("Menu" is a relatively vague term, whereas a hamburger is slowly becoming a standard symbol for a specific kind of menu: a top-level navigation menu.) Norman and Nielsen advocate labeling ...


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Even if your competitor's website is slightly different, his approach can inspire you. You don't learn exclusively from similarities, but from differences too. The true similarity doesn't rely on formal aspects, but on a common principles. If there is a common principly with regard to your competitor's website and yours, there is always a possibility of ...


1

You can argue it either way... Yes, you should conduct it. No, you shouldn't. What matters more is your usability and how memorable and appealing you are to your customer. After all, the point of conducting the usability test on your competitor is to gain some kind of advantage. I think you can put your time, money, and energy into something that will ...


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No matter what you use, remember that you may use them to present the results to stakeholders shortly. Those stakeholders don't care the research process, they don't have much time, and too many, or unclear labels may be considered as a waste of time by them. I don't know the context of your research, but I would suggest instead of looking for seemly ...


2

I think your next step here should be focusing on the improvement of the current features. If you have already discovered that "most calls point to issues that could be solved by improving current features, rather than introducing new ones," then adding new features doesn't make much sense here from a UX standpoint. Instead of wasting your, designers, and ...


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I wouldn't say it differs at all -- all the standard methods seem appropriate: social media, craigslist, ads, recruiting agencies, local groups, etc. If you can't offer them anything in return, it might be a bit harder, but then you can also play the charity card and motivate people by letting them know they're doing a good deed and that it will have actual ...


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Without really knowing any of the information that you have on hand, I can suggest some basic strategies that you can consider for feature prioritization, which you can combine to create a weighted feature list that should suit your purpose. For each of the categories listed there are a number of different ways in which you can score the features (old or new)...


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You've answered your own question here (although, ahem, you might want to rephrase it into a question). User research shows that the priority is improving features you already have. Prioritise that before adding another feature. At the heart of great UX is a long, fiddly, detailed, often boring, Continuous Improvement Process


0

Some believe that the best way to determine what should be built is to observe users in the wild before deciding on features. Watch them as they do their work, without directing them. What tasks do they perform most often? Which ones give the most trouble? What do they never do? Discovering these patterns should provide some obvious directions for what ...


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In my opinion the study on the CSR you did is a good starting point. If you have the chance to interview the users, try to understand why do they needs those features, which additional features they could want or imagine.


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On the UX side I typically have the following principles: don't listen to the feedback, look at the problems users share listen to solutions offered but make sure that whatever is used follows the principles of the product goals organizer user feedback so each piece tells a complete story so the analysis is comprehensive Putting my product management hat ...


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From my experience, for in-person research, you should analyze the results of user interviews or tests as soon as possible, using the notes you took during these interviews/tests and revisiting audio or video records based on the notes. (It helps to annotate important notes with a time stamp.) You can link to summaries, notes, or recordings from the analysis ...


0

My general advice on running any type of user testing is to have a practice run or two with someone so you can be confident with the process and procedures, especially if you are not that familiar with it. Steve Krug's Advanced Common Sense website is a good starting point to consolidate your existing knowledge on usability and testing in general. In ...


2

Too often in UX design we find both new and experienced designers debate over the definition of terminologies. Before I give my take on the answer it is important firstly for you to consider what you want to do and why you are doing this. Thinking about this first will guide you to creating the right assets regardless of what it is called, and I encourage ...


1

It's a little strange to have that button there with all that space wasted in the most important area of the screen (close to the fingers); Having only one button will always make the user go for 2 clicks (3 clicks with the selection of a playlist) for any action and in time one of the 2 actions will get the most usage (track that) and will become ...


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Next to the "Add/+" button, you can have /(downarrow) selector which could either accordian-open a drop-down menu or pop-open a modal box which would allow setting indivual on-the-fly user-action preferences. (Add/Delete Behavior Settings) Similar to how myfonts.com handles the behavior selections for viewing overview samples.: The Behavior Settings ...


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Not sure if you are looking for tools to do this, but here is one called Reframer by Optimal Workshop. https://www.optimalworkshop.com/reframer


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I'm not aware of any framework, though I'm sure many of us have developed our own. I start with these base category/tag sets and add if the product demands it. Feedback type Bug Feature request Observation Sentiment Positive Neutral Negative "Observation" + "Positive" gives you praise and + "Negative" gives you pain point. Cross-reference those ...


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We usually do user testing in early stages using low/high fidelity prototypes/wireframes to find design issues earlier and avoid dev rework. so it will take long time for us to create prototype which handles all real time scenarios.so we usually use some real time scenarios to do user testing.. Since you are redesigning, you will get analytics information ...


0

Most tests are based on systems where the user has a number of choices in terms of the tasks they wish to perform - Even on a simple website the user can choose to find information about X, look at pictures of Y, contact the owners... etc. Each of these tasks has it's own complexity - How does the user find out how to contact the site owners? Do they use a ...


-1

Alarm clocks have a "snooze" button, so the alarm goes off, you should wake up - but you can choose to have an extra 5/10 minutes in bed. Perhaps with your call, you could do a countdown timer as you'd suggested in the first case (although I'd keep it obviously counting down throughout the whole of the last couple of minutes). Perhaps one or both parties ...


10

Don't worry you don't need to be a doctor to design a medical interface. However, you should definitely study the domain so you know the context well. You need to interview doctors about their typical process of work and where it could be made more efficient. You need to understand very well the dynamics of the process you are designing so you can account ...


3

If the business model says this has to be prepaid, I like the idea of a countdown timer on the edge of the frame that changes to yellow with 5 minutes left, red with 2 minutes left, and flashing red with 10 seconds left. This can be relatively unobtrusive but still informative. If the call hits zero seconds left, kill the audio and provide the client with ...


1

Don’t cut off the call; just bill incrementally for extra time, and let the user end the call. No matter how you spin it, or warn it in advance, having a call cut off will make most users unhappy. However, there’s a very well-established model for this, used by many professions: bill for the service, by time, at a clear pre-arranged rate. Make the terms ...


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I would suggest to mix both of the approaches. Your goal is to provide excellent user experience and it should not be a big problem if you extend the call with 2 minutes or so. The important thing here is not the strict 15 minutes call but the happy user. Imagine the user didn't understand something and needs additional 30-60 seconds more and just then ...


14

I find this question also to consider the business model, not a pure UX question. I mean, from the point of view of the user, for sure, the first, less disruptive, approach is better: "Hey, I can keep the connection w/o paying for it". On the other hand, from the point of view of the business, this is bad unless it is willing to take the cost for the, ...


30

I personally feel the Second approach is a lot better. This ensures that the party doesn't get to extend a call each time. Think of how many Consultants might extend time if you give them the control. It is biased towards both parties and might take a while to educate both of them to know who can extend the call and who can't and this might even lead to ...


2

The browser is a platform agnostic environment. You don't have to follow OS convention (although it would definitely aid UX if it did). Saying that though, you can't beat a bit of convention! Looking at some frameworks and examples, they generally follow the Windows way. Here's a jQuery UI dialogue for example: Also, doing a good ol' google search for ...


0

Irrespective of if you are developing the web app for Mac or Windows, the web application's popup buttons like close, minimize, maximize are all placed on top tight; the windows style. Trust the Golden Ratio Recent studies suggest that people who are right-handed (which is 90% of us) tend to trust information positioned on the right of the page; ...


0

Design is meant to solve problems. In order to answer your question, we need to think of some hypothetical situations where a self-distruct button is needed. We also have to consider that a "self-distruct button" could be abused by those who want to compromise your empire. By the simple fact that you put it there, you make it easier for them to bring to the ...


1

Not sure the use case for this. what are the tabs? what does the app do? I think perhaps there is a way to prompt your users to move to the next tab without auto-moving to the it. The issue is it's an action that the user can not undo, if i'm scrolled at the bottom of a long list, then auto moved to another list...i just lost my place. Also it's not a ...


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This is an out of the norm situation. Therefore, perhaps some out of the norm user research techniques might help. Interviews are the next best thing, but once again, you need something more than that. It's all mathematical: in order to plan a product you are accustomed with, you need to elaborate an interview, right? in order to plan a product you are ...


0

Good question. That's a philosophical question, believe it or not. The Rolling Stones said "You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you might find, you get what you need." Your question only seems to be technical, or better said it only seems to have a technical workability, but in fact it regards life in its wholeness. People behave ...



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