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30

I personally feel the Second approach is a lot better. This ensures that the party doesn't get to extend a call each time. Think of how many Consultants might extend time if you give them the control. It is biased towards both parties and might take a while to educate both of them to know who can extend the call and who can't and this might even lead to ...


14

I find this question also to consider the business model, not a pure UX question. I mean, from the point of view of the user, for sure, the first, less disruptive, approach is better: "Hey, I can keep the connection w/o paying for it". On the other hand, from the point of view of the business, this is bad unless it is willing to take the cost for the, ...


10

Don't worry you don't need to be a doctor to design a medical interface. However, you should definitely study the domain so you know the context well. You need to interview doctors about their typical process of work and where it could be made more efficient. You need to understand very well the dynamics of the process you are designing so you can account ...


8

I would suggest to mix both of the approaches. Your goal is to provide excellent user experience and it should not be a big problem if you extend the call with 2 minutes or so. The important thing here is not the strict 15 minutes call but the happy user. Imagine the user didn't understand something and needs additional 30-60 seconds more and just then ...


3

If the business model says this has to be prepaid, I like the idea of a countdown timer on the edge of the frame that changes to yellow with 5 minutes left, red with 2 minutes left, and flashing red with 10 seconds left. This can be relatively unobtrusive but still informative. If the call hits zero seconds left, kill the audio and provide the client with ...


2

The browser is a platform agnostic environment. You don't have to follow OS convention (although it would definitely aid UX if it did). Saying that though, you can't beat a bit of convention! Looking at some frameworks and examples, they generally follow the Windows way. Here's a jQuery UI dialogue for example: Also, doing a good ol' google search for ...


2

Too often in UX design we find both new and experienced designers debate over the definition of terminologies. Before I give my take on the answer it is important firstly for you to consider what you want to do and why you are doing this. Thinking about this first will guide you to creating the right assets regardless of what it is called, and I encourage ...


2

I think your next step here should be focusing on the improvement of the current features. If you have already discovered that "most calls point to issues that could be solved by improving current features, rather than introducing new ones," then adding new features doesn't make much sense here from a UX standpoint. Instead of wasting your, designers, and ...


1

User testing refers for a specific method for evaluation of an interface while user research incorporates a group of methodologies for evaluation of a system/interface that include user testing, interviews, surveys and others. So, user testing is just a type of user research method. User testing - this is one the most used and most valuable methods for ...


1

"User testing" is a bit of a misnomer. It makes it sound like the user's being tested, which can make participants fairly uncomfortable. I prefer the term "usability study," which means the same thing without without those negative connotations. Usability studies are just one of many kinds of user research. The Nielsen Norman Group published this diagram ...


1

You've answered your own question here (although, ahem, you might want to rephrase it into a question). User research shows that the priority is improving features you already have. Prioritise that before adding another feature. At the heart of great UX is a long, fiddly, detailed, often boring, Continuous Improvement Process


1

It's a little strange to have that button there with all that space wasted in the most important area of the screen (close to the fingers); Having only one button will always make the user go for 2 clicks (3 clicks with the selection of a playlist) for any action and in time one of the 2 actions will get the most usage (track that) and will become ...


1

Next to the "Add/+" button, you can have /(downarrow) selector which could either accordian-open a drop-down menu or pop-open a modal box which would allow setting indivual on-the-fly user-action preferences. (Add/Delete Behavior Settings) Similar to how myfonts.com handles the behavior selections for viewing overview samples.: The Behavior Settings ...


1

I'm not aware of any framework, though I'm sure many of us have developed our own. I start with these base category/tag sets and add if the product demands it. Feedback type Bug Feature request Observation Sentiment Positive Neutral Negative "Observation" + "Positive" gives you praise and + "Negative" gives you pain point. Cross-reference those ...


1

Very interesting topic...and question! Have you been doing research as a part of the UX process for a long time now or are you new to this? and where did you learn about Empathy as it relates to research? Empathy is mostly being able to take away your point of view and to be able to take on another's point of view... which is a flexibility and skill set ...


1

Don’t cut off the call; just bill incrementally for extra time, and let the user end the call. No matter how you spin it, or warn it in advance, having a call cut off will make most users unhappy. However, there’s a very well-established model for this, used by many professions: bill for the service, by time, at a clear pre-arranged rate. Make the terms ...


1

Will using the mouse wheel also scroll the page? Many people use the mouse-wheel to scroll the page, rather than trying to manipulate their mouse in a circular motion (which will not be easy to do for some people). I am all for adding fun into the experience, but there is nothing fun or exciting about scrolling - it is a simple utility which comes with ...


1

I think that if you open your favorite drawing software and try to draw a circle with your mouse freehand (using a pencil tool, not a shape tool), you'll find that it's quite challenging. Making circles with your mouse is a difficult task that requires very advanced motor skills and most regular people will find it very inconvenient - let alone people with ...


1

Not sure the use case for this. what are the tabs? what does the app do? I think perhaps there is a way to prompt your users to move to the next tab without auto-moving to the it. The issue is it's an action that the user can not undo, if i'm scrolled at the bottom of a long list, then auto moved to another list...i just lost my place. Also it's not a ...


1

Simply said, there is a causal relation between these two terms. Research is the action, while discovery is the result. You discover something because you research it. Research is the "process" and "discovery" is the product. To name a few more differences, research can be extremely complex and diversified. Research supports all kinds of strategies and ...


1

This is an out of the norm situation. Therefore, perhaps some out of the norm user research techniques might help. Interviews are the next best thing, but once again, you need something more than that. It's all mathematical: in order to plan a product you are accustomed with, you need to elaborate an interview, right? in order to plan a product you are ...


1

You can argue it either way... Yes, you should conduct it. No, you shouldn't. What matters more is your usability and how memorable and appealing you are to your customer. After all, the point of conducting the usability test on your competitor is to gain some kind of advantage. I think you can put your time, money, and energy into something that will ...



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