Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

114

Make sure that you focus on goals. Don't ask what your users want or need in terms of functionality or form. Find out what they need (or want) to achieve .. that way the parameters you use to define and solve the problem will be much clearer and focused. Questions to ask your users might run along the lines of; what they need to achieve. how they ...


97

If the user can type it then it should be allowed in their password. Telling someone what they can and can't use in their password always feels wrong to the user. Passwords are currently the most universal way to authenticate. Preventing users from entering anything is, in essence, telling them who they can or can't be. 1. Any printable character that a ...


86

Don't overdo this. How can you distinguish the driver looking at the app vs. the front passenger looking at it? Location / movement will be identical. Navigation systems warn upon start up, "Don't do this when driving." That should be enough. I think some thinking is needed in this world. As it used to be back in the times of caves and leopards.


72

I would recommend against an auto-correct as domain name extensions are about to change drastically, to the point where an email ending with "sitename.anything" will be valid. Consider an inline check, which means it doesn't cause the frustration of the usual ENTRY > SUBMIT > ERROR MESSAGE > RE-ENTRY > SUBMIT name@company.co [!] Did you mean .com? Asking ...


41

You say that your target audience is professional drivers. A professional should know better than to operate the phone while driving. (And if they do violate that bit of common sense, they'd have the skill to still avoid a crash.) Instruct the user on startup to not operate while driving, and then trust the human element to not be stupid. The universe will ...


35

Having worked on an iOS app like this previously, I'll just relay my experiences and some conclusions. Please note that all of these experiences are developing an iOS app which at the time more heavily sandboxed apps than Android apps. Know the platform you're developing for. You can use GPS to determine if a person is moving, and that's about it. Using a ...


33

My friend at Malmö University, André Mabande, wrote his Bachelor degree on the topic with the title Designing for Dialogue. He concludes that: The findings in this study seem to validate the hypothesis of the chronology as a major factor for generating a consistent discussion within a commenting field. When comments are shown in the order posted ...


33

Rather than the other answers that just express personal opinions let me direct you to this article that in turn cites some actual research which I will quote here as well: However, most studies have shown that dark characters on a light background are superior to light characters on a dark background (when the refresh rate is fairly high). For example, ...


32

I had a customer a few years back who had gone through several stages of improvements to the way their system worked. Initially they managed everything in Excel and it kind of worked, but it started getting a bit bloated and rather out of hand - well you can imagine the problems! Then they got a team of developers in-house to improve the situation. How? ...


30

In the team I am on, our idea on the matter is as follows: Continue is used when you're talking about a directed flow forward only. Continue implies that anything you've done hitherto will be saved, so that you can move forward in the workflow. Ideally in a Continue-based setup, there will be alternate ways to return to previous app states, if your design ...


30

If a site requires that passwords only contain certain character codes, then a user will be able to enter the password into almost any device which is capable of producing those characters. If the password contains character codes which may be entered on some devices but not on others, then a user who creates a password on a device which could enter the ...


28

Another alternative to consider is the initials of the user. This is done by the collaborative card site Trello.com. So if your name was John Smith, you would see for example a gray square like you had for that first image, with the two centered letters 'JS'. A font like Helvetica would be perfect for that. For example: That would be the easiest ...


21

The technique is called progressive reduction. Basically, it's a hand holding approach to designing interfaces for users. Over time you "reduce" the UI elements in your application as the user naturally learns and understands the system. Thus the interface adapts along with the users knowledge and familiarity with it. This may be the article you came ...


21

Try to distinguish between what users want and how they want it done. Taking your example above, users wanting one vs. two input boxes is all about the how. The what is being able to paste comma-separated coordinate pairs vs. not having to press comma. (Or, for some users, being able to simply press comma rather than having to click a second input box.) In ...


19

I've come across this before and the following image illustrates just part of the problem: I've found that one way to find out what a user actually needs is to really understand the user's requirements, to the point where you can put yourself in their shoes and ask yourself "What would I need in this position?"* The other thing I've found that helps is ...


19

Place demographic questions at the end of the survey. If you place them at the beginning, you will induce a phenomenon called stereotype threat. Stereotype threat says that if you remind someone of a stereotyped attribute of themselves, it will impact their performance even if they don't believe that stereotype. For example, suppose a girl has heard a ...


18

I would like to add to DaveAlger's point. I, like many people, create algorithms in order to better remember passwords. I've spoken to many people (in an informal manner) about passwords and I have heard a lot of objections why can't I use a part of my email or my username in my password? why is there a character limit? (affects my algorithm) why can't I ...


17

Why would you want something more contemporary which users don't understand? What are you improving about their experience by doing this? Don't use something different just to be cool or clever. All you would be doing is illustrating that good graphic design is not the same as good UX design.


17

There are a number of research methods you can use depending on your scenario. But first, state your research goals... Get the questions out of your head and onto paper and share them with others, get feedback. Start out getting all collaborative right off the bat. Plan the whole process and verify you actually have the time and funds available. ...and ...


17

I feel like you have very different questions here. To answer your first question: is some research in regards to how font-weight affects readability? Yes, there is. First you have to understand that type/fonts are judged by their "readability" (how easily can words, sentences, and paragraphs be read by an average reader) and their "legibility" (how ...


16

This will help to know the power of ROI impact on UX and UI Human factors Video explaining ROI for UX UPA take on ROI with metrics Top key points that i remember are : UX issues are in the top ten reasons for project to fail Good UX will reduce customer care calls Early changes with UX design will take just 10 percent cost when compared to later stages. ...


16

Yes, there are a few considerations for domain names: Is the name memorable? Could your domain name be confused with another address, such as goggle.com vs. google.com? Is the name easy to relay? Can you tell another person the name by saying something like "penny-dash-arcade-dot-com"? Is the name accurate to your brand? If your site is "Cheap Pens Now", ...


16

If you expect comments to be part of a conversation, then you should order them from oldest to newest (bottom posting). This follows reading direction, and is far easier to follow a series of related comments. Examples include this site's comments and Reddit. If you want to emphasise novelty over conversation, you should order comments from newest to ...


15

What is the business goal of the Self-Destruct button? UX is all about balancing business needs with user goals. So, let's say the business goal is to sell more computers. The user goal is to disable their computer so that they can open an IT ticket, have IT investigate, and eventually replace their computer, having found nothing wrong. Let's talk to some ...


15

You can't please everyone Most changes or additions will leave some people behind. They may catch up later, they may hate you forever. Shoot for net gain in the experience. If you avoid negative feedback, you avoid progress. It helps to keep a destination in your sights. Focus on an established list of goals for the long term vision of the product and the ...


14

For starters there are a number of articles which call out the possiblity of doing User research on a low or non existent budget. A good article to start would be 10 Tips on Doing User Research with No Budget which has provides 10 different ways you can get research data without having to spend any of your budget. To briefly quote some of the points in the ...


14

In terms of navigation and hierarchy, Open Card Sorting should do the job. Open Card Sorting: Participants are given cards showing site content with no pre-established groupings. They are asked to sort cards into groups that they feel are appropriate and then describe each group. Open card sorting is useful as input to information structures in new or ...


14

You can certainly objectively define the characteristics that would make an avatar male or female. Take a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_sex_characteristic (there are other lists that might work better, but this one was easy to find; cultural aspects of "gender display" should also be considered) There are some characteristics that would ...


14

It is, of course, possible to produce a UI without involved the users. So yes, in a purely technical sense, you can create some kind of UX without directly involving the people who will actually use your product or service. That said… I've been involved with building software that people other than myself use since 1986. Nearly 30 years. Every single time ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible