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108

Make sure that you focus on goals. Don't ask what your users want or need in terms of functionality or form. Find out what they need (or want) to achieve .. that way the parameters you use to define and solve the problem will be much clearer and focused. Questions to ask your users might run along the lines of; what they need to achieve. how they ...


32

I had a customer a few years back who had gone through several stages of improvements to the way their system worked. Initially they managed everything in Excel and it kind of worked, but it started getting a bit bloated and rather out of hand - well you can imagine the problems! Then they got a team of developers in-house to improve the situation. How? ...


31

My friend at Malmö University, André Mabande, wrote his Bachelor degree on the topic with the title Designing for Dialogue. He concludes that: The findings in this study seem to validate the hypothesis of the chronology as a major factor for generating a consistent discussion within a commenting field. When comments are shown in the order posted ...


29

In the team I am on, our idea on the matter is as follows: Continue is used when you're talking about a directed flow forward only. Continue implies that anything you've done hitherto will be saved, so that you can move forward in the workflow. Ideally in a Continue-based setup, there will be alternate ways to return to previous app states, if your design ...


19

Place demographic questions at the end of the survey. If you place them at the beginning, you will induce a phenomenon called stereotype threat. Stereotype threat says that if you remind someone of a stereotyped attribute of themselves, it will impact their performance even if they don't believe that stereotype. For example, suppose a girl has heard a ...


19

The technique is called progressive reduction. Basically, it's a hand holding approach to designing interfaces for users. Over time you "reduce" the UI elements in your application as the user naturally learns and understands the system. Thus the interface adapts along with the users knowledge and familiarity with it. This may be the article you came ...


17

I feel like you have very different questions here. To answer your first question: is some research in regards to how font-weight affects readability? Yes, there is. First you have to understand that type/fonts are judged by their "readability" (how easily can words, sentences, and paragraphs be read by an average reader) and their "legibility" (how ...


16

Why would you want something more contemporary which users don't understand? What are you improving about their experience by doing this? Don't use something different just to be cool or clever. All you would be doing is illustrating that good graphic design is not the same as good UX design.


16

This will help to know the power of ROI impact on UX and UI Human factors Video explaining ROI for UX UPA take on ROI with metrics Top key points that i remember are : UX issues are in the top ten reasons for project to fail Good UX will reduce customer care calls Early changes with UX design will take just 10 percent cost when compared to later stages. ...


16

Yes, there are a few considerations for domain names: Is the name memorable? Could your domain name be confused with another address, such as goggle.com vs. google.com? Is the name easy to relay? Can you tell another person the name by saying something like "penny-dash-arcade-dot-com"? Is the name accurate to your brand? If your site is "Cheap Pens Now", ...


16

If you expect comments to be part of a conversation, then you should order them from oldest to newest (bottom posting). This follows reading direction, and is far easier to follow a series of related comments. Examples include this site's comments and Reddit. If you want to emphasise novelty over conversation, you should order comments from newest to ...


15

I've come across this before and the following image illustrates just part of the problem: I've found that one way to find out what a user actually needs is to really understand the user's requirements, to the point where you can put yourself in their shoes and ask yourself "What would I need in this position?"* The other thing I've found that helps is ...


13

Standard Progressive Disclosure should start at the simplest, least intrusive information first. Maybe even consider allowing users to put off answering some parts of the form (this will probably reduce completion rate of the "extra" fields but increase the completion rate of the start of the survey). But if you must do it all in one go, I'd generally ...


13

I have read up on this a bit, and it seems that my answer will contradict some of the things that have already been mentioned. My sources are all academic, and as such reflect the use of on-line surveys for conducting experiments. Feel free to read the sources that I link to, and draw your own conclusions. I mention some peripheral work as it relates to ...


13

This article cites some studies about it: Some recent research in the Journal of Business and Psychology reveals that placing demographic items at the beginning of a survey increases the response rate to those items in comparison to demographic items placed at the end. And more importantly, it did not affect scores on the three noncognitive ...


13

In terms of navigation and hierarchy, Open Card Sorting should do the job. Open Card Sorting: Participants are given cards showing site content with no pre-established groupings. They are asked to sort cards into groups that they feel are appropriate and then describe each group. Open card sorting is useful as input to information structures in new or ...


12

There are companies who specialise in recruitment for usability testing, they will be able to source the correct user groups for your needs. I would generally only use this route if you need to target specialisms, for instance medical staff or lawyers. I would provide examples, but it would depend upon your locale. In my experience, having worked with ...


12

There are a number of research methods you can use depending on your scenario. But first, state your research goals... Get the questions out of your head and onto paper and share them with others, get feedback. Start out getting all collaborative right off the bat. Plan the whole process and verify you actually have the time and funds available. ...and ...


12

No, neither is better. They deal with different aspects or strategies, and in general you need both. A small change lets you refine your design and have a better understanding of what affects conversion, but may let you end up with a local maxima. A more radical change with many elements will not help you understand what affects conversion, but may also ...


12

For starters there are a number of articles which call out the possiblity of doing User research on a low or non existent budget. A good article to start would be 10 Tips on Doing User Research with No Budget which has provides 10 different ways you can get research data without having to spend any of your budget. To briefly quote some of the points in the ...


12

Most users will recognize the logo mark for the social media platforms they use, so additional explanatory text for each icon would be overkill. If you do feel like users might need some additional context, you could use tooltips to display extra text on mouse hover. The current placement of your social icons seems random. It looks like you placed them in ...


12

In the beginning of the design phase I would recommend these methods to discover the users needs: 1. Contextual interviews. http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/methods/contextual-interview.html Basically follow a user around in the environment in which they will be using the product, performing the tasks which the products will help them perform. ...


11

Here's what is rapidly becoming the new replacement save icon: That's assuming it's needed at all of course. For example, it's used by Google Docs here - although they've added text as well in this case:


11

I would strongly recommend reading this excellent article on smashing magazine on Lean UX,to paraphrase the article: Lean UX is the practice of bringing the true nature of our work to light faster, with less emphasis on deliverables and greater focus on the actual experience being designed. Traditional documents are discarded or, at the very least, ...


11

Below are the 6 factors used in the O'Brien/Toms User Engagement Scale. 1) Perceived Usability: users' perceived effort, their ability to accomplish tasks, the navigation and organization, and the emotions evoked in user. 2) Aesthetics: screen layout and graphics/images, overall aesthetic impressions of attractiveness, and sensory appeal. 3) Focused ...


11

I'm with @Michael Lai, and think they're a great tool to have in your bag for the right case. What they can help you with: Understanding the client As a UI/UX designer you often come into new environments, sometimes very complex ones. User journeys can help you understand processes that might be way out of your field of knowledge, by allowing your client ...


11

It is perhaps not necessary to write out the label Facebook or Twitter next to the icon as Chris stated in his previous answer. But, please explain why I should follow you on Facebook. Is it for getting great discounts? Is it because you post new outfits that I can use for inspiration? Is it because I no longer need to go to your web site for updates? If ...


10

Assumptions it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about, not a bunch of features at once $40 is too much for that (I agree) but I guess $3 would be ok personal interview preferred over anonymous test (at least this is my preference - so much richer feedback) Try Starbucks testing* Here is how it ...



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