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24

I'd prefer the option you called "positive statement". The reason isn't only consistency. The other reasons are: Positive statement style is a great way to introduce the functionality of the application. So config dialog could partially play the role of software help and documentation. It tells to a user like: "I can do this, and this, and this...". The ...


19

Yes, you should allow users to escape it. The Boston Globe redesign was handled by Ethan Marcotte, who wrote the book on responsive design. Combined with the CMS nature of the site makes it perfect for deployability, usability, and flexibility concerns with responsive designs. Each viewport has to morph content to promote, demote, and generally rearrange ...


11

It could be useful in the following circumstances: When the user's native language isn't English, but they are more familiar with English labels than the native equivalents. For users who need to switch keyboards (and auto-complete dictionary) using both their native language and English (or another secondary language). For users that give their old phones ...


9

A few choice excerpts from the CAN-SPAM act and the caveat that making it harder to opt-out of the e-mail than it would be to report the e-mail as spam should be enough to convince any business person with a decent head on his or her shoulders that it makes far more sense to make opting out easy than it does to deal with constant spam complaints and getting ...


8

I suggest not making the change at all. Here's why: The affordance you are trying to provide could cause more confusion than help. Since you have small number of filters, giving the repeat users more help to "not have to" set the filters to their liking every time is a nice thought, but weigh this against this user data: • how long does setting the filters ...


6

There's a few discussions on it already around the web. They are very similar. 'Preferences' usually control the settings of your personal favorites -- things of little consequence -- like color of font, type size, background photo... -- usually personal prefences. The tern 'settings' is much broader and can impact system issues -- ram size, ...


5

An alternative would be to offer two radio buttons rather than a checkbox, with both versions given. Gmail gives an example of this in use: Or, as per Apple, giving a custom button UI that specifies the active state through the button, rather than through the label (in this case, they seem to be using the default option as the label text):


5

Color schemes, yes - individual colors, no! Since you know a lot of color impact on readability, specify three to five schemes your academic users can chose from. That way, they will appreciate your concern over their reading experience within well determined boundries. Leaving limited options to users is never wrong.


5

Jacob Neilson specifically recommends allowing mobile users to opt out of the mobile version when they need to. But it's also important to note that this is an example of the site improperly adapting to a device. Your mobile phone is not the same as all other mobile phones, and if enough effort was spent it is likely that an in-between layout... not the ...


5

I would recommend you integrate it into the profile settings. However, I would suggest you move the "change profile picture" block upward to the top so it is more prominent on the page. As you have already said, you already have a large list of settings and I believe the "change profile picture" block is simple enough to not require its own tab. Happy ...


4

The mobile market place is changing at such a fast rate that it's impossible to design for all the different configurations. There are simply to many variables in play to build a design matrix to address all the possibly different combinations. While you are using an iPhone with a 3.5" display, another visitor might have a 4.6" with a 720p display. Are they ...


4

A vertical 'table' with Groups as the first column and the settings for each group as a row would do nicely here. It's very quick to scan this to see what settings are currently set, very quick to add/remove settings and can give a select/unselect all checkbox. The row the mouse hovers over should be highlighted slightly to help the user 'read' left to ...


3

Addressing the question of single page vs. multi-page forms: there's no evidence to suggest the page numbers in forms cause it to perform better or worse. A form's success has more to do with the content of the form than the layout. Building on Igor's answer of progressive disclosure, I would suggest taking the approach with user account creation of asking ...


3

I suggest to use a kind of progressive disclosure principle. Progressive disclosure defers advanced or rarely used features to a secondary screen, making applications easier to learn and less error-prone. Read more on http://www.nngroup.com/articles/progressive-disclosure/ In my opinion, it would be better, if profile and preferences would be ...


2

Any request from a browser is (should be) accompanied with an Accept-Language header. On first visit, that header should be used to determine the preferred language, if and only if there is no language parameter in the URL. Additionally, a language selector should be provided to change the current setting. So the priorities are Does the URL have a language ...


2

It's definitely a good idea to include multiple colour schemes. As for your question on whether there's value and whether people will use it: For the first part, you might want to consider whether this feature falls into the list of must-haves or nice-to-haves in the overall scheme of your application and it's development. As you progress, move from the ...


2

There are two issues here: What notification is necessary for the use of the feature? Do you feel an obligation to notify the user that you are using cookies and/or give them the option not to have information saved? With regard to the first point, actually no notification is needed for the user to use this feature. It is adequate for the site to simply ...


1

It would be hard to convince me that you would ever want to display the price as the "option" when choosing shipping, the primary reason being that the "description" of the shipping option is always (in my experience), the unique identifier for the type of shipping that you are requesting. If you consider the most common traits for shipping options, there ...


1

The real answer is "It depends." For products website, it is suggested to remove the authorship of the web page. When you intend to search product, you perceived that the face-tagged post probably is not the product page. So you tend to skip over those links and go for another. Example: How Google Authorship decreased our traffic by 90% For reviews, ...


1

Further to Revolt's nice break down of the different terms, it seems clear to me that "preferences" is actually quite different from "settings" (despite some people using them interchangeably). If something comes with a default value, then that setting is not a preference until the user changes it! Whose preference, exactly, does it reflect when still in ...


1

HTTP Standard 1.1 The standard method involves listening to the browser because it provides its own language during the page request. The problem with this is that you have to have a translated version of every page on the site in any languages that you plan on accepting. This is expensive to maintain and time consuming. Google Translate One of the ...


1

I don't know how you designed the whole experience of your app but I would recommend to adapt the interface to the native language first and then letting users select the language they want to learn. http://www.busuu.com/enc In the first case a simple multiple selection would be good and I would use the two letters code or the entire name of the language. ...


1

To answer your questions: No. It should not open maximised unless it was closed when maximised (and perhaps not even then) Yes. It should remember the last screen size used. Yes. It should remember the last screen size and position used even after being shut down and restarted.


1

2 Points. 1) If I am a designer, and I design a site specifically for a mobile device, you accept it. If I make a site specifically for a 7", or 15" device, you accept it. Why is it bad if I design for all of those situations in one site? 2) People surf on their phones when they are on the go, usually busy, often between things. If I go to the Boston Globe ...


1

I have bult a prototype responsive site that provided 'go to full site' functionality. Unfortunately I'm not able to share it but I can share the general principles. The CSS is built using Less which means that the content of media queries can easily be parsed into a second style sheet that effectively applies the same rules as the widest media query. ...


1

Very interesting question. But I would like to turn the question on its head: when would a general, non-readable and zoomable overview be an aid in navigating content? This is exactly like the cognitive zoom in the upcomming Windows 8, where you can zoom out of the Metro tiles view to rearrange your tiles. The is a vid of a demo here (look for it at around ...


1

I feel that it is unnecessary if the site content is presented fully and correctly to the user. It is about being content-centered and displaying it correctly for each view. If the content and/or organization of the site does not lend itself well to this then a full responsive design is most certainly not the right choice in the first place. A full split or ...


1

I hope this becomes an answer rather than me rambling in my head...but I'll give it a shot... The iPhone was really the first mobile device (at least, widely distributed device) that was designed with the intention that you view 'the regular web' rather than the dumbed-down WAP and other mini mobile-centric type web sites. Steve Jobs made a device that ...


1

If you are sending electronic marketing messages to New Zealand email addresses then by New Zealand law you must include the ability for user to opt-out of further messages. Whilst this doesn't mean "making it difficult" is not acceptable, its still not a good business practice. In NZ, the antispam law is administered by the Department of Internal Affairs - ...



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