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58

Designers When it's your working version and you just want some text in there to visualise the overall page balance, and you'll only share it with other designers, then using Lorum ipsum should probably be fine. End users For end users, I would suggest using some other real example text. Yes, you'd have to localise this, but it's quite easy to simply ...


30

Font and layout is exactly what Lorem Ipsum is designed to do. It has been used by type setters and printers since the 1500s. The idea is that by not having real words the users focus on the layout. It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is ...


25

Yes, you should allow users to escape it. The Boston Globe redesign was handled by Ethan Marcotte, who wrote the book on responsive design. Combined with the CMS nature of the site makes it perfect for deployability, usability, and flexibility concerns with responsive designs. Each viewport has to morph content to promote, demote, and generally rearrange ...


24

I'd prefer the option you called "positive statement". The reason isn't only consistency. The other reasons are: Positive statement style is a great way to introduce the functionality of the application. So config dialog could partially play the role of software help and documentation. It tells to a user like: "I can do this, and this, and this...". The ...


15

Assuming you handle the changing between language versions (as in the example of your first bullet point - sending a page) in a reasonable manner, then yes, you should consider having the language in your URL, but for a reason you've not mentioned here. Note: This generally gets referred to as 'language/region' because, more often, the two letter codes are ...


12

If the goal is to provide a short text sample for the style then use a pangram like "A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". This will show how each letter is rendered.


11

It could be useful in the following circumstances: When the user's native language isn't English, but they are more familiar with English labels than the native equivalents. For users who need to switch keyboards (and auto-complete dictionary) using both their native language and English (or another secondary language). For users that give their old phones ...


9

A few choice excerpts from the CAN-SPAM act and the caveat that making it harder to opt-out of the e-mail than it would be to report the e-mail as spam should be enough to convince any business person with a decent head on his or her shoulders that it makes far more sense to make opting out easy than it does to deal with constant spam complaints and getting ...


8

I suggest not making the change at all. Here's why: The affordance you are trying to provide could cause more confusion than help. Since you have small number of filters, giving the repeat users more help to "not have to" set the filters to their liking every time is a nice thought, but weigh this against this user data: • how long does setting the filters ...


7

If the text preferences are important, you should not use example text in a different (which includes fictive) language. Languages have different characteristics, and what looks fine for a paragraph of "Lorem ipsum …" is not necessarily ideal for text in other languages. So you should show text in the language the user is setting the preferences for. You ...


7

Choose a text generator that suits your domain and use it instead. Lorem ain't good for layout/typography, it was never meant to (see other answers for why it's not, unless you are in a real printing business, Gutenberg&co-style). If you're after font/typography, use a pangram for the language you are after (hello localization!), like @ratchetfreak said ...


6

There's a few discussions on it already around the web. They are very similar. 'Preferences' usually control the settings of your personal favorites -- things of little consequence -- like color of font, type size, background photo... -- usually personal prefences. The tern 'settings' is much broader and can impact system issues -- ram size, ...


5

I would recommend you integrate it into the profile settings. However, I would suggest you move the "change profile picture" block upward to the top so it is more prominent on the page. As you have already said, you already have a large list of settings and I believe the "change profile picture" block is simple enough to not require its own tab. Happy ...


5

The mobile market place is changing at such a fast rate that it's impossible to design for all the different configurations. There are simply to many variables in play to build a design matrix to address all the possibly different combinations. While you are using an iPhone with a 3.5" display, another visitor might have a 4.6" with a 720p display. Are they ...


5

Jacob Neilson specifically recommends allowing mobile users to opt out of the mobile version when they need to. But it's also important to note that this is an example of the site improperly adapting to a device. Your mobile phone is not the same as all other mobile phones, and if enough effort was spent it is likely that an in-between layout... not the ...


5

An alternative would be to offer two radio buttons rather than a checkbox, with both versions given. Gmail gives an example of this in use: Or, as per Apple, giving a custom button UI that specifies the active state through the button, rather than through the label (in this case, they seem to be using the default option as the label text):


5

Color schemes, yes - individual colors, no! Since you know a lot of color impact on readability, specify three to five schemes your academic users can chose from. That way, they will appreciate your concern over their reading experience within well determined boundries. Leaving limited options to users is never wrong.


5

Here is another option that might work depending on the situation. It has the added benefit of not needing to be localized into different languages... credit: Facebook placeholder loading card


4

A vertical 'table' with Groups as the first column and the settings for each group as a row would do nicely here. It's very quick to scan this to see what settings are currently set, very quick to add/remove settings and can give a select/unselect all checkbox. The row the mouse hovers over should be highlighted slightly to help the user 'read' left to ...


4

Don't think there is a correct way necessarily, but providing the user with the information they need to continue is beneficial. The issue would be that keeping an up to date set of information on how to allow locations on each browser could become tiresome and result in out of date information, which is potentially unhelpful. If you rely heavily on ...


3

Addressing the question of single page vs. multi-page forms: there's no evidence to suggest the page numbers in forms cause it to perform better or worse. A form's success has more to do with the content of the form than the layout. Building on Igor's answer of progressive disclosure, I would suggest taking the approach with user account creation of asking ...


3

I suggest to use a kind of progressive disclosure principle. Progressive disclosure defers advanced or rarely used features to a secondary screen, making applications easier to learn and less error-prone. Read more on http://www.nngroup.com/articles/progressive-disclosure/ In my opinion, it would be better, if profile and preferences would be ...


3

In my experience, Lorem Ipsum is beloved of typography fans, and unknown to the common man - aka, the client. So, if you want to avoid a discussion with the client about why the text is garbled, and why you selected this placeholder text rather than some text saying "this is placeholder text" and then properly exercising as many code points and ligatures as ...


3

Why waste the opportunity to promote your clients, company, or products? I realize you're trying to give them something without meaning so they won't focus on the words, but if you give them the same positive words about your product every time, they will read the message once then quickly overlook it from that point forward. "You are a balanced and wise ...


3

While »Lorem Ipsum« is great for the early design stage it is nearly always worth to change the blind text to localized dummy text (Yes, this is additional work which seems not necessarily needed. But it shows you're paying attention to details.) The trick is to use text which looks like a normal reading text – this is very important! While most people ...


2

Here are some suggestions: Create three columns Admin Mail/Everyone Mails/Weekly Digest. Create a 4th bucket of all groups the user has subscribed to. Allow drag drop from the 4th bucket to any one of the 3 columns Do away with check boxes! :-)


2

Why not just a simple toggle to add, remove or switch style sheets, though I am sure there might be some drawbacks to this approach. Try resizing the browser window and clicking on the toggle buttons on this demo.


2

Any request from a browser is (should be) accompanied with an Accept-Language header. On first visit, that header should be used to determine the preferred language, if and only if there is no language parameter in the URL. Additionally, a language selector should be provided to change the current setting. So the priorities are Does the URL have a language ...


2

It's definitely a good idea to include multiple colour schemes. As for your question on whether there's value and whether people will use it: For the first part, you might want to consider whether this feature falls into the list of must-haves or nice-to-haves in the overall scheme of your application and it's development. As you progress, move from the ...



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