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2

There's a gamification effect associated with the indicator. It tells the user they are doing something right and people generally like to achieve things.


1

Re-entering data is always a pain for the user, so avoid forcing them to do so where possible. If you have 2 password fields (a 2nd for confirmation), you could reduce the pain by just blanking the 2nd confirmation field so they only have to retype it once. If it was data in a field which caused the error, it is nice to have the cursor on that field so the ...


1

I'm thinking about pre-filling the following for sure with the same values that were previously input by the user: First name, Last name, Email, Terms (checkbox). I think you are right to do that. But should I also do that for the New Password and Re-enter email fields? In the case of an error with the e-mail, I think that you should ...


4

Users will want to have full control of the content they post. This will be the case whether the context is a social networking site, a discussion forum, themed communities etc. If you block the possibility for a user to remove content they have added to the site you will produce agitation in that user. And if you keep content posted/accessible that a user ...


2

Jakob Nielson describes the 3 time limits which he calls the 'Response-Time Limits': There are 3 main time limits (which are determined by human perceptual abilities) to keep in mind when optimizing web and application performance It is an article written in 1993, but three years ago he published a new research report on website response times ...


1

I recall that 2 sec is when some start dropping out nowadays. Of course it depends on the site and the situation. Also it depends on the timing of separate parts of the site. For example, layout, text, and image placeholders might load earlier while images load later. Other stuff can happen in the background. Perceived performance is more important than ...


5

I think that being able to edit their recipes is important because the authors might want to add alternatives (gluten free etc.) or correct their texts (typos etc.). This is especially important if you wish to have high quality entries.


38

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University recently (2012) looked at password strength meters and its impact on password creation. The paper "How does your password measure up? The effect of strength meters on password creation" has all the details, but the abstract summarises their findings nicely (emphasis is mine): We present a 2,931-subject study of ...


30

Password strength indicator does not, per se, guarantee stronger passwords - from a pure UX perspective the more complex your requirements are the more likely people are to click away, to use an existing password or to write it down hence making it harder for a human to remember but, all too often, only marginally more difficult for a computer to crack. ...


0

There's a theory that typing is actually a two separate processes working together, where one loop puts in keys, and the other is trying to detect typos. (You ever notice how when you make a typo, you have to pause before you can correct it?) I think this behavior makes a whole lot more sense with this theory, as it explains both the reasons in ...


1

They increase password strength by getting the user to avoid very weak passwords, but this is barely shoring up the weak end of things. Strong passwords tend to be so far off the "high" end of password strength meters that the meters don't actually help distinguish between them. One thing that I've seen suggested is to use "time to crack" as an indicator, ...


1

Password strength indicators are designed specifically to avoid setting of a very weak password, so in a way that helps the user to avoid the cycle of entering a password > submitting > coming back to change (since the system shows that the password is too weak). When the indicator shows that the password is weak the user may change/extend it to at least an ...


2

I would say you're thinking the wrong way 'round. Requirements first is waterfall design. And it's a surefire way to make something on budget and on time that everyone will hate and noone will use. Of course, even if you see your first implementation as nothing more than a starting point, you need something to get started. But a list of requirements locks ...


7

I am wary of any solution where the user has to remember that inputting x really means y. If the "infinite" or "unlimited" state can't be unambiguously represented by the spinner control I would consider using another one specifically for the "unlimited mapping" use case. Perhaps have another checkbox for unlimited that, when selected, disables / greys out ...


0

Tag clouds should not be used for tags, much less for website functions. One of your problems could be the site's functionality is somewhat complex, and so explaining its functionality is one of the main challenges). Taking a complicated problem, and adding a complicated way of displaying that problem does not simplify the solution. And tag ...


0

The best solution would be to handle those emails automatic, forwarding them to the appropriate recipient. For emails that cant be auto forwarded, you can simply write an automatic email back saying something like: "Sorry, you can't reply to our automatic emails, please login and do your action online (examle.com/do/action). If you have any questions ...


0

Unfortunately there is only one way to fix this issue and it's not a good one. People will always do this even if you include the warning in 48px blinking red type so you have to set the reply-to email as the one that should be getting replied to. Either that or live with people that can't be bothered to read the instructions. You may consider putting the ...


0

I think the problem that you are describing is not a problem with do-not-reply emails but with the lack of support for email interaction with your system. Many systems (like bug reporting Sifter, Trello, Basecamp and others) let people respond to issues sent to them by email (a response needs to be included above a certain point in the email) and after a ...


0

If the user is the account, then the account can be the top-level environment. In this case, you would get: Form the user's perspective, the UI includes everything he/she can do when logged in. If the user has multiple accounts, the UI can stay the same:


0

Of course, you can measure how much time your users spend on each of your app's screen, actions performed by your users, user retention and churn and so on. But it won't tell you the full story, you'll understand the 'what' and not the 'why'. In order to understand the 'why', that is to say, understand how users use you app, I suggest to integrate visual ...


2

A quick correction to the top answer by @PatomaS "creating an account on Amazon to buy things, is worth the effort." Amazon is an exception in the case of e-commerce. When selling things a login just gets in the way. All you need is their email address. The user can access orders using their email and order number and are sent a password if they want ...


4

Generally speaking, people are coming to your site/app to perform a certain activity. Whether it's buying a present for their friend's birthday, or obtaining a piece of information related to their work. The fewer barriers you put between the User and them achieving that goal, the more successful the site/app you are creating will be in serving the User. ...


3

As I understand it layout is more important to comprehension than UI markers. In the Code Complete book by Steve McConnell there is empirical research as to what code block formats are robustly understandable, and which cause issues. In short, as I remember it, nested blocks should be indented, and a block should be left aligned. Now if you have issues ...


2

To improve your UI/UX and would strongly suggest you to put a legend somewhere near, so it is clear for your users and then it will not be so important how exactly you show start/finish of a block as long as you notify your users about the meaning of colors/blocks in your interface. That would solve the essence of your problem and the question how to show it ...


1

Going to prefix this with i am a developer first and budding UX person second so some of the terminology may be off here. Putting this in an answer as it may be long, but any little helps i guess and may open up a debate. Maybe we are complicating the user model with the user flow. The current system model is the true system setup because everything is ...


5

Yes. Yes we are. This is a perfect example. I was on Stack Overflow, logged in, and saw this question on the side bar. I wanted to comment and guess what - I have to log in again. Why? What is the point? Now I need to create a Stack Exchange account also? What PatomaS said is dead on: "The most important thing here, is the reason. usually people won't mind ...


0

If you have some kind of touchpoint with these users, reach out to them directly. You can directly email them with a personalized email (not just a mail merge!) to ask them if they are interested in providing feedback. If others in your organization have such touch points and a good relationship with users, they might be better suited to sending out your ...


1

In a world with open ID, users are sick of sites that don't give them the option of using a login they already have but instead insist on them making a new username and password, and putting arbitrary password restrictions on them (e.g. exactly 8 characters, with 1 uppercase letters, 2 lower, 4 digits, and a squiggly).


5

Logins for trivial purposes aren't just annoying for users, they can be very dangerous. Here's why. No one practices good password security. You do. I do. Bruce Schneier does. But the vast majority of internet users do not. They use the same 5 or 6 passwords over and over again because everything else is just too damn complicated for them. Remember that ...


2

There are a lot of discussions on-going about persuasive design. Humans interact with each other, regardless the channel of communication. Computer's interface is just one of these channels as more and more people communicate their ideas through the interface. As any communication, it could be used for the better or the worse, and you develop this point ...


6

4chan has a very unique user system that may be worth examining: Anyone can post to 4chan, with absolutely no registration or login required; instead, users must solve a separate captcha for every post. Proof-of-identity for post deletion is handled by having users supply a password (by default, the client generates it for you, so you don't have to enter ...


1

If the users expect to spend a lot of time on the site, they would not mind creating an account. Otherwise you will lose the prospect, because the effort (typing e-mail, remembering the password) is not worth the benefit. A good alternative is to use OpenID (like SE does - "Sign up", "Using Google", "Accept", "Confirm"). Just remember not to request any ...


8

Depends of how user-friendly the site is Not only forced logins irritate, but also passwords complexity policies and, of course, unreadable Captchas. Password policies sometimes make more harm than use. If an user cares about his security, he often has his own password-making algorithms for different sites and when the password policy prevents him to set ...


27

Hiding information behind logins is really bad from the usability standpoint. Imagine you are a user who googles for a certain piece of information. Workflow on website without registration-wall: enter search-term into search-engine click on first result read question to confirm it's really relevant read answer Workflow with registration-wall enter ...


18

I disagree with @Alphabeticaa's answer. From personal experience, I hate it when I need to register simply because I wish to view an article or post a simple question. I have a "dump" e-mail address with a free provider especially for these "one-time" registrations but I try to avoid them. As a concrete example, I often browse the Stack Exchange websites ...


2

Yes and no. Logins (and sign ups) sometimes make people feel like they are part of something. A lot of the time, people sign up and log in so that they don't forget about a certain site, and to feel like they a part of the community. As PatomaS said - there often needs to be a reason to sign up. Special content, features, abilities. It's give and take. As ...


58

Answering you question, which doesn't involve specific motivation behind it. Yes, people don't like to register on sites, people don't like giving information all the time, people don't like remembering passwords and user names. This behaviour is common to everyone, but some groups are more annoyed than others and some are more radical than others; for ...


0

People, particularly long-time users of legacy systems, are averse to change - period. If your paycheck depends on keeping your users happy, you did the right thing. If your paycheck depends on bringing innovative solutions to your users and educating them to accept them, you did the wrong thing. Did your manager/supervisor have any input regarding your ...


0

I would suggest another approach. Instead of hitting the database every single keystroke or after a particular interval, why not hit the database one time on page load, pull down your dataset of possibilities, and filter off of that? Doing that would be nearly instantaneous. It's a few years old, but this article may be of interest to you as well: ...


8

With this feature, if a user leaves the title field and then clicks on it again to continue typing, they don't have to type "space" first before adding another word.


1

Re: option 1 I'm assuming you have this control area because there is more than 1 filter that can be applied at a time. Consider renaming the refresh button to something actionable like "Refine Results" That will make more contextual sense for the user. Also look at how sites like ravelry.com, kijiji, eBay, and autotrader.ca do it. They have a million ...


2

A filter is a filter and a sort is a sort I find it rather hard to understand the purpose of the refresh button. But the answer to your main question is simple - filter means filter, sort means sort. When you filter something you take away other things. Here's a dictionary definition: Pass through a device to remove unwanted material. Consider what ...


0

re: Point 1 If in relation to error messages in forms, please see my answer for this question: Does a tooltip require close button? I have posted my sources there as well. re: Point 2-3 PROs: From a development standpoint because then you have tools that are specialized in nature. Adobe does this with their suite of tools. CONS: It is not an efficient ...


6

The list in the drop down is not long enough to justify the text filtering (about 75 items). A very interesting statement. Scrollbars aside, I would test both UI's on yourselves and see how well you perform a searching task with 75 items with or without filters.


6

Joshua Barron's on the right track with his leading answer. I do see some additions to make, but I'm not cool enough yet to add comments. Let's stick with the simple assumption that the new UI is better than the old one. That way, we're just talking about the Developers who are Right, and the Users who are Wrong. The key problem then is how do you ...


2

There may be other reasons, too. I worked on a system that had a clunky UI, click here, click there, click back here, etc. I asked the systems analyst about it and it turns out there was a very good reason for it. It was designed that way to force the user to look in both places (it was a comparison tool) and then consciously go somewhere else to accept it. ...


11

This is the however If the majority of users have rejected a design, it seems ludicrous for any UX professional to insist on that design because 'they know better what's good for the users'. Quite appropriately, the majority of the replies to your question follow that thinking. I would, however, like to offer an alternative take on this, which goes well ...


0

If the end users aren't happy with it then the project is a failure. But as a suggestion perhaps you could consider a hybrid approach which gives the best of both worlds. i.e. the drop down can filter the tree view as with the old design. But by default, the whole tree is displayed as with the new design?


10

I'll take a different tack from some of the others on this. If users hate it then chances are it made their job harder instead of easier. Drawing an arbitrary line in the sand and saying that 75 items isn't worth doing text filtering seems silly as well. Real users interact constantly with the system you are building, where you only interact with it on ...


11

To my mind, the way we redeveloped it is unambiguously better. That's great, but "Better" does not always equal "Best". You may have thought you had "Best" before you received user feedback. However, the feedback you received should have thrown up red flags in your mind. What was the right course of action here? First, be willing to ...



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