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0

The first aspect would be to use an API which will generate an address with minimal input such as the users house name/door number. This helps with formatting issues as you generate the address as it should be and do not put that responsibility on the user. The second aspect to this, is to add a manual set of fields in which the user types their address in ...


0

You might find this article helpfull http://www.nngroup.com/articles/form-design-placeholders/ Basically, it says that it is better to use the placeholder text as a hint to the label (not an example), but it is better to avoid placeholder text altogether.


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If controls float with users' scrolling, it can be irritating, specifically in the case of image-heavy services that tend to overload their users with visual content. I prefer sharing buttons to appear on hover, they tend to steal too much attention from the content and should be an opt-in. Hovering an image (video component etc) when you need to operate ...


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I am really bad person to answer this as I hate both social media and "listicles", but the benefit of "pop up" is simple enough. They save space. Basically, if your site has lots of separate items you want people to share separately, it becomes desirable for every item to have separate sharing option without more than one being visible at a time. So if you ...


2

I Studied Human Factors in grad school. In my personal experience, which may or may not be representative, the UX circle of a Venn diagram is mostly encompassed by the HF circle. The primary difference is that I learned very little about visual design, and a lot about biological/cognitive processes affecting perception and movement. We covered the same ...


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Short answer: They are meaningless corporate titles applied to people with similar (apparent) skills. They're the same. Long answer: 1- How do human factor specialists and user experience designers differ? It all depends on what definitions you ultimately settle on. I have held both titles of "Human Factors [something]" and "User Experience ...


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Human factors is about getting things done effectively and efficiently. User experience is about getting things done effectively, efficiently and effortlessly. If the human factors engineers in aviation only learned from crashes, that would be a major difference to usability engineers and UX designers who try to anticipate possibly problematic design ...


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User experience specialists have to be human factors specialists. User experience is (mostly) human experience. Its what the user lives during a precise activity, and what he lives is a combination of differents perceptions (feelings, emotions, meanings, ...) wich are the consequences of differents factors, including human factors. User experience is what ...


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After each job is completed, you could have the system revert all settings to off, so that the user is forced to turn on the appropriate settings for the job at hand before they can proceed.


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Think of the use case first! (And I was led astray by the simple "Bill Splitting" title - I consider calculating every part down to the penny as parsimonious (the mean meaning!) and not really social). So the bill is on the table, and the guy (or girl) who paid it wants their money back. I think the easiest way to go is to run down this list of items on ...


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I strongly recommend that you put the T&C first, followed by the Facebook agreement, followed by the account creation. This is the most logical flow because the end user will want to know there rights above anything, and know how their personal information will be handled, with creating an account being the least important step.


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Not sure what the gear icon does here but can you change it to a badge with the total number of items? That way the only thing left on the page is Item Name, Price and people who ate some of it. Clicking ADD can animate the number in the top right corner as it increases to indicate that it's up there. Clicking the number in the top right corner can list ...


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I think your first UX challenge is that the Add Button will fall off the bottom of the screen (fall beneath the fold) as soon as you add a few people. If that Add button's click is the moment that you save your data, then letting it leave the visible part of the screen is dangerous. The user may leave the app with unsaved data and should the app ...


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The other answers explain why autocorrect is bad. But you are correct about users being really bad at typing their own email address, so here's an alternate solution: Make them enter their email address twice, just like when setting a new password. Even if they are lazy and copy-paste it, hopefully they will at least look at it again and have a chance to ...


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I think this is somewhat debatable. if they are agreeing to your Facebook sign in and you get the permissions, what happens if they decline the t&c? I would question if in this case and t&c should be the first thing that is shown to the user followed by account creation/facebook permission request. I would also like to know in what way you're ...


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I think i would say the obvious: the common patter for that now is [] I agree to the {Company Name} Terms and Conditions [] I accept the terms and conditions. where [] is a checkbox.


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The best option for T&C is use a check box with the link to TC, only when the check box is selected you can go to the next step. Another alternative is to show the T&C and have the Agree or Not agree with the display.


1

Depends on How smart is your checking? Relatively speaking a list of typo's is unsophisticated. There are services that can determine the presence of a valid Domain Name record an email server an individual email box Certainly in the case 1 above, if there is no matching Domain Name Record - then an email can not reach the recipient. So in this case ...


1

I wouldn't personally recommend auto correcting the email address' domain name, but you could check it against the "VALID" domain name extension, and for that you need to check it against list of valid domain name extensions which would be an absolute pain, specially nowadays that we have new and totally weird domain name extensions, here is a link to all of ...


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It is a long standard that every top level link should present a page with the name of the link and that page should present the next level of sub links. This continues for each level. The content on those pages should contain and overview of of the pages each link will present A bread crumb trail below the nav bar is also very good for people who prefer ...


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I think that this approach would provide the most control: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I think you can have both worlds in the scenario you described. First, add the "choose location" as optional input box when searching. Insert it near the search field so that it will be seen, but don't require the user to fill it. Then, if location wasn't entered and user searched - he may receive too much irrelevant results. Then you can have a helper text ...


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Case 1: Where there are few options(<5) to multiselect. Then it is better to show checklist inline in tte pane, which doesn't take much screen realestate. Case 2: Where there are many options(>5) to multiselect, Then it is better to show combobox dropdown like in:- http://davidstutz.github.io/bootstrap-multiselect/ ...


0

People sometimes intentionally obscure their contact information online, e.g. by l33t-ing a few characters. One more reason not to do it.


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Definitely don't silently change the address without telling the user, as this can lead to extreme confusion if it guesses wrong. Instead, you might consider a "Did you mean...?" message underneath the field. This is easily understood by any user who has done a Google search. Mailgun has a service for doing exactly this. They have an online demo. In ...


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How about an ajax request real-time to check if the submitted domain is valid or not? If it's valid, presume it's right. If you can't find an MX or A record at that domain, state "could not find this domain" or suggest a "did you mean" mined from past records you kept about what users changed the input from and to all the previous times you "could not find ...


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I think its useful to separate common typing errors from spelling mistakes. auto-correct might not be relevant for correcting domain names as @Simwil suggested because of changes to domain name extensions. This being said, if we are looking solely at auto-correcting typing errors this would enhance the overall user experience and minimise user frustration by ...


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Autocorrect is somewhat invasive, and sometimes doesn't let user understand what was the typo or notice it at all. I would opt for typeahead (autosuggest) dropdown saying "Did you mean correct address?".


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I would recommend against an auto-correct as domain name extensions are about to change drastically, to the point where an email ending with "sitename.anything" will be valid. Consider an inline check, which means it doesn't cause the frustration of the usual ENTRY > SUBMIT > ERROR MESSAGE > RE-ENTRY > SUBMIT name@company.co [!] Did you mean .com? Asking ...


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I would lean towards not using Auto-correct in this instance as it can lead to more frustration than presenting an error message. The reason I say this is with the increase of domain names the accuracy of auto-correct becomes less and less. Your example is changing the .con to .com, what if the user's intention was to write .cn or .co? Form field error ...


1

I wouldn't display "No Tip" as an option in a list of tip amounts, that is a form of social pressure. To avoid social pressure, do not require the user to say yes or no, in this way by not taking any action, the decision is to not leave a tip. One idea might be to provide a button at the bottom when reviewing the total payment. "would you like to leave a ...


3

I don't follow the current vendor-specific security-speak, but I can try to list some UX implications related to various security measures for log in dialogs: locking accounts, even temporarily (necessary against brute force password attacks) - link to the support service must be available, email notification to the user should be generated, admins have to ...


3

Tipping varies wildly between countries, and even between industries. I would suggest two alternatives: If possible, have the operator cofigure the menu according to his particular indusry's customs. Perhaps he could choose between placing the "No tip" item at the top or at the bottom (I think it's usually very inappropriate not to tip, or very uncommon ...


1

It looks like you can't do much to make this easier. If these are the only options you have than I would go for option 1 and leave it up to the seller to explain the tipping function. Your option #2 is misleading and #3 is confusing. Explaining the tipping function can be done in a very approachable way: Press the arrows to choose a tip if you will and ...


0

This totally depends on your culture. In some regions/countries, tipping is seen as normal whereas in other areas, tipping is totally up to the customers and not taken as an offend it a customer doesn't tip (some places in europe e.g.) So depending on your culture I'd go with option 1 or 2.


-1

I personally like the table checkout at Chili's Restaurants. They use Ziosk. Once you've swiped your card, you're taken to a tip selection screen. If I recall correctly, 20% is selected by default. To not leave a tip, you have to move the slider to zero. You then click "Tip This Amount" to get to the signature step. I feel that making the tip selection an ...


1

"Sign up" gets so much visual weight because it's really important for every business, including Evernote, to convert new visitors into users. "Sign up" CTA is the most important element of this page (of this whole site) and nothing should distract users from this, even some slightly more prominent design of the "Sign in". "Sign in" is so close to "Sign up" ...


0

This is a very interesting, albeit micro scenario to consider. In the case that you provide, I'm a huge fan of account creation only after a shopping cart purchase has been finalized. This can even include an action/request by the user before the "purchase" button is hit (such as 'please create an account for me after purchase' checkbox next to an ...


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Yes, it is manipulative (in the same sense that a baby's cry is manipulative, car commercials are manipulative and butterfly's wing patterns that look like eyes are manipulative). And yes, these practices are usually ethical - as long as you are not selling something illegal, promoting credit cards to poor people, lying about the product qualities, that ...


0

I think the scenario you describe is very unlikely to happen. The user will finish his current goal at the eCommerce, before he attempts to change other passwords. It is true though, that the password strength indicator will be a distraction that will consume user's attention and may also cause anxiety. But this is a matter of trade-off between enhancing ...


1

Using design psychology to influence your user-base, is perfectly fine (ethics don't apply). I don't think however that what you want to happen and what will be perceived by the end user are in line with one another. With your specific question I could see the following effects taking place, as an end-user: I'm somewhat confused by some random thing ...


0

Here is one use case to consider We have a app where we load the link page in a separate window. This is so current list view is still visible and the user can continue to monitor the list while researching the details page separately. This helps with multi tasking. Also the state of the list is not lost. Say you are scrolled down in the list. Of course I ...


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I have yet to see a GUI that could replace the expressive power of a text representation for any query. Bugzilla has a somewhat clumsy Custom Search interface that allows you to "Show Advanced Features" to be able to put parentheses around groups of criteria like (a OR b) AND (c OR d NOT e) - almost impossible to change your mind if you make a 1 wrong ...


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The call to action should be well-designed enough to stand out alone without animation. Place the button in a universally accepted area where the user will expect to find it. Adding animation often looks like a cheap trick and user's won't appreciate it especially if they are engaged in your site and then their focus and attention is taken away because of ...


0

It never hurts to show a selection of relevant information on the listing page, information that is appropriate when users are comparing between options. A single product page makes good sense for SEO and for link sharing, however you can still have a combination of unique product pages but also the ability for a product view modal on the listing page (as ...


0

Agree with first answer. The key is to show that the data will be kept private vs public. I have seen it done by Having separate sections for public and private data. Eg email address. Birthdate etc in private sections


1

The problem with a lock is that is also used to depict a secure connection (HTTPS). Many browsers use the lock for HTTPS. A symbol is effective if is used consistently. Have a link to your security policies and practices. Don't make a general statement your data is secure/safe as if you do get hacked then you have lied. Maybe a key symbol to identify ...


0

Your description reminded me of the Advanced Search feature in the Thunderbird mail client. In Thunderbird's Advanced Search window, users either pick "all of the following" (a query with only AND operators) or "any of the following" (a query with (a query with only OR operators). The query itself is then constructed from a number of 'rules', which are of ...


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Finance, accounting, risk management people use interfaces like this all the time. I want category A, B, C in time range X but without B1 and C 2. If you're making an app for such users I don't think it's an issue at all. As always make sure you understand how users complete their task and what they are trying to accomplish (don't take the BA's word for ...


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This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...



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