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Hiding the incompatible file types completely will cause confusion. Users will wonder if they picked the wrong folder and may spend a while looking for this missing file before they realise it can't be used. The best option would be to show all the files, but grey out the incompatible ones and make them 'unclickable'. Therefore it's immediately clear that ...


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Looking at Nielson's top 10 (despite being written in 1995), and based on some user testing, I actually think there's a case to be made for option 1. Consider the situation where a user believes the file they have prepared for the program is located at a place on the disk. The file is not of the required type, but most users don't always (often) read ...


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If you video users (webcam on top of screen) and use screen recording software with a 'screen in screen facility to record the two feeds together then you will have a recording of users facial reactions as they complete tasks. This will give you a broad brush guide to their emotional reactions from their facial expressions. Lots of stressed expressions ...


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Option 2 is much closer to the mark than option 1, but having no "option to change [the] file type", especially when the user would normally expect to be given that option, is still wrong. Ideally, you should not be deciding whether the file in question is valid based on the filename extension, but rather by checking some type of tag at the beginning of the ...


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I think you have to differentiate between 1 / Unable to Use and 2 / Don't want to use. PC's up to about 2005 were pesky complicated things, which required lots of user fiddling with to keep going. So anyone over a certain age (probably about 50) is going to associate smartphone = computer = complicated and unreliable. So I think part of the issue is ...


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It really depends on how savvy your users are, but usually the simpler you can make your interface, the easier it is for users to navigate and use. A psychological principle known as Fitt's law shows how the Paradox of Choice affects user behaviour. For a typical sample, the more options you offer people, the less likely they are to actually make a ...


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You can provide options for two kinds of users, non-power users and power users, those two kinds of users differ a lot in how they want to do something. Non-power users need only one simple way to do their tasks, and no more, and power users likes to have the more flexibility to do what they want. Take an example: newegg.com By default they use a guided ...


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Errors cause frustration and confusion. Forcing a constraint to avoid an error is the better option. Forcing functions are a form of physical constraint: situations in which the actions are constrained so that failure at one stage prevents the next step from happening. In addition to preventing the user error, afford the user a clue about acceptable file ...


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The answer is in the 10 Heuristics for User Interface Design by Norman Nielsen, which are a must read if you listen to me. Error prevention: Ā«Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Either eliminate error-prone conditions or check for them and present users with a confirmation ...


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The standard approach is to show to most used/useful/efficient filters, and then add some "Other filters" / "Advance Search" to show more specific filter/search parameters.


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Maybe not the best design but this is what I do in one app Let the user expand / collapse so they don't have to see the details of options they are not interested in


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On an application, displaying a single text can be less user-friendly than displaying an icon that everyone can understand easily. The issue can be the choice of your icons, between "Cancel" and "Delete", there's a thin subtlety. So I suggest to display both text and icon (since one cannot 'alt' a image on an application) with relevant icons : Edit + a pen ...


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Preface: We should all strive to make the UI as simple as possible. What you have here will work for your users but there are ways to improve it based on who your users are. Icons or Words? If space provides you should use Icons and Text to communicate the action. Icons should be left aligned in the button to have an equal indentation for the button label ...


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Leave the value in there as an invalid state You should allow users to change the type and still keep what they wrote in value field. They might have clicked the wrong type, or want to copy what they had written. You need to communicate that the value is invalid though so I suggest you indicate this by making the value red: When the user leaves this ...


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To a certain degree, the system can handle the problem itself - if an integer is changed to a string, the number can be converted into a string automatically (in the image above to the string "123"). In this case no user intervention is required. If a conversion is not possible, there should be a warning message. You say, the user "can change data types ...


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Aside your questions you should take a look at accessibility, as ipavl already stated in his comment. To get started you could take a look at the anySurfer website, if I'm not mistaken the label is only valid in Belgium but they offer a complete and normative checklist with code examples and solutions for common problems. Personally I think the majority of ...


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I'm not sure what your web development skill level is but from a UX perspective this sort of flow could be appreciated: Provide a "Fix formatting issues" button User pastes text into textarea so simply display a friendly message box saying something like "Pasting content from another program such as Microsoft Word can prevent your post from looking it's ...


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Instead of a technological solution, why not employ a little psychology. Job posters want their listings to be seen, preferably near the top of any list which contains them. If you warn them that failure to properly format their posts (using the tools provided) will negatively effect their list placement, most users will comply. It isn't really necessary ...


2

Is there any big difference when it comes to designing for people aged 60 + and people aged 50? Technological know-how, perhaps. For example, people who are 60+ might have never used a computer aside from simple tasks, but those who are 40-50 might have some experience with a bit more. This would depend on your user-base, of course. You should also ...


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It's platform dependent according to Nielsen Norman Group. Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. That said, It's correct on Apple devices, but not OK on Android/Windows Phone devices.


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First, the wording leaves too much ambiguity; be clear and the point. What time did you leave home? How long do you plan to work (hours)? I know this isn't short and sweet, we need more clarity to understand what is needed. Second Input Personally I would change it to: - "Planned Work Duration" - cal, number input, "+ and - " along with word "hour" ...


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The simplest solution might be to have users enter the time work completes, and then have your program (or spreadsheet analysts) compute work duration from the two times (assuming you're including commuting in the calcs).


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You can use (a) pre-designed silhouettes or (b) customized avatars Silhouettes depicting archetypes will focus on the classifications (in this case, age/gender) rather than the avatars themselves. However, to be widely understandable, your depictions will probably be stereotypical in some way: thus, they might be offensive to some users. For example, a ...


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None of your avatars resemble my appearance at all, so I would have to select based on other criteria. I might pick the lower right one, because I think he looks cute. I'm a 60+ woman. Even among those who pick an avatar based on some similarity to their own appearance the similarity might be in skin color (already mentioned in another answer), hair color, ...


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You cannot trust what users will tell you. The medical field has experienced this for ages. However is that essential? You could just ask for an age-group instead. I've seen its value in research by Forrester and many others. Asking for less precise data could yield the same relevance but preserving a little user anonymity might get your further. Without ...


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Others have mentioned already that avatars not always correspond to the person's true gender and/or age. Another problem is that a number of people will struggle with understanding what avatar represents what age group. From the above avatars you showed, I'm struggling with figuring out who is the teenage woman and who is the 20-40 year old. I believe the ...


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Just a thought: You could model avatars based on distinct personas you created earlier in the UX process and let the user choose one of these taht he finds himself fitting into. You could use this information to further engineer the UX process for the set of users that picked same persona.


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Users pick avatars that are not always representative of their "real life" appearance. Often picking an avatar which doesn't match their true age/gender/ethnicity etc. This concept of an avatar allowing you to present yourself differently than in real life I imagine is strongly embedded with users. So if you want to capture real data you would be best of ...


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If you need a piece of information from the user, ask for it. Trying to trick it out of them is likely to get you bad data (in particular, female users will often pick male avatars to hide their gender, and a significant subset of male users will pick female avatars), and may backfire if users realize you're trying to trick them.


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When considering user permissions I think there's a few general questions to ask that could apply to any project: ROLES & PERMISSIONS - will users have different roles, with unique permissions, that allow them to perform specific tasks within the system? For example, Super Admin, Editor, Writer, Moderator GROUPS - will users be grouped so that you can ...


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Here you can find the results of an eye tracking study about where people focus their attention on popular websites. The websites analyzed include Pinterest (it's the last one on the list): The study was conducted by EyeTrackShop, a startup that runs eye-tracking studies. Unfortunately I haven't found similar studies about Trello so far (I'd be very ...



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