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3

You should use points. Here's why: If you're interested in gamification, then points will give the user immediate feedback, which is important. Gaining a level might take too long for the user to bother, but gaining points, even small amounts, works quickly, easily, and gives immediate positive feedback. With gaining levels, it might take too long to ...


0

In both your examples the applicant will have to go back and forward between roles and persons/organizations. It seems to me that you have some roles that are defined earlier in the process and you want the ability to change a role to some other person or organization instead of the one doing the application. I think you should ask yourself if having a ...


0

I basically agree with Benny Skogberg's answer. However I think it would also be safe to display a "Do you really want to abort the search?" confirm message, but only if the search usually takes a lot of time. Accidental taps can be frustrating if you've been waiting minutes for a result. I wouldn't display a confirmation message if the search is trivial ...


0

UPDATE: Ok now that I've seen some "in action". I really recommend to go for a fixed area for the tool tip texts! The user sees its getting more and more (and probably will actually wait for all of it to load -- check this!). Or tries to already click on a label. Then somewhere opens a fixed location with the text. User reads it, when she's done looking back ...


3

Yes absolutely. Every action a user takes should interrupt all other activities for several reasons: Data load. Loading data is (often) costly and we want to use as little as possible running a mobila app. Threading should be avoided. Expectations. User expect a mobile app to respond quickly at the time they do something. If you're ever used a search ...


1

People can remember on average between 6 and 9 things at a given time. I think this is one of the reasons why most website like Amazon and Ebay show a number of suggestions that is fairly close to this figure. You don't want to overload your user with suggestions.


2

Basically the number of choices given to the users should not be too many. How much depends on what the product is and what are the suggested products. Since, here its food, the lesser number of choices the more likely that people would actually make a choice. Sheena Iyengars famous jam choice experiment talks about choice overload. " At a luxury food ...


2

You can use below button for your Non-signed up users As soon as user mouse over on the button Show the Little Signup Form - Followed by the Follow Button On Follow Click - SIGNUP THE USER + TRIGGER THE FOLLOW ACTION Hope this helps. BTW We a/b tested this approach. You'll see a way high conversion rate in this. Users love Quick Signups (They ...


0

As far as I've observed, most websites have a few features like this and almost all of them show a pop-up or modal window where you can login or signup upon clicking the "members only" feature. You've mentioned that "I would like the button there so that non members know that there actually is a follow feature and therefore would hopefully be encouraged to ...


0

I did my master's thesis on Emotional Design with Prof. Pieter Desmet in TUDelft. He has several methodologies including the Premo http://studiolab.ide.tudelft.nl/studiolab/desmet/premo/ I am sure Pieter's work and related references will help you a lot with this. For my project, I used more quantitative methods based on the need of the research. Very ...


0

Some general pointers (not sure about the literature that is out there) and hopefully people can build on some of the things I have listed here: Usability Testing If you are talking about a usability test then you should be focusing on goals and tasks first and understand the success rate. I suspect that people's emotions would be affected by how usable ...


1

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


0

clarity and transparency towards the end user Why would the end user care about if the CMS is on a seperate domain or subdomain? If I would move the CMS of one of my customers to a seperate domain, they won't notice because there's just one thing they want to do: manage their website and nothing else. They won't pay attention to the address bar. Did ...


4

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


0

I'm not sure how many administrators you have and what their skill level is, but if they look anything like our customers they will just look for an e-mail with the URL or a bookmark to the CMS and they really don't care what the domain is. Also, since people don't really read pop-ups, I doubt anybody will notice the missing subdomain in the message. (I ...


0

If the chart type doesn't depend on the data provided in 1) and 2), then selecting the chart type first won't be a problem. The problem arises when you can rule out certain types of data after the first steps, as this would lead to an error if the "wrong" data gets provided in later steps. It of course also depends on your target audience. Experienced chart ...


14

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

Option #1 - switch to Synchronous Assuming you are using jQuery, you can set the following option: $.ajax({ async: false }); This will prevent the user from interacting with your app until the app receives and processes the response from the server. Traditional desktop ctrl+z and such is syncronous but it's just so fast that you wouldn't know ...


0

How about sticking to the flat/linear structure and then for each entry have a button available to list replies to that thread? I imagine that this button would filter the posts so you only see the selected post and related replies (remember to provide a back button).


0

I would have all fields pre-filled except the ReCaptcha If the user enters an email that is already in use I might redirect to a log-in page with the email pre-filled. (with an option to go back and have the form still be pre-filled) This is of course assuming e-mail is the username to log in. Otherwise there could be an option for sending a username ...


0

How about showing a tooltip when hovering the link? Something like this: CSS3 Tooltips Unfortunately this won't work on mobile devices...



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