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1

Power users open links in new tabs and rarely use the Back button, while most users rarely open links in new tabs and rely on the Back button instead. Patrick Dubroy conducted this study for his master’s thesis while working at Mozilla. You can read about the presentation that he gave there and the paper that he wrote for CHI. In describing his ...


0

Responses i'm seeing so far are looking to only to "make it work" for now. URIs will stay - so when designing them try to make it work even after a site re-design/re-structure in the future. I share the concerns of your team mates, We can't expect an ideal way user would interact with the site, but we can make the site function ideally for any user. ...


1

This kind of falls into the 'flexibility and efficiency of use' heuristic from Nielsen Norman Group's heuristics. Their definition for this heuristic is: Accelerators -- unseen by the novice user -- may often speed up the interaction for the expert user such that the system can cater to both inexperienced and experienced users. Allow users to tailor ...


0

For the lack of overhead that is involved in modern web application frameworks like spring Rails or asp.net I would add another route that redirects users there to mitigate this problem. I dont see any negative effects of having both routes active and its like 5-25 minutes of work to do it. It seems like a win win unless I am missing any risks. For example ...


4

Well, first of all, I'd seriously consider using another logic that implements non confusing, semantic URLs. Assuming this is not possible, I'd recommend you to track your user's behavior and see what happens. Nevertheless, the solution for your problem is quite simple: just use htacces to redirect any user that hits somesite.com/event/ to ...


0

It might be a good idea to consider easy ways of correcting mistakes in this case. This is a concept taken from the book Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness Make it easy on the users by auto renewing their subscriptions, but also make it easy to cancel subscriptions at any time with no/minimal penalty. The example from the book ...


0

For me it is like this: If the user wants everything to stay the same (meaning he/she wants to stay subscribed), he/she shouldn't need to do anything. So automatically extending the subscription should be fine, if the user is properly informed about it. I think most big rail companies (and other subscription-based companies like internet providers, etc.) ...


0

If the user is signed up for one year automatically as soon as they sign up, without any option - for signing up then I think this needs to be stated explicitly at sign-up time: Signing up to our service will subscribe you for one year and your subscription will be automatically renewed each year, unless you cancel. Please note: you cannot cancel in ...


0

I’ve never seen a solution like this. Facebook Paper allows for chat bubbles to be tossed around the window (if I remember correctly), but I haven’t seen any exploration in roughing productivity, which is what I would call this type of feature. I’m not sure there is a valid use-case for this as the organized person has a pretty specific idea where they want ...


0

The other two answers as they stand right now are good. I'd argue that you could make the entire "Card" a link to the item and then have a nice-sized button like "Sign up" or "RSVP" for the call to action. I'd also design out a hover state for the entire card to show that it's clickable and give an idea that it's going to the detail page, but also keep the ...


0

Well, you have 2 actions here (register and see details), so at some point of the interaction flow, you'll need to include those 2 actions. You have several way to do it, the obvious one is to have a link fro each one of the actions. Not necessarily a button, just a link should be enough. But of course, you have more options, and you have to consider the ...


0

It can be hard to visualize this without some type of example, however.... I'd do both, and see if it becomes visually redundant. A CTA is a great way to make the path clear, but at the same time, it can be frustrating to users when titles aren't clickable. Often times in e-commerce sites, users become frustrated when they can't click on just the titles of ...


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Since it is related to "deleting" a record, I would say do not keep the option upfront. Until the user "hard presses" the record to be deleted. The trash icon appears upon hard press and there you go. Hard press to bring the Trash Icon And the confirmation appears in line , Sure or No, cancel.


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I would suggest this, I'm not a fan of modal boxes or interrupting the users interaction with the current screen.


1

WCAG guideline 2.1 (Compliance level A - highest) states: Make all functionality available from a keyboard. If the function of the button and the dropdown trigger is different, users must be able to access both. So first "A" then "B" is the answer. Then comes guideline 2.4.7 which state that each should have its own focus indicator. I think your ...


0

I agree with NO. Immersive is a heavy word to me. In regard to an interface I think of Coopers interface postures and his sovereign posture which is reserved for large feature applications used continuously at full screen on a standard monitor. As an owner of a Pebble and an Android Wear watch I feel the nature of a smart watch should be transient in ...


0

The short answer, Yes, they can be immersive but if only the user wants to get immersed in them. The focus however should be on getting the content to the user quickly and contextually The long answer Apple's products branding philosophy is completely based upon establishing personal connections between the users and their products enabling them to ...


0

I would think about it on the basis of conversions (i.e. as a landing page). In the case of the Housing.com link the information could be considered by some to be, as you say, cramped and more difficult to digest effectively. In the case of AirBnB it feels more like a dedicated landing page in order to attempt to convert as many visitors as possible. ...


0

Actually it should be "C" Reason: When you hit the Tab button the focus should be on the Primary Area, as mentioned by Alexey as well. But the focus should shift to another button on hitting Tab again and not on the secondary area. There is no need for focus to go on Secondary area. Because when the focus is on Primary, hitting ENTER should display the ...


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The problem with the "split button" is that it is not just one control but that it is presented as one. I've seen people pressing the button while expecting opening the menu. Since they are seperate controls my first impression was to focus on A when pressing the tab key, and focus on B when pressing tab again. But I agree with @AlexeyKolchenko that it ...


1

I opted to implement a mix between the provided answers. There are now three states: 0 images have been added: 1 image has been added: 2 images have been added: Now there is always a placeholder. The placeholder is the same size as the other grid items and is always at the end of the list so the interface will not change drastically after ...


0

i wont use any site or app the forces me to do anything not needed to use it. if i were making this app (and i've stopped using two like this, btw. I'm an iphoneographer, mother of a dev with apps in the appstore, and i create literally 2 to 4k images a month), one would be sufficient. let busy people do one if they want. if the like how it goes they might ...


1

I like your circle, and I think the idea is on the right track. In this suggestion, the central number denotes the significance of the circle and celebrating the client's accomplishment of goals. The lesser prominent number is the client's current score. The important thing to illustrate is setting goals and achieving them. Green, cyan, and blue are ...


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Instead of showing an empty list, show one with two placeholders that need to be filled before continuing - this shows the user that you're expecting at least two images. As real images are added, remove the placeholders.


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I would use some caution with incredible granularity of gamification. The old style of gamification encouraged competition and with the more levels of granularity the greater the percieved competion. Research has shown that certain demographics are less likely to participate or shy away with too much competition (women primarily). So if you ...


1

Link rewards to experience goals Gamification should be inextricably linked to UX. It should not, most of the time, be fun for fun's sake (that can be a brand strategy). What I mean by that is simply that the rewards should be linked to key experience goals. The granularity of those goals should drive the gamification strategy. Take SE as a superb ...


0

As I understand, you are trying to capture the behaviour of your users while interacting with your application. This is basically usability testing. There are two ways to capture such data Direct and Indirect Direct ways include interviews and observation. You can team up and ask your users to perform a set of tasks. While the testing is going on, the ...


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From your diagram, we can add a simple message next to the 'add bikes' button, stating "x images to go." or "1 of x images added." after an image is added. Additionally, to ensure that the user uploads the correct amount of images, we can disable the save button until the correct amount of images is reached.


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A simple resolution would be to show a simple descriptive text which tells them what to do i.e. they need to atleast upload two images to continue. Here is a quick wire frame for that. Until the user doesn't add the required number of images keep the continue\save button disabled.


0

I'm curious about your research design. Your control group should have the identical experience but without the treatment. In other words, the only difference between the 2 groups should be whether or not they receive the recommendations. You are potentially creating a confound by only giving the behavioral questions to the experimental group. Just asking ...


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This is a common UX situation Most users 'self police' and do not need warnings or guidance. You have few heavy users who need to be [gently warned/dissuaded] to avoid waste or abuse. You have isolated cases of abusive users. This heavily skewed distribution of users is very common in lot of applications (cell phone usage, all you can eat buffets, ...


2

Asking a user for anything is a barrier to entry I've seen some websites ask for a list of friends email before you even get to use the site which is ridiculous. Let me answer your question with another question... Is it a good idea to require users give an email address to see our prices? Would you go into a grocery store if someone at the entrance ...


1

We used to have the same problem in my office. (Although we have 2 separate recycling bins and 1 garbage bin) There was only 2 post-it notes above the bins but no one bothered to pay attention. Now we added a much better sign and I think it helps because it tells everyone exactly what goes in each bin. For example, it say "No soiled paper" in the paper ...


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No, I would strongly recommend otherwise. A month or so ago I was searching for a library that was compatible with Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android. Technical stuff aside, I was comparing the product of different companies. Some companies provided a straightforward, fixed price, whereas other companies required you to leave info for a tender. The latter was ...


0

I have seen a few examples of behavioural modification that make use of the 'norm' - for example: you could try putting up a poster that says something like "98.5% of people sort their trash correctly" Alternatively, you could (and I hate this word) 'Gameify' it by posting some stats for correct recycling bin contents like: "last week we sent 2 bags of ...


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I've been suggested it might be a good idea to require an email address for the first two plans before showing the price. This would also discourage people from staying on your site. I personally would have to be very motivated to leave my email address on your site for a product which I don't even know if I want. I'm not alone in this and price is one of ...


0

Idea is to show 'best' in a subtle way


6

Take a page from video games and treat your personal best streak as a high score. Classic games like Pac-Man show your high score at all times as a goal to reach, and when you achieve it you get to see both numbers change at the same time to reinforce the fact that each point is setting a new record. More recently, Diablo 3 offers increasingly ...


1

I always thought it should be turned on by default. I've introduced countless people to Macs and I take a close look with their first interactions with it. They try to tap the trackpad numerous times and don't understand immediately why their "clicks" are not registering. Last time this happened was last week. My friend is a Judge and a VERY smart person, ...


-5

My professional experience with major, international web marketers may be of relevance. None of them. Not one of them. True. And, I guess, I can answer as an expert in the field when I say that no research has been conducted to determine the percentage of device users that know how to open links in new tabs/windows. Probably, lack of funding has seriously ...


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Your graphic seems to require far too much information to describe what it means. Github does this through a table of Longest Streak next to Current Streak. It is easier to understand with just text. To keep it compact you could remove everything but the most important information: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


3

I think you should look at the use of bullet charts/graphs, which is an enhanced version of bar graphs commonly used instead of dashboard gauges and meters. Characteristics of the bullet chart allow you to a lot of information in a small amount of space, and are cluttered with useless and distracting decoration. The bullet graph features a single, primary ...


8

**Here are two alternative ways to represent ratios ** Using a high watermark line. This allows them to contrast their all time best with the current streak while also affording them to see some minor trends in their performance. A risk is them not understanding the high watermark which a screen overlay the first time might help them out. Apples health ...


4

Is there a reason you're doing a ratio of "current streak" to "longest streak"? I don't know why that would be helpful to the user and encourage them to continue with their habit change. Do you want to go a more aspirational route? The user is either going to be 1) In the middle of creating their longest streak or 2) working towards meeting their longest ...


0

The list you showed is designed for items that are quickly/easily recognized like the days of the week. Survey questions aren't that type of content. Don't make users scan a list, find the question, read the question in the list, find the corresponding button, check the button's state, tap the button to change its state, check the button's changed state, ...


1

In my opinion this can have a couple of different reasons – here's just some thoughts: Moderation of comments can be a lot of work – especially if you have a popular blog and you're writing all by yourself. For a high quality, high traffic blog I would estimate that moderating incoming comments may take as much time as writing the actual articles. If the ...


0

I believe one reason might be trolling, which has become a serious problem these days. Even come to the extent that groups of people like students are paid to troll. Comment threads are good as long as discussions are productive. but with trolling and hate speech these days, comment threads easily go off topic and turn sour and make even the blog look bad


0

I think a good way to engage and motivate people is to give them some kind of incentive to recycle. Maybe add a sign that says "it's been X days since we successfully recycled" and whenever trash ends up in the recycling the number goes back down to 0. Or maybe see if it's possible to add an official office rule that recycling is mandatory. Here in NYC ...


1

You would have to ask your users to find out if they find it creepy and untoward to have strangers chat with them. One way would be that a person has to opt in to be part of a chat (meaning that the person will not be pinged/IMed if he has not selected to be active in the chatrooms (as opposed to simply being on the site). There are many options but ...


0

Toggle buttons are an interesting alternative to radio buttons and in this particular case it would look very similar to what you have and would take just about the same amount of space. In that respect there would be little difference. One of the differences would be that the toggle button is a bigger target than the radio button. Of course toggle buttons ...



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