Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I agree with both previous answer but they've missed one pretty important point > Locked Tabs are always staying most to left. If you'd have a possibility to close tabs to the left you'd just simply always close your Pinned/Locked Tabs – which you for sure don't want to. IMHO that's the main reason – personally I'm using locked tabs for most important ...


2

I agree with @rewobs about the first tabs often being more important. It's not just a common observation, but actually a very reasonable occurrence, because new tabs open on the right. So if I open my "main" item (my inbox, my facebook feed, an article), and then it leads me to open a bunch of secondary items (through links in the original), the secondary ...


6

It has been discussed in google forums but it seems that there isn't any clue about it. The only theory I can imagine of is related to when someone starts googling about an specific topic and open a lot of tabs (whichs will open on the right), then when navigating, the result might be found in the first previously open tabs, so you don't need anymore all ...


1

Users actions speak louder than their words. Have users try both products, tell them to think out loud, but most importantly, look at what they do and how they react to the interface/interaction. You don't need them to tell you why they like product B more than A, find it out yourself. Read more here.


0

Limiting allowed characters in passwords to a sane subset of printable characters is a good idea. More flexibility is not always better. That's why we have speed limits on roads. Frequently, usability is about protecting users from their natural aptitude for shooting themselves in the foot. From a server-side security standpoint, there is no problem in ...


1

The scientific method can be very helpful here. Speculate on what feature(s) people care most about (a hypothesis). Present a choice between products / services that have and don't have those features (an experiment). If you're creative enough you can come up with a large enough list of what it might be that you feel overwhelmed trying to present them ...


2

There are questionnaires created especially to measure and compare the user experience of different products. Off the top of my head I know two, but I would guess there are more. AttrakDif The AttrakDiffTM questionnaire by Hassenzahl et al. (2003), developed together with User Interface Design GmbH, measures subjective assessments concerning pragmatic ...


1

The usual solution is to provide sample data for each of the features in your dashboard. Clearly label that one is providing sample data (example put a "SAMPLE" overlay over the chart/graph). Don't forget to put clear call-to-actions. Example: "Import your data over here." You can use videos but that's probably not necessary.


0

When you have complex features that require lots of data to work, consider providing sets of sample data that can be used to demonstrate each individual feature. You can let the users play around with their own copy of the sample data to get a feel for how they might use these reports.


1

Normally the folder navigation / selection and naming of a document are presented on the same screen. Something like this layout: The default file name is pre-populated in an editable text field that the user can edit if they wish, or leave as is.


1

Yes, unfortunatelly, the restrictions on characters the user can use in the password have sense from the UX perspective. If you're operating a worldwide service, you'd like your users to be able to log from all places of the world. If it's the case, you must take into account, that unfortunatelly, the keyboards are not standarized. Event the layout of the ...


6

I agree with others that there are just too many variables (a good portion were exposed) to make a decision without A/B testing. btw, I think the image of the OP seems to be reducing the chances to a false dichotomy where one or the other (price or discount) must be the one "highlighted" in the final design, when in deed they could both have their ...


3

Marketing Answer: The discount is most important! UX Answer: The actual price is most important!


11

I took a course on Coursera. Beginners Guide to Irrational Behavior by Dan Ariely. The course addressed these kind of issues. As you would guess, people are irrational. Lets say a customer is buying a pen for $20 and you say to them, "The store down the road has the exact same pen for $10". They would be more likely to consider that a deal worth exploring ...


2

There are many factors that go into marketing a product for sale. A key factor is the environment the buyer is operating in. If I am physically in a store and I see an item with a steep discount it may trigger an impulse buy, so discount might be the most important factor. However, that is not your environment. A user willing and able to run your app to ...


5

I don't think there's a perfect answer here but I know I lean towards Option A. People already know where to look for the price. You've trained them to look in one spot for a price so it's easy for them to find, they don't need an extra highlight to spot it. The discount is what sets this item apart from the others. Every product on this store has a ...


55

There is no universal answer to this question, as which is a more important factor in a buying decision varies depending on: price; type of user; perceived quality; and type of purchase. Price In general price matters more for lower valued items and discount matters more for higher valued items Type of user At the risk of being slaughtered here by the ...


4

You could do some A/B testing to determine which approach is best but, as some other answers suggest, there may be no one size fits all solution. If you could start by randomly varying which number is given prominence and track how individual customers respond to this (i.e. are they clicking on more products with big discounts, or going for lower prices), ...


1

Depends There are 3 Type of buyer in World, One, Who want good quality product who never compromise with price for good product, Second are who find products that may comes handy in their budgets. So some time they compromise with product quality. And Third type are who, want product for their fond of and change that product frequently. So they found low ...


2

It depends on your price bracket and customer type. If the product is already cheap (like a 50p pencil down 10% to 45p), then the price is more important. If the product is expensive, or an investment purchase (like a £1500 handbag down 10% to £1350), then the discount is more important than the price. The other thing to bear in mind is that some customer ...


2

Without knowing anything about your app, the best solution I can think of, is introducing a brief on-boarding that includes instructions on swiping with one finger to use the app (with an accompanying visual example). I'd be interested to know where they're getting the idea that two fingers is for swipe; maybe they're laptop users having a hard time ...


0

A few guide lines: Let user enter any character in the ASCII range of 32 (space) to 126 (~) - these should be the same in any character code. Limiting your users to less characters will only frustrate them and force them to choose less secure or harder for them to remember passwords. Characters bellow ASCII 32 (and ASCII 127 = Delete) have specially ...


1

Ahh I feel your pain. This word may be your product's greatest strength and yet its greatest weakness -> Enterprise. I can realise where your customer is coming from. The data you want to collect is pretty harmless for regular consumers as long as its anonymized. But for enterprises, you are asking them to share how they operate your software potentially ...


0

What if it takes two weeks to get the password reset by a letter being sent to my home address and I can’t access my bank on holiday due to their being a character in my password that I can’t type on my iPhone. Will I blame the bank, will I consider changing banks…… What if my back decides at some later stage they wish to use drop down lists to input a ...


2

One problem that I've seen with non-ASCII passwords is that some systems deal with characters and others deal with encoding-specific code points. The "א" character might be represented in different ways depending on encoding, and sometimes the same character may be represented in any of multiple ways ("é" could equally be U00E9 or U0065 U0301). Consider the ...


0

Authentication and security are critical. A security breach will kill you. Do you have any idea what goes on between a keyboard and server? You have normalization, encoding, ambiguities in Unicode, serialization, NAT, man-in-the-middle, and other measures. That is a secure end-to-end transaction that is used for the entire session. Bad guys want to take ...


3

It depends. If you've got reasonably strong control over the password input mechanism (keyboard layouts, software stacks, etc.), then letting users freely input anything they want is a good idea, because it maximizes the available password space. Someone attacking an English-language site probably won't try even obvious things like "كلمة المرور" (which ...


3

It can make sense from a usability and support perspective. If the character isn't possible to type on a keyboard/phone without using alt codes or copy-pasting. Keep in mind that the most active internet enabled devices have touch screens. Your user could create the account from their laptop, then try to access the account with their phone, which isn't ...


28

If a site requires that passwords only contain certain character codes, then a user will be able to enter the password into almost any device which is capable of producing those characters. If the password contains character codes which may be entered on some devices but not on others, then a user who creates a password on a device which could enter the ...


16

I would like to add to DaveAlger's point. I, like many people, create algorithms in order to better remember passwords. I've spoken to many people (in an informal manner) about passwords and I have heard a lot of objections why can't I use a part of my email or my username in my password? why is there a character limit? (affects my algorithm) why can't I ...


86

If the user can type it then it should be allowed in their password. Telling someone what they can and can't use in their password always feels wrong to the user. Passwords are currently the most universal way to authenticate. Preventing users from entering anything is, in essence, telling them who they can or can't be. 1. Any printable character that a ...


1

Short Term Trend spamming probably wont be a problem early on, you'll have trusted users who'll build good content. At the start the people using your site will be early adopters, supportive friends and product evangelists who will be more interested in using your product rather than trying to spam with it I'd advise that in early stages you concentrate on ...


0

Maybe you can just plainly explain to the users, why you need them to precisely tag the videos (i.e. for the video search function). Also provide tag hints and prompt a window, just after the user uploaded a video, to make this process as fast as possible. Another idea is ask relevant questions (for eg. "What words would best describe your video?"), to aid ...


0

If the user is required to add tags, it would be great to apply a couple tags automatically for them in the tag section. (You could "force" them to use these tags by not letting the user delete them, but you should make sure if you implement that way that you have a very accurate system for automatically assigning tags). Then, you can give the user the ...


4

I'd like your opinion on the process I am trying to simplify, any and all suggestions welcome. I don't know — because I don't know what the customers are like, what the booking process is like, and what the pricing and business model is. Things I would be thinking about: Is it actually faster and more convenient? You are, for example, removing ...


1

There are two cases, and two different optimal behaviours Clearly if the app has the language available that user has chosen in Android, then it should not display anything and app should "just work". Having a language choosing chore is an unnecessary task for a user, and that's poor UX. If your app does not have the language on the Android platform, then ...


0

Depending on how important it is for the user to choose the language, you could: proactively ask the user in the on boarding flow which language they'd like (and depending on the device's chosen language you might be able to predict which languages they are likely to choose) not proactively ask the user, but include the option for the user to change the ...


0

I think adapting the app to device language is an idiot idea. For most users the default language is not what they have chosen. It depends on where they have bought their device. A Spanish marketplace mostly sells devices with Spanish as default language. We are not supposed to guess the user preferred language. Preferred language depends on lots of ...


0

Rather than allowing the administrator to add, edit, and delete questions, consider allowing the administrator to add or archive questions instead. In this way, the administrator could change the questions to be displayed on the profile without the danger of creating nonsensical answers to questions. Archiving questions also provides for the case in which ...


3

In the described scenario, you should never provide an edit option or you'll have the problem you're mentioning. Basically, you're writing to a database, so let's say I have this question and answer: Q: roses are red, sky is... A: blue And now I edit the question, effectively overwriting the database's value: Q: Your teacher is... A: blue Which can ...


0

You could use a spinning indicator spinning at a speed proportional to the loading speed. They use pretty much the same paradigm on iOS to make the speed difference clear between 3G (and faster) connection and Edge.


1

All Smartphones have a built in visual representation for showing that data is loaded at the very top left. It is often represented by some kind of a rotating object, such as the following animated gif. But if you make it more obvious to the user if you replace the video with a progress bar while loading data, and switch to video when all is downloaded.


1

You're asking us to give you reasons why it's a bad idea. Sorry, but to me this just looks a bit lazy. What you should be asking us is “Is this a good idea, why (not)?”. Agreed, it should be backed by solid reasoning as well as outweigh the disadvantages. But if the reasoning is solid, adding it doesn't have to be bad per se. Advantages A ‘Read more’ ...


0

Depending on the revenue model of the site, "Show more" actually brings money in. Assuming it sends you to the article, it actually gives twice the ad revenue. It also increases page ranking through pass through clicks and time spent on the site. This is why you see a lot of sites now doing "top 10 most ugly celebs" etc. That requires 10 clicks and 10 sets ...


2

The benefit of 'show more' is to prevent content from pushing the content below it out of view. If this is for the whole page, then there is nothing below (except perhaps a footer) and it is an unnecessary hindrance to reading the entire page. If you need to persuade them, show them a fixed position 'show more' page on a short and tall display. On the short ...


7

There's two situations where I see "Show More" valid: When the "more" part implies a lot of data which might not be needed on the initial view. What "a lot" means depends on the target audience: if it's an intranet site, or internet, if it's going to be shown on mobile phones with limited data transfer rates or not, etc. When there's content under that ...


18

Pretty much what JonW said. Ask them what problem they feel this is solving. Clients often ask for features just for features sake without actually ensuring that the feature serves a useful purpose. In general, web pages simply don't have 'heights' and if there is more to see, there's no reason to hide it behind an extra user interaction. Just show it in ...


0

Once I, the service provider, get in a 2 way conversation with you, the user, the chances you buying my service increase dramatically. This is from my experience, but there are a lot of studies demonstrating that engaging the user helps. That being said, it's easy to exaggerate with the number of mails, to annoy users. Hell, some users marked as spam the ...


1

It would really depend on how complicated this game is, but luckily there is a great example of card-game UX in a game called Hearthstone. Their approach would most likely take more work than you'd like to put in, which is to have a series of tutorial games against AI. They are carefully sequenced to introduce elements at a learnable pace, and while it ...


1

I would just keep fields in the left side menu. Field properties panel could be a floating panel that appears on selecting a field. Similar to how Balsamiq does it. The form properties could a panel or dialog getting invoked by an action or icon in the main navigation or you could think of placing it in the fields panel. Suggesting this on the assumption ...



Top 50 recent answers are included