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0

http://www.anagram-solver.org/?letters=eplthneat http://wordsolver.net/solve#!q=eplthneat Anagrams are no threat to AI. But if you would be to replace, add or remove some of the letters — it would no longer be an anagram thus only decipherable by complex guessing algorithms which would also be true for humans as well though.


0

From what I understand a user can activate a item indirectly by selecting it as default. While there is no technical reason to prevent this, I think the UI would become a lot easier to understand in terms of it causalities if items that are not enabled have their radio button for making them default disabled (greyed out). You have one UI action here ...


1

Your approach is correct, you need users to confirm the changes to avoid any change taking place by accident. And in fact is not the same action, but a set of actions with at least 2 sub-actions: enable editing (fires action set EDIT), then the possible sub-action branches in the main action tree: save (sub-action 1) cancel/undo (sub-action 2) Based on ...


0

I first came across this issue in 2008, and wrote it off as the client not getting it. I did some quick informal testing and found that other people didn't get it either, that the main nav items with dropdowns are also clickable themselves. To any initiated web user, it's a no brainer. But apparently not to others. I've just come across it again in 2015 ...


2

Grey is a convention, not a rule It helps to understand why grey is used for disabled buttons: Grey is a neutral color so it's good for communicating subtle or de-emphasized elements. Disabled buttons (because they are not clickable) are usually communicated to the user via de-emphasis. The visual message is: "I am a button (look at my shape) but I ...


0

Nothing ever always represents anything... man. But seriously, those buttons look disabled. Don't waste your time running a test, just use another color. White buttons with a blue outline would probably look fine.


5

No. I do not thing this is a good alternative to captchas. There are several goals that I think need to be achieved in order to be considered as an alternative. As Seamless As Possible When designing a captcha or a captcha alternative, it's very easy to lose sight of this goal. You have to keep in mind that we're purposely blocking users from doing what ...


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Ironically, I could not get by myself what bgeigr meant, but almighty Google helped me out: So this captcha is quite easy for computers to guess, yet may be hard for humans. And bear in mind that Google is using an error model for common typos (letters replaced by those adjacent on the keyboard etc.) If you program your computer to only consider ...


0

I agree with the points made above. The visual association of a disabled button depends on the context of other buttons and styling. In the same way that red and green to do not always mean negative and positive, grey can mean anything you give it providing there is context enough for a user to understand what active looks like.


4

The main thing is not distracting people. If the images help illustrate the point you're making and meanwhile you're keeping the audience engaged they work great. If they are busy and distracting, they will stop listening to what you are saying and focus on the image - it's all about finding the balance, and using your skills as a presenter to complement ...


4

My short answer is no. Grey does not always represent disabled condition. I think it depends on the usage, context and the colour scheme of your app. Lets take email sign up popups as a first example. You land on some news website and immediately after the page loads you are presented with a popup with couple of inputs and usually two buttons, Cancel and ...


1

You might want to have a look at a related UXSE question. It is okay to use grey for non disabled things, provided there is no conflict on page. Currently your grey color is overloaded by two meanings. On buttons it acts as a disabled state, on icon is not the case. This reduces affordance and users would definitely frown upon it. The top answers in the ...


4

This would be incredibly easy for a computer to determine. The thing is to not go head-to-head with a computer on its own turf. A hacker can go through millions of permutations per second. Any form of l337 speak or other variation would be decoded in a heartbeat. Literally. (If that). EDIT: A program will check to see if the word is in a dictionary. If not ...


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I couldn't believe that I could Macaulay uesdnatnrd what I was radioing: the phenomenal power of the human mind. According to a research team at Cambridge Nerviness, it doesn’t matter in what order the letters in a word are, the only iprmoatnt thing is that the first and slat letter be in the right pilau. The rest can be a tootle mess and you can still ...


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tl;dr A good captcha would need (ideally) to offer the best possible protection (difficult to get for a computer) and ease of use (easy to get for a human). But captchas aren't good at this and "typoCaptchas" doesn't seem to improve them. Questions can be rearrenged quite easily and then if the question is easy enough for people is probably easy enough for ...


5

Would Typocaptcha result in a better or worse user experience when compared to CAPTCHA? It doesn't really matter. CAPTCHAs are a hurdle for humans. Which is the intent...they are meant to be a hurdle...hopefully one a human can jump but not a computer. But regardless, hurdles are a bad user experience so if there's a way to do it without the hurdle, ...


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Why would this be indecipherable to a computer? Since each word has the correct letters, but they are scrambled, it would seem very easy for me for a computer to crack the correct order of the letters by comparing it to known words. Which defeats the whole point of having this extra barrier. Secondly, how would this affect folks with dyslexia or other ...


-1

It's absolutely so it's less user friendly and you'll just end up wanting to stay signed in instead of having to log in using this cumbersome method.


0

This is part psychology, part UX, part Marketing. Our friend above already provided good starting points around Social Theory and Activity Theory. Besides, this academic paper about "Identifying the Optimal Number of Claims in Persuasion Settings" is a great read. Regarding UX, I did my fair bit of research last year while working with a few startups ...


1

Here is my solution, use fear of loosing with gamification or ranking to prepare user to create his account... How this can be achieved Step 1) Let the user post his score, (Don't restrict your user to register before posting score) Step 2) Then show his score with ranking like you are at 19th place in all Europe (Engage him with comparative stats) Step ...


3

I dont see an issue with the naming. We had a similar issue in one of our applications, the solution was to display a column after the sorting with the number of days remaining along with the actual due date. Due in X Days. Although, I believe these labels are more common: Due date soonest first Due date latest first


1

I think your design and terminology work fine: Dropdowns are a common and proven approach to sorting. Your labels are clear. Sorting future dates is not an easy concept to convey, and you've done it in a clear manner. The only additional suggestions I'd have are small ones: It's common to offset the title of the menu item from the detail, for example: ...


4

Yes, it's good to inform users ...particularly if there are mixed links on the page (some open in new tabs and some don't). One popular way to denote new-tab links inline is to use an icon as follows: If you're developing using CSS, this can be done in a way that fails gracefully for text-only or accessibility browsers. You can insert an :after sprite, ...


2

I think if the link will be redirecting to a different site, then it's helpful to convey this information to the user by means of an icon. The second icon in the question is apt for such cases. If the link will be redirecting to same site on the domain, then opening the link in new tab is not required. For plain text links, a small icon just next to the ...


0

I think the iPhone/iPod strategy of aggregating apps provides a good solution to solving this problem. Essentially you allow users to create a group by stacking items (up to a certain number of items), and perhaps also allow them to create 'supergroups' that are stacks of groups. However, if you want to provide an infinite number of items for a user then ...


1

Sharing, inviting and suggesting are all social activities so I'd would start with broad strokes from Social Theory and Activity Theory. In addition you could check studies on marketing and how / why people suggest products to each other (word-of-mouth is known to have an effect on how people review the product, for example). There is one Finnish article ...


7

Official google explanation aside (as mentioned in the other answer), there is probably another work at play which goes unmentioned - using UX as stick/carrot method to promote desired behavior. Note that if you at any time previously checked the "stay signed in" checkbox, even after logging out of the Gmail the google will remember your username (via ...


37

As per the official Google announcement, the reasoning behind this change is to try out methods which would complement new password authentication methods. To quote the post Today, you sign in to Google on a page that includes both the ‘email’ and ‘password’ fields on the same page. We’ll be gradually splitting those two fields into separate pages in ...


1

I have not tested this. But, design logic would say yes, inline links should work better on average. Many twitter links have been shortened so it's difficult to tell what the contents of the link are. This creates hesitation for the user because she has to figure out whether to click the link. Users will typically try to figure out what the link ...


1

If you're looking for a quick fix, I'd suggest placing the checkbox near the bottom, and providing a help icon that is next to the label to help users understand what the control means. This avoids the awkward splitting of fields between recipients and the personal message, and places the checkbox in the left-aligned visual flow to help the user perceive it ...


1

Groundwork first: To streamline the process and increase efficiency you need to do some groundwork first to address the root issues, search mechanics will follow. You can see the below as either as a three step process or separate work streams that you might need to focus on: 1. Focus on the data: You need to assess the quality of your data as this is ...


2

I don't totally understand the difference between old and new here. I do understand that it's not always acceptable to post visual reference of proprietary systems. Here's a shot in the dark: Providing cues In app cues are critical with this kind of change. Providing some form of contextual help when results fall below a reasonable level will go a long ...


4

If I understand you right, this is an app for the teacher, to record attendance of students at each lesson. Put yourself into the teacher's shoes (or better, interview a few teachers) and think about the entire process: What is the teacher's motivation? A requirement by the school? The need to factor attendance into grading? You may identify ...


2

I think your beginning is a good way. I recommend you to read a short introduction into user-centered design. First you need to get your user requirements (who does what and why, what is the environment, life cycle, ...). You started already, but in your post the requirements are too generic, too formal - I guess that humans will using the app? If you have ...


0

Flyout elements can be distracting. If it has to happen you can consider just sliding it out from bottom to top but make sure it doesn't cover the sharing options. While the real estate is limited, one alternative is to also have a sticky section on mobile (it'll be consistent with web experience). Perhaps at the bottom of the page.


0

If you have some common motives to why a user would flag content, you could use the flag button as a popover/drop-down where the user can select one of the common motives or explain it him self. This dribbble shot is a good illustration of what I mean. Regarding how the user explains the flagging him self - I don't see why you couldn't use a pop-up both on ...


0

First of all, try to categorize your actions in groups like 'Primary', 'secondary' actions. Primary actions - 'Create Order' and 'Add new item' Secondary action - 'Cancel' Think about 'Accordance' of these action buttons on the basis of primary and secondary. (as shown in image below) You can also use 'Floating' buttons or FAB for 'Add New Item'. Let me ...


0

I would make the flag explanation field optional. And the flow would be like this. Flag click/tap > Want to explain why? [Just flag] [Explain] [Undo flag] If the users decide to explain why they are flagging a course, then you take them to the new page where they can fill up the flag explanation.


6

It's because you're using an antipattern Right clicking is typically used to bring up contextual menus. It can be used to do other things, but that will not be intuitive because you have to overcome your users' learned behavior. Right clicking also presents some challenges for systems where there is no right-button on a mouse. You can still use the right ...



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