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0

Just from a visual analysis of the design, there a couple of design issues I see here. You are expecting the user to perform two actions while landing on a page i.e. scan the content and then choose a song and expect a player to pop up. This interaction might seem too cumbersome to users which causes the additional impatience when users wait for a song ...


2

We have very little information about the website (e.g., who are your users? In which context do they user your website? What are the user journeys? etc.), so it's hard to give you specific advice. Anyway, I think that the article "3 Tricks to Make Users Think Your App Loads Faster" published a couple of weeks ago summarises some interesting practices. Even ...


0

"How can I improve this interface so that users actually stay on the page instead of navigating away?" Avoid creating stuff for teenagers. Only kidding. I'd recommend auto loading (not auto playing) the first song in the list. The user will see a visual cue and should understand how to play the song or change tracks.


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If you're committed to having each review be its own form, there is some low-hanging fruit visual cleanup you can do, like: using hr's between forms aligning the text field left edges increasing the vertical space (padding/margin) between text fields Also you should commit to doing some graceful handling of the form states. For instance: Confirm ...


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Provide less of a cognitive load. Seeing a form like that will make the user anxious, and more than likely lead to an abandon. Instead, why not create a form similar to this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This form provides less information at first glance, but once the user wants to add more instructors, all ...


1

Make these fields part of a one form with a single submit button. This reduces the number of interactions for the user and cognitive load. I would also consider top alining the labels and adding padding between questions for clarity. In addition you could consider adding a title for each field-set.


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Many sites are adopting the partially logged in state when the site recognizes your email address or other account identifier. Maybe the user has not cleared cache and cookies and cache are still good, or maybe he's come from an email. The user is neither fully logged in/authenticated NOR are you logged out. The "Hi Vincent, Sign In" indicates you are in ...


0

This is tough because there is the risk that knowing the constraints of the medium (whatever tool you are using) can prevent you (anyone, not just you) from moving the user experience forward. This is the only hesitation I have for UX / coding unicorns. There is also the time factor. Doing all the UX disciplines also means listening to people All The Time. ...


2

Wait, you can be that guy on a big company too. I was in the same position. I work in a big company (big => 300k people) as a UX designer. All the dev's in my project are oriented to take care of the backend. So, it's not surprise that our web and mobile interface are terrible. The guy who was developing frontend here is using primefaces (how i miss the ...


0

I am a User Experience Advocate Where I work, I design and code, because when you pass off a design to developers, there is a loss in translation. I create coded prototypes if I can't create a prototype with a program. That way, people understand what I mean when I say I want it to be a fully immersive experience. All these things can be interpreted ...


4

I'm not sure if this question really belongs into this forum, but since I think I know quite well what you mean, I dare to write an 'answer' anyways: IMHO The larger the company and the bigger the business –> the more likely you will find yourself in a team of highly specialised people. Teams of developers are split into front-end and back-end ("wait! I ...


2

You could open your open company. You could find work at a small company; the smaller the company the better chance the developer has of making the decisions and design. Try jobs like Technical Product Manager where you may be expected to do some of both design and coding. Get a job as a developer in a "not too rigid" company, and make sure to get involved ...


0

I have the job you are asking about and the comment from boz is right, you will need to look at smaller companies. What does that look like? Well, I get to develop REST API's and websites, but I also get to advise, design, and do some artwork for fellow devs as a UX Designer. I also get to go out and interview our internal and external users, do usability ...


6

To me, this user interface element reminds the user that he or she has a relationship with the website in question, even if he's logged out of the site. For example, I've used various travel-booking sites, and for some I might have an account, and with others I may have transacted as a "guest." So it's hard to remember where I have an actual account. If, ...


4

This is a common and effective pattern if done correctly. Essentially if there are a few sensitive actions and other less sensitive then delaying the authentication check may allow the user to perform low risk activity unhindered. Examples of sites that do this well are: Amazon: Browse and add products to your cart. Try to check out or view account / ...


32

In general it should improve perception of security, but user perceptions are a funny thing. Consider example 8 on these surprising AB Testing results. In this instance the security seal on the form led to a drop in signups, because the security seal icon was interpreted by some users as a sign they were about to pay for something. The moral of the ...


5

Here's an interesting fact about people on the net, especially towards e-commerce. Anything that looks secure gives the user confidence It was noted in user testing that if a login form, checkout process, or anything with sensitive information looked secure, it made the user feel safer to proceed. This was done user testing specifically the checkout ...


1

In regards to the 'half-authenticated state' being a good idea or not, I believe that's mostly a security "feature" to prevent unauthorized users from mucking about in your account too much. Like if your kids jump onto your computer, you don't want them adding stuff to the cart and buying $347 worth of pool noodles for some unknowable reason. Being ...


0

Slightly off topic - The nicest feature I've seen on this kind of site (if it allows online 'discussion') is an 'Ignore' Button so that users can choose to ignore the postings of a particular user (their posts then show afterwards as 'Ignored User'). This adds a "pre-reporting" stage so that users who post content which could end up producing more heated ...


2

You could improve user interface but because you are asking for why user leave your site within few minutes is because, your site is not offering them anything at all other then a timer. You need to add some content which will attract users to your site again and again...


2

You need to tell the user what to do. Right now it simply looks like a statement: YOUR EYES NEED REST Every twenty minutes Look at something at least twenty feet away For at least twenty seconds The most important part is hidden in the bottom right of my screen: Next eye-rest in: 03:53 Keep this web-app + your sound open. It will ...


2

I suggest that you use modeless feedback, as defined by Alan Cooper in his book About Face 2.0 : Feedback is modeless whenever information for the user is built into the main interface and doesn't stop the normal flow of system activities and interaction. There are already some suggestions for modeless feedback e.g. @HEM, but I will give you my ...


3

In addition to the suggestions offered by TJH, I would suggest another approach: blink the "discount" cell background in a different color when the value changes because of some (intuitively unrelated) other action taken by the user, such as selecting express delivery, to draw their attention to it in a non-intrusive way. You could also add a message bar ...


7

I think what we can first look at here is any other options besides your popup. A couple that spring to mine quickly are: 1 - A dismissible warning above the cart - offering full cart scope - "Promotional items are no longer discounted when Urgent Delivery is selected". If this isn't prominent enough a dismissible (or, I guess, timed, but personally I don't ...


0

Managing "stuff" on a computer is cumbersome for many. There are inherent complexities introduced when exposing the file system. Especially considering how poorly the experiences have been on most popular desktop operating systems. The idea of files and folder-structures isn't completely faulty and I think when it's executed well it can provide a good ...


1

I'm not sure why, but this is one of the only meaningful discussions I can find for this. My take on this is that the app-centric approach is a symptom of efforts to lock users into a company's ecosystem. The app-centric framework makes it difficult to take content to a different platform, therby


1

It's possible to reshuffle the design with every added feature, but it's inefficient, takes up a lot of time, and occupies your thoughts with individual elements. A better alternative is to refactor once the strain of your current design becomes apparent, as then you get to look at everything at once, giving you a lot better picture of where things should ...


0

Well if I was designing this form, I would like to let the user know how many of such pages are there and how far his progress is. So like if there are 10 form, might be a small row of numbers with completed ones marked. Additionally, I would have extracted the common factors like Phone Number, URL, Email and have a separate page for that so that they are ...


0

Seeing from your comment that this form is more like a course registration, reusing the user's information would be most efficient and only requiring new/unique information to be inputted per course vs. having the user enter in all the data for every course. Reducing the amount of input required by the user and validating that information (selecting classes ...


1

I also agree that gender neutrality is very important with a default avatar, and breaking away from that default avatar is important. However since the goal of the avatar is also to help identify who the person is in a list, having variety can be important, and as designers we may have to accept the fact users may not upload their photos (so we may as well ...


1

There are two studies suggesting you are correct. This one and this one. From the first study: " this raises the question of whether, for non-experimental purposes, there is any benefit beyond marketing for the 5700 dpi mouse we used." From the second study: "Though other reasons may prevail, the quest for mouse resolutions above 10000 CPI does not seem ...


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Firstly, if you are interested in mouse technology and how it works this article does a great job of it: An Overview of Mouse Technology To answer the first question, cpi (the correct term, but often confused with dpi) is pushed higher on mice for a number of reasons, but the tricky part is balancing out the different variables so that errors don't occur, ...


0

Partial answer: We try to always use a gender neutral avatar that's an actual, default avatar. I think that breaking away from the 'Myspacey' look of old fashioned avatars is key, and I think doing everything you can to get people to not even use the avatar and upload a profile photo immediately in the first place is even better. We've done that in two ...


1

Honestly, I think it depends on whether or not a price drop is a good thing. While under the assumption that a price drop is a good thing (as in the case of a store's products going on sale), perhaps green is more appealing to the customer. On the other hand, red could be more appropriate if the action is bad. Using the example from Chairman Meow, a ...


2

On our e-commerce site, we use RED for price drop because red stands out and grabs the user's attention. Also red is commonly associated with price drop; for example, in US stock, red means price drop and green means price increase. Also, major e-commerce sites like Amazon and Zappos uses RED to indicate price drop so assume they spend millions on UX and ...


-1

I think its not made for the user wrist instead it is made for the better synchronization with high resolution games, or graphics, to give better experience while playing high resolution games or making high resolution graphics. Edit Consider if you have a high resolution monitor with high graphics, but you mouse is having low dpi. so when you move your ...


1

For a music-only site, I can't really think of a reason a user would require a mute button. As you said, if a user wanted the music to stop, they would pause, as opposed to having silent music playing in the background. However, if you were to include some kind of visualization or video to accompany the music, then there might be a case you would want a ...


0

You can argue that there may be more than one reason why someone wants to mute the music. From a functionality perspective, adjusting the volume to zero is equivalent to turning the sound off, but in doing so you lose the level of volume that was set previously by moving it to zero instead of using the mute button. I think if there is a reason to preserve ...


0

There's always a limit to the amount of information a user is willing to share, and that limit is exactly equal to the amount they want what's after this form. If I was giving away a million dollars to whomever completed a form they would spend weeks filling out nonsensical pages of jibberish at the hope of reaching the end of the form and their prize of a ...


0

What you are looking for is a "trust" or "reputation" system. You are looking for a network of interactions and evidence that a user's opinion is of value. So: User posts a review Review gets a "weight" based on the poster "reputation" Others vote review up/down - review "weight" alter based on up/down voters "reputation" Reviewers reputation gets altered ...


0

What is a valid user name? Is it a user name that was sent to the user from the application when he or she signed up? if so, you should indicate it instead of a generic "Please enter a valid username." If the user name is what the user entered when signing up, you should have a link "forgot my user name." Users are forgetful, and instead of making them ...


3

Things, you are talking about can be usually solved by cookie profiling, tracking and analytics. But thats not an easy thing to do, so the best way would be to buy some third-party applications for such tracking. For example Google can do it, becouse of gathering lots of different information about the user from lots of it services and account connections. ...


1

Using some conditional styling in your CSS you could add icons to the ends of links inline with the content that would look for certain URL's or kinds of links for instance: a[href^="mailto"]:hover:after{ content: "\f003" attr(title); font-family: FontAwesome; font-style: normal !important; font-weight: inherit !important; ...


1

I would link you to a few pages about Color Psychology. The color should somehow reflect the brand or feelings that brand evokes. Red color is always very intense and it evokes strong emotions (coca cola and its happy american dream with all those families and childrens), love and rebels (Rolling Stones logo). It also evokes strength (for example Red Bull) ...


6

I don't think a red logo has a negative impact considering the many iconic red logos. Levi's, Coca Cola, Leica, Red Cross, Lego, Canon, Virgin, Mitsubishi... Red is the color of blood, and because of this it has historically been associated with sacrifice, danger and courage. Modern surveys in the United States and Europe show red is the color most commonly ...



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