New answers tagged

1

I can present as one example where I attempted to do so was with regard the US Government Healthcare Exchange website. This site expects you to do certain things via logging in the site. It creates an account, associates it with the user's email. Warns the user NOT to make another account, then sends a confirmation mail that you need to click a link in. ...


1

Is it possible for the app to add the IMAGE placeholder automatically at the point the user selected to add an image? In other words, whenever I wanted to add an image, I would expect the app to add the IMAGE placeholder for me at the current location of my cursor (and most likely, the desired location for my image).


0

You will need to put instructions because this is not known interaction. The instructions do not need to persist for all time in your UI - you can use on-boarding techniques to provide a very short tutorial the first time someone uses the app (and you would also need to provide a way to re-run the tutorial, just in case someone needs a refresher).


1

Personalize the heading A good way to reinforce the personalized nature of the page would be to label it as "My Outs" (or "My Wall" or "My Invites"). Provide guidance on expanding your results If a short list of results feels disappointing to users, give them the tools to fix it: at the bottom of your result list, provide calls to action. How do your ...


2

The browser is a platform agnostic environment. You don't have to follow OS convention (although it would definitely aid UX if it did). Saying that though, you can't beat a bit of convention! Looking at some frameworks and examples, they generally follow the Windows way. Here's a jQuery UI dialogue for example: Also, doing a good ol' google search for ...


0

Show only options that are applicable for all selected objects, otherwise users will be very confused and make mistakes. This is the standard behavior in almost all applications, and it is an expected behavior. To make your list more usable, you may provide them with a type sorting, so that users will easily select all items of one type and apply an option ...


0

Irrespective of if you are developing the web app for Mac or Windows, the web application's popup buttons like close, minimize, maximize are all placed on top tight; the windows style. Trust the Golden Ratio Recent studies suggest that people who are right-handed (which is 90% of us) tend to trust information positioned on the right of the page; ...


-1

For me the normal reading pattern is from left to right and top to the bottom and also my first need as a user would be "first to understand the data" and then to decide what to do, so for me the buttons on bottom seems more clear


3

This can be clearly solved with a small foot note: Note you are only seeing outs that you have been invited to. As to where you could put it. You put it where you expect users would want to see it - where it logically makes sense. If I randomly put it in a tab that is not related to "outs" it makes no sense. Your issue is dealing with "outs" nothing ...


0

That looks like it may just be a WordPress thing, but I think the best practice for a modal like that would be to have all possible actions shown as buttons at the bottom (perhaps including "Install Now" and "Cancel" for this example), and to only have an "X" button at the top to close/cancel. The reason for this would be to mimic native OS modals, which ...


0

There are regions where you read right-to-left (Kurdistan is a region that comes to mind). In such a culture, putting the navigation elements on the right-hand-side may make more sense, since that is where a reader's eye may start browsing the page.


2

You should My friend had a problem, that he accidentally mis-set his age. Then, he couldn't change it, and because it was a kind-of age oriented service, and he stopped using it. I don't really remember, but it might be Steam or Origin. So you really should enable people to change them age, such as sex and name. There are transgender people out there. ...


8

Allow users to update their age. Why? Users can make a mistake during initial age entry. Users may also provide a fake age when initially registering with your site if they (1) were asked for personal information without understanding why, (2) didn't realize precision mattered beyond choosing a date over some age threshold like 18, or (3) before they ...


0

You should not allow Users to change their Age or birth dates for one another reason apart from all those mentioned above If in the near future, you decide to provide some treat like (discounts/coupons etc) when your service is used on Users Birthday. Editing the age or birth date maybe misused for getting those discount deals.


1

Absolutely not Here's why: Generally, a persons name,brithdate,sex and other permanent individual criteria do not change. If your website is trying to restrict underage people to purchase items that they arent allowed to purchase by law, it would be irresponsible to let them change their age whenever they feel like it since this is pretty much one of the ...


4

I think you should allow users to correct their age (date of birth, or whatever). Sometimes people create their accounts and they don't care about some stuff, or they don't want to give too much info about themselves (I'm one of those people :) ). And after they realise that it wasn't such a good idea, they would like to correct it to buy your goods. On the ...


5

Since toggle buttons are essentially just differently-styled checkboxes, it makes sense to use the same access key, which is normally Spacebar. (Here's an example of another toolkit's toggle button, which also uses Spacebar: Oracle JET.) Depending on your UI toolkit and the particular grouping of controls in your UI, the arrow keys may be used to move to ...


0

It depends. What's the typical and expected duration where these issues are open? If they're suppose to be dealt with very rapidly, i.e. within minutes, Then option two showing duration first is helpful to emphasize that. On the other hand, if tickets are dealt with more in the days range or months, then the duration itself is less important. Difference ...


1

The first question is "Do you need either of those buttons?" "Back" is a universally-available browser control. There is no need to replicate existing browser functionality inside your interface -- at best it'll be redundant, at worst it's a source of confusion (is it going to act exactly like the browser 'back' button, or do something different? does it ...


0

On Back button you should navigate to the previous page without any confirmation or any message..... On Cancel you should just ask for a confirmation and reset the field(clear all fields) so do look for proper validation upon that...


0

For arguments sake lets say this is a two step wizard and you are on step 2. Back - goes back to step 1. Retain any values entered on step 2 when going back unless fields on step 2 are reliant on options chosen on step 1 (in which case retain what makes sense on step 2). Cancel - cancels the entire wizard with a confirmation to confirm cancel. Cancel ...


0

Depends on the function and result of the interaction. If both buttons basically have the same effect, you'll only need one button. Back means navigating away from your current page, but it doesn't tell the users what happens to their input on the current page. Cancel clearly communicates that you are about to abort the process, and thus clearing the info ...


0

The word Menu which looks like a button (i.e. with an outline) seems to be the most user friendly. Articles: http://deep.design/the-hamburger-menu/ http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-icons


1

First option is much more explanatory for the user. I would use some blank slate that describes the cause (why the table is empty, who & when erased it) and possible actions that can be undertaken (Undo, Import of new data). If your product allows to manually fill in the table, you need some empty rows at the beginning, with option to add more of them. ...


2

The problem with patterns is that it’s hard to stand out when you’re doing the same thing everyone else is doing. But you don’t want to deviate too far from functionality with something as important as navigation. You need to find that sweet spot right between familiarity and creativity. While thinking outside the box is usually a good idea, but there are ...


0

In a multi-step-wizard like scenario this would make sense, but if I understand your case correctly and you really only have one step then Cancel would probably be enough.


1

One thing that is missing and you should have is - information on total number of pages available. In your screen shot user does not know how many pages there are when the grid loads. Knowing that information is good but you still need validation. I suggest an alternate solution. I think this is simpler UI , no explicit go to buttons , it keeps controls ...


0

I think both approaches are correct as long as the users knows the number of pages S/he can navigate to. Something like this...


1

Did you consider using other ways to select a page number? One of the challenges of allowing a person to type into a field is they may not even type a number, so you will need to consider all sorts of other types of data entry field validation. If you use an alternate way for selecting the page, which doesn't involve typing, then the person cannot enter ...


0

You can either leave the Go button enabled or disabled. But, disabling it without providing the reason might confuse the user which may ask himself "why is this disabled?". Your suggestion to highlight the box and providing the tool-tip is a common and good solution to validation of the page number.


1

You could try presenting the primary hotel and alternate as cards, with the primary accommodation presented as the top card. Show some details of the hotels on each card. Label the primary hotel card "Primary hotel" or "planned accommodations" or something like that, and make the primary hotel card background color brighter than the secondary one. Label the ...


0

A simple solution would be to mention the hotel which is most popular in bookings OR the nearest hotel to the user's selected or current location. Below, you can have a drop-down or a button that mentions View 1 More Location. As far as a holiday feel is concerned, I would advise you to switch to a better interface and use images to your advantage. The ...


1

Your second icon is definitely better. It clearly communicates the idea of getting directions/navigation, which is what you want. I'm not familiar with Apple Maps, but a car is neither the symbol for Google Maps nor the symbol representing directions/navigation within Google Maps. The only thing it is used for is selecting the transportation mode in that ...


0

I would agree that the car isn't a clear icon for the action of going to maps and checking a route to get there. It's kind of a best practice nowadays to use a pin-type icon (known from apps such as google maps) for showing either a location, or a way to get from "A to B".


0

It's Depend. let's say if you can handle a simple styling or toggling with CSS, then don't use JS instead. simple css will do the job. But in case you having complicated web app: Almost all modern web apps are heavily depend on front-end technologies which designed by AngularJS, BackboneJS and etc. it's almost impossible you give a good experience ...


3

I believe a suitable message can be: Javascript is turned OFF in your browser. For the optimal site experience, we highly recommend you switch Javascript ON. Know more here: Turn On Javascript for Chrome. This helps in the following manner: It suggests the user that the website highly depends on Javascript. If it's turned off, the user will know ...


1

Both options seem valid for me, it all depends on the business rules behind it. You cannot compare a content website like youtube to a brand website like wacom of pg. A brand website usually create this kind of pages because they have different localised website across the regions. The websites might look really different in terms of look and feel and ...


1

Hierarchies. One of my favourite tools is my tiling window manager. This lets me manage a lot of windows though a very nice hierarchy. Here's a rough simplification: You have a number of workspaces (aka. virtual desktops). Each workspace has a set of panes. A pane may be a window, a tab strip of panes (like a browser), a horizontal or vertical "tile" of ...


0

It might also be interesting to try to access these sites with restricted browsers (say lynx or with JavaScript disabled) or from a machine equipped for blind users. Having a dedicated, static HTML page might be part of the strategy for dealing with these situations.


2

I don't think you are missing anything, the above site 'http://us.pg.com/ or http://www.wacom.com/' options are handled very well. My analysis on apple.com, country selection must be in new page because the country list is more than 140+. Its hard to handle such a big number selection on same page. My suggestion on providing the Country selection option ...


3

I personally prefer the Second method since it ensures two things. Quality onboarding and diving right into what your app provides. If getting a user to register is your mission, the quality of onboarding needs to be on point. This leads to more creative solutions on how one can give the user an immersive and awesome experience and then at the Success/ ...


0

You can make access open and restrict access to some key features until a user has created an account - if a user tries to access the restricted features you can prompt them to create the account. Another approach is to make the barrier to entry very low, i.e. only ask for an e-mail address, and nothing else (not a password, username, etc.) The lower the ...


4

Firefox introduced a tab grouping feature ("Panorama") some time ago, but removed it again. I think the idea was good, but the implementation had issues (bugs, bad performance). A contributor states in a blog post that another reason for the removal was usability, but without going into details. Panorama worked like this: You have a button in the UI (and ...


1

According to your comment, you have basically two different areas: the neutral lobby and all the process rooms. Well, that hotel/office metaphor came naturally. So you could make a "shiny" lobby looking very different from the office rooms where the work happens. Since it sounds like one person could have to work in more than one office, the differences ...


3

If you choose list view then the image should be thumbnail size. Show the full image onhover of the thumbnail. If the primary goal is to show bigger image then it's better move towards card view or tile view (Pinterest ) Attached some mockup for reference


2

This is a good article/research by NN Group. It also helped me in one of the projects of mine in the e-commerce space. I personally feel the images should be large and the following article/research suggests the same. Also, design is really context specific so it really depends on your specific scenario. Hope this helps. Ecommerce UX: 3 Design Trends to ...


1

Depends on the type of your content and how do you want users to focus on them. do you have a lot of content and you want users to scroll and scan them fast? or do you want them to focus on each image? Example: If it's a gallery of cloth images, the details are important so you should use larger images. Or consider Tinder app. the image is the main content ...


1

One very straight-forward way to do this is akin to how StackOverflow handles the review queue. Every so often, a random "experimental" question is asked - the correct answer for which is predetermined. If they get it correct, then you know they are serious and paying attention. If not, then perhaps you give them x number of tries before handling the non-...


1

Your definition of seriousness is actually quite hard to measure, since you are defining it as whether the user has read the question properly or understood it. It is almost impossible to know whether someone has read the question properly unless the only way you can complete the question correctly is by following the question exactly and interpreting it ...


3

I think you should combine 2 measures: subjective and objective. You should then make analysis based on both. Here is a proposition: Subjective questionnaire - post task After the users fill in the forms, just ask them whether the answers they gave were correct. If the user says, "No, I just filled them to get rid of the task," ask him/her to specify which ...



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