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First, I'd check the assumption that your target audience is stressed. In the situation that you describe of learning something difficult, there are many emotions that your users might be feeling. They could be feeling stressed. They could be feeling resigned. They could be annoyed that they have to do something that they don't think is worthwhile. ...


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This a great question. Taking into consideration the emotional journey is crucial to creating an exceptional experience. Anxiety and security are the two emotions you want to manage. These two are the big friction generators and often result in abandonment. The good news is both can be addressed in design. We can't eliminate all friction but we can work to ...


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Many of the modern sites are using some type of a guide which walk you through the basics. Google is using it when it redesign its applications (Gmail, Photos) and when it launched Inbox. It shows up when you first login to the service and is usually designed as quotes. When you complete the guide you no longer see it but you have the option to relaunch it ...


1

From my experience users doesn’t read manuals from start to finish. They often find themselves in a solution where they can’t complete their task by their own or by asking a colleague. So when creating a manual we need to address this task based thinking. Which media to use is often irrelevant, more important it that the manual resolve the task at hand ...


2

Multiple interconnecting popups is in itself not a very delightful experience, since it causes confusion. For example, can I as a user step back to the previous popup when the next popup appears if I believe that my action on the first popup was incorrect? What happens if I accept the terms stated in the first popup, but cancel in the second, is the action ...


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I've enjoyed both the book and workshop by Nir Eyal on creating habit forming products. The Trigger-Loop model has some great uses that could complement your UX toolkit. I think that the Hooked model is not often mentioned in UX lectures because that model is more aligned with strategic product conception and planning, while UX, in general, is perceived as ...


1

Given that the user cannot proceed unless he/she performs an action/set of actions, the use of a constant reminder is a good play. Also supporting your text content with icons is a good strategy that will assist those users who tend to skip text content. For the actual content, I would suggest be precise and to the point. An Example: In order to use our ...


2

In my opinion I would leave it as is and let the users choose (I would think more would use google than twitter anyway), but if you want to do it that way I see a couple ways you could do it: Just tell the user your preferred option Have google as the default option showing, then under a dropdown panel of sorts have alternative options (twitter, fb, etc.) ...


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To answer your question, because in your context 0 does not mean a better position than 1, then the 0 entries should be displayed after the last relevant entry (ranking > 0) when sorting ASC, and before them when sorting DESC. If you can change the back-end, then either replace 0 with 9999 (or other relevant positive value), or add a new column or alter ...


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If you're displaying the value 0 you should definitely have it before 1 and 2, etc. When you sort based on ordinal values, you should be consistent, otherwise you are almost certainly going to confuse users. For example, what if you have many items, and the items with 0 value are shown at the end of a list 1 million long. That would be terrible UX wise. ...


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It's a great model that is backed up by real evidence and research. However, the model itself hasn't (to my knowledge) been scientifically tested and the Hook model itself hasn't undergone a peer review like published scientific papers would have.


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Here is one approach favored by my End Users, have an underlined option stating 'Clear' when the field already has an icon within (calendar in my example). Having an X clear button within the edit field is good, but coloring it red might mean error after the User types in a text. The common theme across apps/web is to use a lighter grey/grey colored X ...


2

Usability is not the same as habit-forming The Hook Model is about building products that are habit forming. That is different from building products which satisfy user needs. For example, a toilet brush has been designed carefully to satisfy user needs (for cleaning toilets)... ...but this product is not habit forming because users don't need to, or ...


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This example tested well with all types of users It helps if you try it out yourself by clicking the above link but here are the two things that make the X more intuitive and discoverable as a clear button... Only show the X if there is something to clear Place the X inside the input instead of next to it


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You'll find fields with a little "clear" button in them all over the web. Like this:


1

I would say it depends on the scope. For a single text field you could simply use an x such as the one provided by Font Awesome (here) If you are clearing all information from the form it'd be better to use a button that has a different color to the submission button. For instance if the submission button is the color green, a good differentiating color ...


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Any user will never sign up if he does not know what is there in the website for him. In case you think your site is too complex that a user will not be able to identify the complete potential; you can use an optional tutorial after the user signs up.


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A big factor is how difficult is it to convey the value of what you're selling? If the unique value is not apparent, then you don't want someone just comparing you based on price. Instead, you want a chance to explain your relative strengths whether you're priced higher than competitors or not. For example, if you priced a software development tool as ...


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In addition to JohnGB and Jimmy's answers, I would add that not having a 'downvote' button potentially generates more content and, specifically, may generate content that represents alternative views. For example, if someone starts a thread saying "We should ban all soda" and, overtaken with emotion you feel the need to take action on this thread, you ...


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Seconding Devin's point about existing research - online dating has been studied extensively (particularly in the communications field), and the Pew Internet and American Life Project (gold standard) has ongoing research in the field. There was one part of your question that was concerning. That is, modern dating sites/apps are often targeted at certain ...


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There's a lot of valid research on this subject, and I mean A LOT. You could start with something general like http://mentalfloss.com/article/59509/11-results-studies-about-online-dating and go from there. Data is data. However, if you're looking to do your own research (which is valid and recommended), I suggest you to visit not the user's forums, but the ...


3

If you are sure that both environments won't be used by a single user then I imagine it would not cause issues. However, to me a trash can is not very intuitive for "deactivate" anyway. I would recommend simply changing the icon to something more representative of "disable" such as a slashed circle or a lock (depending on what deactivating something ...


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Reddit has at least a couple subreddits (/r/tinder and /r/okcupid) where members of those dating apps congregate. You could (if it's okay to recruit there) post a link there to a survey site or a screener survey for more in-depth studies.


0

I can't upvote yet but I would be happy as a user with either top left or category tabs. so imagine two upvotes, one on each. if it didn't follow me, I'd would on android or anything not apple appreciate a "tap top to go to top" option (apple) and also a "tap bottom of screen to return /to where you were when you tapped " top." I do a fair bit of online ...


3

I don't particularly like it. And the reason has to do with the visual separation of questions on a page. In short, the voting buttons are presently the most distinguishing feature identifying the top of a question and act as a very intuitive visual separator between questions. I found that when the voting buttons scrolled with the top of the window, I got ...


2

I feel like it would increase the likelihood of me clicking the wrong voting buttons because I'd have 2 sets of voting buttons very close together when reading near the end of a comment -- those for the current comment and those for the next comment. Also, like others, I find the motion distracting.


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How about showing the link to the log in form as a button "log in to comment" instead of the input field? Then, to make it user friendly, store the current link in a session, have the user log in (or register) and redirect to the page where he wanted to place a comment Makes the process very clear.


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How about you make the form a little larger and show both login info & create form fields into the same dialog? So: Check if user is authenticated upon clicking on the "Create" button If logged in, just show input fields in dialog If not logged in, show login fields in top section and the create form at the bottom section of the dialog That way ...


2

As a user I'd expect to be asked to login before the input dialog is shown. If I'm shown the input dialog I expect the login to be unnecessary, and if otherwise I'd consider it as a violation of the principle of least astonishment.


2

I agree with @Vincent but I want to point out that an Horizontal bar guided just by colors isn't probable the most user friendly way of displaying this data.. I would go with the classic pie chart or at least with horizontal stacked bars. Here some that I consider good examples: Pie chart: Stacked bars:


10

It's a good idea, but it needs some implementation tweaking I think With a fixed voting console, it's easy to see how the console relates to the answer (it hangs off the top left so users know it relates to the answer) Once the panel becomes sticky while scrolling, it visually detaches from that anchor so it's important to maintain visual-semantic ...


3

Having control buttons in a fixed position is something quite common on today's web experience. You see the top navigation bar fixed at the top of a lot of news paper site and e-commerce sites. More annoying for some users (who don't use an AdBlock tool), is the fact that advertisement banners, usually on the right side of the page and not inline with ...


2

Personally I think it's a good idea although currently ther doesn't look to be much distinction between a question and an answer, which means the user could confused as to what they are seeing on the left hand side, maybe it needs better labelling or hierarchy applied? Also in the case of a long answer versus a short answer, it doesn't hang around long on ...



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