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0

It may be culturally dependent (Czech Republic), but the sign I've always known, seen, and used to indicate "turn page over" is a (big) percent sign in the bottom right-hand corner. In this particular case, it's not really a percent sign, but indicates a sheet of paper being turned over, or alternatively that there is something on both sides.


1

When someone lands on the page, you should introduce people to what this does, what it's useful for, etc. That will be an easy win. For increased engagement, you need some interesting content to engage with. I would add a few lists myself, maybe those of actual dishes, and have them show, with the calorie count, on the homepage. That way, instead of coming ...


2

For my point of view there are few things you can improve 1) Add a tag line on your main page which tells what this app is about. As i kept wondering for 5 seconds and then clicked on ABOUT link to know what is this search input do 2) This information is not very sensitive so you can skip the password part and let the user save their list by providing just ...


1

There are good and reasonable answers here that explain how to show readers that they must turn the sheet around, but what you really want in medical applications is making sure all necessary tests have been ordered/performed, not superfluous ones and not the wrong ones (for adjacent rows for instance). That is why I think it is more important to change ...


1

When I first started to reply to your question, I felt like I was pretty firmly in the paging camp, but as I researched and thought about your question more, I think I've landed in the scrolling camp. Pro-Paging: Level of Control I found an article that compares the "fine grained control" of scrolling, vs letting the user read the story. It talks about ...


1

You should make it easy for the user to cheat. "I see you didn't run 2 km yesterday. Do you want to delete this task and completely forget about it?" Too often messages to the user sound like they are nagging or chastising them. An app should be written as a friendly helper, not a disciplinarian. If a user doesn't want to do a task, nagging will mean they ...


0

I'll chip in another perspective on this. Even though it's a bit different than how social media like Twitter, Fb or StackExchange does it, I really like how real-time collaboration apps do this. Google docs, for example. Something going on is really, really clear here. Reloading the page doesn't even cross user's mind. For most of the time, at least.


0

Though there has been a lot of focus on language in the other answers (which is an important consideration), I believe that the key focus should be on heuristics (this Smashing Magazine article provides a great introduction into heuristics). The Default Effect For your question it's very important to consider the default effect, in that people have the ...


0

Instead of checkbox you can try with the toggle switches(on/off). Now days most the forms you find this kind of options. Please have a look at the below images to get an idea. ![toggle switch][2]


0

Labels for check-boxes should always be phrased in a positive/active way. As a rule of thumb, consider your alternative without the verbs: comments in this post It’s obvious that an empty check-box next to this label means ‘disable’ (or ‘forbid’) and a filled one stands for ‘allow’ (or ‘enable’). You may make it explicit for sure – you may even be ...


1

Think of it via the form perspective. Checkboxes are commonly used to add to the existing form (ex: add me to your newsletter, remember me, etc). So in the perspective it should be "add comments to your post" where a check will enable it. Putting disable with a check is kind of contradictory: I'm "adding" a disable? Also to add to what you're asking ...


1

Possitive wording The general rule is that positive wording is better in general since it's easier to interpret and tends to be shorter which is always good in checkboxs' labels. Microsoft agrees with these in their guidelines. If it is the case of a blogpost, I think it's not a big deal, since users should later be able to delete the comments and ...


16

There are many good answers about annotating the bottom of the page clearly (I like Dave Haigh's best), but as an alternative, how about making the last task (on each side) indicate that tests continue on reverse -- that way, it's directly in what they're (meant) to be reading/completing? I don't have an image editor to hand, but instead of: download ...


1

The issue with creating variables about how the product is used and then trying to fit / map your research data to these variables is that you may be skewing / projecting bias as to how you think a product is being used and not letting the research data "speak for itself". As you've collected all your research data (and I'm not sure how you've conducted your ...


1

The exact design will probably depend on your page (e.g. how frequently the page actually updates). For example, if you're using a periodic poll (say, every 30 seconds), you can provide a visual indicator, such as a progress bar in a corner that reads something like "next update in X seconds", perhaps with a visual progress bar alongside it that that ...


3

This is something the web community needs to get used to. But right now, we're looking for a way to make the community get used to real time loading. To do that, we'll have to condition users not to click a button (sounds like reversed reallity, doesn't it?). How it's done right now Example from Stackexchange: Example from Twitter: UX Stackexchange, ...


5

These are great answers, particularly Dave Haigh's, however none of them seem to address one important issue: What if the paper initially is placed on their desk with page 2 upwards? All the suggestions about "turn over to see page 2" don't address the issue of "turn over to see page 1". For example the big black box "10 more tests" somehow needs to be ...


16

Option 1: Print on multiple pieces of paper Just out of curiousity, is printing it on two separate pieces of paper an option? Having two papers and a staple indicates clearly to the reader that it isn't a single page document. Option 2: Add something to the end of the test to inidcate it is done I wonder if there are workflow type triggers that you ...


1

You can add an extra checkbox at the end of the form that says: "All checkboxes are checked" or "Check all test receipts are attached", or something to that effect. For this to be effective, lab workers need to be trained and conditioned to expect a checklist completion checkbox on every checklists they use regularly. The purpose of this checkbox is to ...


8

Use workflow and cognitive dissonance to draw the user's attention The form workflow is top-to-bottom, left-to-right. So the user will naturally end up at the bottom right of the page. So, place the page-turn indicator on the bottom right since the user's eye will be there. The form uses a grid layout, and has a lot of content. Therefore if you use ...


24

Simply adding the arrow at the bottom will help. Check the below img


3

What happened to the conventional arrows that were correlated to the number of pages there are? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You don't even have to show that left arrow when you're on page one.


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I think a start would be to make it clear the total number of tests and/or total number of cards at the top of each card. And also the breakdown of how many rows you seeing out of that total. e.g. Total Tests: 22 Page: 1 of 2, showing tests 12 of 22 Mockup 1


0

In a table form: If the user didn't mean to leave, she is most likely to press cancel. If the user did mean to leave, she: won't save if she meant to discard the changes save if aware of changes but forgot to save cancel if meant to leave but unaware of changes and want to see what these are save if unaware of changes, but still OK with saving these ...


5

You don't want to prevent your users from closing multiple modals rapidly, every approach in this direction will be a fail. What you want to do is preventing your user to close any tab by mistake. As it is a mistake use case, do not design for it from the beginning (except if it does not disturb any 'normal' use case). Rather than doing that, just add the ...


1

I would say go for the second option. Giving only two options makes it easier to process. Furthermore, if you label your ‘Yes/No’ buttons with a specific action, users will be able to see what action they’re about to do without reading the dialog box. This approach lessens user errors and saves users’ time, especially when the dialog box message gets ...


1

Firefox had the option to move tab close button to the end of the tab row, effectively removing it from the tabs themselves. Option was removed on version 31. I used it and it eliminated the possibility to close multiple tabs by accident. It was kind of small button, possibly very far from where your mouse usually were (Fitt's law). And you really had to ...


3

You could use a percentage based approach regardless of the number of tabs. meaning the sum off all the tabs is 100% of the total width. this way the location of the close button at the edge of the tab will rarely be at the same point.


0

After you do what @user71432 suggests in a different answer on this page… Use the frequency-commonality grid to help you decide You could apply the method that Isaacs and Walendowski recommend in Designing from both sides of the screen. It involves looking at both the frequency (how often) and the commonality (how many users) of each control, and then ...


1

Your next steps may vary depending on problem which you're trying to solve. Your study shows that some areas are not very important for most of your users and this means that removing/moving those areas (links) to other part of the page won't harm conversion. Also, looking at your bar in header I would suggest to group links by meaning. You can use ...


0

On the subject of moving through large datasets, these two tools may help you build a more efficient UX: https://github.com/cmpolis/smart-table-scroll http://nexts.github.io/Clusterize.js/ Both written by Chris Polis.


1

Is this what you're looking for? In this one I grayed out the end time box because Run until completion is selected by default. To make it easier for the user, I also put a default value into the text boxes. For example, for the start time you can put the time an hour from now, or the time that the users computer is least likely to be used (or anything ...


2

The first thing that came to mind was the phrase "the lesser of two evils". In developing an application with a UX mindset, it's almost always best to reduce the friction between the user and the interface. In this case, using the link "Get Coupon Here" to link to another page that actually provides the link to the user is introducing this friction, causing ...


0

Just-in-time tip for a user is better than long app tour before a user even tried to play. High UX and right words for actions in proper places do not make a need to present the tour at the beginning. If you would like to present anything in the beginning of the app make a user see it in a smart movie on a landing page/ homepage. Don't make a user skip and ...


1

The problem with the way you have it in the example is that it mixes up two different tasks. For example if users wanted to both add, and create new members, they select the checkbox, and then fill in the email. The second task is more complex than the first, and it is not clear in the interface what will happen next. Will they be asked for more information? ...


3

Why ? From a UX perspective there is no good reason to do this. So in the context of UX, there is NO good reason if we keep the scope ONLY on this particular point, but for more, see end of my answer. From a business perspective there are many good reasons why this happens. But I think the following points are most valid: Free does not exist for ...


-1

The reasons for this have little to do with UX, and a lot to do with business strategy. Businesses care more about Customer Experience than User Experience, and getting your payment information is a way of pre-qualifying you as a potential customer. That way the free plan or service that they are giving you is a marketing tool. If they didn't do this, ...


0

That is because websites or companies which their only interest in their user base is making money - know that all their users could be a potential customer (and certainly not duplicates). I agree that it is annoying,or even outright SCARY to give a service that is presumably partially free ,all the possible ways to TAKE YOUR MONEY Yet remember that ...


0

Why do designers do this? Concealing information in this manner helps designers display content in a way that's manageable and complies with relevant theories on how users seek/consume content. Is it good UX? Yes, see: Information scent Studies show that users will continue to search (read: click through) for information that is more rewarding than it is ...


0

Another reason for a Read More button is to allow the site to show an advert within the body of the article without creating a "false floor", which may lead users on mobile devices to erroneously believe the article to have ended. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ad-placement-mobile/


5

So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


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There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


7

Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


2

1.1 You seem to have space for a [ haggle (3 left) ] there. I believe that does it. 1.2 A "send haggle" button would be more clear. Don't use the counter inside the send button, though, inform that elsewhere. "You have 2 haggles left" 2.1 replace the "Send" button with a "get more haggles" paired with the above message changed to "You have 0 haggles left". ...


0

Whilst I like Bart's answer for this instance, I would make a suggestion for a slightly different circumstance. When searching for products, style/colour should come first Why? In the example you've given it looks like we're just about to go to checkout, we've found what we want and would like to take the next step. Prioritising Bart's way works well ...


0

This is a bad idea. Xabre is right that this makes interfaces more confusing for new users. However, it also harms usability for experienced users. A menu item that is visible can be reached in a single action. When a menu item is hidden, I have to: Stop and think where the item is hidden. Click on the menu to open it. Once the menu is open, find the ...


3

That's a clear "NO", as it lowers the discoverability of the system you're trying to make. Design-wise it may look sexy to really minimize it untill nothing's left, but to me it just adds to the confusion. It also seems pointless to add another step which just "gets in the way of doing my job". But hey, don't take my word for it: ...


1

If you look at a large ecommerce site like Amazon, "categories" aren't really treated as definitive categories where a product belongs to a single category. They act more like a predefined set of tags. A product can belong under multiple categories. Example from Amazon Some shoppers may care about the material of the shower, others may care that it's ...


1

Alternatively, you could use a grid. You've got 2 dimensions of data (size, color) so you could use X for sizes and Y for colors/patterns, or vice versa. I'd put the most predictable and/or smallest amount on the X axis because scrolling down is easier. For example if there are 10+ colors, you wouldn't have a stupid wide page. Just another option, though ...


1

Guide the workflow better Observations There is too much information on the screen. The SEARCH and DETAILS panels persist and clutter the user's flow at the top. This makes scrolling awkward, and it's easy for the user to feel overwhelmed with choices because of the number of widgets on screen. Fundamentally you are using a very linear workflow. The ...



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