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13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


4

It really depends whether we're referring to Save as simply an action which persists the users data without any wider impact, or whether this could also apply to other scenarios. If my Save action has an impact on something wider (e.g. applying some settings that cause significant changes to a system), then losing manual control over this action could be ...


3

You should use points. Here's why: If you're interested in gamification, then points will give the user immediate feedback, which is important. Gaining a level might take too long for the user to bother, but gaining points, even small amounts, works quickly, easily, and gives immediate positive feedback. With gaining levels, it might take too long to ...


3

Yes absolutely. Every action a user takes should interrupt all other activities for several reasons: Data load. Loading data is (often) costly and we want to use as little as possible running a mobila app. Threading should be avoided. Expectations. User expect a mobile app to respond quickly at the time they do something. If you're ever used a search ...


3

Did you take a look at Venn diagram? They could be simplified into icons, where AND could be two circles with the intersection filled with your theme color, and OR having the whole area. As long as they stay next to each other. I think they should be clear enough. Or, just put AND OR in the icon.


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

Option #1 - switch to Synchronous Assuming you are using jQuery, you can set the following option: $.ajax({ async: false }); This will prevent the user from interacting with your app until the app receives and processes the response from the server. Traditional desktop ctrl+z and such is syncronous but it's just so fast that you wouldn't know ...


2

If you're asking this question, then the next logical step is to ask why we have doors at all. An open doorway would surely be even easier to get through. The problem though is that providing a portal for you to walk through is not actually the function of a door. In fact, the function of a door is to block access. That's right: the whole point of having a ...


2

You can use below button for your Non-signed up users As soon as user mouse over on the button Show the Little Signup Form - Followed by the Follow Button On Follow Click - SIGNUP THE USER + TRIGGER THE FOLLOW ACTION Hope this helps. BTW We a/b tested this approach. You'll see a way high conversion rate in this. Users love Quick Signups (They ...


2

This reminds me of a discussion a while back about the current save icon, the floppy disk. The OP thought the floppy disk was outdated and youngsters didn't recognize the metaphor. The discussion consisted of people trying to come up with an alternative. My opinion on that matter was to remove the save button all together. Documents and such should be saved ...


2

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


2

Usage of auto save button is great but it should not be forces to user. It works like a charms in google doc, email etc scenario. But I'd never implement it with forms because 1: It takes control from user 2: Auto saving data will fire lots of server calls 3: With auto saving forms a false alarm might send to user that some one is storing data without ...


2

Basically the number of choices given to the users should not be too many. How much depends on what the product is and what are the suggested products. Since, here its food, the lesser number of choices the more likely that people would actually make a choice. Sheena Iyengars famous jam choice experiment talks about choice overload. " At a luxury food ...


1

People can remember on average between 6 and 9 things at a given time. I think this is one of the reasons why most website like Amazon and Ebay show a number of suggestions that is fairly close to this figure. You don't want to overload your user with suggestions.


1

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


1

I think it's your second choice explanation for why everyone doesn't save automatically. . . "It's technical or technology limitations of the specific job and code language and architecure already in place. " Saved buttons are still used because lots of back end programers haven't learned to program auto saves well and haven't had experience with new ways ...


1

The auto save is a great idea. Agree with you that Google docs and Gmail using the auto save are the best examples to save data/progress automaticaly. But this may not be ideal for every application. Imagine trying to play a game which autosaves every couple of minutes, it would be annoying. This would be more annoying if the saving time is more. Google docs ...



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