Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

58

Answering you question, which doesn't involve specific motivation behind it. Yes, people don't like to register on sites, people don't like giving information all the time, people don't like remembering passwords and user names. This behaviour is common to everyone, but some groups are more annoyed than others and some are more radical than others; for ...


56

What was the right course of action here? Is there a point at which the user's fear of change becomes an important UX consideration in its own right? This is an interesting question - I believe the answer is yes. The core tenet of user centered design is considering the characteristics and needs of your users in your design. If the fear of change so ...


43

Normally the users have a point. It may not be the point they think, but that does not mean there is not a valid issue at the heart of it. The choice of (a) "old way" or (b) "our correct new way" is rather stark. I have re-factored a lot of UI's and occasionally missed a much loved short-cut. Always found there is a way of blending the better design for ...


40

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University recently (2012) looked at password strength meters and its impact on password creation. The paper "How does your password measure up? The effect of strength meters on password creation" has all the details, but the abstract summarises their findings nicely (emphasis is mine): We present a 2,931-subject study of ...


31

Password strength indicator does not, per se, guarantee stronger passwords - from a pure UX perspective the more complex your requirements are the more likely people are to click away, to use an existing password or to write it down hence making it harder for a human to remember but, all too often, only marginally more difficult for a computer to crack. ...


27

Hiding information behind logins is really bad from the usability standpoint. Imagine you are a user who googles for a certain piece of information. Workflow on website without registration-wall: enter search-term into search-engine click on first result read question to confirm it's really relevant read answer Workflow with registration-wall enter ...


18

I disagree with @Alphabeticaa's answer. From personal experience, I hate it when I need to register simply because I wish to view an article or post a simple question. I have a "dump" e-mail address with a free provider especially for these "one-time" registrations but I try to avoid them. As a concrete example, I often browse the Stack Exchange websites ...


14

Smartphones are difficult to use for older people Older people are not stupid, there are some very good reasons why they still choose basic cellphones instead of smartphones (and for those who do own a smartphone - why they don't use the full potential). Smart phone usage among Canadians The screen is too small for people with vision problems. The small ...


12

Before ignoring the wishes of your users, you must first validate that your new solution is indeed better. The way to do this is to get a number of fresh, non-involved users of the system and test the existing and proposed options with them. When the uninitiated users prefer your new method, you have validated your approach, eliminated assumption and you ...


12

A possible solution would be to do it like JIRA does. Normal: While hovering over it: When clicked on it:


11

To my mind, the way we redeveloped it is unambiguously better. That's great, but "Better" does not always equal "Best". You may have thought you had "Best" before you received user feedback. However, the feedback you received should have thrown up red flags in your mind. What was the right course of action here? First, be willing to ...


11

This is the however If the majority of users have rejected a design, it seems ludicrous for any UX professional to insist on that design because 'they know better what's good for the users'. Quite appropriately, the majority of the replies to your question follow that thinking. I would, however, like to offer an alternative take on this, which goes well ...


10

I'll take a different tack from some of the others on this. If users hate it then chances are it made their job harder instead of easier. Drawing an arbitrary line in the sand and saying that 75 items isn't worth doing text filtering seems silly as well. Real users interact constantly with the system you are building, where you only interact with it on ...


8

Depends of how user-friendly the site is Not only forced logins irritate, but also passwords complexity policies and, of course, unreadable Captchas. Password policies sometimes make more harm than use. If an user cares about his security, he often has his own password-making algorithms for different sites and when the password policy prevents him to set ...


7

I am wary of any solution where the user has to remember that inputting x really means y. If the "infinite" or "unlimited" state can't be unambiguously represented by the spinner control I would consider using another one specifically for the "unlimited mapping" use case. Perhaps have another checkbox for unlimited that, when selected, disables / greys out ...


6

4chan has a very unique user system that may be worth examining: Anyone can post to 4chan, with absolutely no registration or login required; instead, users must solve a separate captcha for every post. Proof-of-identity for post deletion is handled by having users supply a password (by default, the client generates it for you, so you don't have to enter ...


6

The list in the drop down is not long enough to justify the text filtering (about 75 items). A very interesting statement. Scrollbars aside, I would test both UI's on yourselves and see how well you perform a searching task with 75 items with or without filters.


6

Joshua Barron's on the right track with his leading answer. I do see some additions to make, but I'm not cool enough yet to add comments. Let's stick with the simple assumption that the new UI is better than the old one. That way, we're just talking about the Developers who are Right, and the Users who are Wrong. The key problem then is how do you ...


6

Users reaction to change is an interesting topic, look at all the problems major services have when they update - Facebook/Windows 8/etc! Changes becomes a bigger issue where you have expert or repeat use users. They have invested in the process over time and will have developed a relationship with it. Even if the solution is easier from a pure usability ...


5

If you are asking if it is possible to apply the Scientific Method to find out how people interact with technology, then yes, there is "science" involved. A rough outline of the Scientific Method: Define a question Gather information and resources (observe) Form an explanatory hypothesis Test the hypothesis by performing an experiment and collecting ...


5

Is the user have to fill these fields before by using a classic form or is it the only edition method ? In the first case, users have a clue to understand that the completion of these field are belong to them You can also write an explicit placeholder like "Description : Add a new description..." Or, instead a border, slightly change the background color ...


5

Logins for trivial purposes aren't just annoying for users, they can be very dangerous. Here's why. No one practices good password security. You do. I do. Bruce Schneier does. But the vast majority of internet users do not. They use the same 5 or 6 passwords over and over again because everything else is just too damn complicated for them. Remember that ...


5

Yes. Yes we are. This is a perfect example. I was on Stack Overflow, logged in, and saw this question on the side bar. I wanted to comment and guess what - I have to log in again. Why? What is the point? Now I need to create a Stack Exchange account also? What PatomaS said is dead on: "The most important thing here, is the reason. usually people won't mind ...


5

Users will want to have full control of the content they post. This will be the case whether the context is a social networking site, a discussion forum, themed communities etc. If you block the possibility for a user to remove content they have added to the site you will produce agitation in that user. And if you keep content posted/accessible that a user ...


5

Whenever I've had the opportunity to introduce or explain a new tech to an elderly person, some of the major events that have caught my attention are Our obvious is not their obvious. For instance, whenever we see something on the screen that is selected or highlighted, it automatically registers as the default or current choice. I have noticed that this ...


4

Generally speaking, people are coming to your site/app to perform a certain activity. Whether it's buying a present for their friend's birthday, or obtaining a piece of information related to their work. The fewer barriers you put between the User and them achieving that goal, the more successful the site/app you are creating will be in serving the User. ...


4

How about this: Intro text adds nothing Name is not essential to create account, or at least make it one field Re-enter email is redundant The way you aligned labels is not optimal New password? I don't have any existing password at this point, am I? Choose one colour for your links that is not red and not the same colour your headers have Consider ...


3

As I understand it layout is more important to comprehension than UI markers. In the Code Complete book by Steve McConnell there is empirical research as to what code block formats are robustly understandable, and which cause issues. In short, as I remember it, nested blocks should be indented, and a block should be left aligned. Now if you have issues ...


2

A filter is a filter and a sort is a sort I find it rather hard to understand the purpose of the refresh button. But the answer to your main question is simple - filter means filter, sort means sort. When you filter something you take away other things. Here's a dictionary definition: Pass through a device to remove unwanted material. Consider what ...


2

There may be other reasons, too. I worked on a system that had a clunky UI, click here, click there, click back here, etc. I asked the systems analyst about it and it turns out there was a very good reason for it. It was designed that way to force the user to look in both places (it was a comparison tool) and then consciously go somewhere else to accept it. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible