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71

I think a start would be to make it clear the total number of tests and/or total number of cards at the top of each card. And also the breakdown of how many rows you seeing out of that total. e.g. Total Tests: 22 Page: 1 of 2, showing tests 12 of 22 Mockup 1


24

Simply adding the arrow at the bottom will help. Check the below img


17

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


16

Option 1: Print on multiple pieces of paper Just out of curiousity, is printing it on two separate pieces of paper an option? Having two papers and a staple indicates clearly to the reader that it isn't a single page document. Option 2: Add something to the end of the test to inidcate it is done I wonder if there are workflow type triggers that you ...


16

There are many good answers about annotating the bottom of the page clearly (I like Dave Haigh's best), but as an alternative, how about making the last task (on each side) indicate that tests continue on reverse -- that way, it's directly in what they're (meant) to be reading/completing? I don't have an image editor to hand, but instead of: download ...


15

Size should be first. Reasoning: Things that are beyond your control should go first. Your t-shirt size is not something you can control. You just happen to have a certain size. I can imagine that a certain color t-shirt is possibly not available (or in stock) at a given size. So the question to ask is, which has priority? Let's say our user is a size M ...


8

Use workflow and cognitive dissonance to draw the user's attention The form workflow is top-to-bottom, left-to-right. So the user will naturally end up at the bottom right of the page. So, place the page-turn indicator on the bottom right since the user's eye will be there. The form uses a grid layout, and has a lot of content. Therefore if you use ...


7

Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


5

You don't want to prevent your users from closing multiple modals rapidly, every approach in this direction will be a fail. What you want to do is preventing your user to close any tab by mistake. As it is a mistake use case, do not design for it from the beginning (except if it does not disturb any 'normal' use case). Rather than doing that, just add the ...


5

So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


5

These are great answers, particularly Dave Haigh's, however none of them seem to address one important issue: What if the paper initially is placed on their desk with page 2 upwards? All the suggestions about "turn over to see page 2" don't address the issue of "turn over to see page 1". For example the big black box "10 more tests" somehow needs to be ...


4

I would urge you to always give users the option to opt out. If a user doesn't want to read something they're not going to, forcing them to click on it will only become an annoyance. Think of it like a terms of service agreement. You're forced to read them even though most people don't care whats in it. Even though the developer put in code to make you ...


3

What happened to the conventional arrows that were correlated to the number of pages there are? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You don't even have to show that left arrow when you're on page one.


3

You could use a percentage based approach regardless of the number of tabs. meaning the sum off all the tabs is 100% of the total width. this way the location of the close button at the edge of the tab will rarely be at the same point.


3

Why ? From a UX perspective there is no good reason to do this. So in the context of UX, there is NO good reason if we keep the scope ONLY on this particular point, but for more, see end of my answer. From a business perspective there are many good reasons why this happens. But I think the following points are most valid: Free does not exist for ...


3

That's a clear "NO", as it lowers the discoverability of the system you're trying to make. Design-wise it may look sexy to really minimize it untill nothing's left, but to me it just adds to the confusion. It also seems pointless to add another step which just "gets in the way of doing my job". But hey, don't take my word for it: ...


3

Because your question is so general and you haven't talked about a specific case, I answer generally. I think there is no exact test to determine if users really like to take a tour and how long they tolerate it, but if a task is progressive and user feels going forward, they will do it. I some cases when you get into the homepage of some websites they ...


3

This is something the web community needs to get used to. But right now, we're looking for a way to make the community get used to real time loading. To do that, we'll have to condition users not to click a button (sounds like reversed reallity, doesn't it?). How it's done right now Example from Stackexchange: Example from Twitter: UX Stackexchange, ...


2

Generally: when it's good enough for YOU UX is very different from mathematics, because axiomatic mathematical truths are invariant to circumstances and context whereas UX is highly dependent on circumstances and context. Therefore, a UX practice or technique may be conventional enough for one situation (or designer) but not conventional enough for ...


2

Surely the practicalities of trying to launch an alert from an email preclude that option. What you are trying to achieve is, initially, reassurance for the user that they have successfully unsubscribed. The most simple way to do this would be with a landing page that says something like "You have successfully unsubscribed". However, your secondary concern ...


2

1.1 You seem to have space for a [ haggle (3 left) ] there. I believe that does it. 1.2 A "send haggle" button would be more clear. Don't use the counter inside the send button, though, inform that elsewhere. "You have 2 haggles left" 2.1 replace the "Send" button with a "get more haggles" paired with the above message changed to "You have 0 haggles left". ...


2

The first thing that came to mind was the phrase "the lesser of two evils". In developing an application with a UX mindset, it's almost always best to reduce the friction between the user and the interface. In this case, using the link "Get Coupon Here" to link to another page that actually provides the link to the user is introducing this friction, causing ...


2

There are good and reasonable answers here that explain how to show readers that they must turn the sheet around, but what you really want in medical applications is making sure all necessary tests have been ordered/performed, not superfluous ones and not the wrong ones (for adjacent rows for instance). That is why I think it is more important to change ...


2

For my point of view there are few things you can improve 1) Add a tag line on your main page which tells what this app is about. As i kept wondering for 5 seconds and then clicked on ABOUT link to know what is this search input do 2) This information is not very sensitive so you can skip the password part and let the user save their list by providing just ...


1

I would say go for the second option. Giving only two options makes it easier to process. Furthermore, if you label your ‘Yes/No’ buttons with a specific action, users will be able to see what action they’re about to do without reading the dialog box. This approach lessens user errors and saves users’ time, especially when the dialog box message gets ...


1

Firefox had the option to move tab close button to the end of the tab row, effectively removing it from the tabs themselves. Option was removed on version 31. I used it and it eliminated the possibility to close multiple tabs by accident. It was kind of small button, possibly very far from where your mouse usually were (Fitt's law). And you really had to ...


1

Your next steps may vary depending on problem which you're trying to solve. Your study shows that some areas are not very important for most of your users and this means that removing/moving those areas (links) to other part of the page won't harm conversion. Also, looking at your bar in header I would suggest to group links by meaning. You can use ...


1

When I first started to reply to your question, I felt like I was pretty firmly in the paging camp, but as I researched and thought about your question more, I think I've landed in the scrolling camp. Pro-Paging: Level of Control I found an article that compares the "fine grained control" of scrolling, vs letting the user read the story. It talks about ...


1

Is this what you're looking for? In this one I grayed out the end time box because Run until completion is selected by default. To make it easier for the user, I also put a default value into the text boxes. For example, for the start time you can put the time an hour from now, or the time that the users computer is least likely to be used (or anything ...


1

The issue with creating variables about how the product is used and then trying to fit / map your research data to these variables is that you may be skewing / projecting bias as to how you think a product is being used and not letting the research data "speak for itself". As you've collected all your research data (and I'm not sure how you've conducted your ...



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