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5

You'll find fields with a little "clear" button in them all over the web. Like this:


4

Here is one approach favored by my End Users, have an underlined option stating 'Clear' when the field already has an icon within (calendar in my example). Having an X clear button within the edit field is good, but coloring it red might mean error after the User types in a text. The common theme across apps/web is to use a lighter grey/grey colored X ...


3

Usability is not the same as habit-forming The Hook Model is about building products that are habit forming. That is different from building products which satisfy user needs. For example, a toilet brush has been designed carefully to satisfy user needs (for cleaning toilets)... ...but this product is not habit forming because users don't need to, or ...


3

This example tested well with all types of users It helps if you try it out yourself by clicking the above link but here are the two things that make the X more intuitive and discoverable as a clear button... Only show the X if there is something to clear Place the X inside the input instead of next to it


3

If you are sure that both environments won't be used by a single user then I imagine it would not cause issues. However, to me a trash can is not very intuitive for "deactivate" anyway. I would recommend simply changing the icon to something more representative of "disable" such as a slashed circle or a lock (depending on what deactivating something ...


3

I don't particularly like it. And the reason has to do with the visual separation of questions on a page. In short, the voting buttons are presently the most distinguishing feature identifying the top of a question and act as a very intuitive visual separator between questions. I found that when the voting buttons scrolled with the top of the window, I got ...


2

I feel like it would increase the likelihood of me clicking the wrong voting buttons because I'd have 2 sets of voting buttons very close together when reading near the end of a comment -- those for the current comment and those for the next comment. Also, like others, I find the motion distracting.


2

I agree with @Vincent but I want to point out that an Horizontal bar guided just by colors isn't probable the most user friendly way of displaying this data.. I would go with the classic pie chart or at least with horizontal stacked bars. Here some that I consider good examples: Pie chart: Stacked bars:


2

As a user I'd expect to be asked to login before the input dialog is shown. If I'm shown the input dialog I expect the login to be unnecessary, and if otherwise I'd consider it as a violation of the principle of least astonishment.


2

In my opinion I would leave it as is and let the users choose (I would think more would use google than twitter anyway), but if you want to do it that way I see a couple ways you could do it: Just tell the user your preferred option Have google as the default option showing, then under a dropdown panel of sorts have alternative options (twitter, fb, etc.) ...


2

Multiple interconnecting popups is in itself not a very delightful experience, since it causes confusion. For example, can I as a user step back to the previous popup when the next popup appears if I believe that my action on the first popup was incorrect? What happens if I accept the terms stated in the first popup, but cancel in the second, is the action ...


1

Given that the user cannot proceed unless he/she performs an action/set of actions, the use of a constant reminder is a good play. Also supporting your text content with icons is a good strategy that will assist those users who tend to skip text content. For the actual content, I would suggest be precise and to the point. An Example: In order to use our ...


1

Should we consider behavioral variables in the domain of the user (e.g. shopping) or behavioral variables in the domain of the product (e.g. shopping products) or both? Depends. Is not the same if you're working on a chain with many stores, a single store, a local online delivery shop, a worldwide retailer, and so on. As a general rule, the ...


1

I think you should go as granular as your objectives go. For example if you are looking to target search bar recommendations very specifically, you could go as deep as to know what are the most frequent searches for the persona, but if you want to go deeper, you could also analyse at what time in the day they search for certain types of products, considering ...


1

You create personas based on observation of real world users. They will exhibit behaviors. As you gather more observations of their various behaviors, certain behaviors will stand out as bold patterns: Things everyone does, things no one does, things everyone does once, things that are important, etc. These are your variables. For example, users of ...


1

This a great question. Taking into consideration the emotional journey is crucial to creating an exceptional experience. Anxiety and security are the two emotions you want to manage. These two are the big friction generators and often result in abandonment. The good news is both can be addressed in design. We can't eliminate all friction but we can work to ...


1

From my experience users doesn’t read manuals from start to finish. They often find themselves in a solution where they can’t complete their task by their own or by asking a colleague. So when creating a manual we need to address this task based thinking. Which media to use is often irrelevant, more important it that the manual resolve the task at hand ...


1

If you're displaying the value 0 you should definitely have it before 1 and 2, etc. When you sort based on ordinal values, you should be consistent, otherwise you are almost certainly going to confuse users. For example, what if you have many items, and the items with 0 value are shown at the end of a list 1 million long. That would be terrible UX wise. ...


1

I would say it depends on the scope. For a single text field you could simply use an x such as the one provided by Font Awesome (here) If you are clearing all information from the form it'd be better to use a button that has a different color to the submission button. For instance if the submission button is the color green, a good differentiating color ...


1

Any user will never sign up if he does not know what is there in the website for him. In case you think your site is too complex that a user will not be able to identify the complete potential; you can use an optional tutorial after the user signs up.


1

How about you make the form a little larger and show both login info & create form fields into the same dialog? So: Check if user is authenticated upon clicking on the "Create" button If logged in, just show input fields in dialog If not logged in, show login fields in top section and the create form at the bottom section of the dialog That way ...



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