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32

In general it should improve perception of security, but user perceptions are a funny thing. Consider example 8 on these surprising AB Testing results. In this instance the security seal on the form led to a drop in signups, because the security seal icon was interpreted by some users as a sign they were about to pay for something. The moral of the ...


7

I think what we can first look at here is any other options besides your popup. A couple that spring to mine quickly are: 1 - A dismissible warning above the cart - offering full cart scope - "Promotional items are no longer discounted when Urgent Delivery is selected". If this isn't prominent enough a dismissible (or, I guess, timed, but personally I don't ...


6

To me, this user interface element reminds the user that he or she has a relationship with the website in question, even if he's logged out of the site. For example, I've used various travel-booking sites, and for some I might have an account, and with others I may have transacted as a "guest." So it's hard to remember where I have an actual account. If, ...


5

Here's an interesting fact about people on the net, especially towards e-commerce. Anything that looks secure gives the user confidence It was noted in user testing that if a login form, checkout process, or anything with sensitive information looked secure, it made the user feel safer to proceed. This was done user testing specifically the checkout ...


4

I'm not sure if this question really belongs into this forum, but since I think I know quite well what you mean, I dare to write an 'answer' anyways: IMHO The larger the company and the bigger the business –> the more likely you will find yourself in a team of highly specialised people. Teams of developers are split into front-end and back-end ("wait! I ...


4

This is a common and effective pattern if done correctly. Essentially if there are a few sensitive actions and other less sensitive then delaying the authentication check may allow the user to perform low risk activity unhindered. Examples of sites that do this well are: Amazon: Browse and add products to your cart. Try to check out or view account / ...


3

Things, you are talking about can be usually solved by cookie profiling, tracking and analytics. But thats not an easy thing to do, so the best way would be to buy some third-party applications for such tracking. For example Google can do it, becouse of gathering lots of different information about the user from lots of it services and account connections. ...


3

In addition to the suggestions offered by TJH, I would suggest another approach: blink the "discount" cell background in a different color when the value changes because of some (intuitively unrelated) other action taken by the user, such as selecting express delivery, to draw their attention to it in a non-intrusive way. You could also add a message bar ...


2

We have very little information about the website (e.g., who are your users? In which context do they user your website? What are the user journeys? etc.), so it's hard to give you specific advice. Anyway, I think that the article "3 Tricks to Make Users Think Your App Loads Faster" published a couple of weeks ago summarises some interesting practices. Even ...


2

Wait, you can be that guy on a big company too. I was in the same position. I work in a big company (big => 300k people) as a UX designer. All the dev's in my project are oriented to take care of the backend. So, it's not surprise that our web and mobile interface are terrible. The guy who was developing frontend here is using primefaces (how i miss the ...


2

Firstly, if you are interested in mouse technology and how it works this article does a great job of it: An Overview of Mouse Technology To answer the first question, cpi (the correct term, but often confused with dpi) is pushed higher on mice for a number of reasons, but the tricky part is balancing out the different variables so that errors don't occur, ...


2

On our e-commerce site, we use RED for price drop because red stands out and grabs the user's attention. Also red is commonly associated with price drop; for example, in US stock, red means price drop and green means price increase. Also, major e-commerce sites like Amazon and Zappos uses RED to indicate price drop so assume they spend millions on UX and ...


2

You could improve user interface but because you are asking for why user leave your site within few minutes is because, your site is not offering them anything at all other then a timer. You need to add some content which will attract users to your site again and again...


2

You need to tell the user what to do. Right now it simply looks like a statement: YOUR EYES NEED REST Every twenty minutes Look at something at least twenty feet away For at least twenty seconds The most important part is hidden in the bottom right of my screen: Next eye-rest in: 03:53 Keep this web-app + your sound open. It will ...


2

I suggest that you use modeless feedback, as defined by Alan Cooper in his book About Face 2.0 : Feedback is modeless whenever information for the user is built into the main interface and doesn't stop the normal flow of system activities and interaction. There are already some suggestions for modeless feedback e.g. @HEM, but I will give you my ...


2

You could open your open company. You could find work at a small company; the smaller the company the better chance the developer has of making the decisions and design. Try jobs like Technical Product Manager where you may be expected to do some of both design and coding. Get a job as a developer in a "not too rigid" company, and make sure to get involved ...


1

Make these fields part of a one form with a single submit button. This reduces the number of interactions for the user and cognitive load. I would also consider top alining the labels and adding padding between questions for clarity. In addition you could consider adding a title for each field-set.


1

In regards to the 'half-authenticated state' being a good idea or not, I believe that's mostly a security "feature" to prevent unauthorized users from mucking about in your account too much. Like if your kids jump onto your computer, you don't want them adding stuff to the cart and buying $347 worth of pool noodles for some unknowable reason. Being ...


1

It's possible to reshuffle the design with every added feature, but it's inefficient, takes up a lot of time, and occupies your thoughts with individual elements. A better alternative is to refactor once the strain of your current design becomes apparent, as then you get to look at everything at once, giving you a lot better picture of where things should ...


1

Honestly, I think it depends on whether or not a price drop is a good thing. While under the assumption that a price drop is a good thing (as in the case of a store's products going on sale), perhaps green is more appealing to the customer. On the other hand, red could be more appropriate if the action is bad. Using the example from Chairman Meow, a ...


1

There are two studies suggesting you are correct. This one and this one. From the first study: " this raises the question of whether, for non-experimental purposes, there is any benefit beyond marketing for the 5700 dpi mouse we used." From the second study: "Though other reasons may prevail, the quest for mouse resolutions above 10000 CPI does not seem ...


1

For a music-only site, I can't really think of a reason a user would require a mute button. As you said, if a user wanted the music to stop, they would pause, as opposed to having silent music playing in the background. However, if you were to include some kind of visualization or video to accompany the music, then there might be a case you would want a ...


1

I also agree that gender neutrality is very important with a default avatar, and breaking away from that default avatar is important. However since the goal of the avatar is also to help identify who the person is in a list, having variety can be important, and as designers we may have to accept the fact users may not upload their photos (so we may as well ...


1

I'm not sure why, but this is one of the only meaningful discussions I can find for this. My take on this is that the app-centric approach is a symptom of efforts to lock users into a company's ecosystem. The app-centric framework makes it difficult to take content to a different platform, therby



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