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67

I would recommend against an auto-correct as domain name extensions are about to change drastically, to the point where an email ending with "sitename.anything" will be valid. Consider an inline check, which means it doesn't cause the frustration of the usual ENTRY > SUBMIT > ERROR MESSAGE > RE-ENTRY > SUBMIT name@company.co [!] Did you mean .com? Asking ...


10

I would lean towards not using Auto-correct in this instance as it can lead to more frustration than presenting an error message. The reason I say this is with the increase of domain names the accuracy of auto-correct becomes less and less. Your example is changing the .con to .com, what if the user's intention was to write .cn or .co? Form field error ...


9

Definitely don't silently change the address without telling the user, as this can lead to extreme confusion if it guesses wrong. Instead, you might consider a "Did you mean...?" message underneath the field. This is easily understood by any user who has done a Google search. Mailgun has a service for doing exactly this. They have an online demo. In ...


7

How about an ajax request real-time to check if the submitted domain is valid or not? If it's valid, presume it's right. If you can't find an MX or A record at that domain, state "could not find this domain" or suggest a "did you mean" mined from past records you kept about what users changed the input from and to all the previous times you "could not find ...


6

Short answer: They are meaningless corporate titles applied to people with similar (apparent) skills. They're the same. Long answer: 1- How do human factor specialists and user experience designers differ? It all depends on what definitions you ultimately settle on. I have held both titles of "Human Factors [something]" and "User Experience ...


3

I think you can have both worlds in the scenario you described. First, add the "choose location" as optional input box when searching. Insert it near the search field so that it will be seen, but don't require the user to fill it. Then, if location wasn't entered and user searched - he may receive too much irrelevant results. Then you can have a helper text ...


3

Human factors is about getting things done effectively and efficiently. User experience is about getting things done effectively, efficiently and effortlessly. If the human factors engineers in aviation only learned from crashes, that would be a major difference to usability engineers and UX designers who try to anticipate possibly problematic design ...


3

User experience specialists have to be human factors specialists. User experience is (mostly) human experience. Its what the user lives during a precise activity, and what he lives is a combination of differents perceptions (feelings, emotions, meanings, ...) wich are the consequences of differents factors, including human factors. User experience is what ...


3

Tipping varies wildly between countries, and even between industries. I would suggest two alternatives: If possible, have the operator cofigure the menu according to his particular indusry's customs. Perhaps he could choose between placing the "No tip" item at the top or at the bottom (I think it's usually very inappropriate not to tip, or very uncommon ...


3

I don't follow the current vendor-specific security-speak, but I can try to list some UX implications related to various security measures for log in dialogs: locking accounts, even temporarily (necessary against brute force password attacks) - link to the support service must be available, email notification to the user should be generated, admins have to ...


2

The call to action should be well-designed enough to stand out alone without animation. Place the button in a universally accepted area where the user will expect to find it. Adding animation often looks like a cheap trick and user's won't appreciate it especially if they are engaged in your site and then their focus and attention is taken away because of ...


2

Finance, accounting, risk management people use interfaces like this all the time. I want category A, B, C in time range X but without B1 and C 2. If you're making an app for such users I don't think it's an issue at all. As always make sure you understand how users complete their task and what they are trying to accomplish (don't take the BA's word for ...


2

This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


2

I think its useful to separate common typing errors from spelling mistakes. auto-correct might not be relevant for correcting domain names as @Simwil suggested because of changes to domain name extensions. This being said, if we are looking solely at auto-correcting typing errors this would enhance the overall user experience and minimise user frustration by ...


2

Autocorrect is somewhat invasive, and sometimes doesn't let user understand what was the typo or notice it at all. I would opt for typeahead (autosuggest) dropdown saying "Did you mean correct address?".


2

I think that this approach would provide the most control: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

I Studied Human Factors in grad school. In my personal experience, which may or may not be representative, the UX circle of a Venn diagram is mostly encompassed by the HF circle. The primary difference is that I learned very little about visual design, and a lot about biological/cognitive processes affecting perception and movement. We covered the same ...


1

Depends on How smart is your checking? Relatively speaking a list of typo's is unsophisticated. There are services that can determine the presence of a valid Domain Name record an email server an individual email box Certainly in the case 1 above, if there is no matching Domain Name Record - then an email can not reach the recipient. So in this case ...


1

I wouldn't personally recommend auto correcting the email address' domain name, but you could check it against the "VALID" domain name extension, and for that you need to check it against list of valid domain name extensions which would be an absolute pain, specially nowadays that we have new and totally weird domain name extensions, here is a link to all of ...


1

I wouldn't display "No Tip" as an option in a list of tip amounts, that is a form of social pressure. To avoid social pressure, do not require the user to say yes or no, in this way by not taking any action, the decision is to not leave a tip. One idea might be to provide a button at the bottom when reviewing the total payment. "would you like to leave a ...


1

It looks like you can't do much to make this easier. If these are the only options you have than I would go for option 1 and leave it up to the seller to explain the tipping function. Your option #2 is misleading and #3 is confusing. Explaining the tipping function can be done in a very approachable way: Press the arrows to choose a tip if you will and ...


1

The problem with a lock is that is also used to depict a secure connection (HTTPS). Many browsers use the lock for HTTPS. A symbol is effective if is used consistently. Have a link to your security policies and practices. Don't make a general statement your data is secure/safe as if you do get hacked then you have lied. Maybe a key symbol to identify ...


1

Yes, it is manipulative (in the same sense that a baby's cry is manipulative, car commercials are manipulative and butterfly's wing patterns that look like eyes are manipulative). And yes, these practices are usually ethical - as long as you are not selling something illegal, promoting credit cards to poor people, lying about the product qualities, that ...


1

Using design psychology to influence your user-base, is perfectly fine (ethics don't apply). I don't think however that what you want to happen and what will be perceived by the end user are in line with one another. With your specific question I could see the following effects taking place, as an end-user: I'm somewhat confused by some random thing ...


1

"Sign up" gets so much visual weight because it's really important for every business, including Evernote, to convert new visitors into users. "Sign up" CTA is the most important element of this page (of this whole site) and nothing should distract users from this, even some slightly more prominent design of the "Sign in". "Sign in" is so close to "Sign up" ...



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