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37

I think the first thing to do is to break down your premise that they are doing it "for no reason." You are correct that clicking the pen does not engage the pen in its role as a writing implement. But if so many people are doing it (this writer included) it must serve some purpose to them. The Wikipedia article you link to includes a list of causes of ...


11

This is security, not UX. The only reasonable lockout time is the minimum time needed for security reasons. There is no use in adjusting that for UX purposes. You are asking for a "reasonable" time frame so it should be a reason explainable to the user. But what would the explanation be? A few absurd examples: For a shorter time frame than necessary: ...


6

I have seen pens where the user must press the top to reveal the nib but to retract it again they must release a latch on the side. This certainly makes the process of habitual clicking slower. My solution would be to rethink the model entirely - I have used pens in the past that operate on a twist mechanism which is entirely silent but still offers a ...


5

1. Keep what works and has stood the test of time The current mechanism for extending and retracting a pen is super easy to use. It's so easy, in fact, that some people extend and retract their pen repeatedly without even thinking about it. Most people don't do this. We shouldn't alter a familiar thing in order to prevent a certain behavior by just a few. ...


5

I haven’t seen any stats on the issue but I have a suggestion that might help narrow things down to allow you to conduct testing: Aggregate and prioritise game controls : Start by aggregating controls into logical entities and prioritise them inline of how you think the game should be played. Test and refine design and layout: Test and refine to distil ...


4

There's a comprehensive article here that covers most of what you need: http://scotthurff.com/posts/how-to-design-for-thumbs-in-the-era-of-huge-screens It's based around the iPhone series but most of the information is transferable. Basically it says don't make users over stretch or over flex: for right-handed users, the bottom right-hand corner is ...


4

Most likely because product options/variations cannot be selected from the product thumbnail itself. Defaulting variations in color, size and quantity when a user clicks "adds to cart" from a product thumbnail page could really be a UX/Customer care nightmare if the user is not aware or notified product variations exist or that they can be modified. Leading ...


4

I would propose a third option. Make the button and image clickable It has become a convention that images are clickable on websites and in applications. My personal experience with this is during my time at a webshop where user research pointed out that almost 70% clicked the image of the product in a list of products in order to navigate to the product ...


3

What's the goal for the lockout, without knowing that it's hard to advise on appropriate timings. Are you still seeing dictionary attacks after implementing your other measures? How long do those attacks last? How long does a genuine user leave it before trying to log in again? (i.e. what is your users average time between visits). If you know all those ...


3

We are implementing a temporary account lockout after throttling login attempts and actively directing users to reset their password. Why do you try to get users to reset their passwords if it wasn't compromised? This doesn't seem like a good idea from a usability point (its annoying to change passwords), or security (if you make me change my passwords ...


3

There's more than one type of mechanism for retractable pens. As others have said, besides the click-open, click-closed mechanism, there are ones with an end button to open and a side button to close. I have seen some pens (mainly high-end metal body, Parker I think) that are opened and closed by a screw mechanism: about 1/2 turn clockwise to open (shorten) ...


3

Zero values are important to include in legends and are often wrongly overlooked. In fact, there's a case for why the zero value is the most important value in the legend to explain. Unlike other values in a legend, 'zero' can have multiple meanings...it could mean 0, no data available, not enough data, or a very small amount. Without a legend, the ...


3

Oh no, not this again. Users scroll. I've always had this discussion with people when they ask: "If we hide information underneath the fold, will they know that there is something there?" What is the first thing that people do when they land on a page? They try to discover, and one way they do that is by scrolling. If a user cannot scroll, the page will ...


3

The answer to your primary question is: no, you should not force or emulate a scroll bar on mobile devices. Explanation Mobile platforms already have a scroll bar in the interface. However, it becomes visible only when a user is scrolling. If you introduce an element that nobody else is using, you are creating an expectation for users to see this element ...


3

This is where UX and marketing will come into conflict with each other. The marketing people will correctly claim that it tends to measurably improve revenue, while the UX people will correctly claim that causes potential clients to either leave a site or builds a poor association with the company, which lowers revenue. So how can they both be correct? In ...


2

Make the pen button very sharp so there is a cost in pain or discomfort in clicking the pen. While some people might still habitually click the button (especially once their thumb is safely wrapped in band-aids) at least there would be quiet while they were looking for the first aid kit. Also, it would be convenient if your business consists of a lot of ...


2

Click-ability and its side-effects The habit of clicking on a retractable pen is just a evidence that the design of the retractable pen was done with affordance in mind. However this has had some side-effects where users will hijack a specific affordance to satsify conscious or a subconscious needs which results in the habitual pen clicking behavior: ...


2

The best user experience should be tested by potential users. If you find that the best experience is to play the game with the tablet on a table, then you should inform your users of this at the start of the game. It would be nice to still offer the ability to switch the controls and maybe warn the user again that for the best experience, switch to ...


2

You shouldn't. Login screens are barriers and common exits points, so in this case it's a big user counter-goal. You have said explicitly that you are not sure what to do with the emails, so clearly there isn't at the moment any related business goals. If I follow your line of thinking, one can ask why not asking for other details (age, gender, favourite ...


1

Your question is one that Intuit has put a lot of time and effort into putting into practice with its TurboTax UI, where parent activities are done first, and child forms take care of the rest. The entire procedure of necessary work has been (as far as I can tell without being involved in its design) ordered from parent-to-child. As you may realize, children ...


1

While I agree that this is probably better suited for the Security SE, there is a user experience aspect to consider. What is it that you're protecting? What true value does your site hold for its users? If I enter my password wrong on my banking website and am locked out for 24 hours, I am annoyed, but also a bit relieved that the security surrounding ...


1

Correct me if I am wrong, but it appears to be an issue with state management across browser tabs and it appears to be corner case. When you are coding for corner cases, you must make sure that the system does not break. But higher priority must be given to the most common flow. Having said that I would be reluctant to go all the way to monitor state change ...


1

If it's going to be used for an email, and is a valid email address, you should allow it. It may not be something that many people use often, but that doesn't mean that you shouldn't allow it. Some people may use this to mark an email address that is used only for potential spam sites, or that is of significance to them in some way. Take the real life ...


1

I think it is not a good idea to restrict user from choosing their username combos. I agree that johndoe_ looks uglier than john_doe but that is not a good enough reason. What you can instead do is, suggest the possible list of usernames once the user fills his first & last name (like twitter). You can omit johndoe_ from your suggestion list. But you ...


1

First, you can think about the psychology of forming habits (Nir Eyal, BJ Fogg's model) that explains that triggering an action into somebody's mind increases the chances of conversion. If you remind people, they are more likely to visit your website. Secondly, I want to quote the study by Freedman and Fraser (see ref below) that explains how people first ...


1

Scrollbars provide three real benefits: 1. Scrolling Although this was their initial primary purpose, it was also never the only way to scroll, as users could use page up / page down or spacebar / shift + spacebar. it has largely become obsolete for users with mouse wheels, or some touch scrolling. 2. Position Scrollbars give an indication of where in ...


1

Consider the alternatives. I've seen several common approaches. You support only one stored shipping address per user, but they can overtype it with a different address. In this case there is no need to enter a name for it. You support two stored shipping addresses per user, a default and an "other". If they want to ship to a location other than those ...


1

Your suggesting would be poor UX, and poor business logic. By your logic every address that is of the form me@mydomain.com would be rejected because someone somewhere used a me@.... email address. There are many common names before the @ in email addresses, and trying to exclude me for example because there was some other iCloud user with the email ...


1

The idea of having two ‘baskets’, one for paid products and another for free items, seems too complicated to me. You’d be asking the user to maintain two separate groups of products and making the transaction harder. A customer wouldn't be expected to carry two baskets around a shop in the ‘real world’. Instead, I'd present the free items and the paid items ...


1

I don't know of any published studies. I do know from having introduced A/B testing into several organisations that: I've never seen any drop in numbers after we introduced testing. We've never received any complaints. When we've had longitudinal studies when we're revisiting the same users, and they've ended up having slightly different experiences, ...



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