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29

The short answer to the high level UX question here is -- it depends -- so here are a few cases why a company like discourse might choose to put click counters next to their hyperlinks along with things to watch out for... I'm new here what does everyone else click? Sometimes when I visit a new restaurant I'll ask the waiter what most people order. This ...


16

According to, literally, the first result when you google discourse click count, Jeff Atwood defends the click counter as a valuable signal for users to determine if a link is worth clicking: The purpose of links is to be clicked, their entire existence is predicated on being clicked at some point, and showing the click data gives you, THE READER, ...


6

Your friend is probably right Assuming you actually want people to view the content, that's one of the worst places in the room to place a TV display. You not only have a staircase with (presumably) two-way traffic, but also a blind hairpin turn where traffic coming in and out of the main doors rounds the corner to climb the stairs. Adding a visual ...


6

It's very simple: social proof. People are more persuaded when they know many others have traveled the same way. This click counter is very prominent in Like buttons, to serve the same purpose:


6

For administrator or testing mode, the testers usually want to be able to see the website as closely as possible to the user's point of view. One way to do this is to just highlight the top nave bar a different color (like red or green) so that the tester knows the browser is in impersonation mode, but all everything else is the same so they are seeing ...


5

Type of impersonation Interesting question! how exactly this might look will depend on the aim of impersonation and the relationship between the impersonator and impersonated. Few questions might be helpful in devising the right approach: For example, is the impersonation feature required for social networking product or for an enterprise solution? Is it ...


4

I would propose a third option. Make the button and image clickable It has become a convention that images are clickable on websites and in applications. My personal experience with this is during my time at a webshop where user research pointed out that almost 70% clicked the image of the product in a list of products in order to navigate to the product ...


3

I would do this through the combination of a pretty obvious UI state change and a change in wording. For example, if your header is normally white when you're logged in as you, change it to bright orange to indicate a difference in status. Similarly, you could also just stick a bar over the top of the UI like this. As for the wording, maybe something like ...


3

You can add an overlay on the graph if the data and filters mismatch prompting user to refresh / reload / load the graph again. However it does not end there. I wonder if users are expecting the graph to refresh when they select the second value. How your application behaves in other similar scenarios? Are actions auto triggered on selection or there are ...


3

Thought I will give it a go :) Spatial disorientation (temporary term) happens when user has no reference point in-sight to orient their next move. This seems to be a known issue with infinite scrolling, as well as in the navigation of virtual spaces. In both situations the user could lack sufficient insight to guide their decision making process and ...


3

The phrases I'd use to describe the effect on the user are probably 'Spatial Disorientation', 'Cognitive Overload', and perhaps 'Choice Paralysis'. I found a few articles that deal with the subject: http://designmodo.com/infinite-scrolling/ http://www.nngroup.com/articles/scrolling-and-attention/ http://www.nngroup.com/articles/infinite-scrolling/


2

Having implemented this feature a few times, I have found the cleanest solution to be "exec" instead of "sudo". Steps: Power user logs in. Power user accesses "login as" feature. Power user types Target user username. Power user clicks submit button. Page boots, sees Target user in session, execute Auth::login(target). App now behaves as though Target ...


2

Does adding a click count next to a hyperlink enhance the user experience? The fact that the use of click counter makes use of social proof as clearly suggested by many answers here is true and rightly so. That being said, does it improve the user experience? Yes it does, here is why: Social proof is a psychological phenomenon where people ...


2

The first option will fail when the user has enough files to put the "+" button below the fold. The second option doesn't suffer from this flaw, although it could benefit from a call-to-action heading, e.g. "Add a new item"


1

What about simply swapping the icon for a button with the text "Update chart" ?


1

Predictable placement is important for common tasks If creating files is important (as it is for most sites of this nature), then it's important that users know instantly where to navigate to create a file. If you add the create widget to the end of a list, you are forcing the users to hunt around for it, which can be very frustrating. For frequently ...


1

Why couldn't OAuth and a fake name coexist? Use OAuth to set up an account for each new commenter. Keep the information acquired during the OAuth private, for your own use only. Then let the user create a fake name which they can share with the community. Best of both worlds? Also, while you're getting the OAuth Authorization, be sure to acquire Facebook ...


1

I can't see how a click counter next to the actual link would enhance the ux – if the links were not part of some time of "hot list". And even then the probablility of 'backfirering' as @DaveAlger points out would be a reason not to display click counts nest to the actual links. Instead IMHO I would suppose a click counter would actually distract many ...


1

The idea of showing the item in your list is good - having it disappear or not labeled as "Discontinued" would be jarring and confusing. Using the disabled style sounds fine. The product selector should be easily found from looking at the discontinued line item, and the discontinued item shouldn't be listed in the product selector.


1

In all other cases, when the product is discontinued, do you plan to show it in the selector? I would advise against it. You are talking about a case where use has an un-submitted order of a product that is discontinued. I am assuming the errors are shown to the user when user goes to interact with that particular order (either save/submit it). I would go ...


1

Your question is one that Intuit has put a lot of time and effort into putting into practice with its TurboTax UI, where parent activities are done first, and child forms take care of the rest. The entire procedure of necessary work has been (as far as I can tell without being involved in its design) ordered from parent-to-child. As you may realize, children ...


1

Your suggesting would be poor UX, and poor business logic. By your logic every address that is of the form me@mydomain.com would be rejected because someone somewhere used a me@.... email address. There are many common names before the @ in email addresses, and trying to exclude me for example because there was some other iCloud user with the email ...



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