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2

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


1

The technical term for that is "Incremental Filtering". It's always hard (particularly in mobile) to show big sets of data, but IF the user is going to know who to send this to right away, for example, if the user is going to have the addressee already in mind, the expected behavior is for the user to start typing the friend's name, and this is optimum. I ...


1

This complex interface has two layers, both of which are complex in themselves. A primary and secondary layer if you like. Using a popup is a good start but there are several ways you can make this easier to use: Highlight the cell that they are operating on and consider using that as the trigger to open the popup, or highlight and the enter key, meaning ...


0

Having too many pages can be a bad experience for the user too. Typically the "Contact Us" page link would be located in the footer anyway, so if anything you are cutting out an unnecessary stage.


0

In a similar case, I used a tooltip instead of a poppin. You just have to roll-over a cell for more than 1 sec to see the additional information. You can even add a link if you need to go to another page download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at RHS, especially if ...


13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


0

Not knowing the context of use makes it fuzzy to come up with a solution. Here is what I can come up with: How about selecting the raw and the column separately? Here is what I am trying to explain: the user selects the column they want to get the data then selects a row. When the raw and the column are selected, the extra pop-up can appear. ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


1

Rather than using a popup, which can get problematic on small devices, I'd suggest to display the additional information below and inside the affected row. The example in the image shows what I'm trying to describe. It usually a grid with various album names. The song names of the album appear when you click the link (in the example it's clicking on Sleep Is ...


0

My advice would be to add a row at the top of your grid with the information for the user to click in the grid squares to see the additional info in pop ups. In my experience it is better for the user to see the instruction to get more info first, rather than have them figure out where it is or stumble upon what to do to get it.


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


0

I don't think that there is a definite best approach to this, or any UX decision making, for that matter. Usually, "the best" layout of information (and corresponding UI elements) for optimal conversion cab be determined via A/B testing, and many people advocate this approach. However, I personally consider focusing too much on these things a waste of time ...


0

Not based on any research, but I believe best way to show this will be comparative between free and paid options.


2

I would suggest you to use iconography for this. You can treat part above the line as list view and once user tap on it show the detailed view. (As shown below) IMO you can use the entire block in list view. The favored participant has been shown with a heart. (Obviously the ticked one are those who have accepted the meeting) The help icon will help ...


1

I think the best solution to this problem is to have both. Create a contact us page. This page will be rich in detail and can include things such as: a list of relevant contacts at the company, including names, emails, phone numbers etc. location map(s) a contact form company social media a set of FAQs for common contact us issues links to other relevant ...


-1

Maybe you are trying to reinvent the wheel. Restaurants, theatres, and other venues have the concept of: Reserved seat Free seat And they also have a limited number of seats for each session (dinner, play,...). When you want to buy a seat, they display you the number of available seats as: Total seats - Reserved seats This way, if Julia reserved a ...


0

To answer your question: No, you cannot conduct a usability examination by yourself. You have some options to improve your user experience, depending on the resources that you have available. You could conduct a heuristic evaluation, which will probably uncover some problems, but doesn't necessarily tell you whether users are able to complete ...


0

Agree with Volker Siegel - you are way too biased. As a UX expert, you might be able to point out some inconsistencies and other design flaws, based on your experience, but you would merely be scraping the surface compared to testing on real users. You don't need a lot of users, though. I would suggest trying to get clearence to bring in a handful of ...


1

I just designed multiple screens registration form in the iOS app. First we wanted to make it as single screen but then after little research I find out that it is much more comfortable for users when you split all informations in logical steps (2-3). It could be even more effective for the app developer. Let me explain. When user come to the registration ...


1

No, because you can not "play" or "imagine" the diversity of things the user may try or how he might behave, and you are heavily biased* because you know the software way too closely. *in probably every possible way


0

The plan looks good in itself. I'd certainly advise to make observations in heavy- and off-load times, because the method/app you are going to develop should work in both scenarios (otherwise it will either slow down in peaks or just bother in low load). That also should guide you in the time frame of observation - if one/two full serving cycle is good ...


3

As long as the footer does not need a long scroll to show up, I think this design is good. If all you had in that 'contact us' page was just this small to fit in a footer, this new design would also be getting rid of unnecessary white space and an additional click.


0

This is more of an algorithmic problem, but it is worth keeping in mind that some languages do not have the distinction of upper- and lowercase. E.g. Japanese (they also don't have the concept of bold text). And some letters do not exist in an uppercase variant, e.g. the German "ß" ('sharp S') is a strictly lowercase letter1 as there are no words that start ...


5

There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


0

Tables in Bootstrap are not pretty. Bootstrap provides a table class, but in my experience it breaks on phones, allowing the table to leave the right side of the screen. I find it best to build your table using Bootstrap's CSS framework, utilizing the row + col structure; in your case, one row and three col-md-4's. Your "Bigger field" would be in its own ...


1

My suggestion would be to use a tool-tip If the description or additional details are of a smaller size, you can use the title attribute to display the information when the user hovers over the column header If you require a consistent experience, you can implement a custom tool-tip


0

In broad terms the flow should be centred about the users focus point - namely the ensemble the user will buy. If the right UI is achieved this display should be ever present. Few high-level approaches Have browse tools that will "drop" an item onto the 'mannequin' Build a matrix of looks (i.e. generate real-time masonry portfolio) based selected ...


1

I won't use remote testing for mobile apps, because: Hardware need to be good enough to handle simultaneously one consuming app (screen grabbing and video saving) and your test app. Streaming isn't possible or only in WiFi conditions. You need enough disk space / SD space. That narrows your testable smartphones down to premium phones with mostly huge ...


0

I posted the question so that there is a live, working reference in the Internet. After doing it my first impression was that it's annoying and should be considered bad practice. For the problem of selecting text with narrow letters, I think the answer is to use bigger fonts. Bigger, more plump fonts seems to be the fashion in this age of touch apps anyway. ...


0

Don't do this because what you see is not what you get. If I click a point on the text where I want to start typing, I end up typing in the wrong place when the font changes. Similarly, if I hover my cursor over a letter and start dragging, the text expands and I end up selecting the wrong letters. While you could do a bunch of coding to translate the ...


1

I think this is a great effort and a challenging problem to solve, but I think this solution may be annoying (to use your words). Here's why: When I go to click to highlight a letter or section of text the cursor jumps to a different section. PS. That's a cool article even if its 14 years old!


1

personally i prefer guerrilla usability testing aka cafe testing, where you approach people in cafes (when they aren't busy) and offer them a coffee in exchange for their time.


0

Data grid makes sense when you are dealing with entry or edits of large number of items at a time. One of the things why this layout looks complicated is because there are 4 modules grids on the page. Does the user need to deal with/reference information in the other grids when they are viewing or editing a single grid? A way to make it feel easier to get ...


0

The "data grid" editing pattern is not in itself evil. Just replacing one pattern with another could Severely disrupt users that have become efficient with current pattern Introduce another set (or even the same set) of issues. There is no guarantee a new pattern has better UX The issues you mention may be driven by visual or implementation issues - not ...


0

Check out http://www.useronboard.com/ They run through the onboarding process for many popular webapps.


1

One idea, if applicable based on your data set and architecture, could be to have : one single quick search field using predictive typing and live refresh of search results. Your users could then start typing, say, "repl 113" and the predictive typing would suggest "replenishment" as they type the "l" (in real time during typing, so difficult to render ...


0

The Summary grid should have different UI colors giving it a look of inactive thing. The Summary grid displays the actual grid's data, so 'Clear' option will go only with actual grid.


0

This blog post provides a downloadable pdf with colors and their code numbers. It also provides suggestions for readable color palettes. http://www.dmcinfo.com/latest-thinking/blog/id/8840/simplifying-ui-and-ux-design-with-color-cheat-sheet


0

This is a kind of 2D tree view control and is very rare in use. I have seen such kind of thing using icons instead of labels and that gave a bit better look than this one. In my opinion, it is better to display the sub-options at a separate place instead of growing the tree.


8

If the exams option is always empty, then the users will (at some point, depending on the individual person) give up checking that menu option. If there is no mechanism in the application to draw the attention to new exams that appear, then you have a usability issue. Your suggestion is one way to indicate the "new items" idea, but it is not necessarily ...


1

@Jayfang : I think that I would like to use eBill frequently to verify my expenses. I found this eBill unnecessarily complex. I thought this eBill was easy to use. I think that I would need professional support to use this eBill in order to verify my expenses (analyze). I found the various parts in this eBill were well integrated. I thought there was too ...


7

I have not seen this pattern employed exactly as you describe. My relevant experience in information-rich webapps stems from enterprise health-monitoring and deployment software, which has a deep navigation hierarchy. In my opinion, the left-navigation and the main content should not both employ accordions. Left hand navigation is typically vertical, and as ...


1

SUS has been shown to work well with isolated parts of the system - i.e. you can re-define the "system" being surveyed as "the eBill". However if the phrasing of a question causes significant doubt about a valid answer, then that is likely to skew the results. So take look at the questions individually I think that I would like to use this system ...


0

I haven’t seen this type of control before, but I imagine it would work. All if the information Architecture is logical to the user and the implementation work as expected. This probably derives from the need to navigate information dense web applications where you need some way to hide things that doesn’t belong to content, such as navigation. It could ...


2

Both printed and digital documents can be evaluated for usability, in the sense that you can define metrics that gauge just how easy it is to use the document. There are also overlaps between the use of colour/contrast, typography and information architecture that are relevant, although you have to adjust it for the type of content, which is a static ...


0

The obvious solution is to replace the entire interface for non safetly critical items with voice control. "Computer: Put on Radio 4." "Conmputer: Make it 2 notches louder" And eventually if you get bored driving on your own you'll be able to chat to your friendly in-car entertainment system....


0

I wouldn't use it. I'd use a test which was designed to measure "Readability" There are a number of established tests of this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readability This covers the content of a document but not other aspects such as font, font size, and indexing.



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