New answers tagged

1

If you change the labeling away from what the option is towards what the option does - and therefore what it enables the user to do, then it can become much simpler.


0

No Connection Established, Not linked yet, Not matched, Still Looking, Available


5

Lets take this example - Say there is a menu item with broad heading: Shoes. So, the items inside will read Formal Shoes, Slippers, Kids' Shoes etc. and not just Formal, Slippers, Kids'. However if you changes the headline to say, Choose by Shoe type - then having items like Formals, Slippers, Kids are acceptable and make sense. So the esscence is that the ...


0

In an answer to a recent question I suggested gradual engagement. Same answer applies here. Each request to the user for info should ask only for the info that's necessary at the time, and makes clear why it's necessary. That is, registering for a site might only ask for an email address and password. Ask for the user's mailing address only when they're ...


0

Company wants to sell something and customer want to buy something, but the real factor is none of the users don't like to fill webforms especially the long ones. So you must careful when you are presenting a long form in front of a user. Few factors which will help you to build conversion forms. 3 Principles : 1. Make the from short and sweet, 2. Provide ...


0

The usual method (at least on the Internet, so I'll assume your "product" is a web page) is to divide the form into smaller sections. If the user is trying to buy something, make a first page asking for the payment info, then a second asking for the delivery adress, etc. Try to keep the user informed on the number of steps required though (even if there's ...


0

I'm coming from a Central Asian nomadic culture (Kazakh), north of China. We share many components of nomadic culture, including the pottery. Rounded cups have been known in the region since second half of 1000 BC. Our cups are called kese [keseh]. The ergonomic factors of kese are exhaustively defined by the nomadic tradition. One, the shape has to ...


1

Perhaps you should break down your features into separate pages. You should focus on doing one task per page since mobile device has limited screen estate. Doing one task only also has the benefit of simplifying the app and reduce the cognitive load on the user to learn your app. This is a very typical layout for a messaging app. The contact list should ...


10

When you can't think of a noun for an anchor or headline, think of a verb If you can't quite think of a name for the content on the linked page, you can instead try thinking of the action that users would do theres, just as the "registration page" may say "Register" or "Join." In this case, something like "Make connections" or "Expand your network"? ...


-1

Black text on an ORANGE background would be good to alert the user. Orange is widely associated with a problem, and gives more contrast than red with the pink form background.


5

Building off of several other answers: Never only rely on color. Adding an icon or text or texture not only helps colorblind people, but also makes things a bit easier for regular-seeing people. Using a dark grey or black bar gives a strong contrast with the background. It's also color neutral so you can put other kinds/colors of notifications in those ...


0

I once asked this question at a sushi restaurant and the answer was, if it's too hot for your finger then it's too hot for your lips.


11

You might try adding a white border, then play with the background color. The one color that communicates 'something is wrong' louder than red is the color of death, black.


0

Each of the bullet points you've listed above describe distinct user tasks and goals. You need to think about which tasks require which interface elements. Start by identifying which tasks will be carried out most; to prioritize a task ask the these questions: how often is the task done? How many users do this task? Based on your answers, you can prioritize ...


5

Why not go with something more positive such as Available. That way it wont have any unwanted connotations and users may be more interested in requesting a connection.


2

If you use back then the behavior os back to the immediate screen the user was prior to the current one, not the level parent, unless you specifically say Back to Parent (where parent is usually replaced by the parent name). Depending on he desired behavior, you may need one of these options or some variation of them. As for options, since you're using ...


1

I don't know what happened to our good old breadcrumbs... I feel if you don't have more than 2 sub levels, you should go for breadcrumbs rather than depending on back buttons.


1

you might want two options. back should take them back to where they were previously. you could then have another button to jump to the parent. another term you could try is maybe return?


2

You could test your users, or review other sites, especially your competitors and see what they do. Make a spreadsheet and examine your results. If everyone: on-line merchants,banks, and other sites all do the same thing - then that would be a good choice as it would be the industry standard. The two choices I see most often (correct me if I'm wrong) are: ...


0

Depends. If what you are logged into is blocked from those not signed in, then you should take them to a login page or form overlay. If people can still view the content, such as this page, then you should just log them out with some indication that this has taken place.


0

It should inform the user they were logged out successfully and provide a way to easily log back in. This could be a link back to the login form or the login form can be present. The login prices should be within two clicks.


18

The standard color for error messages is red, see this question : One important point to understand is that using conventional colors for errors is important because they make the errors more noticeable. User being annoyed by the color of error message is lot less of a problem than user not being able to complete the form because they didn't ...


3

The question actually provided a lot of the alternate options available, but for clarity I thought it would be good to summarize some of the answers provided: Find a complementary colour to use that will stand out - there are plenty of tools for this, and you can also consult the branding guidelines as a secondary check; this could be for the UI, the font ...


4

One thing these cultures have in common is a top-down organization of writing. When a line breaks, both cultures continue writing below what was just written. You could lean on this in your designs. The Flipboard app uses "pages" that flip up and down rather than left and right. I'd start with something along those lines. Maybe new screens slide up from ...


1

Generally, all ltr interactions, layouts etc. should be be mirrored in the rtl counterpart - anything that gets its position based on eye-flow should be reversed to accommodate a rtl pattern. On the other hand swipe gestures for complete/delete etc. should follow device norms - although they have a direction associated with them, it's not necessarily ...


48

I would go with something in the shade of the background, but have a more red text in the alert. You can add a border in the shade of the text to make it stand out as an error more, as well.


1

I recommend using another pattern and ditching the radio buttons. Personally, and according my company pattern library, the maximum for a set of radio buttons is 5-7. For anything higher than that, autocomplete/typeahead (as suggested by @prerit-mogre) or a select menu (as suggested by @gino-van-de-staaij) will provide a simpler interface for your users.


62

I feel bad that you have to work with this background color. Oof, i just can't even wrap my head around how that decision came to pass. At any rate, if that's not a variable you have influence over then I'd go with a color that'll always retain stark contrast. I'd also avoid venturing too far outside of the styles that that users are generally familiar ...


-1

You could also try a light red background for the alert:


37

A bright yellow background with black text would work well. Fits the colour scheme of a warning sign.


15

That's an accessibility nightmare! Try reversing your error message styles: Red text on a white background.


2

As mentioned by Gino, with bigger label lengths you might run into problems. Whereas a good solution to radio buttons are searchable dropdowns. Something like this should work if Master-Detail interaction pattern doesn't work for you.


3

From the moment you can only choose one item, could a drop-down also do the job (perhaps even with a grouping as indicated above)? The reason I suggest this, is that judging by your example, you might get into layout problems when you have items with varying label lengths, which in turn might prompt you to choose for a vertical list (and as a result take up ...


3

There are a number of different strategies that you can apply, depending on the relationship between the applications (or lack of): Grouping: try to group applications of similar function into a subset and provide a label, that way the users can scan the headings first and reduce their search space. This strategy will work if you end up having to add ...


4

You can use Master-Detail interaction pattern, see the image: The list is fully visible, so you can observe and choose any item quickly. If it's possible, try to group the applications in some meaningful way, like Photo & Graphics, Office, etc. This will help to navigate on the list in a faster way.


0

Google Scholar will list academic studies into usability, ux for 3d tv if you use the right keywords https://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?q=%223d+television%22+user&btnG=&hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C5&as_ylo=2008 Which leads you to articles such as http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141938214000638 Jenny C.A. Read, Viewer experience ...


1

Eye Tracking - the place where people look first and can look at it without losing the focus on the item they are viewing at the same time. The place where important filters are placed is the area most users will not leave un-noticed. Recently eye tracking has been heavily used in website design and testing. When I became involved about eight years ...


0

Yes definitely there is a reason. As per my observation and knowledge below are the reasons for that. when you have filter with many attributes then it will be feasible to display in left on right side with vertical bar when you have very less filter attributes then you can show it horizontally above the listing but here don't forget to make header to ...


0

Below is the solution of your problem. If you find any doubt then comment.I will explain you. You can apply same approach as "Add Salesperson" to add multiple phone number of the company.


-4

It's this way to prevent you from doing disastrous things. Replace should be disabled and never used. If you worked with XCode and Swift for a while you will realize that the missing refactoring methods for Swift are actually a blessing. They force you to think ahead of naming stuff right, so you won't need refactoring/renaming. For normal (non Swift) IDEs ...


-1

I personally don't care for the touch screens at all. Having been an accident investigator, I can see the as quite a distraction. I have driven a number of cars with the touch screen feature and they are a distraction. What really gripes me is that most manufacturers are making them standard equipment and not giving the buyer a choice. We usually get a ...


1

I think the answer is provided by your first screenshot. The cursor changes to allow input over the text; it would I presume change to the hand cursor when it hovers over the drag indicator on the left edge of the list item. Gmail also does it this way. When you mouse over an inbox item, the draggable indicator appears and when you hover over that part, it ...


2

Find is sensible with a non-modifiable document. Replace is not. Historically, was "replace" greyed-out or not displayed in read-only mode? Maybe back when there was only space for one copy of the document on the 720k floppy disk? These days, it's normal that the document's text is always modifiable and it's the file that is not, So it is "Save" that is ...


16

Both Find and Find and Replace are related functionally as you mention. But both actions seem to be orthogonal in terms of what user need (mindset) they cater to. You will know in advance either you want to find something or you rather want to substitute occurrences of something. In the latter case it just happens that you need to find occurrences of the ...


0

There's a lot of history to text editors. e.g. vi which is one of the oldest separated these out as there is a defined split between viewing a document (find) and editing a document (replace). In technical terms they're quite different things, like GET vs POST for the web, and text editors are typically quite technical tools. Word Processors less so but I ...


8

If you can expect your users to be power text editor users, for example programmers, then it makes sense to combine these dialogs into one, or, even better, make it a toolbar and show real-time results as you type. This is an expected feature for development tools nowadays, as it speeds up the editing process greatly. IDEs (integrated development ...


4

I see this as new behaviour. Without an old install of MSOffice to test I can't be absolutely sure, but in the past find/replace dialog boxes were often modal, and covered quite a lot of text. For find only tools this isn't necessary - they tend to have 2-4 controls of which only one is a text box (wide). Replace requires at least another text box and ...


1

What you are describing is essentially different facets of the same products. Search best practice suggests you use find as you type search ( single input). There is actually a number of patterns within this category with varying levels of difficulty in terms of implementation.The example below uses an auto-complete approach. "Designing Search: As-You-Type ...


0

You could rather use a single text field for equipment name that intelligently drops a suggestion box in case the user inputs a specific equipment type and/or model name/number. Let's say your equipment model numbers start with XT, then as the user starts typing "XT" in the textbox, suggestions would start dropping down. Otherwise, the search box would ...


3

And Apple uses white background for their videos on website. While using light background colors, make sure you apply shadows to the player so the visual content stands out. Take a loot at the Video Player UX on Pinterest Here are some aspects of dark color



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