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1

Here's a classic usability answer: "That depends." Will your app facilitate Facebook messaging, or be more like a messaging system dependent on phone numbers? Will your users communicate with their "social media" friends, or might your app be used to communicate with business contacts as well? I lean toward ArtOfCode's suggestion in offering choice. That ...


0

Two options Detect tap/touch/click outside the input box and search results (if you wanna avoid x button) Go with traditional x button But users might not know how to close if only option 1 is implemented, until they try.


1

From my comment above. One way of implementing this is to add a little gray 'x' symbol at the end of the input area, that when clicked will clear both the input area and the dropdown results. This system is fairly widespread so users are likely to understand it (for example, Windows Explorer's search box uses this). However, you can always add a caption ...


0

The default behavior on Android (and iOS) is: If you are not doing something, the volume buttons change the ring volume, going all the way down goes to vibrate mode, pressing once more goes to silent. If you listen to music or watch a video, the volume buttons change the playback volume, not the ring If you are in a call, the volume buttons change the ...


1

Regarding the rounding error, if you store in the unit they entered initially (or as a single type of unit), and then convert on display, you should only get a small rounding error but it shouldn't be compounded. Regarding the switch, I think the answer depends on why people would be switching back and forth between units. Wouldn't they typically just use ...


0

The iphone(among others that have the same function) way is very efficient because you usually will want either loud or vibrate or silent. Changing volume of the ring is not used as much. So the ring OR vibrate/silent is very simple and efficient. Having to press the button a few times to change the volume could be seen as a problem. A solution, different ...


20

This post from Hubspot shows some interesting results for the number of form fields vs converstion: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/6746/Which-Types-of-Form-Fields-Lower-Landing-Page-Conversions.aspx They then (partially) break this down by input type. It's interesting to note that conversion appears to go up with from 1 to 3 fields and ...


1

Here is a good piece on the required marked vs. optional marked fields: http://uxmovement.com/forms/why-users-fill-out-less-if-you-mark-required-fields/ Marking the few optional field takes the onus of the user so much, and aesthetically having numerous red stars next to your fields does not make for an easy to absorb form.


3

This depends on what kind of information you're trying to gather. In general, the correct number of required fields is the absolute minimum number of fields required to make a record usable. If you are collecting information about a new user in your system, you may need only an email/username and a password. Without a username or password, a user record ...


41

It is a general question that can be answered with a general answer: One more than is actually required by the business is too many. In other words, make sure all the required fields are essential to allow the user to progress. All too often, the required fields are only required in the sense that someone on the business side wanted the field, rather than ...


1

If you don't want to present information for legal/fear of competition reasons then don't show it. For example if I didn't want to disclose my street address but I did want to show my email address then I wouldn't trash the entire contact page. I would have a contact page but only show my email address on there. What i'm getting at is if your homepage ...


0

You can break the long task up into sub tasks and show the progress of these sub tasks, which should give the impression that things are being completed. You can provide some useful information that is not strictly related to the task at hand, so that the users feel like they are not just sitting there waiting for the process to complete, which gives the ...


1

Keeping in view one of Nielsen heuristic "Match between system and the real world". Red colour is perceived to be for ending anything in progress in real world, for example in tape recorders to stop recording stop button is used which have red dot or circle for identification. Similar, is the case with the televisions in which red colour identifies the ...


0

I agree it depends on the Context I have a similar project where i am using red color for primary action and white button with red text on it for secondary action....Links are also red and grey... Now for the table of data, the context is changed and now the red color only shows Negative values and green shows positive values and blue is for links....... ...


2

As most startups are technological (web,mobile apps, technologies,...) its almost necessary to have your own 'about page' with general contact information, rough description what are you doing, maybe some neat screens or design elements to catch visitors... You need it. At least if you want to reach some customers. To be worried about stealing your ideas ...


2

In my (rather limited) experience, the strongest 'about me' pages share a more general overview about the business and the people involved -- as opposed to commercially-sensitive details of specific products and features. Try designing your focusing on what it is that makes you different. What, specifically, is it that makes you stand out from the other ...


0

All item having equal weightage may be quiet true but without knowing the real estate that it might take in the page it is not possible to answer perfectly. I'll also assume that all elements take up equal real estate. In this case the internal page navigation with fixed submenu bar can be used. One of the best way using that is explained in this site ...


2

It is very important for a startup to have about us page which is very concerning for potential customers, since they have to trust a startup. This is where you build confidence with customers. Being a startup you will have the advantage of addressing the crowd in much user friendly tone rather english-perfectionist. But when it comes to competitors it very ...


0

In both your examples the applicant will have to go back and forward between roles and persons/organizations. It seems to me that you have some roles that are defined earlier in the process and you want the ability to change a role to some other person or organization instead of the one doing the application. I think you should ask yourself if having a ...


0

In the Bugzilla for Gnome Seeking phrases such as header bar and title in relation to Epiphany found a few items of interest. Primarily Bug 711408 - Difficult to see web site title with the new toolbar/header bar As a bug, it was high priority (seriously broken …) and critical. Raised on 2013-11-04, resolved by a fix on 2014-02-17. A few highlights: ...


0

UPDATE: Ok now that I've seen some "in action". I really recommend to go for a fixed area for the tool tip texts! The user sees its getting more and more (and probably will actually wait for all of it to load -- check this!). Or tries to already click on a label. Then somewhere opens a fixed location with the text. User reads it, when she's done looking back ...


5

Placeholder If it's feasible to have your help text only show when the field is empty, you can use placeholder text. Top-right corner (or left, as already suggested) Seeing as your textarea takes up the entire width of the column, the top-right corner is also an appropriate choice. If applicable and if space permits, you can add supplementary help text ...


11

Adding just an icon may fail to serve the purpose. You can easily find through the stats from the server logs on how many user actually clicked on "Help" for the purpose of it's existence. It is always recommended to let the user know what he is going to do in short rather hiding it totally. You may use the pattern as stated by Arkuen after a threshold when ...


19

Have you considered placing it immediately after the textarea title? That way, it's immediately visible to the user if they are confused. ("Description? What exactly does that entail?")


1

Because there's so little value? The passenger doesn't have keys, so it's almost never useful. With keyless entry, even a keyhole is only valuable on the very rare instance that the remote entry has failed and you need to urgently get in, before you get the remote entry fixed. Remember how before keyless entry, only the front two doors had keyholes, but the ...


0

Think Google. One search box with incremental filtering/autocomplete!. If you can even include personnel pictures along with the results, even better. It's quick and effective.


1

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


2

Here's another approach: I work in e-commerce and one possible solution to your additional info in a grid problem could be solved with how we display more info about our product on the product listing page. If you think of a product grid as a cell in your spreadsheet. In order to see more info about a product (in this case your cell), a pane could slide ...


3

Don't move my cheese I think this is a classic problem where the developers who've created these tools haven't been able to anticipate how their applications are going to be used. When you can anticipate everything, you're able to design a great UX on the first try. But that just isn't happening here. And then as features are added, they don't bother ...


2

Being a developer in PHP, Android, C# and working professionally with SharePoint I can only applaud this question. In many developing languages and IDEs it sometimes looks like someone came up with an idea and it was implemented as a button, a menu item or a keyboard shortcut. Without thinking of that this feature will actually be used by someone. Sometimes ...


3

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


1

The technical term for that is "Incremental Filtering". It's always hard (particularly in mobile) to show big sets of data, but IF the user is going to know who to send this to right away, for example, if the user is going to have the addressee already in mind, the expected behavior is for the user to start typing the friend's name, and this is optimum. I ...


1

This complex interface has two layers, both of which are complex in themselves. A primary and secondary layer if you like. Using a popup is a good start but there are several ways you can make this easier to use: Highlight the cell that they are operating on and consider using that as the trigger to open the popup, or highlight and the enter key, meaning ...


0

Having too many pages can be a bad experience for the user too. Typically the "Contact Us" page link would be located in the footer anyway, so if anything you are cutting out an unnecessary stage.


0

In a similar case, I used a tooltip instead of a poppin. You just have to roll-over a cell for more than 1 sec to see the additional information. You can even add a link if you need to go to another page download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


6

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at right hand side of ...


13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


0

Not knowing the context of use makes it fuzzy to come up with a solution. Here is what I can come up with: How about selecting the raw and the column separately? Here is what I am trying to explain: the user selects the column they want to get the data then selects a row. When the raw and the column are selected, the extra pop-up can appear. ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


2

Rather than using a popup, which can get problematic on small devices, I'd suggest to display the additional information below and inside the affected row. The example in the image shows what I'm trying to describe. It usually a grid with various album names. The song names of the album appear when you click the link (in the example it's clicking on Sleep Is ...


0

My advice would be to add a row at the top of your grid with the information for the user to click in the grid squares to see the additional info in pop ups. In my experience it is better for the user to see the instruction to get more info first, rather than have them figure out where it is or stumble upon what to do to get it.


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


0

I don't think that there is a definite best approach to this, or any UX decision making, for that matter. Usually, "the best" layout of information (and corresponding UI elements) for optimal conversion cab be determined via A/B testing, and many people advocate this approach. However, I personally consider focusing too much on these things a waste of time ...


0

Not based on any research, but I believe best way to show this will be comparative between free and paid options.


2

I would suggest you to use iconography for this. You can treat part above the line as list view and once user tap on it show the detailed view. (As shown below) IMO you can use the entire block in list view. The favored participant has been shown with a heart. (Obviously the ticked one are those who have accepted the meeting) The help icon will help ...


1

I think the best solution to this problem is to have both. Create a contact us page. This page will be rich in detail and can include things such as: a list of relevant contacts at the company, including names, emails, phone numbers etc. location map(s) a contact form company social media a set of FAQs for common contact us issues links to other relevant ...


-1

Maybe you are trying to reinvent the wheel. Restaurants, theatres, and other venues have the concept of: Reserved seat Free seat And they also have a limited number of seats for each session (dinner, play,...). When you want to buy a seat, they display you the number of available seats as: Total seats - Reserved seats This way, if Julia reserved a ...


0

To answer your question: No, you cannot conduct a usability examination by yourself. You have some options to improve your user experience, depending on the resources that you have available. You could conduct a heuristic evaluation, which will probably uncover some problems, but doesn't necessarily tell you whether users are able to complete ...



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