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0

If you have a lot of elements represented by cards, and you are including multiple actions in those cards then perhaps another design pattern like list or table should be used instead because cards are not suitable for organising and manipulation large amount of information (that's what lists and tables are for). I think a good way to deal with the need ...


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Due date (earliest) Due date (latest)


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I dont see an issue with the naming. We had a similar issue in one of our applications, the solution was to display a column after the sorting with the number of days remaining along with the actual due date. Due in X Days. Although, I believe these labels are more common: Due date soonest first Due date latest first


1

I think your design and terminology work fine: Dropdowns are a common and proven approach to sorting. Your labels are clear. Sorting future dates is not an easy concept to convey, and you've done it in a clear manner. The only additional suggestions I'd have are small ones: It's common to offset the title of the menu item from the detail, for example: ...


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Under normal circumstances I would say don't show progress bars for completed processes, especially if you are showing a list of jobs in various states of progress. It should be easy to quickly scan the list and identify the major categories of in-process: not started, in progress, completed, and if applicable also paused and failed. It is much easier to do ...


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Not sure whether anyone has quoted this blog entry yet but the UX director of mailchimp has written about exactly this topic a couple of years ago: http://blog.mailchimp.com/social-login-buttons-arent-worth-it/


5

Don't show the review widget The user cannot review the item, so it's not a good idea to waste space and create frustration for users (with disabled controls, etc) when you already know that they cannot review the product. Instead, you can provide a link to explain why users can't review: (click image to expand) If a user wants to leave a review, you ...


0

This is what I will do in case. The reason I just grayed out the form is for the users to know where it is when they finally decided to buy and review the product. Corrections are very much welcome.


1

Best way has fulfill two needs: Explain the user error Stop the error from occurring This is best done with an alert, typically. The language you use is up to you. I'd suggest something like "D'oh! You already have [taskname]" But be aware of the usability challenges associated with it. Does the alert offer a way to retain the data, meaning return to ...


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I think it really depends on how often you are going to have to do this, otherwise it is no point in creating a custom control for a very specific purpose that doesn't actually get used very much at all. One thing I thought of it to create a calendar-like widget that allows the user to click a start date and then an end date for the range, such that a ...


1

Option 1 The direct answer would be to enable reviews based in product purchase and nothing else. We did this for a site (they don't review products, but the seller/buyer, however the same principle applies) and here's the gist of it: Since we want to encourage people to review, when people enters their profile's dashboard, the first thing they see is a ...


0

You know, the review doesn't make sense unless you buy the item. You can't review something you didn't have the hands on. With this being said, the most natural scenario would be to be able to review items you purchased in your dashboard (where you list the items a user bought.) If you won't opt for this solution, you can test if a user already purchased ...


1

I'd probably separate this out into two separate views: Viewing the date range data, and creating/editing date ranges. The latter might use an accordion-style setup to create blocks for the dates and create some visual/logical separation: ...where the former would present the chart data with a date range selector and a link to the editor where one could ...


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For this functionality you must consider how frequently users are likely to enable or disable the feature. I see no problem in keeping all the settings intact when user sets it for the first time. Additionally you can, Ask user if they want to clear out the settings when they disable. Ask user to use the previous settings when they enable again. Just ...


0

In regards to your first question I'd say let the browser language decide but if it really matters to you then a landing page with a Spanish or English button before entering would be fine and then use that decision to determine which version of the site you show. For question number two I'd say it's going to be a bit of a novel experience UX-wise if you ...


0

It is a good starting point, but not always accurate. There are different ways to detect the user's language. If the IP address is used it fails for traveling users. If the browser's language is used it still fails in internet cafes, hotel lobbies, etc. Yes, it is necessary to allow users to change the language. Be careful how you present the choices: it's ...


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I saw a research on how to use users feedbacks (i.e. comments) in appstore/googleplay as a starting point for usability studies. This was presented in IEEE requirements engineering conference. Will post the link here if I find the paper.


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There are two design strategies I can think of, and I think it would depend on the actual content that you are putting into the cards. Option A - associate action with content, assuming content is modular and act as subsections within the card Option B - separate content from action, assuming all actions are relevant and apply to all content (where content ...


2

Simply put, a regular sign up won't hurt — especially for users that'd prefer to leave their social network details out of it. Sometimes when I'm trying something new, I prefer a regular signup.


1

If you have the expertise or infrastructure to do so you should also offer your own registration (i.e. if it doesn't add too much expense to your project). Social media single sign on is a great low friction method for users who are already signed up to the various providers and don't mind using this method, but you probably don't want to force potential ...


2

There are some variables that you could take into account here to express time: "Shapes" getting smaller Seconds (numbers) decreasing Color Maybe you don't need to use all that variables, but I made a mockup with all of them to get the idea. BTW "wait" and "close" are the first words that came to my mind, but since I'm not a native English speaker, you ...


4

Gaming popups have some different constraints For many games, notifications/notices are challenging to design because the user will be focused on the core game play: So, designing notifications is difficult because you have to make sure the user sees the notification, but it cannot be so intrusive that it takes the user's focus away (in space or time) ...


4

The methods of registration you provide define your addressable market of users. Whichever option you provide your users, you are hoping for two things: They actually have that sign in method. They trust you with having access to the method they choose. Do they have the sign in method? Think about your market of users and if they'll have these methods. ...


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Provide a regular register method In a comment to your question I said that I wouldn't use your app if the only way to register is via social networks. The reasons vary from person to person and to not make this answer go off-topic too much I'll give you just a quick outline about some issues: Simple but relevant: I don't use the famous networks I don't ...


1

A simplified approach can be as follows download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This would show the user how much time is there for the popup to close and also enable him to prevent it from closing as well. The close icon on the top right enables him to dismiss even before the timer runs out as well. This said, I am ...


4

Only using these big social media authentication accounts to sign into your website aimed at students/young people will work fine. However lets think about the users who dont have a gmail twitter or facebook. You should put a section in there for them. Dont have a twitter/gmail/hotmail? sign up for one here. Suggest them to sign up for one that takes the ...


0

I work on thre displays (17" laptop + 2x24"), so her is my solution. Laptop - best idea is to have it on stand with display aligned bottom to external screen - it is the easiest way to maintain head on same level and use eyes na little right-left move of your head in horizontal. Also - put main screen on external display, because checking time and starting ...


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Official google explanation aside (as mentioned in the other answer), there is probably another work at play which goes unmentioned - using UX as stick/carrot method to promote desired behavior. Note that if you at any time previously checked the "stay signed in" checkbox, even after logging out of the Gmail the google will remember your username (via ...


34

As per the official Google announcement, the reasoning behind this change is to try out methods which would complement new password authentication methods. To quote the post Today, you sign in to Google on a page that includes both the ‘email’ and ‘password’ fields on the same page. We’ll be gradually splitting those two fields into separate pages in ...


1

I think based on the naming scheme for the themes that it might be more of a semi-random convention rather than anything else. In fact, I think you'll find it very difficult to stick to the convention and expanding on it simply because of the ambiguity in the naming scheme. If you examine it more closely: light: could be referring to colour or weight, so ...


0

The cognitive perspective From a cognitive perspective, here is the likely sequence of event: User sees page An info message asks the user to change her password The user fills the 3 fields An validation error has occurred At the point the user already know the purpose of the screen, so there is no point for the information message to stay there - it can ...


1

There are many different color-semantic mapping schemes, but most have some basis in color theory. Color theory is quite expansive so an explanation of how specific colors are matched to meaning is probably not suitable for UX.SE. Fortunately there are a lot of resources available to help you work through this. The term you want to look up is "color ...


3

Meanings of colors vary by culture. Of course, a few colors have similiar meanings everywhere, for example gold stands for sucess and high quality in most cultures. On the other hand in the U.S. white signifies purity and is used at weddings, but in other cultures white is color used for death and funerals. It's very likely that the authors used meanings of ...


1

For very long lists, it's better to use a different UX for mobile Multi-select is a complex operation, so it's difficult to use the same interface for both web and mobile. You already recognize this because you've outlined two different layouts. Your mobile design is problematic because: It requires users to tap once to add an item, and then select ...


1

Error messages and helpful information are very different, so they need to be visually distinct In your layout, the error message and the information message are shaded differently, but have the same font, shape, and placement. This visually communicates that the messages are similar but not identical. That is not true: helpful information is the ...


1

The process of getting someone to use your website / application is called user onboarding, it includes everything from sign up onwards. User onboarding almost always includes some sort of tutorial to explain some of the intricacies of the UI. useronboard.com has lots of walk-throughs of user onboarding on different websites. You should get some ideas of ...


0

If you do have access to edit the front end, I would probably suggest using indicators on the field/field group (such as "has-success" if you're using bootstrap). Then I would suggest that maybe the 'info' error isn't necessary once they've made an attempt. Or instead of using an alert, make that the heading for the section.


0

I'd suggest using something similar to the iOS "Select" functionality in Camera Roll. User taps a button to activate a "selection" state. User selects all the items List A items they want to move to List B. User taps a button to move items to List B. I'd also pair this with a search box that allows the user to easily filter out the names they want. That ...


0

In general, error states should clearly communicate where an error occurred. In your example, you haven't clearly shown which state is the problem. Additionally, you have two competing messages here. It seems like these two alerts could easily be consolidated into one alert. Finally, watch the language you use. You say "Old password appears to be ...


0

Generally speaking you can but the message texts have to be very clear and non-confusing. The biggest, read confusing, issue I see here is that the message in the orange rectangle does not clearly communicated which field the user has to change: 1, 2 or 3? Neither the message in the red one is 100% clear. Some users will wonder whether "Old password" ...


3

First of all - not ABCD... but autocomplete in search (consider Cyrillic, Greek or other alphabets). Drag-n-drop is a beautiful feauter, but consider dragging aprox. 50 elements. I will be extremely time consuming. Clicking on item on the left to assign it to group will be much easier. For mobile my proposition is to switch view between Available <-> ...


1

If we're talking about mobile, maybe override the default web scroll element and implement a scroll with a native-like behaviour and then show a tag list above it. To add something to list B from list A, click on a row in list A. To remove from list B, click on the tag on list B or click again on the row in list A. download bmml source – ...


0

The Google Material design guidelines on cards is a good read, recommended. You didn't specify whether your cards are of equal size or not but based on not "mess up the grid" they probably are of equal size. Grid of different sized cards is a possibility but you should be extra careful not to overload them with actions. From Google Material design: ...


0

I would suggest option A as the user is more like not to consider the physical location in any more detail than "left screen or right screen" Also, generally, when connecting a laptop to an external screen, the laptop should still form the 'primary' screen as this is the one you will use more often than the external screen: you'll use it when you're not ...


1

We have decided to go with "Need Attention" and "Archived". We tested it with our users and it works ok. We also tried "Active" before, but it was confusing, because the items we display can be "Active" and "Closed" regardless on their location in my app.


1

As with most questions, I guess context and the individual user preference has a lot to do with what the 'best' answer might be. However, I am offering a way to consider how you might come up with that decision. The first thing you need to think about is the relationship between the devices. I read a good reference article by Luke Wroblewski on the subject ...


0

Address this in layers Duplicate purchases can be expensive for retail sites (handling returns and cancellations can be costly) and they can happen for several reasons: User hits Purchase button twice User doesn't see the purchase confirmation page (the case you mentioned) User forgets he hit purchase earlier today and resubmits Best practice is to ...


1

Although the solutions mentioned are not wrong, in either case there is a chance that frustrating the user and we don't want that. I like what is suggested by UX Movement : Stop resubmissions by progress buttons In addition to that, what I would suggest is to make the button which reads " Completed" unclickable. This does not confuse the user and also ...


0

So let us assume that the checkbox enables a form that the user needs to fill.When checkbox is checked, the form is displayed and the user could fill up the form and could submit the form saving all the input in the form, when disabled it shows tooltip explaining the contents below it. It would have easier to answer this question if an initial wireframe or ...


1

I think it depends a little on what kind of users you are targeting. If you want to make it as easy as possible for any user (newbie or professional), look at big search engines like google. They let you search for anything and have an advanced search with many different fields where you users can define what they want to search for and what they don't want ...



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