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2

I think all options you have are not that good. Adding "none" option spoils the overall idea, because "none" is not an option. It just shows options can't be used. Radio buttons without selection is an anti-pattern ComboBox is not a good replacement for a radio buttons. According to my understanding of the problem, you have two options. In some cases ...


0

Usually its possible to group content into two or three tabs, and then give further options inside of those major tabs. I understand there might be concerns about 'hiding' options inside of other tabs, but its generally possible to interpret/ learn the most common use-cases and show them as obviously as possible. In cases where the number of tabs is going ...


-1

I think the reason why it ended up this way is that the design was not tested with users. An expert review could have caught this as well, as we all seem to agree it seems awkward. Many times, I find Github to be an example of WHAT NOT TO DO. For example, this cute little cartoon uses Jedi mind tricks to make the user forget about that big 404 error. In ...


3

This is just another example of the famous state-action ambiguity problem, which is discussed in length on this UX.SE question. The designer of the interface in question has chosen to show the state, rather than the action. Like you, I find it a bit awkward and unintuitive, but theory wise - there's nothing wrong with it, it can be either or, and neither ...


0

Another option would be to use sliders like on a tablet computer interface. The text could simply say "Online" and if the switch is green and slid say to the left, the system is online. When the slider or text is clicked, the slider moves to the right and goes red (or maybe grey, as it doesn't imply danger so much), then the system is offline, and vice versa ...


1

Remove all borders and rounded corners and keep each cell a single solid color. The best UI is no UI at all so make sure that everything you add absolutely has a reason for being there. Even simple things like borders and gradients can cause friction to the end user. I'm not sure the keyboard is even required to be there. Perhaps consider having a way ...


1

Short Term Trend spamming probably wont be a problem early on, you'll have trusted users who'll build good content. At the start the people using your site will be early adopters, supportive friends and product evangelists who will be more interested in using your product rather than trying to spam with it I'd advise that in early stages you concentrate on ...


4

It depends: where do you expect the application to be used? If most users will be in a relatively quiet, indoor environment, the conference room should be close enough, in my opinion--even if it's not exactly the same (at home vs. work, for example). However, if the expected environment of use is quite different, testing in a conference room won't be ...


0

Maybe you can just plainly explain to the users, why you need them to precisely tag the videos (i.e. for the video search function). Also provide tag hints and prompt a window, just after the user uploaded a video, to make this process as fast as possible. Another idea is ask relevant questions (for eg. "What words would best describe your video?"), to aid ...


1

You guys have a major UX issue, since buttons are being used interchangeably for both as buttons and as "status messages". You have already improved the situation for the better by replacing the button with icons (tick and X). Now just need to modify the text on the button clearer. You could use "Turn ON" and "Turn OFF" on the other action buttons ...


0

With the proliferation of cross-posting, it would also behoove you to only use a social timeline if you're sure that something you posted on Instagram, for example, won't automatically also be shared out on Twitter and Facebook as well, or you could easily end up with an extremely repetitive timeline.


0

If the user is required to add tags, it would be great to apply a couple tags automatically for them in the tag section. (You could "force" them to use these tags by not letting the user delete them, but you should make sure if you implement that way that you have a very accurate system for automatically assigning tags). Then, you can give the user the ...


1

Have you tried using focus to direct user attention? Assistive technologies will let them know if an element has been given that focus (the same way they press tab to navigate - and focus on - each link on a page). You need to use javascript to make this work, triggering the .focus() method when the link is clicked on. It is very similar to how "Skip to ...


2

The main reason for preferring Undo over Confirmation Boxes is laid out by Alan Cooper in 'About Face 2.0, The Essentials of Interaction Design' Confirmations illustrate a quirk of human behavior: They only work when they are unexpected. If confirmations are offered in routine places, the user quickly becomes inured to them and routinely dismisses ...


7

I was inspired recently by @jeffatwood 's excellent article about The God Login where one would ask: What would God do? Well if God was doing this, there wouldn't even be a selection list - the option the user wants would be right there already - no selection necessary. God already knows which one you want. The drop down is being used for someone to ...


12

A drop down is probably not your best option here. To make this task clearly understandable a more suitable UI would be some form of dual list as in the example below: This does not only offer a selection mechanism but also a constant visibility of what has been selected. Update: Given that you have limited manoeuvre around the design i would suggest ...


0

Everything which are not needed by your user base, does not have to be included in the final design for your customer, at least from the usability point of view. For the user I'm quite sure it's ok to never change the password, but for the company? Security risks? For a software product you should also consider requirements from all stakeholders.


4

I'd like your opinion on the process I am trying to simplify, any and all suggestions welcome. I don't know — because I don't know what the customers are like, what the booking process is like, and what the pricing and business model is. Things I would be thinking about: Is it actually faster and more convenient? You are, for example, removing ...


0

Aza Raskin wrote a great article on this subject: Never Use a Warning When you Mean Undo. He explains the psychological reasons why confirmations are inhumane while undo is better for how humans work.


0

I think the simplest answer is how much time are you willing to devote to this one portion of your website? The second question is about the clientele that you're serving. The answer to those two questions will be a starting point. If you have lots of time and your clientele is not savvy then do separate pages. If your time is short and your clientele is ...


3

In this case, I would recommend pagination with filtering and sorting. Don't scroll the transactions table- fix it to about a dozen rows. But then provide a way to sort the columns, and even better allow the user to filter down the visible rows by some criteria. Finally, provide pagination if they really really want to view more rows. Users never (well ...


1

It depends. In general long forms where long = lots of form fields is a bad idea and should be avoided. Splitting a form into separate pages may help in that situation. But in your case, you're using the term long to refer to vertical height of the page. Remember that people are just fine scrolling--ESPECIALLY on touch devices. As such, I see no benefit ...


0

A/B testing and Usability testing will give you the correct answer. Forms are super tricky. I am dealing with a huge/unfortunately necessary long form and I've realised A/B testing and Usability testing is the only way to find out.


0

You should consider doing some user testing on two designs: one like this and one with steps. You could get valuable feedback from testing multiple designs. If you split the form up, your sections should be very clear and distinct. In looking at your form, I can't clearly distinguish different sections. There's an "about your project"... but what category ...


0

I consider that is better to divide the screen in two steps or three, this is a very important for our users to navigate to the app. If they bored, simply they go back or close the site because the UX isn't the better. You take a look some mobile apps and inspire you in how design a web mobile app. For example, in the facebook's apps wizard we have various ...


3

I'm going to answer this from the perspective of a webmaster who is familiar with the error codes that your web app should produce. A 404 Not found error is a very general error for the case when a URL was entered that cannot be parsed. You may not know what area of the site the user was looking for. There may even be nonsense in the URL like ...


-2

No. It can be a security risk to do so, and for the example you give isn't really appropriate anyway. If I try to find a particular meeting - even from a direct link - and it doesn't exist, why throw an error in my face? I'd much prefer a site that displayed a basic "This meeting doesn't exist" message, and then displayed a list of other meetings, for ...


25

The first problem with having multiple 404 pages, each dedicated to a particular area is that you assume users were in the right part of the website at the point when they fell on to the 404. Bearing in mind that many links come from search engines and not necessarily from within the website, then I don't think you can guarantee that a dedicated 404 is ...


0

I agree with Vitaly, the 404 page shouldn't be an end to the users route it should give them help on why this page might not be here and relevent ways to procceed. In your example, suggesting things like "Is this the meeting you are looking for?" then listing relevent results helps the using keep moving forward rather than backtracking


4

I designed a 404 page sometime back with a function you might find interesting. it was using a recommendation engine module suggesting products the user might like and what they previously viewed. not sure what kind of website you are asking this in context to, but a golden rule i stick to is never to bring the user to a dead end.


8

Treat a 404 page like an error message, which it basically is. A good error message offers the users way to overcome the problem. In your example, a 404 for meetings could offer possible matches for meetings, a 404 for recordings could offer recordings, and the same for documents. The possible solutions are different for each type of entity, and the reasons ...


0

I get this is a UX site but the answer is technical PDF in a print dialog is what you are accustomed to as that is how it works. The free driver from Adobe is a print driver. PDF is a page rendering. You can select page size and portrait or landscape. Once you load the driver it is available as a printer to all applications (that print). Microsoft ...


2

Full disclosure, I prefer keyboard shortcuts to menus even though they aren't visible. I think all menus already obscure their content, so it's not just a case of knowing where 'file, edit, etc' are you already need to know what is inside them. If you know what is inside them then chances are you know where they are positioned on the screen. As such I ...


1

The logic, or origin, is the option below: "Save as PostScript..." . PostScript is the common language of printers. You print a document by converting it to PostScript and sending it to the printer. (Roughly, like everything else there are other options.) So basically "printing" is "convert to PostScript, then send to printer", naturally someone wanted to ...


3

Based on my own experience on the beginning of printing to PDF, I'd say it was due to the workaround it started with. Many programs like Microsoft Office or browsers didn't include an option to print to PDF till a few years back. When they need for printing to PDF came up other programs (mainly PDF creating tools) were extended to install their own printer ...


0

If you want to keep all of the information in the popup window, then I can think of two options to help maximize screen real estate. If there elements on the popup that need to stay persistent, then you can calculate the max-height of the modal content container based on the window height of the browser. This way when the user "shows more" then the modal ...


0

The whole idea of popup was to show limited information. Do not give too much information on the popup, design a separate landing page if required.I design eCommerce back offices and my client often wants me to show the activity log on the popup. Best practise is to show 5 entries then a call to action which takes user to the landing page.


0

Ideally you'd have all information shown on a single screen, but when that isn't possible you have to look at alternatives. Having an inner scroll is one alternative, and given what you've explained it seems like a rational initial choice to me. However, it still depends on the common case interaction; who your users are; what they are used to; etc. etc. ...


1

A tricky question, which is difficult to answer. However, my theory is the following... You are really converting from one format to another. That may be HTML to PDF, DOCX to PDF, MSG to PDF and many more. Therefore, it would really be more understandable for a user if we used this technique today and called it converting document. There are also many free ...


0

Advantage: It saves vertical space Ubuntu Unity was originally designed for Ubuntu Netbook Remix, a GNU/Linux distribution made for devices with 9" to 10" (220 to 250 mm) displays with roughly 1024x600 pixels. (Though netbooks stopped being manufactured roughly at the end of 2012, 10" tablets with detachable keyboards such as the ASUS Transformer Book have ...


0

I would use a button interface that will let you know how long I took. Its easy to know if it was more than 60 minutes, specially if it does not requires how many minutes after the 60 mark. Expanding in the subject, here is my input: Although 60 minutes time frame is a great push and pressure to complete the challenge, I think that time frame is not for ...


3

Users aren't likely to fill out optional fields. Most people's brains aren't wired to keep track of time while they're actively engaged in an activity. To have them quantify how long they spent on the project by entering a number will cause most users to short-circuit and skip that field entirely. If you absolutely don't have any practical means for ...


0

I think both work, and the right hand solution looks good with the rotation. I just don't see the point in showing the user the number of lines, which causes the problem of the numbers being too small. A good solution might be having just the arrows, indicating ascending and descending order, so the rotation would just be 180 degrees. It's a pretty ...


1

You're asking us to give you reasons why it's a bad idea. Sorry, but to me this just looks a bit lazy. What you should be asking us is “Is this a good idea, why (not)?”. Agreed, it should be backed by solid reasoning as well as outweigh the disadvantages. But if the reasoning is solid, adding it doesn't have to be bad per se. Advantages A ‘Read more’ ...


1

I would recommend getting rid of the + button for every row. Instead make the rows draggable. Further in the "Perform the following actions" section, the controls are not abiding with the whitespace convention set in the prior section. See if you can adjust the controls in the second row so that they don't stand out. Another way to look at it is if you see ...


0

Depending on the revenue model of the site, "Show more" actually brings money in. Assuming it sends you to the article, it actually gives twice the ad revenue. It also increases page ranking through pass through clicks and time spent on the site. This is why you see a lot of sites now doing "top 10 most ugly celebs" etc. That requires 10 clicks and 10 sets ...


2

Blocking the user is bad UX unless the operation is catastrophic (i.e. causing great damage and/or suffering)     Imagine the following scenario... You want to copy a folder full of files from one location to another so you begin the operation and the computer is nice enough to let you know that files are copying and that it will take about 2.5 ...


2

The benefit of 'show more' is to prevent content from pushing the content below it out of view. If this is for the whole page, then there is nothing below (except perhaps a footer) and it is an unnecessary hindrance to reading the entire page. If you need to persuade them, show them a fixed position 'show more' page on a short and tall display. On the short ...


7

There's two situations where I see "Show More" valid: When the "more" part implies a lot of data which might not be needed on the initial view. What "a lot" means depends on the target audience: if it's an intranet site, or internet, if it's going to be shown on mobile phones with limited data transfer rates or not, etc. When there's content under that ...


9

In the general case, I agree with Evil Closet Monkey: Undo creates less friction than Delete, so it is preferable. But there is at least one case where Delete+Confirm is preferable: When your users are overwhelmed. A user is overwhelmed when he wants to complete a task, but has no idea how to do it, and expects to fail. It can be so subtle that the user ...



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