Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

It depends on many factors. Please avoid using popup unless you really want to get the users attention. Here in Sign in/Register popup is unacceptable. Number of fields in your sign up form If there are many fields say more than 6 it is better to go with a separate page. A Tabbed Modal or a Pop up will not match here. If your sign up form has less number ...


0

Your proposed solution looks great and should work fine. That being said, I can give a few inputs to possibly improvise it. Mountaineers and Hikers use something called as Alpine Club Maps or AV Maps to orient themselves. You can take a hint from these maps to include certain things so as to provide a bit more details to mountaineers. For example: Contour ...


0

I'm not expert in this field, still I see some flexibility can be provided to the mountaineer, like re-sizing and positioning the concentric circles to mean something like:- There is no 'Below' on the East side, and I'm on the NE Alpine. Please refer to the modified image below. Ignore this suggestion if this doesn't make sense.


0

I've experienced similar feedback from users, i.e preferring forms on a separate page rather than a modal box. Sign in and register are no exception. Don't think there are any prefered design patterns but personally I also think modal boxes are associated with pop ups, which can be pretty disruptive to the user.


3

I'd combine a push notification with an in-app confirmation option. For example, if you want everyone to confirm within 6 hours before the meeting, you can send a push notification to everyone who opted in for the meeting 6 hours before the start time of the meeting. If a user clicks the notification, they are taken to the app where the top confirmation ...


-1

What you're describing here seems mostly semantical. If there's no specific invitation list, everyone's invited. A simple [ i'm coming! | not interested ] set of buttons in between the event info and attendee list should suffice.


1

It all depends upon what you are trying to achieve. If it's simply to prevent the user taking actions (such as posting in a forum), it seems overkill to destroy everything they've ever done and prevent them from actually logging in. Bear in mind that forum posts that are randomly deleted cause confusion when others have already replied - context is ...


0

I would send the users that are put into the participant list a notification that they have been invited, from there they can accept or decline the invitation. Something like this: When the user then hits accept or decline the participant list can update with either the green check or red 'X' like so: This creates a separation between the process of ...


1

It might be instructive to look at how other big players are handling this. If the 'big guys' are doing it then it's a reasonable assumption that many of your users will be familiar with the approach. Here's a non-scientifically selected sample based on what I happen to have open in Chrome right now... Facebook Avatar | Name Twitter Avatar only Stack ...


2

Think about the user's tasks. They're using the app for a particular purpose, working toward certain goals. Ads are, therefore, distractions or hurdles in the way of reaching those goals. You might also be interested in reading about Banner Blindness.


1

There's no right or wrong way in doing this. It depends on who your users are, the overall look and spacing of your UI and the purpose of your application. If you look at Google support threads there are several discussions about users who are having trouble finding the "Sign Out" button after it was moved into the dropdown. I myself worked with users who ...


0

Taking materials into consideration.. Chinese tea cups are made out of thicker material where it doesn't conduct heat so probably design need not required any ear to it.


1

It's bad practice to assume every user is familiar with keyboard commands and contextual menus, because many aren't (I know someone who just found out about CTRL + C/V, and he's college-educated and has been using computers for years). While they can benefit UX by streamlining commands, your interface and functionality should be able to stand on its own. ...


3

Great to see you are building a case for not doing this. From a User Experience perspective, here is some ammunition to help build your case: Norman Nielsen Group - The Most Hated Advertising Techniques: 95% of users (based on 605 respondents) said that their web experience was impacted "negatively" or "very negatively". I recommend reading the full ...


0

I see what you mean with the not-so-obviousness of the error. To look at it another way: could you indicate progress in a non-linear way (related to the form information, but not step by step), which gives a completely blatant indication of what's DONE and what's PENDING? Pending can do along with glowing perhaps to hit it home (a subtle glowing or ...


1

From a quick look at the page, it would seem that one way of handling this is to issue a page wide banner/overlay which identifies errors and on-click the user is directed to the element which is wrong/missing. The element can also be highlighted.


2

Hick’s Law does not necessarily require equally probable choices. Only the simplified version T = b Log2 (n + 1) does. It is algebraically derived from the “full” theory, which is T = b Sum( p(i) Log2(1/p(i) + 1) ), where p(i) is the probability of a choice i. Hick’s Law can be combined with other calculations to predict average menu item selection time, ...


2

On breadth versus depth... Yes, this topic has been studied with some rigor by the academic and professional community. You can do a search for "menu breadth versus depth" to get a good sampling of papers and articles out there, but the quick summary is: Generally, breadth has been proven to be more effective than depth across many different dimensions ...


2

You should not interrupt the user's flow. Frequently asking to rate the app is bad. If the user beats some level there will be a positive vibe in him. Utilize this vibe and ask him to rate the app. "Congratulations Dude(or user_name),That was awesome!! Would you mind taking a moment to rate us?" A swipe banner is always better than a popup.


0

Explane why they should not multitask and how this correlates with the number of good votes they will receive when writing their part of the story in that flow. Use exactly those points you mentioned for argumentation. If they realize that their point of view was taken in to account and your program wants the best for them, they will realize that they are ...


1

The ideal solutions have been mentioned already: User Interviews & Testing. However, if you must put something tangible out in the wild, you could consider running the A/B tests. One option has the technical change presented, while the other does not. Let the results speak for themselves.


1

It's for these problems that it's important to have some sort of User Research done and follow a Goal-driven design approach if possible. This will help you answer some questions like: How does the proposed feature fits in the design requirements? Is this particular feature implemented by someone else and if yes, how are people using it? How are they ...


1

A year ago when i was designing an application for time registration and planning, I designed and tested 24 hour selection widget like in below. Instead of select all, deselect all, creating patterns related to the context (day shift, night shift and holiday) worked quite well. After you select a template, you can change each boxes like toggle button - on ...


1

It seems, the conceptual model you provide isn't aligned with user's mental model. Let's step back from UI to UX. There are research which recommend clear time limitations for parents: Pediatricians: No More than 2 Hours Screen Time Daily for Kids Children should have two-hour limits on the time spent in front of screens Parents also aware of the ...


0

In the physical world, one term that could applicable is potentiometer. It's typically a knob or slider and the further you turn it, the the higher or lower the resistance within. Note that these are difficult to implement in a virtual UI. Knobs and sliders are great physical objects to interact with*. They can be a real pain to interact with via a ...


1

The basic functionality sounds to me like what would be in the physical world called a jog dial. There are two basic types of wheels. One type has no stops and can be spun the entire way around, because it is a relative rotary encoder. This type depends on tracking the actual motion of the dial: the faster it spins forward or back, the faster it ...


1

You can start by defining the priority of the fields: Primary fields are fields that must be mandatory otherwise the system can’t even work. For example an email needs to be verified before a user can access the application. Secondary fields are fields that you should make mandatory otherwise the application has no value for the user or for the customer. ...


1

The stack exchange has the answer for your question. you can use highlighted pop up kind of messages show up for mandatory fields like the Username, mail and CV kind of fields one by one while the user leave any field empty.


0

Some fields are more important (CV), some less (driver license), but this should not be communicated to the user. It's not about telling the user the importance to the recipient of each field, you just have to visually communicate which fields are mandatory and which are not. The convention is to use an asterisk beside a label, but you should always ...


16

Date selection isn't easy... This has been a peeve of mine for a long time. I've not found a decent calendar widget. Generally, I prefer calendars to scrollers because: Using a scroller to select a date far in the future can be a real pain. Calendars provide a lot of valuable context (today's date, day of week, physical distance to the date, etc). In ...


0

It depends on the context. Entering credit card information. You just have to choose month and year. Dropdown works best here. Planning a trip to Hawaai. You should know a date range, weekends, Departure and Arrival. Initially date pickers that display just 1 month at a time were used. Now, a few travel site use date pickers that display 2-3 months at a ...


-1

Datepicker controls like that of kendo, or make your own, are the ideal UX imo. As long as you don't take them away from the current context, indicate that its a bubbled popup by having an animation for it popping out to the user. Start it small and transparent to full sized and non-transparent. Having it automatically start on tomorrow if thats what users ...


5

The value of a grid (aka, calendar view) is it adds the context of the day-of-the-week. If knowing the day-of-the-week is important, than a calendar picker will provide the user with a better experience. Trying to schedule a meeting next week? Knowing the DOTW is important. Choosing your birthdate? DOTW is irrelevant. So it depends on the particular ...


0

I always ask people: Have you ever thought about an application: 'This is to easy to work with, I can't work like this!' They always answer no, sometimes they ask something about missing functions. But an application that is missing some parts is not the same as an easy one. If there is any difference it might be more in the marketing department: ...


18

When it comes to UI/UX, "better or worse" is very subjective. There is, however, a standard for best practices: cater to your product, users, and target devices. What I mean by this in your situation: If your product expects a date in the next week 90% of the time, design your date picker around that. If you users require a larger interface to better use ...


4

Not at all. There are many studies demonstrating that general adjustments for older people are of benefit for both the elder and the younger extremes. These studies also demonstrate younger demographics (specially teenagers and kids) prefer big, bold, contrasting elements over subtle, low contrast elements. While there are many misconceptions around this ...


0

It's not perfect, but we're replacing the select tags only if the device DOESN'T support touch support. The native option picker for iOS and Android is definitely the better solution


1

Just one page loading needed elements makes your life not easier: Seo: Isnt possible anymore as bots wont get all elements. Your websites will apear as just one single page - the starting page with its keywords. No mpre keywords possible. Thats the complete opposite of a landingpage.... Users: Cant use search engines to jump directly into your pages. They ...


1

Google does something like this for Google Web Fonts: As the user selects options, the estimated overall impact on performance is displayed in a "speedometer"-style graphic. Some explanatory text is displayed below the graphic so users can easily understand the effects of their selections.


0

Message depends on who is using this, for what reasons, expecting what results, and performing what related actions at the same time. Need more context on target users, task flow, and the application. Based on the 3 options that you have provided Show icon - only possible for always expensive actions - can't use this for the same reason. Estimate time ...


0

Idea: Add a graph. Label red for long times, yellow for medium. Graphs display potential for "short circuiting". "Any" conditions are put in parallel, "All" conditions are in series. This would result in overload for casual, light users, but experienced users may find the graph useful.


0

Learned helplessness is going to forever be your enemy. No matter what you do to make your login form super-efficient, there will always be some other forms out there. As soon as a user tries to tab on a poorly designed login page and the focus jumps to some random link, or completely fails to appear, they will fall back on their trusty click-to-input ...


0

The UI you have presented is not consistent either. It has visual consistency. But the interaction is not consistent. When a user adds a form, it is added below the dropdown, but when a new field is added, it is done above it. This affects consistency as well. The user has to get used to one of this pattern (either adding above or below). Otherwise, it ...


0

Consistency + heirarchy = mo betta There's nothing wrong with consistency among controls. I think the problem you're sensing is hierarchy. In your example, adding a field (the low-level item) is more prominent than added a form (the high-level item). The controls are identical, but the ground contrast is greater within the form edit module. With a few ...


0

The ideal answer is "test both" and see which works better for your users. Without testing, if you have to make a choice, clarity always trumps consistency. Focusing on your specific answer, I would suggest a different UX pattern for adding fields to make it even more different than adding a form. For example, eliminating the dropdown completely, and ...


2

Multiple interconnecting popups is in itself not a very delightful experience, since it causes confusion. For example, can I as a user step back to the previous popup when the next popup appears if I believe that my action on the first popup was incorrect? What happens if I accept the terms stated in the first popup, but cancel in the second, is the action ...


2

In my opinion I would leave it as is and let the users choose (I would think more would use google than twitter anyway), but if you want to do it that way I see a couple ways you could do it: Just tell the user your preferred option Have google as the default option showing, then under a dropdown panel of sorts have alternative options (twitter, fb, etc.) ...


0

Although following your suggestion of providing password information when entering a password may make it easier to get the right password (although this is still arguable), it comes at the cost of worse security. If someone needs an easier to remember password, let them choose that, but by you revealing something about their password when entering, you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included