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2

For me it would make sense to split the flow in two. Have Add Tip and Ask Question flows. This way there may be fewer mistakes when users are filling in the form.


0

I believe it is better to break this into several steps when going for a mobile or responsive approach. People on the phone might not be able to fill the whole page in one go and giving them several steps might help on finalising the form. The reason being is that the forum is rather large and also keep in mind that every-time the user has to input ...


1

We don't know the details of the service context and targeting (or anything else, for that matter), but if this is a job searching service I think first user need (matching job offers) is much bigger (more important for the user) compared to two other. So it should differ visually and take more important place/be more accessible than two other CTA's. For ...


-2

I think the placement is right, top-right side of the accordion would be a better place to display


0

In my opinion, right side above of the table would be a better place, it looks good if it display in same size of the button and font size which is used for - Shift 1 button


0

More content: pages, less content: stack. Items in category: pages, sequence or story: stack. Each section needs call to action: pages, just one call to action per page: stack. I would use tabs here, because products assortment in shops tends to grow typically, because this is a horizontal categorisation and because each section here would benefit from ...


1

The first aspect would be to use an API which will generate an address with minimal input such as the users house name/door number. This helps with formatting issues as you generate the address as it should be and do not put that responsibility on the user. The second aspect to this, is to add a manual set of fields in which the user types their address in ...


0

It depends... do the people know each other? Traveling together as a group? Then it likely makes sense to have the seats face each other. Trains have this (where groups of 4 face each other) as do various road vehicles (VW Eurovans come to mine--where two rows of seats face each other) do they not know each other? Prefer privacy? Then having ...


0

You might find this article helpfull http://www.nngroup.com/articles/form-design-placeholders/ Basically, it says that it is better to use the placeholder text as a hint to the label (not an example), but it is better to avoid placeholder text altogether.


1

The old - attention grabber Of all low-level visual 'features' (colour, size, etc.) that our brain processes, motion (ie, animation) is the most attention grabbing one. See this quote from chapter 2 (What we can easily see) of Visual Thinking for Design, Ware 2008: The web designer now has the ability to create web pages that crawl, jiggle, and flash. ...


0

I like to use animation to communicate where things are located. For example on page load show the navigation open but then animate the minimize feature so the user knows where to find the nav when they need it.


1

Nothing wrong with it as such. It is a little bit non-standard to have a vertical bar like that, a bit of a break in standard functionality consistency, but nothing to cause anyone who thinks about it for a few seconds any trouble. There could be a slight problem in using a 'loading bar' when it actually means the opposite of loading- when it is full the ...


0

The most important question is "What do your administrators need to determine it's a duplicate?", and the second important question is (I guess) "What do the do about it?". A pie chart (or any other graph or report) telling the administrator which kind of difference (mobile phone vs. street no vs. social security no) will not help at all in determining ...


1

You still could use something like a tapbar on mobile (see twitter.com for example) or build a navigation-bar which also includes some navigation elements (pinterest). Personally I think that for now the hamburger button isn't the worst option (facebook still has it on it's webapp version) and we shouln't kill it just yet. Yes there are drawbacks, but pretty ...


1

I would display [1][+0] for inbox only and [0][+20] for reputation only updates, to keep the title consistent with both-updates situation like [4][+30]. I would probably not include seasonal promos like the current WINTER BASH, but if you want to include it, something like [1][+0][1] should be sufficient..


0

To display the latest information would be more user friednly, since the user would be accessing his own accout. Users would be more interested what new things have occured since his/her last visit, than looking at the complete old data.(As per human nature this looks more suitable)


1

with number 50, they're not all features...they are functions. You don't have to show all functions of your products in one page, you have a whole website to do this. Back to features, usually most of products show no more than 3 features...range that people would remember about product before they use it. "Ah, this product A has ABC, APQ and AYZ, let's ...


0

If controls float with users' scrolling, it can be irritating, specifically in the case of image-heavy services that tend to overload their users with visual content. I prefer sharing buttons to appear on hover, they tend to steal too much attention from the content and should be an opt-in. Hovering an image (video component etc) when you need to operate ...


0

I am almost 71 and wear bi-focal glasses which I definitely need in order to be able to read either on or off the computer, and generally need for daily living as well). I prefer dark text (black or dark grey) on a light background (either white or an off-white (such as the colour of the 'Your Answer' pop-up that appeared as I started my answer.) I HATE ...


0

It also depends on what type of info is in popover like of info nature or a form. Why not provide both for the two kind of users. The new generation of users are pretty savvy to click away to close the popover. Evidence as pointed by Facebook example above. Esc or clicking away closes the popover. This is also the default in angular Ui modals. Final ...


1

Based on personal experience, I argue that the close button is not necessary when the popover was easily initiated by the user (he or she can quickly initiate the popover again, if necessary). I have watched a couple of elderly people get very frustrated trying to click outside of the popover to try and close it with no success. They seem to have trouble ...


0

I am really bad person to answer this as I hate both social media and "listicles", but the benefit of "pop up" is simple enough. They save space. Basically, if your site has lots of separate items you want people to share separately, it becomes desirable for every item to have separate sharing option without more than one being visible at a time. So if you ...


0

These experiments, [...] show that people are more likely to purchase [...] when offered a limited array of 6 choices rather than a more extensive array of 24 or 30 choices. Moreover, participants actually reported greater subsequent satisfaction with their selections [...] when their original set of options had been limited. Implications for future ...


1

Decided to make UI much simpler and obvious, saved a lot of space in the process! :)


4

People are going to find it extremely hard to scan a list of 50 items, particularly if their presentation involves a less than 3-7 word description. The tools you should consider (both, by the way, trace back to our working memory, which is cognition's biggest bottleneck): Clustering Divide features into logical groups, and even into sub groups. This will ...


1

It's one application but acts as a pack of different tools. How many tools? Does each tool have features that relate to it? You could try grouping the features by tool functionality, if that's the case. Another way is to pick the top features, and give more space to explain and demonstrate and then list the lesser features in one column. Do you really ...


0

I would NOT use two different contact forms. Hearing you talk about a "quick and easy" contact form accessible on every page in addition to the "full" (a.k.a not quick and easy) contact form makes me ask the question, Why wouldn't users always want the quick and easy option?


0

Can you not combine both on a single page?


0

For such cases I almost always use the so-called "Primary marketing message" in header (usually in visual hierarchy it stands right after logo). It can be a short neutral phrase ("Technical supply equipment") or marketing slogan, but in any case it should cleary describe the intention of the website — that is why purely emotional slogans fail (like something ...


0

This all depends on your target group - if it is a community of aficionados, then the immediate search page is good for them. If you're mostly recruiting one-time users from search engines, you might want to show them first that they reached a reliable site (on the landing page). I do not, however, quite understand the exclusiveness of your alternatives: ...


0

There is a very simple solution to this problem, and that is making a simple welcome popup. On first view, the site will darken most of the ui, and display a small subtle popup box, which will cease to display unless the user checks off a box. Good luck!


0

You should not have a landing page and instead make your search automatically filter the results as the user types. As soon as there are no search results you should display suggestions similar to your landing page.


0

It depends on how much evidence you need to change the design decision. Gather feedback until you have enough evidence. In this case, if it's a pure interaction design decision that you have a lot of control over, yes, change it right away. If it was a decision that has more to do with branding or the product itself, you might feel like you will only get ...


0

How many times would a user land on an individual page unless he was directed there via a search engine or from an inbound link? It is entirely likely that the user searched for and chose to land on that particular page. Why would you take him away from there and ask him to search again?


6

Although I wouldn't change a prototype based purely on the feedback from the first tester, I would definitely and fearlessly make such a change if I got a majority of the first 4-5 testers revealed a problem. ...and I would stop wasting testers on the old design until that change was complete. Here is why... In UX, Ignorance is precious. Every user only ...


1

Among the spreadsheet applications I have used so far, current Apple Numbers has the nicest inline formula editor. It goes beyond mere color-coding. Note how there are no literal parentheses in the screenshot. Traditional math typesetting (e.g. TeX) increases the size of outer brackets sometimes, which can help with deep nesting, but when editing it is ...


1

This was discussed on Car Talks this past weekend. One of the brothers (forgot which) mentioned that German engineers have, for years, considered that placing it on the passenger side was superior for emergency situations when you have run out of gas and you need road-side fill-up. By placing it on the passenger side there is less chance of being hit by a ...


0

My 2 cents. It takes longer to walk around the car to fill up when the tank is on the passenger side of the car. (maybe 1 or 2 secs?) If you drive 150,000 miles at get 25 mpg you will buy 6000 gallons of gas. If you have a 12 gallon tank you will fill up at least 500 times. Over the ownership life of the vehicle this can mean you waste over 8 minutes just ...


2

Usually this comes down to space. If you have the space, two buttons makes more sense and is easier to implement. A single button is bit more confusing because you don't know which action will happen first.


0

Case 1: Where there are few options(<5) to multiselect. Then it is better to show checklist inline in tte pane, which doesn't take much screen realestate. Case 2: Where there are many options(>5) to multiselect, Then it is better to show combobox dropdown like in:- http://davidstutz.github.io/bootstrap-multiselect/ ...


0

I have just recently designed an UI for stripping regular expressions manually, maybe it can help or give you an idea.


0

What about a tree diagram? Here's an example from Predicate Logic that may be applicable: The end nodes in this case are constants, but in your case should be replaces with expressions. Also, PL has more operators. This is definitely more graspable that just inline bracketed notation. However, editing will probably have to be inline. Consider how ...


1

OK, I've done a bit of research and found something fairly conclusive. Facebook may not be everyone's favourite website but it has to be usable otherwise they would be absolutely inundated with confused users - they currently have 1.19 billion monthly active users. It's pretty hard to argue with that. Based on the popover in the screenshot below, I would say ...


1

You should experiment with various options and try which is the most intuitive to your users - you will likely need a Settings menu anyway so users will be able to choose 1st day of the week and so on... default status for the dates could be undecided, default action of 1 click could be to make the day available, 2nd click would toggle it to unavailable ...


3

Not an easy question. 1. You can't let people click 5 years' worth of days. That will take ages. 2. Off the top of my head, a nice way to lower the amount of clicking: Perface the date picker with some thing like this download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This will at least ensure the user doesn't have to click ...


0

Start off with a calender, and keep it clean, using very minimal colors (white reccomended), and when the user wants to set availability, just let them click on the date, and bring up a split menu, with the right half showing a green button saying 'available', and the left being red and saying 'unavailable'. Good luck!


5

From a pure user standpoint, I see two reasons to do so. 1. Radio buttons double as bulletin points download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The left version of this list looks much more organized because it looks like a list, whereas on the right side there are three rows of text, with buttons at the end. In your ...


1

I'd suggest using a monospace font. It helps a lot with readability and they're usually made so you distinguish letters. Also, why discard numbers? I don't have a study to demonstrate that, but i think humans recognize faster the numbers.


0

My rule(s) of thumb: if the option is boolean: checkbox if the number of options is 2 - 4: radios if the options have a lot of text: radios if there are lots of options: dropdown if there are LOTS of options: dropdown with search, like chosen


0

If the number of answer options is less than two, then we should avoid using dropdown button. This is because the survey participant has to click on the button to see the answer options and he/she might get annoyed if there are only two answer options. Instead, it's better to use a radio button if there are 3 or 4 answer options.



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