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0

Do you even need drop-down for only two choices? Instead of browse button you can have label "Templates" and then two buttons: Program From computer


0

I read somewhere that YouTube started out with a five star approach, but changed it with a "like" system later. The reason for this was that most ratings given were either a 1 or a 5. Do you expect many nuanced ratings? Also see: http://youtube-global.blogspot.nl/2009/09/five-stars-dominate-ratings.html


0

Depends on the next steps: The left one let's me change my decision again and again since it's always on top of what we are doint The right one is part of a (sort of) wizard with selected steps (in a way) I select where to find my template and go on the next step, and going back to change my decision will take a lot more effort


1

If it links to another page, why not use the standard link analogy? The convention is well known for users. Otherwise a small symbol next to the row title in Tohster's solution would also work. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

I think it's hard to solve this problem without changing styling or adding elements. However, you may be able to indicate the navigation in a way that minimizes the impact on styling. The basic issue here is, the section titles and row headers are perceived as passive because they almost always are. Therefore, you will need some kind of indicator to ...


0

look at how for example facebook handles this: first they show you what the website can and might access and under that it shows you what it cant do. this order is important so the user understands what he accepts when giving you his information and what he doesnt need to worry about when accepting the form. http://i.imgur.com/0Y92Zxo.png sorry this is ...


2

I really like the idea! however I wouldn't decouple this into two UI features, I would combine them in a single UI like below: which conveys that both comments and contributions are equally important, this is how I have visualised it: I would also add a list of recently discussed subjects along with information about what the user did (Icons). Did he ...


4

I would propose a third option. Make the button and image clickable It has become a convention that images are clickable on websites and in applications. My personal experience with this is during my time at a webshop where user research pointed out that almost 70% clicked the image of the product in a list of products in order to navigate to the product ...


0

Your clickable area doesn't have to be bigger than it needs to be to actually click, taking into account the size of fingers and the fact that some people don't have the motor skills with mice and fingers. From this article we see guidelines raging from 28px (Nokia) to 44px (Apple) but the article goes on to quote research here and here that shows the larger ...


0

I would stop using the term filter as it means reduce. Or is going to add. Maybe refer to them as search terms (or search fields). In advanced you need to open it up to a lot more than introduce tokens. They may want to change the order of the terms. They may want to use terms twice. Many of the legal industry document products use this type of syntax. ...


1

Your concerns with making the entire address a hyperlink are valid. Another potential issue with that approach is that it would make trying to copy the address more difficult, as users might inadvertently launch the link while just trying to copy the address. Option 2 makes much more sense, and you could be even more concise with a link of, “View in Google ...


0

One issue which comes up when doing testing is how not to give away the answer while asking a question: For example - There's a button which users are supposed to press which carries out the next part of the process. For some reason they don't get this and are happily going off and clicking on other buttons on the page. So as a tester you need to find out ...


1

I came across an issue with meta programming in one early test I did. I was asking the following question: A form on a web page needs to have a way of clearing or submitting the data – traditionally this is handled with two buttons. One says ‘Cancel’ and the other says ‘Submit’. Of the two buttons, One is on the left and the other on the right. Which ...


-1

If you are working on a website, capturing the key they press with JS and then modifying the appearance of the "sensitive data" with CSS can help. It could be done with these steps: Create a CSS class like .hidden then add color: transparent; and put an ID on all sensible elements. Capture the key they press to make a screenshot. Capture it on a event ...


2

“All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players” I have conducted usability testing in a number of environments both controlled and uncontrolled and I genuinely believe that there is no silver bullet to deal with bias, but you do have to take precautions and consider impact on test results. Erving Goffman who was a very influential ...


3

Colors should really match the theme of the site and be easy to the eye. For example, if the site is about valentines day, use shades of red and pink. Most importantly, make sure contrast is good. An example of bad contrast which many websites produce is light grey on white. Visit checkmycolours.com and put any URL in it to see if the website has good ...


18

Here are 3 ways to accomplish a high-precision, trace-style outline without the fat-finger effect. Approach 1: Similar to Kit Grose's excellent answer. A mask gets applied, and you can use brush and eraser to adjust the boundary. The only difference here is, if you need to see the detailed interior of the wound, then the mask works in reverse, i.e. the ...


4

You can use an offset pointer/cross-hairs above the center of the touchpoint with an appropriate width. This will make allow you to see where the line is being drawn, not being obscured by your finger or hand.


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I would flip the problem on its head: instead of tracing around the wound, have the user paint a colour over the wound. Give them two tools; a paintbrush and an eraser. This behaviour is similar to the Quick Mask mode in Photoshop and it works great because you can use a very large brush size at first and then come at the sides with a large eraser to ...


3

Aside from what is on that list, when I conduct usability tests I: Try to ensure that I give identical instructions to each participant. When people are doing tests remotely, it's easier to do this as you can provide written instructions. In person, however, I try extra hard to avoid going "off-script" and potentially leading anyone towards answers I ...


1

I assume there are IMHO two possible tools to develop to make your users' life easier. Note that in both cases, it would probably make you work more with your users, to fit as close as possible to their needs. Develop a feature that would format those sensitive data while exported : this means that the report has to be modified, identifying each column to ...


4

If I understand the question properly then the answer falls into many different areas. You should be well read on the subject but I would recommend looking into a range of articles from the Gestalt School to Tufte to Nielsen to computer scientists looking into color and data visualization (as for example): Why Should Engineers and Scientists Be Worried ...


1

While I agree that this is probably better suited for the Security SE, there is a user experience aspect to consider. What is it that you're protecting? What true value does your site hold for its users? If I enter my password wrong on my banking website and am locked out for 24 hours, I am annoyed, but also a bit relieved that the security surrounding ...


3

We are implementing a temporary account lockout after throttling login attempts and actively directing users to reset their password. Why do you try to get users to reset their passwords if it wasn't compromised? This doesn't seem like a good idea from a usability point (its annoying to change passwords), or security (if you make me change my passwords ...


0

As was hinted here before, it really depends on what the users are used to. As a consumer in Israel, I'm used to seeing prices that include VAT (because that's the law in Israel). Recently I came to the US, and no one here shows you the VAT before the check-out. Even e-commerce sites in the US show the VAT only at the check-out. Though irritating, I soon ...


2

Yes, yes and yes! 37% of our customers would not proceed with the purchase once they would find out that VAT was added at the later stage. We (my company) used to sell cheap trips around Europe to students. At first we thought that excluding VAT is a good idea, but shortly realised that we are loosing a lot of customers. After surveying those who never ...


1

It is completely subjective and you will find very different contrasting opinions on here. So here's mine: In the right place they can be productive and add to the content. In particular it is a good way of prioritizing your content. For example, you've worked on 4 projects lets say and you want to show screen shots of all of them in multiple states. You ...


0

I would suggest to use carousel. PROS Works on all platforms Supports mobile gestures CONS Not every user knows how to use carousel Auto-scrolling carousels are bad For more detailed information check: http://uxmovement.com/navigation/why-users-arent-clicking-your-home-page-carousel/


0

To make it clear that there is some kind of scrolling/paging functionality, it is helpful, to indicate via truncated content (which shows the direction where the full content is) or via visual representations (carousel, scrollbar). Have a look at the attached screenshots of some examples:


11

This is security, not UX. The only reasonable lockout time is the minimum time needed for security reasons. There is no use in adjusting that for UX purposes. You are asking for a "reasonable" time frame so it should be a reason explainable to the user. But what would the explanation be? A few absurd examples: For a shorter time frame than necessary: ...


5

This depends entirely on your target audience. There are two trains of thoughts, but both have ultimately the same outcome: Tell them there and then on the product page. In detail: Audiences who pay VAT Most consumers will not want to be surprised by VAT at the checkout (it is a hidden cost) and yes this would definitely reduce the number of abandoned ...


3

What's the goal for the lockout, without knowing that it's hard to advise on appropriate timings. Are you still seeing dictionary attacks after implementing your other measures? How long do those attacks last? How long does a genuine user leave it before trying to log in again? (i.e. what is your users average time between visits). If you know all those ...


1

First off, if you're able to group tabs, definitely just go for it. You might even get away with placing some tabs' content on the 'General' or 'Advanced' page. But in some cases, this is just impossible. Here are some alternative options to Microsofts horrible way: A dropdown menu at the end Hide some less important options under a More, Other, Advanced ...


1

In fact you have many solutions but it depends of your use of these tabs. Ideal one is, as mentionned before, shorten labels or rearrange multiples tabs in one, but it's not often easy. Other way is to use left menu as VLC for instance (it's not the same use but, again, it depend of what do you want to reach) Or the notepad style (much like web ...


0

The keyboard cable on mid 90s Apple Macs ( ie pre USB ) actually came with a small coiled section in the middle - so if you pulled the keyboard towards you it provided some 'cushioning' before you yanked hard on the connectors: Apple Macintosh ADB Keyboard Cable The design may have been to keep things tidy - or it may have been to protect the connectors. ...


0

Principally when you dont want lost the focus about the information of your main page you use a Modal popup... Can you tell us any more information about your issue?


1

Personally, I prefer the method used in the Google Chrome settings pages of Apple's control panels: Each time any control is changed, switch is toggled, field completed, etc the new state is stored automatically as soon as the state for that particular input is changed. However, when I am wary of the changes I am making (if it's something difficult, ...


0

PaRaP briefly touched on a really important point "In traditional touch interfaces, like [kiosks], targets are usually a lot larger than in mobile phones" There's not going to be a single optimum size in px or mm, as it depends on how the user is interacting with the interface. If they're liking going to be sitting still, such as a news reader app, ...


0

Another possible way to rewrite this with positive language is to frame the options as exceptions. The user is managing a list of exceptions and so the UI doesn't need the same negative language. By default, all images and their entire meta data are indexed. EXCEPTIONS The following will not be indexed [✔️] GPS data [✔️] Caption date


2

Coiled cables are in tension as soon as you stretch them beyond their at-rest state. This has two problems: It puts strain on connectors. Connectors in this case are in danger of being pulled out of their sockets and can, if plugged in at an angle to the direction of the cable in tension, put strain on the socket. Smaller devices will be pulled around by ...


1

Adding a hyperlink divert the user from your app. Better embed the google map on your app instead of adding hyperlink. Or If you only want to add a hyperlink, then add a text saying Locate our property on Google Map and upon clicking that link it should open PopUp to show your google map.


7

The design introduces other problems They tangle more than straight cables. Try putting 20 of those in a box, moving house and leaving it six months, or imagine what a work cable cupboard might be like with 100 in not stored carefully. This means the user has more of a headache to extract and use the cable they require. You can't wrap them up neatly like ...


0

Agreed with the above... whenever possible, when you have a situation like this it's nice to think of user cognitive load and reduce that as much as possible. Does it make their mind have to think? However, the times where it's ok to NOT have the primary nav go somewhere is if the action to open a drop down nav is via the click action as opposed to ...


0

Should primary navigation items always link to page? Typically speaking, yes. I believe that is the best user experience and the least confusing to the user. But if you don't, see my answer to question 3 below. If they do link to a pages is it OK if those pages are just a section landing pages or summaries of the pages below them, or ...


2

It depends on whether industry standard is relevant to your users, which in turn depends on a clear understanding of what your users are likely to do with this table. I use both DNS tables and LMHOSTS files in my work, and I use them in different ways. LMHOSTS is not something I change very often, because when new servers go up (if they need LMHOSTS ...


0

Industry standard fit to industry use and context. If it's not coherent for the use on web context, you have to change it. But keep it closest as possible to those industry standard to keep user habits. And it also depend to the synergy of those two, if you switch one from the other very often, it can be frustrating to "compare" them all the time.


1

You might try to re-word the dialog such that the meaning of the items and the checked state stays the same, but it no longer used a negation. Perhaps: By default, all images and their entire meta data are indexed. [✔️] Skip indexing gps data [✔️] Skip indexing caption date This might not be as nice as doing the complete reversal, but you negate the ...


4

There's a comprehensive article here that covers most of what you need: http://scotthurff.com/posts/how-to-design-for-thumbs-in-the-era-of-huge-screens It's based around the iPhone series but most of the information is transferable. Basically it says don't make users over stretch or over flex: for right-handed users, the bottom right-hand corner is ...


1

It really does depend on your users and their context using your software. Unless the concept of "being live" is well understood for the users (because they have learned what it means by using your app), I think you need to find a better way of phrasing it. I'd consider: thinking about other ways to phrase it and doing usability testing when you talk ...


0

There are quite a few ways of handling this. Places I would look for inspiration are iTunes shop, Amazon homepage, Google Play and eBay homepage. These places all have to deal with the issue you are asking about: Thumbnails within categories.



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