New answers tagged

1

That really depends on the usage scenarios at hand. If the user is likely to spend a non-negligible amount of time reading through the detailed information, two screens make sense. You can see this applied in GMail and other messaging apps. If, on the other hand, a user is likely to only use the detailed information at a glance, perhaps to compare the ...


0

Even if your competitor's website is slightly different, his approach can inspire you. You don't learn exclusively from similarities, but from differences too. The true similarity doesn't rely on formal aspects, but on a common principles. If there is a common principly with regard to your competitor's website and yours, there is always a possibility of ...


1

I think the way gmail handles swiping to delete is perfect: Three pieces of this interaction are key: 1. There's a clear indication that the user's swiping action means deleting. This is shown with the trash icon during the swiping motion. 2. There's clear feedback after the swipe that something was deleted. The deleted item is clearly marked with a "...


1

You can argue it either way... Yes, you should conduct it. No, you shouldn't. What matters more is your usability and how memorable and appealing you are to your customer. After all, the point of conducting the usability test on your competitor is to gain some kind of advantage. I think you can put your time, money, and energy into something that will ...


0

I can suggest to listen to Motion and Meaning podcast hosted by Val Head and Cennydd Bowles. Episode 2 in particular focuses on laying out basic principles, but all 10 episodes are absolutely worth listening. You are right about that animation for the web is in the stage of experiments, but it does not mean that there no foundation web animator should ...


0

A feature-rich star rating widget is always best to visualize the rating in your scenario. Also it should support fractional rating shown by partially filling the stars, and also it will be best if the rating widget itself can be used as an input field to retrieve rating not collected yet. You can see such a control in action here.


0

What a thoroughly confusing widget - a search field which contains a drop-down tree control which is being used to filter by facet . This will be difficult to make keyboard enabled because you need to: expand the drop-down Navigate the folders Select a folder Get out the widget It will be easier for everyone (mouse and keyboard) if you created two ...


2

There are many types of tests you can make! It depends on your goal/feature... For example, you can conduct focus groups, do user observations, have user interviews.. or you can do something less direct like running A/B tests. My favorite is to conduct user interviews because if the user can explain something, it means it has caught their attention! ...


0

The main reason why it's important to show all five stars is because it would not be clear what the star limit is otherwise. (If I'm on a page with 3 stars, I could think that that's the top mark.) I'd also suggest going with outlined stars or you could use two shades of gray, one very light.


0

Graphic design is part of the user experience, it's just a specialized part. Motion design, too. It would make sense to me to talk to a graphic designer in the same manner as to a fellow UX designer.


1

In a word, no. There is no consensus on swipe actions in apps. To illustrate the lack of consensus, here's a quick list of some applications of swipe actions: (When I say "swipe right", I mean swiping from left to right.) Google Android notifications: both left and right for dismissing Android recents: both left and right for dismissing Android wear: ...


1

A good summary. Making sure that you keep prompting the participant to think aloud is really important. What they say about why they are doing something is as important as the record of what they actually do. Also - don't attempt to take notes on what happens, your notes are to prompt you to ask questions at the right second in real time as the test ...


3

Rocket Surgery Made Easy by Steve Krug is the golden standard to read here, especially if you don't have a lot of experience and need to get something done fast. The process tends to be: Look at your product and see what needs to be tested, prepare some tasks and situations to test. Find participants that fit your target audience -- don't underestimate ...


0

OK, here's my take: You have at least 3 elements to consider: menu item link to screen a menu item with an associated behavior While I have no info about what do this settings affect, based on the information provided you have to consider this: menu items are at a "local" level (that is, they show in current screen) arrows are a "shuttle" to a ...


1

Google has something that might help you a lot. You can find the default and accepted general swipe gestures on mobile applications on the following link: Gestures Patterns by Google Users are really familiar with this kind of gestures and their actions.


0

I agree with Splatz that gestures have no affordance, unless gestures that are widely accepted already by the general public. Companies such as Apple has created some standards and have advertised those standards to customers. So I think you can safely use those well-recognized gestures, but not on core functions and definitely try not be creative on this. ...


2

If you think about it with some imagination, the graphic designer is also driven by a "user-centered mindset" (please notice the quotation marks). In this regard, you are both the same. A good graphic designer won't design something aesthetically pleasant for himself only. When he designs something, his purpose is to please people. He does it so that "...


0

The main UX differences between pages and dialogs are: A dialog can have fixed dimensions, whereas a page has to scale. I'd suggest sketching the screens in your payment process for both a tablet and a smartphone in this case. In a person's mind, a page is a new place, whereas a dialog is the same place. Consider how the page looks and whether it's clear ...


0

Leave alone for payments, generally users don't like modal boxes and find them annoying. From sheer bad experiences like newsletter sign ups the reflex reaction is to close even without reading them (i've personally seen this in user testing sessions). So I've not go with option 1 just that reason.


1

How often dos the user need to access these settings? Because if it's only occasionally, then I don't think it's necessary to display that option permanently. How about this: Display something like "Edit" in the top right corner. When the user taps that control you display the settings icon on all the rows. Then it will probably also be clear what the ...


2

Oh! I thought menu 4 & 5 weren't tappable because of the missing arrows. So based on this new information and your comment on Big_chair's post I have the following idea: User will be sent to "Menu 1" screen when tapped on Menu 1. On the Navigation Bar of Menu 1 a cog will appear, making the user able to edit the settings (either on the same screen or ...


1

I agree with Philip that I adore the centered design more, and about putting the snippets always on the same side to ensure consistency. But here are some tweaks. Have you considered something like this? Have the timeline split the screen approximately 4:6 horizontally. (thus you will have more space for the diff windows, you can put them on top of each ...


2

Looking at the image, the first thing that is somewhat similar came to my mind was, Windows Registry Editor. According to me there are 2 changes you could do, they are: 1) Keeping three columns as it is and just removing (replacing) top and below buttons of ADD,DELETE, SAVE & CANCEL. 2) Changing layout to two columns and on double click of attribute ...


3

Be careful when using colors because your choice on colors has an impact on your entire presentation and brand. You may want to use this opportunity to reinforce your brand by using its colors to symbolize the different levels. Also, you want to make sure the colors you pick are pleasant and in harmony. To create good color schemes and you can use one of ...


1

I would go with the center-aligned approach. The reason is because: Having the whole snippet adds context to the diff change. I recommend indicating in the snippet where the change occurred because it is not currently easy to determine that information at a glance. I would not need to scroll to the bottom of the snippet to see the diff, which is probably ...


1

In our program we showed an empty list with a message saying something like "Select your criteria and click Search."and users hated it. Apparently some were thinking that there were no employees in the list. We end up showing the first page (10 records) of the unfiltered list. I personally like the idea of showing the most recently "used" records. Meaning ...


0

You can try http://clueapp.com/ http://www.bounceapp.com/ http://www.reelapp.com/ all by Zurb, all of them free. They don't have a lot of users though, and quite probably you'll need to try their paid services if you want some real feedback. Otherwise, try 22 Web Design Critique Websites To Help get feedback, although most of the sites listed are dead, ...


0

One of the things I do on a daily basis is check out sites like: http://www.awwwards.com/ http://www.cssdesignawards.com/ These sites are updated daily and show trends on web technologies. Others vote on Design, Usability, Creativity and Content for each site and you are able to see what it is that people are working towards.


0

If possible it is better to have two separate buttons see the post: Expand/collapse all - Combined or separate button(s)?


4

My usual advice for a situation like this is to suggest going back to the core concept of what you're trying to convey... and then to look at other places where colour is used to convey a similar concept. In this case, if you're looking for a visual metaphor to convey a level of mastery in a given field then the metaphor that leaps immediately to mind is ...


3

This is a complex matter pertaining to some principles of gamification. If gamification is what you are aiming for, then your concern might be justified. According to Gartner, gamification is such a sensible matter, that recent gamified applications were bound to fail meeting business objectives, primarily due to poor design: Gamification at Work The ...


2

All the gestures are hidden from the user until they either are taught them or accidentally discover them. Gestures have no affordance. Obviously it does not help if app developers don't follow platform conventions. Onboarding techniques and TV advertising (I am thinking Apple here) can help with education. From a design perspective gestures should only be ...


0

Made a design for a gaming service some years back. The bar below indicated ranks in a modified Elo ranking system. The design scheme was inspired by karate belt colors. The color blocks were displayed near the profile picture of each ranked member. White [new beginners] to black [experts]. I haven't included any theory, but I just thought you should have ...


0

Absolutely, a one page website benefits tremendously from a sticky or semi-sticky menu. (hide on scroll-down, reappear on scroll-up). It improves multiple use cases such as a quick scan of your content, deliberate navigation, and mid-scanning navigation. Luckily there's alot of research on this topic: Sticky Menus Sticky menus are 22% quicker to navigate ...


1

First of all, there is a need to prove it does have a negative influence on usability. So yes, test or study is due. It might uncover marketing team was right or that nobody was right. Then there is a question on what exactly you mean by "what to do with this". If this is about go/no go, it should be a decision of the Product Owner. If the marketing is ...


0

Definitely test test test and film the users reactions to the feature. A film of a user completely dismissing a feature will win over any decision maker...


2

In terms of a users experience whatever is fastest will be best. If you can get all records on the page and search them in the memory of the browser faster than you can send a search request over the wire that will be the better way of doing it. Unless you can know why people would be searching the employee records in some way I don't think you can possibly ...


4

Here's a different idea, what about a department list? Just brainstorming in terms of what people might be doing when it comes to looking at a list of employees. If I know the name of the person I'm looking for, I'll directly search for that. I'm guessing the 2nd most common case would probably be "I know the person is in XYZ department". Instead of ...


1

I'd suggest trying to find an UI pattern that fits this purpose - so users are familiar with it, and will find it intuitive to click there to 'expand' and have more content. In your case, perhaps 'card expand' according to Google guidelines (Material Design? is a possibility? Cards: https://material.google.com/components/cards.html Panels: https://material....


0

That's a tough assignment! You're problem will be that users hate change (when done wrong). It's always advisable to make a change in small increments, working towards a final design. So you'll need to look for similarities between the websites. Improve on it, without making it really different. This is all really vague and one of the toughest things to ...


1

The rule in ecommerce is to NEVER return an empty page after search. Show similar items or when the search query is to incoherent, show popular items or items on sale. But you're asking about default. If there's room you could show something. Recent searches would be a good one. Facebook displays those if you linger in the search box for a few seconds. I ...


1

I would suggest an icon combined with text. Maybe the word expand or show more etc, something along those lines as there might not be a stand alone icon for exactly what you are needing.


5

Unlike B2C shopping sites where you can display a list of popular items or new promotions, there is nothing useful that you can display when it comes to finding employees, so a simple search field would suffice. You might also want to consider including a department filter if it help the user to narrow down the search criteria (assuming your data model ...


23

The use of distinct colours (e.g. green, orange, red or bronze, silver, gold) can be subject to interpretation, as there are usual meaning associated with specific colours depending on cultural, language, context or any other number of factors. A similar question was asked previously on UXSE, where the target audience was for young children: Which colors ...


0

Work with the team that introduced the feature to understand their underlying goal. Collaborate with them to conduct user research to determine whether the feature meets their underlying goal, as well as what its impact is on the user experience. Collaborate with them to identify solutions to the problems that are uncovered in the user research and work ...


0

Depending on the tool you use (for instance Visual website optimiser or optimizely) you can target the whole site in the URL Targeting setting by simply changing the setting to URL Contains and putting it in like so > yourdomainnamehere.whatever or by using matches regex /yourdomain.whatever/


0

I think one reason the browser doesn't intervene at that stage with a standardised message is because it would never look the same as the site you are currently viewing - it wouldn't be seemless and therefore could actually be detrimental to the user experience. To the user, it could look like you have been redirected to a completely different website, with ...


6

Test it That's all there is to it. Every feature has to have a purpose. Clearly state the reason behind this terrible thing marketing did and identify a way to measure it's impact. If it fails the test, it has to go. That's just good business. Choose the right metrics Kerry Rodden at Google Ventures developed the HEART framework to assist in determining ...


0

From my experience, every feature implemented on the site has to have some form of KPI (key performance index) or score assigned to it. The KPI/score can be used to measure & track, the usefulness of the feature users, Or the value that it bring to the site / business (SEO improvement, convergence, user/customer engagement). Have periodic review of the ...


0

Usability suffers, If by mistake you click on a facebook video, can you go back from full screen mode by clicking again ? No you can't, clicking again now works for Pausing/Restarting which is completely inconsistent. So you now have two different behaviours dependent on which kind of view you are (normal vs fullscreen). It is utterly annoying. When ...



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