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Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


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Reuters articles are probably written to serve both print and web and they don't have a rewrite-for-web process in place. CNN's markup strikes me as dated in many respects (note it's XHTML, not HMTL5 - not that there's anything wrong with that), possibly an artifact of an older CMS or other technology. Many of these outlets still publish in print and/or ...


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Assuming users already entered the filter information before landed on the result page (e.g. most sites like http://www.hotwire.com/ have initial form before hitting the search page), it's unlikely that users will need to tweak the provided info again (look into your metrics if any). However, it is more likely for users to modify secondary filters that are ...


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It's likely an unintentional artifact of the platform both sites use: WordPress. People who wrote/formatted the articles aren't UX, SEO or accessibility experts. The WordPress WYSIWYG editor is terrible when it comes to adding headings to text. The dropdown you need to switch from paragraphs to headings is hidden within the so call "kitchen sink" row. ...


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In order to show data is related in the same table there is a 3 step process. Put the data next to the related elements (you did) Show some classification of which data fields are related (you did) Tell the user why its related! Because it may not be obvious See my design. You could alternate colors between the related fields and maybe when they hover ...


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Your current approach is heading in the right direction. When your users use this data regularly, they will already know the relationship between the groups. Switching background color is one way of creating contrast between groups. Other ways would be to use line separators and white space. One thing you can have do to make it more obvious is by ...


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Use grouping horizontal lines and eliminate the verticals one. Horizontal lines helps to lead the eye along the line, while vertical lines become a barrier along the eye path:


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Yes, it make sense ...if the only other choice is a 1-line input box. One line input boxes are terrible for editing long text (i.e. significant box overflow), for reasons that are almost completely obvious. They're bad on the web and even worse on tablets or mobile phones. If you have no other way to create space for the long paths, then a multi-line ...


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Don’t break file paths It opens up too much room for error. The same goes for URLs. Yes, it can be done, but I've never encountered a scenario where a better solution didn't exist. If your user is highly technical, they'll be familiar with long file paths. In my experience, they will prefer keeping it all on one line. They'll be comfortable with a ...


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If you're going to allow users to place long paths, I would opt for a paste button of the sort. (make sure they can paste a long path in the text box). In many years using windows I don't remember many times where ctrl+v has failed me.


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I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


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In response to your comments my answer is this. If it improves the user experience to be able to see and edit the file name and path by breaking it over multiple lines then I would suggest its sensible to do so. As long as you keep in mind accuracy. Perhaps a better suggestion would be to breakdown the file path into it's constituent parts and allow users ...


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The issues with using gestures in mobile sites is more of a developmental limitation, in my opinion. In the event of an error, you risk losing essential functionality if a gesture is key in navigating throughout a site. We see gestures in apps because they are developed for specific devices using the method that is made FOR that device (i.e. Swift, etc). ...


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If there is a special interraction with this file path that start a special event in your application, you may make it larger. The multi-line choice can be confusing if the path is totally filled : So I do not recommend to make it multiline. If it is a common file path, moreover next to Browse, make it one line and aligned with the rest of the ...


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Landing pages are typically focused on ONE type of customer. Additional/ parallel customers would need their own landing pages. So ideally, you'd be focusing on getting the user to do one thing. More options on a page doesn't translate into more interaction from users; it takes away the user's intent. If you go through the landing pages featured on ...


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WCAG guideline 2.1 (Compliance level A - highest) states: Make all functionality available from a keyboard. If the function of the button and the dropdown trigger is different, users must be able to access both. So first "A" then "B" is the answer. Then comes guideline 2.4.7 which state that each should have its own focus indicator. I think your ...


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I agree with NO. Immersive is a heavy word to me. In regard to an interface I think of Coopers interface postures and his sovereign posture which is reserved for large feature applications used continuously at full screen on a standard monitor. As an owner of a Pebble and an Android Wear watch I feel the nature of a smart watch should be transient in ...


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The short answer, Yes, they can be immersive but if only the user wants to get immersed in them. The focus however should be on getting the content to the user quickly and contextually The long answer Apple's products branding philosophy is completely based upon establishing personal connections between the users and their products enabling them to ...


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It's not answerable without UX goals Start by ordering your UX goals with the form. Rank the following: Minimize UX friction / maximize convenience - Favors buttons since (a) the interaction is one-click; and (b) buttons are easier to use than checkboxes; Ensure that the terms and conditions are read - Favors checkbox because they create more ...


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What you need is not abstract percentages which seem needlessly specific anyway, but statuses that shed a positive light onto the current situation. These should be visualizable in a symbol/icon and phrasable in few English words. The following examples are just a shot from the hip, since I’m not really a pub guy: 0% – relaxing atmosphere 20% – instant ...


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I suggest the "I Agree" button. We all know that the "I Agree" button is just some legal mumbo jumbo that neither the developers nor the end user truly care about. By having the checkbox, we lose the "I Do Not Agree" button. This makes it more difficult and frustrating for the end user to quit, which they should be able to do easily and at any time. For ...


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Actually it should be "C" Reason: When you hit the Tab button the focus should be on the Primary Area, as mentioned by Alexey as well. But the focus should shift to another button on hitting Tab again and not on the secondary area. There is no need for focus to go on Secondary area. Because when the focus is on Primary, hitting ENTER should display the ...


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My personal suggestion would be: Have an unchecked checkbox with a description, and disabled 'Continue' button Once the user checks the checkbox enable the continue button Also, make sure you are not violation the law by this. Check your country's legal requirement for user agreement. For example, some countries (like Germany) require an approach that ...


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The problem with the "split button" is that it is not just one control but that it is presented as one. I've seen people pressing the button while expecting opening the menu. Since they are seperate controls my first impression was to focus on A when pressing the tab key, and focus on B when pressing tab again. But I agree with @AlexeyKolchenko that it ...


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The idea you are proposing sounds great. Looks great! But the question to be asked here is that the intent of providing T&C is getting a declaration from the user that they have read it, understood it and hence they are signing the document (By checking the check box) and are ready to take the next step. By replacing the check box with the button, you ...


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I'm not sure if there are legal reasons that would dictate that the user has to acknowledge reading the Terms & Conditions, but with several clients, I've used something along the lines of "By submitting your profile information, you agree to our terms and conditions." Terms and conditions would be a link that would open in an overlay if, heaven forbid, ...


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In many cases the 'agree' functionality is found at the end of a (long) form. IMHO the actual question would be, if having two submit buttons is good or bad. Does it make sense to the user to submit a form he/she doesn't comply to? Technically two buttons on one form would work – but what would be the next step / the next page the user sees? Would you offer ...


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Do you want user to read your terms and conditions? The more steps he has to do on this page, the more time he can read and not bothering you with things written there. It's why a lot of Terms and Agreements requiere to you to scroll to the very bottom before clicking on the button I Agree. It protects you because you have done something to ensure the user ...


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Depends, are their previous and next steps? If yes and you have multiple next buttons consistency is preferred. If you start the application, get this screen and afterwards the application appears: the 2nd one - less clicks, less thinking.


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Regarding designing a longer form The problem with two columns forms is users would be confused by the two column layout and interact differently needing them to more time to get the task done. To quote this article One of the problems with form fields in multiple columns is that your users are likely to interpret the fields inconsistently. ...


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Having inputs on the right side of the tablet that are easy to hit with the thumbs is almost irrelevant, or a at least a pretty low level concern. Users will typically rush through forms to get them over with, and having inputs scattered around the page will take away from the discoverability of inputs and their labels. Left aligned inputs and a scrollable ...


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The solution here would be to go for progressive disclosure where you first show the list of questions and then tell the user that he needs to select a question. once a question is selected, then you can show the related content. Here is a quick wireframe to illustrate the flow download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Here's an idea you may be interested in: It reduces the required space for your marker, and the numbers provide more vision of the map. Outlining them makes them easier to read. Kind of plain. But it's withstood the test of time.


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As far as I can see we have four (4) required items: Who are you. Can you prove that? Which name should be displayed. Possibly additional information fields. Who are you? This can be the traditional username. Or an email address. Or a piece of hardware (e.g. information supplied the chip on a debit card). Both a regular username and some username ...


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As I understand, you are trying to capture the behaviour of your users while interacting with your application. This is basically usability testing. There are two ways to capture such data Direct and Indirect Direct ways include interviews and observation. You can team up and ask your users to perform a set of tasks. While the testing is going on, the ...


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That NNGroup article was, even back then, completely outdated and rather uninformed … HTML über alles. The biggest Pros of PDF are: • the integrity of contents: all needed resources are part of the document, and the integrity can be assured by applying a digital signature to the document. • the integrity of presentation: the way the document appears is ...


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Good for maintaining a precise formatting (for printing) That's really the sole benefit online. And is really what PDFs were designed for in the first place. Alas, that's usually not a major benefit in general if the goal is to disseminate information online. Can be easily saved/copied/etc because it's in one file True, though it's fairly easy to ...


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Along with the pro's you mentioned, here are some more PDF's enable offline access to secured content PDF's can be used for forms which can be filled offline (e.g. i-9 ) which are required to be in a specific format. With regards to cons, here are the obvious ones Some PDF's can be very large which use up the users data or delay him considerably PDF's ...


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Something not mentioned but very important is that parallax effects often break a users mental model of a page. If we look at an extreme example like this one from Sony, we can see some of the shortcomings very easily. No way to navigate, no awareness of state. Essentially it's not a web page, it's an ad(or "experience") that hijacks scrolling for another ...


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See: (a) Frederick D., Mohler J., Vorvoreanu M., Glotzbach R. (2015) The effects of parallax scrolling on user experience in web design, Journal of Usability Studies, 10 (2), 87-95: http://uxpajournal.org/the-effects-of-parallax-scrolling-on-user-experience-in-web-design/ Excerpt from article abstract: Participants believed that the parallax scrolling ...


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Have you thought about conducting a survey as well? It can be very useful to do it before interviews, because you will be able to reach more people and gather more data. People will provide more honest feedback since there is no pressure and less stress. This data will give you a base for your interviews. Since you already will have some information, in ...


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I'm curious about your research design. Your control group should have the identical experience but without the treatment. In other words, the only difference between the 2 groups should be whether or not they receive the recommendations. You are potentially creating a confound by only giving the behavioral questions to the experimental group. Just asking ...


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In Britain, at least, there are architectural/plumbing issues in the past that we had to deal with. This guy explains it better than I could: https://youtu.be/HfHgUu_8KgA


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Hmmm, grouping together markers may not serve the purpose. From what I know, markers are used to uniquely identify something or somewhere. Grouping together unique identities is tricky and can be misinforming. Instead of being represented as one big marker, why not markers become small dots when zoomed out and then have the location precisely cataloged so ...


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What's your question exactly? If it's how to represent unregistered users in the app once a conversation has been set up, you can learn from any service that has a representation of unknown users. E.g. what Google Apps does when anonymous people are viewing a document (representing them by "anonymous animals"). Or what this site does with non-registered ...


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It's kind of hard to have a conversation by yourself :) They can't really have a conversation until there is someone to talk to. Maybe you can "request conversation" and it remains in the "request" state until someone joins - either a user who already has the app joins or someone who gets the email installs the app and joins.


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I would divide it in public and private. BTW I'm not aware of mobile conventions (maybe top buttons should be inside a hamburger menu to save space or to have 1 control with all the possible actions in that page). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups An alternative would be to make the "Choose participants dialog" a ...


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Talking about rotational approach. No intention to comment on creativity. I liked it. It looks different. However I do feel it is somewhat over engineering. This approach works for number columns. For non number column, you would need a separate set of icons. More maintenance would be involved in this approach. In addition, as already pointed out by a ...


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So there are two approaches coming from a cartographic standpoint that could work in your situation, but it depends on what you want the user to do with these markers. The first involves the user using these as just a visual aid meaning they would have no interactivity and be just static images to inform the user. In this case, I would a pie chart marker ...


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You could keep a single pin as the marker but organise a simple visualisation within the pin so the data stays 'contained'. You could increase the size of the pin a little if you have more items to show. For example: Or moving the icon outside the inner circle: You could change the shape of the pin: And you could colour the pin according to the ...



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