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I would suggest you to read this paper : An Estimate of a User Learning Curve on Web-Based interface Using Eye Tracking Equipment I am unsure if there is any specific research to check if custom Form elements need a higher learning curve. But It is obvious that a user will take time to adapt to any new elements. In simple words the best interface is one ...


-1

I would go for that:(mockup style, need some design)


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Can we go back a step and ask the question, have you verify that a filter to limit results based on frequency is actually something that users want? It sounds like a highly artificial metric for filtering and I'm wondering if this is the reason why users don't understand how this control works as oppose to them not understand how the UI control works. What ...


1

Modal boxes are helpful for quick tasks or small notices where it is too cumbersome to load a new screen, and the user will want to return to the main screen after processing the modal. It's sometimes okay for modals to overflow a window (see pinterest for example). The form you are describing seems like the opposite of this situation: It has a lot of ...


1

It's hard to analyze the full interaction because the clip doesn't show how the selector showed up (did it slide in? load with the page? appear after user clicked on the dropdown control at the top?) Based on the very limited clip: The page locks in the user's attention. The user is focused on the top where you have the Please select control and ...


1

This isn't necessarily your responsibility. This is Jony Ive's responsibility now. You're using a native element and we can really only assume that the person is somewhat familiar with the device they are using. Do you know if the person performing the task regularly uses an iPhone? Were they testing on an actual iPhone or an emulator? About the only ...


1

Based off of the clip, I would suggest closing the selector if it is open and the user clicks again. In doing this, it would give your users some kind of visual feedback. This would lead them to explore and see what changes, which would then help them notice the iOS selector at the bottom of the screen.


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In this scenario to give a visual cue about the unseen screens Number of Dots as per the screen count A Horizontal scroll bar can be displayed at the bottom of the screen. This gives the user a hint and also will be self explanatory about the swipe. Anyway to emphasize the content on the screen visibility/opacity of the Dots/Scroll can be increased ...


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This accepted answer from a different question already gives different ways to handle this. Yet I am somehow inclined not to give a persistent visual indication of swipe actions. Mobile devices are hard pressed for real estate. So people tend use as much space as possible to show what is relevant. Having a persistent indicator of swipe actions will take a ...


2

To give you a concrete example: have a look at Command-T which certainly solves the first of your problems and does use such a dialog (displaying a list of files). It targets developers working with rather large trees of code files, just like the Visual Studio plugin you mentioned. Its core algorithm is based on subsequence matching which is pretty useful ...


1

Establish a UX strategy The application has been actively developed for 10+ years. Unfortunately, there hasn't been much focus on UX when building the application. Shifting focus from a development led process to a UX led process is no easy undertaking particularly when your application has been actively developed for more than 10 years! So you ...


2

I guess there are a few different things you want to find out, and I think for me UX is about asking the right questions rather than trying to find the solution, simply because you can find the right solution for the wrong problem and not end up better off than where you started from. So in order of priority: Find out what you know - you mentioned that ...


0

Limiting the number of options as a determiner for which UI input method to use breaks the logic for these elements. Drop-down menus can be single or multi-select and if the intent is to limit the user to a single choice you should use radio buttons and set a default selection. Drop-down menus have issues with long lists of options as well forcing the ...


1

You can try two pictures: open windows which represents checked state closed windows which represents unchecked state


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it's generally a good practice to not treat objects as "records" in a database, as they vary not only in number of properties, attached entities, etc, but also on importance, and their place in the workflow. An object might have a full-blown single page datasheet of its own in one workflow, and might be automatically created just from a string in the other ...


4

Please consider accessibility in addition to the visual experience. I know your question was about visual design, just want to make the accessibility in form controls is considered in this conversation. One way to implement it would be to pair the graphic interaction with a native checkbox element. It also needs a text alternative like a label or alt ...


1

Where should I start? By starting over. Any software that's been continuously updated for a decade+ is due for a complete UI rewrite. How you do that is simply too broad of a question to answer with any specificity, but I'd start with things like: hire a UX consultant do a lot of user testing and, more importantly, user research investigate UI ...


9

I suggest that you use borders on hover. Links have a border-bottom on hover (compare on wikipedia) and a cursor: pointer; that helps the user associate that the image is clickable. At second, add a checkbox to the image. This helps the user understand that it can be checked:


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Why would you replace a 'universally recognized" pattern for something that does the same but not as well? If you simply want to display a photo, why not combine them both? If you want to save space, you could even place the caption and checkbox on top of the image.


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Select the first one (or current one) by default, and show this by highlighting it with a border of some kind. This then acts as a cue to the user that they can change the selection to another and that the items must therefore be clickable. And that'll work on a touch device where there is no hover anyway.


3

Observations: Given the complexity of the control, I would strongly suggest showing the 'Window' image caption all the time instead of on hover. It's pretty complicated and unintuitive to have the caption show up on hover, but then also have the image itself be a toggle. This is a good candidate for material-design inspired interaction. Material Design ...


1

We don't live in that world anymore Some history: The Yes/No and OK/Cancel buttons were created in the very early days of graphical user interfaces (they actually predated that on text screens, but for UX purposes let's start with windows). The constraints at the time were very different from today: Screen sizes and resolutions were a lot smaller, so ...


0

In reference to confirmation dialogs, 'Yes' and 'No' are answers while 'Cancel' is a way out of the process without answering.


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It's simple: don't make me think. Those three buttons have been around forever, users know what the intended result should be. Providing the "cancel" button allows the user to opt-out of making a decision where necessary.


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It depends on the page or form where it's being used. Typically, "Yes" or "No" might be the simpliest and most straight forward approach. "Yes" being a positive action, "No" being the negative, and "Cancel" allows the user to back out without taking action on the form. Wordy complicated buttons might not get read by the user. Also, "Yes" and "No" usually ...


0

It's not a bad practice in general if you have a reason for it and the visual and interaction design will be good. On the other hand yes, it might be confusing and happens to be confusing in software that was not designed and implemented properly. Hope it helps, if not, feel free to attach a sketch of what you have. The CRUD and entity things are pretty ...


0

Depending on your use case, you can either provide a default value of the combo-box with the filter most of your users are going to use, (e.g. like To and From date if this is some ticketing site). You can also have a not-selected drop down that enforces user to select a value before you show next options to the user. This is useful when you want user to ...


1

If there are only 3 items in the drop-down (interval, comparison, options), couldn't you could display them in tabs instead of a drop down? Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 This won't work if you've got more than a few items in your drop-down. Also I'm wondering if those numbered boxes at the top of your screen are tabs or steps. If there are tabs then ...


4

There are several features you can use, which may be combined if appropriate: Status bar. A status bar in the window can indicate that the process is underway or not. Ideally, the status bar will include a progress bar and/or percent done and/or estimated time remaining. If possible, place the status information in the corner of the window so the user can ...


0

If it's a Web page, and the problem is to notify the user, then you can go with buttons instead of auto save. One advantage of using button is user can revert back until he presses save button and you don't have to write code to retrieve the previous changes. Also using JS you can write a method for page leave event in case the save or cancel button is ...


2

Which of these things is not like the other? I tried lowering the opacity to 50% to see how it looked and without the context of the mouse cursor this could be interpreted as a disabled button. With the context of the mouse cursor, however, I really don't think users would get confused. On the other hand, highlighting the button feels more inviting and ...


0

I agree that it is currently a bad practice, primarily because it is returning to the days of metaphoric design. The designer is trying to inspire the appearance of (and a realworld reference to) a frosted sheet of glass floating above the surface of the rest of the interface. In this age of Modern-UI, it is common practice to avoid metaphoric/skeuomorphic ...


2

I see your point – but I'll try to explain in two paragraphs why I think it's not 'bad practice' at all, while personally I also dislike this effect. Trying to imaging the opposite approach: every element has an oppacity <1 and only the 'highlighted' element has an oppacity =1 does not feel 'right' or 'better' 'highlight' in the context of a group of ...


3

If comment area and action buttons are disabled during selecting the state from drop-down, you can have the explained behavior. You can create less than 1 sec waiting time to activate the comment area, this will create a connection between drop down and the rest of the elements. I think that it can be nice if you can use a visual element for selecting ...


4

The purpose of the hover state is to give visual feedback to the user highlighting an interaction opportunity, which does not necessarily require a visual highlighting. While it has commonly been implemented in a way where a solid and prominent color was lightened on hover, this is not the only valid use. The appropriate use will depend on the context and ...


2

1. This is a well-trodden problem Digital designers have been grappliing with this problem since scheduling, project management, and manufacturing planning apps were written in the 80's. 2. Graphical representation is non-trivial When you have multiple, arbitrary dependencies, it becomes very difficult to show dependencies graphically. A simple ...


0

I would probably reverse the order of the columns in your first table and maybe even call them Prerequisites -- things that are required before doing this task. Something like this...


0

In your example, instead of displaying tasks 2 and 3 vertically, you can display them side by side, in more of a flow chart representation, and they both connect independently to task 4. This may get cumbersome depending on how many tasks you're visualizing. There may need to be more cues, such as shape and color to help organize a large array of tasks.


0

To achieve information persistence across pages and gain even more flexibility in linking to important parts of the website, why not consider a more creative use of the footer. below is an idea: This is an excellent idea, because it allows users to contact you without having to navigate to the contact page. source: Informative And Usable ...


0

One solution would be to use an accordion/step-like flow. The user would select the filter in step 1 and each accordion/step section has means allowing the user to go to next (or previous) sections. Example: http://jsfiddle.net/rmardeni/NDncE/49/ (I didn't create this, just Googled it)


1

This is not a "feature", it's bad (or unfortunate) design, and there are two reasons for it, and one it technical: The height of either content in the modal or the content of the page is higher than the designer anticipated. The technical cost of setting a proper height of the modal was considered too high (and in unfortunate circumstances near ...


0

From a UX perspective I can say that it can help users browse long sub-content pages while keeping the original position in the main page. For example sometimes there is the demand to have the main page as a one-page layout. This could be a very content rich / long page – but still you'll also have content rich / long sub-pages. Opening a sub-page in a ...


0

Do you even need drop-down for only two choices? Instead of browse button you can have label "Templates" and then two buttons: Program From computer


0

I read somewhere that YouTube started out with a five star approach, but changed it with a "like" system later. The reason for this was that most ratings given were either a 1 or a 5. Do you expect many nuanced ratings? Also see: http://youtube-global.blogspot.nl/2009/09/five-stars-dominate-ratings.html


0

Depends on the next steps: The left one let's me change my decision again and again since it's always on top of what we are doint The right one is part of a (sort of) wizard with selected steps (in a way) I select where to find my template and go on the next step, and going back to change my decision will take a lot more effort


1

If it links to another page, why not use the standard link analogy? The convention is well known for users. Otherwise a small symbol next to the row title in Tohster's solution would also work. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

I think it's hard to solve this problem without changing styling or adding elements. However, you may be able to indicate the navigation in a way that minimizes the impact on styling. The basic issue here is, the section titles and row headers are perceived as passive because they almost always are. Therefore, you will need some kind of indicator to ...


0

look at how for example facebook handles this: first they show you what the website can and might access and under that it shows you what it cant do. this order is important so the user understands what he accepts when giving you his information and what he doesnt need to worry about when accepting the form. http://i.imgur.com/0Y92Zxo.png sorry this is ...


2

I really like the idea! however I wouldn't decouple this into two UI features, I would combine them in a single UI like below: which conveys that both comments and contributions are equally important, this is how I have visualised it: I would also add a list of recently discussed subjects along with information about what the user did (Icons). Did he ...


4

I would propose a third option. Make the button and image clickable It has become a convention that images are clickable on websites and in applications. My personal experience with this is during my time at a webshop where user research pointed out that almost 70% clicked the image of the product in a list of products in order to navigate to the product ...



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