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Idea: Add a graph. Label red for long times, yellow for medium. Graphs display potential for "short circuiting". "Any" conditions are put in parallel, "All" conditions are in series. This would result in overload for casual, light users, but experienced users may find the graph useful.


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Learned helplessness is going to forever be your enemy. No matter what you do to make your login form super-efficient, there will always be some other forms out there. As soon as a user tries to tab on a poorly designed login page and the focus jumps to some random link, or completely fails to appear, they will fall back on their trusty click-to-input ...


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This question asks for an opinion, rather than an objective answer that can be "accepted". It seems to be a survey.


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The UI you have presented is not consistent either. It has visual consistency. But the interaction is not consistent. When a user adds a form, it is added below the dropdown, but when a new field is added, it is done above it. This affects consistency as well. The user has to get used to one of this pattern (either adding above or below). Otherwise, it ...


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Consistency + heirarchy = mo betta There's nothing wrong with consistency among controls. I think the problem you're sensing is hierarchy. In your example, adding a field (the low-level item) is more prominent than added a form (the high-level item). The controls are identical, but the ground contrast is greater within the form edit module. With a few ...


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The ideal answer is "test both" and see which works better for your users. Without testing, if you have to make a choice, clarity always trumps consistency. Focusing on your specific answer, I would suggest a different UX pattern for adding fields to make it even more different than adding a form. For example, eliminating the dropdown completely, and ...


2

Multiple interconnecting popups is in itself not a very delightful experience, since it causes confusion. For example, can I as a user step back to the previous popup when the next popup appears if I believe that my action on the first popup was incorrect? What happens if I accept the terms stated in the first popup, but cancel in the second, is the action ...


2

In my opinion I would leave it as is and let the users choose (I would think more would use google than twitter anyway), but if you want to do it that way I see a couple ways you could do it: Just tell the user your preferred option Have google as the default option showing, then under a dropdown panel of sorts have alternative options (twitter, fb, etc.) ...


0

Although following your suggestion of providing password information when entering a password may make it easier to get the right password (although this is still arguable), it comes at the cost of worse security. If someone needs an easier to remember password, let them choose that, but by you revealing something about their password when entering, you ...


1

Just change the text of the button to 'Add Another' or 'Add More' to indicate user has already bought this item and he can add more such items if he prefers. I think ebay or amazon has this type of shopping cart.


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To answer your question, because in your context 0 does not mean a better position than 1, then the 0 entries should be displayed after the last relevant entry (ranking > 0) when sorting ASC, and before them when sorting DESC. If you can change the back-end, then either replace 0 with 9999 (or other relevant positive value), or add a new column or alter ...


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The form of the input field its self should be indicator enough to show how much text is or will be expected in the field: If your expecting a short input => use a single line text field. If your expecting a larger amount of input => use a multi line text field Depending on the amount of text use two, three or more lines for the multi line text field. ...


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It sounds like the main case is for people looking for the easiest in and out. There are obviously multiple options for any interface pattern but I'd suggest using a mix of tab bar and one-step back. That means you'd follow a similar nested pattern like you have today, segregating the categories to the given tab bar items which would act as individual home ...


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Validate hierarchy You say it's not an important part of the app, but are you sure? If your app has many potential views and users are going to spend a lot of time with it, a Favorites feature can gain a lot of traction. Follow expectations Once you're certain about feature hierarchy, it's good to stick with the OS's conventions. The main nav bar (along ...


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Since the inbox is going to be of variable length I would recommend putting the favorites feature in a fixed location. If I were to mark my favorites then not check my inbox for a while it could be buried hundreds of emails deep. In my yahoomail I have over 19k emails, that would take ages to get to my favorites at the end of the inbox (I know this is an ...


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If you're displaying the value 0 you should definitely have it before 1 and 2, etc. When you sort based on ordinal values, you should be consistent, otherwise you are almost certainly going to confuse users. For example, what if you have many items, and the items with 0 value are shown at the end of a list 1 million long. That would be terrible UX wise. ...


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What you're looking for can be achieved by Filtered and/or Faceted Search. Basically, you use these filters to narrow the scope of the search, guiding the user through the search process and clearing iterative actions. For example, in your app: You can see some great examples, guidelines and "how to's" here


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I think Amazon has something which would be of interest:


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From the top of my mind, for traditional desktop interfaces, no research backing to list: "the biggest button" a.k.a. desktop corners and edges (you can ram the mouse in at any speed Sub menus open centered around the selected parent menu item, to reduce overall travel time big controls "magnetic" controls (like snapping edges when resizing or moving ...


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Look at your target users and see what the existing best practices are for ergonomic UIs. It is going to vary by industry. I'll give a specific example of a UI that we implemented to reduce RSI. Our company introduced a new order management system about 18 months ago. Through our user research, we discovered that our power users often complained about the ...


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This can be done using both fixed header for batch operations and keeping the card views. Check out how InVision handled it: http://take.ms/Fm21V


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While the accepted answer seems to be "don't ask" -- the researcher in me wants to improve the corpus of knowledge in the world. If you were hypothetically providing a quality of service that would genuinely be improved be asking for this information, a way could be as follows: Optional Checkbox What's in the checkbox list is what makes it interesting: ...


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If your goal is to create an eye-tracker experience, a head-mounted GoPro won't help you with that. You will have a view of the screen (although if you use a top-of-head mount for the GoPro, you might not see the whole screen), but you won't be able to tell where the user is looking. Combining it with a Think Out Loud protocol doesn't tell you where the ...


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Abiding by most of the above comments/answers on sensitivities let us say, we decide to ask and use it for only appropriate purposes. Therefore if the question is how to frame the question, it goes like: write two things unique and great about your ethnicity Of course I would mention that this is completely optional for the user to answer this and that ...


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I think the system you have is getting too complex for the interaction model you are using - I would recommend just having a single print button (no options) that, when clicked, opens a dialogue or modal box where the various options can be explained more graphically (perhaps with small illustrations) allowing the user to make a more informed choice about ...


2

In the US, alcohol advertising is regulated by state and federal guidelines, as well as industry standards for self-regulation. For example, the Distilled Spirits Council has a set of guidelines for responsible digital marketing. Here's what they say about age verification: Age affirmation is a process or a mechanism by which users provide their full ...


0

It's a fair way to get people to say their full birthday. So in the future you can segment them by age, congratulate them on their birthdays (and offer something) or know their zodiac sign for whatever purposes.


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I interpret your question to be the following - if that's wrong, forget this post :-( Why are all settings put into one single dialog, with a left side navigation, instead of providing a menu structure which allows to open (amodal) windows for different kinds of settings (e.g., viewing preferences vs. file locations, "diverse functional groups" in @tohster ...


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I think that your question holds the answer; it would be easier! Perhaps too easy - I think they have chosen a slow and less effective system so that young people wont just easy pop in on the website - at least that is what alcohol-websites tell themselves. In this instance the lack of ease of use is a safeguard protecting them of too many accusations if ...


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Because they feel like one is less likely to lie doing the more in depth version. Another option could be that they dynamically change that based on the market their product is in or where your browser is. However the most likely reason is that they don't have usability experts and they conform to the standard which is less than ideal


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There are many reasons why UX designers make this choice A few observations: Settings are usually "out of flow" from the main app. For example, a music app's main flow is selecting and playing music. Settings like file locations, album artwork settings, and themes are not in the main workflow of the app. Settings are visited less frequently, which means ...


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Three reasons: New information comes onto the page. Information leaves the page Something on the page reacts to the user Whenever one of these three things happens on a page, that's a good time to consider adding an animation to demonstrate What Is Happening/Going to Happen/Has Happened.


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The user who provided feedback said they didn't have insight into what the tool was capturing. You can solve this by being explicit with a dialogue. "Click on the block of text you want extracted". Something as simple as that puts the users mind at ease as to why they are pointing and clicking. Screenshots or link to the plugin would help a lot :)


3

I think non-linear navigation is very common, but maybe is a terminology matter (English isn't my native language). Anyways, just for reference, take a look at the image below from Oracle Alta Documentation showing non-linear navigation. Additional info, including link to nav bar application can be found here However, based on your picture, I think you ...


0

As Golden Krishna says bes tinterface is no interface. So ask the user the localisation of the meeting and ask him the time of this meeting. Take into account or ask him if it is local time. Ask from where he comes and specifies him automatically the time in two formats its real localisation and the time of the localisation meeting with a table with all ...


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Breadcrumbs are used to show the location of the user in the site hierarchy. It is always a secondary navigation for moving in a site. The current location shown by breadcrumbs are relative to the high level concepts helping users know where they are in relation to the site. In your case, the two tables are part of Group 0 of the page. The breadcrumb ...


0

What about this: In your figure it's pretty confusing because you could think the computer from network A isn't allowed to communicate with it's own network. putting computer AA to network B with denied permission is a more clearly way to recognize what going on, since the heading "Access list" is an universal term.


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Similar to Vitaly's Second option, I think you could look at Apple's Automator as an example.


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Print icons go in the top right of your screen. In eye tracking terms, this is a strong fallow area, and makes a good place for secondary actions like printing. This is a scenario where there is a strong conventional design pattern, and you probably shouldn't mess around with it. If printing is the primary action i.e. users most often get to the end of ...


1

It depends on your page design. The best position would be the point where user provides the last mandatory detail. That is the area where the print or call to action button must be placed. And hence it depends on the design or depth of the page. If its above the fold, you can provide immediately after the last input that is suppose to be filled by ...


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Vartabedian, A. G., published in 1971 that people can recognize isolated words better if all capital letters are used. “The Effects of Letter Size, Case, and Generation Method on CRT Display Search Time.” Human Factors, 14, 511-519, in Wickens. Abstract: The effects of letter size, case, and generation method were studied in a task of searching for ...


1

Your observations and thinking is correct. Showing same icon as well as showing different icons might be confusing. What I think in this case is : You can use a hamburger icon at the top (if it is possible and you have some other options to display) and you can include both the type of settings in there. You can use icon with caption like Application ...


1

I think your real problem is not the icons but the fact that you have two different places with settings. Integrate the advanced settings in the application wide settings. Give it it's own tab or page if needed and make it always accessible (as long as the analysis section is accessible for the user). Consider creating a menu for different kind of settings ...


1

I'm not a UX expert but in my opinion, it'll be nice to have a single settings icon and display the different settings in an options-list when you click on the icon. Something like this (with some improvement) -


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Design of anything in an aircraft is heavily regulated. It is likely their is a viewing distance requirement for the text. That would be translated into an appropriate character height. If you go to mixed case, the height of the smallest lowercase letter would need to be the appropriate character height. This would roughly double the font height of the ...


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Its all about readability in the given space. Given the space to contain all the information is anyways quite low. And using lowercase may become difficult to read. And then , wear and tear of the surface due to handling the phone(over a period of time). As the surface smooths out, lowercase letters will be first to get eroded/faded, making them ...


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For me it seems that the available space is quite small, colors are not optimal for normal reading conditions (gray text -or "dirty white" maybe due to low light or dust- on black background) and lines have just 1 to 3 words. Taking that into account the main goal would be just to get sure the text is readable (just effectively, since the text is very ...


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The only idea that comes to mind is that it might make the phone a little less friendly to the general public. Making it appear too welcoming may invite those who are not flight crew to try and use it. I'm not saying it's a good idea -- there are better ways to make the device's use appear restricted without impeding its usability. It's just the only ...


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I agree with @Vincent but I want to point out that an Horizontal bar guided just by colors isn't probable the most user friendly way of displaying this data.. I would go with the classic pie chart or at least with horizontal stacked bars. Here some that I consider good examples: Pie chart: Stacked bars:


1

I think the light color on hover in the first example is better and more fast and simple to use. The second one could really be confuse, and you should not have to click on each line (I didn't even noticed at first the I each line was clickable). I suggest a simple solution, just show the edit/delete buttons (or icons) on the hover state. The table, in this ...



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