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112

Have you ever spend 30 minutes searching for a user interface element or menu item that you knew must certainly be there, only to eventually learn that it had disappeared completely because you were in some state where it couldn't be used? Imagine that you don't know that you can't vote for your own post, and you have decided to upvote your own post. Or ...


99

You could try the following idea: The features are: Full worker name Gray dots show availability of worker at hours Large clicking area (the whole cell) Easy interaction style Easy visual analysis of work load for each user Supporting manager decision on assigning which could be based on user qualification To save the space you could use tabs for each ...


84

Historically It is a simple fact that traffic signals were introduced in 1868. From The Origin of the Green, Yellow and Red Color Scheme for Traffic Lights: In London, England in 1865 there was a growing concern over the amount of horse-drawn traffic causing danger to pedestrians trying to cross the roads. A railway manager and engineer named John Peake ...


82

hiding the scroll bar is a bad practice, for a few reasons: some people do not have a scroll wheel - just as you're worried. Just like how that impoverished county an hour away counts as "3rd world economy" by international standards, so too today do we find unusual relics of usability times 'long past' the scroll cursor is an indicator of position. It ...


72

Quite simply don't do this. False expectations are the biggest source of a disappointing experience. It commits you to features that you may not be able/want to produce, users will assume very short timescales for this functionality to be in action, and it also highlights your apps weaknesses leading users to look for these elsewhere with your competitors. ...


60

I would progressively reveal details to a user as they need them. Consider what would your smart defaults would be? Are there assumptions that you can make that would get most users most of the way there? A couple you could consider: Sunday and Saturday are typically off days for US workers. Is this true for you? If so, then let's go ahead and default them ...


58

"I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that." That scene from 2001: A space odyssey is a good example for why this can be a dangerous practice. Beware of anthropomorphising a computer to the point where the user starts ascribing malice to it. Error messages need to be non-personal to avoid the user feeling like the computer is complaining at them, or ...


58

Handle-less doors exist in many restaurants. The idea is that you can be carrying trays/plates in both hands, and simply walk through the doors, and get where you are going (implementation note, when carrying food, you typically 'back into' the door to go through - you can't push through the door with plates of food in front of you, so, you can't see what's ...


56

Selected – Create an inverted selection state which would make this feature more prominent. Many ways to accomplish but as an example; Make the button background black with a white or light grey pencil icon. Enabled – Increasing the contrast. Our eyes become less sensitive to light and see a narrower section of the colour spectrum as we age. Increasing the ...


54

Personalisation Igor. Content personalisation can be appropriate at times, like in an email or after login. Amongst a few, it makes the system appear more 'human', and can facilitate some personal 'bond' with the user. But one can argue that by attaching a name to a notification you won't achieve that (I see proper personalisation as real user-dependent ...


53

Obviously, the first thing you have to ask is the language that the user speaks, because without that information, you can't ask them meaningful questions. However, a user is coming to the site with the intent to learn a language. If you show them a list of languages, of course they're going to choose the one they want to learn. The fact that the site has ...


47

A great question! I love how UX design makes you think of these things. However, just to play devil's advocate, I can list several reasons off the top of my head why we should not have all doors as you described: Hinges: would have be to become more complex. One-way hinges, as they exist now, are a quite simple 3-piece design that require very little ...


46

There is at least a single benefit for those not using a mouse - Normally you are able to tab between input elements using the keyboard, this is an indicator as to which element currently has your focus.


45

I had answered this question before but unfortunately the person who asked the question got banned for some reason :) The reason is two fold For design consistency: The placement of the two voting options is there for every question and answer and the design is maintained even for the questions\answers which you have written to ensure there is design ...


45

contrast Your icons are lacking discernible contrast--both between the icon and the background, as well as between the active icons and inactive icons. Increase the contrast.


43

I don't have a study for this, but in my script of HCI (Einführung in die Mensch Computer Interaktion, Universität Hagen/Introduction to Human-Computer-Interaction University of Hagen) I read, that the brain can memorize the place of static interface elements better than dynamic ones. If the buttons are always there and don't change much (like the content ...


42

You can actually pull a language preference from the user's browser. Using this as a default may streamline the process and remove one of your entry barriers. Details here: JavaScript for detecting browser language preference The flexibility you offer is fantastic but it's likely the user has already taken care of this on a more global level. By no means ...


42

One reason for the three lights, in the UK at least, is that you have many states. Two of the lights can be on at one time, i.e. red and amber signalling that you should get ready to go, where as a single amber light would mean get ready to stop. The concept you link to doesn't cover this use case. There are also historic reasons for the 3 light traffic ...


39

Generally speaking you should always try to avoid forcing users into doing things, and avoid putting in place barriers that slow down or inhibit access to them to actually use your software to achieve things. On top of that from the user perspective its a bit harsh to require that they have to provide personal information just to be able to export to PDF. ...


37

There are two big problems, from an internationalization perspective: How sure are you that your Name data contains the name the user is called by? Getting your name data format correct is a classically difficult problem. As soon as you add name wildcards to your error messages, they will become much more difficult to translate to other languages. Without ...


37

We are really at the early days of touchscreen technology. While audio feedback and advances in haptic feedback could make this slightly more viable, I see touchscreens as an interim workaround on the journey towards gestural (+ audio) input. The mistake in this design shown in the video is (in my opinion) using a touchscreen at all - i.e. a 'touch ...


36

I would try to use the Google Calendar approach. You spread out the days with an acceptable level of detail/resolution and then the users just drag to mark the time ranges. If a higher level of detail is required, they can fine-tune each time. It took me about 5 seconds to enter these 6 time ranges.


34

It's not psychology; it's purely physical. The reason is that the perpendicular ridges are easy for pedestrians to walk on, but bumpy for cyclists; and the in-line ridges are easy for cyclists and harder for pedestrians. Note that this is at the entry of the cycle lane. It's not designed to alert cyclists that their lane is ending; it's designed to make ...


34

CAPTCHA is an example of forcing a customer to deal with a business/technical problem - an exchange of great effort for little return on their behalf. "Are you human?" often accompanies these all too common patterns. You can do better than CAPTCHA by not questioning your customers' humanity, and instead build honey-pots to catch the bots. Honey-pots are ...


34

Personally, I prefer to have a limited number of carefully selected colors which will look good in most of the situations (or match some standard sets). I also suggest to show them near the note input box so user can see all of the variants and choose one more quickly:


33

It might be that it reduces the height that the water container has to be lifted to to be replaced. The design of water container shown in the photo is both very heavy and difficult to hold on to.


32

This menu got "famous" because Facebook and Path implemented it for the first time. Personally I'm not really attracted to this menu but if I need to choose a side I would choose the right side. That's because aprox. 67% of users use the right thumb (so that means the right hand) and in several studies have proved that the screen area is more difficult to ...


32

Probably the most well-known example of such "self-learning UI" is Microsoft Office 2003. They called it 'adaptive menu', see image below. The menu behavior was almost the same as you described. Besides re-organizing items, they also hid rare ones to maintain a reasonable number of items in a default collapsed view. My experience showed that most ...


31

The only case where a checkbox should be marked "required" is if it must be checked, like when agreeing to legal terms. For any other case, how do you determine whether the user has completed that checkbox field? It might be properly filled out by staying un-checked. Except for the specific case of agreeing to terms, it's important that your form validation ...


29

Technology. When the Chinese tea cup was originated, it was much easier to fashion a cup without handles. It made it much easier to stack and ship, and they were often shipped as ballast for relatively cheap. Additionally, the size of the traditional tea cup made handles impractical. Contrary to popular belief, tea in the Orient originally was served at a ...



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