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111

Have you ever spend 30 minutes searching for a user interface element or menu item that you knew must certainly be there, only to eventually learn that it had disappeared completely because you were in some state where it couldn't be used? Imagine that you don't know that you can't vote for your own post, and you have decided to upvote your own post. Or ...


98

You could try the following idea: The features are: Full worker name Gray dots show availability of worker at hours Large clicking area (the whole cell) Easy interaction style Easy visual analysis of work load for each user Supporting manager decision on assigning which could be based on user qualification To save the space you could use tabs for each ...


82

A better modification of such a statment which I see being used is: 'A company_name employee will never ask for your password' This message alerts the user that if the person is asking for a password, there is something fishy and he should alert the concerned authorities immediately. With all the live chat functionalities that most industries are ...


72

Excellent answers so far. I would attempt to connect the dots between recording and red button like this: Apart from the traditional warning usage, a red light has been used in many scenarios to represent on-going work - radio show room when on air, operation theater when operation is going on, etc. The reason behind that would be the same - it is highly ...


63

Best solution will be to increase the size of the box. If you can do it without changing the layout, it is good. For reducing the font size, I would suggest use a single size rather than going descending. It is easier to read. And, if you want to do 'k' representations, make sure the user has some way of accessing the actual number, via a tooltip or some ...


58

"I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that." That scene from 2001: A space odyssey is a good example for why this can be a dangerous practice. Beware of anthropomorphising a computer to the point where the user starts ascribing malice to it. Error messages need to be non-personal to avoid the user feeling like the computer is complaining at them, or ...


57

Let them know what has happened. Here are some situations with longer, clear example notifications that use proper English grammar: Only the name changed The task "foobar" has been successfully renamed to "dummy". Only the data changed The task "foobar" has been successfully updated. The name and the data changed The task "foobar" has been ...


54

Personalisation Igor. Content personalisation can be appropriate at times, like in an email or after login. Amongst a few, it makes the system appear more 'human', and can facilitate some personal 'bond' with the user. But one can argue that by attaching a name to a notification you won't achieve that (I see proper personalisation as real user-dependent ...


52

Obviously, the first thing you have to ask is the language that the user speaks, because without that information, you can't ask them meaningful questions. However, a user is coming to the site with the intent to learn a language. If you show them a list of languages, of course they're going to choose the one they want to learn. The fact that the site has ...


47

People don't generally use hierarchical structures 'in the real world' -- it seems to be something that has been forced upon them, a technical remnant of the past. What needs to be understood is the way that people recognise and organise things. Our brains don't work in a hierarchical way (without generating a lot of heat). Instead, we recognise things by ...


47

Well, just off the top of my head (and some new ones added in based on comments against this post)... Cons Text can't scale, so it doesn't get adjusted alongside standard browser font-scaling options No SEO benefit - search engines don't read images so they'll ignore any text in images. Screenreaders won't read it out so it'll only be of any use to ...


45

I had answered this question before but unfortunately the person who asked the question got banned for some reason :) The reason is two fold For design consistency: The placement of the two voting options is there for every question and answer and the design is maintained even for the questions\answers which you have written to ensure there is design ...


43

Most security breaches are from social engineering, and so telling someone that they should never under any circumstances give anyone their password is an attempt to increase security. I would suggest a statement more like: If anyone asks you for your password, you should assume they are a criminal and report it immediately! Idea provided by @Kaz As ...


43

I don't have a study for this, but in my script of HCI (Einführung in die Mensch Computer Interaktion, Universität Hagen/Introduction to Human-Computer-Interaction University of Hagen) I read, that the brain can memorize the place of static interface elements better than dynamic ones. If the buttons are always there and don't change much (like the content ...


42

You can actually pull a language preference from the user's browser. Using this as a default may streamline the process and remove one of your entry barriers. Details here: JavaScript for detecting browser language preference The flexibility you offer is fantastic but it's likely the user has already taken care of this on a more global level. By no means ...


39

Generally speaking you should always try to avoid forcing users into doing things, and avoid putting in place barriers that slow down or inhibit access to them to actually use your software to achieve things. On top of that from the user perspective its a bit harsh to require that they have to provide personal information just to be able to export to PDF. ...


37

There are two big problems, from an internationalization perspective: How sure are you that your Name data contains the name the user is called by? Getting your name data format correct is a classically difficult problem. As soon as you add name wildcards to your error messages, they will become much more difficult to translate to other languages. Without ...


36

Your layout should support your content. First content, then appropriate layout. You can not easily break the physical constraints (like small screen), but maybe even your biggest number could be placed as separate line at smallest screen. Also I would recommend to keep in mind three stages concerning software: Useful (Functionality) Usable (Usability) ...


35

We are really at the early days of touchscreen technology. While audio feedback and advances in haptic feedback could make this slightly more viable, I see touchscreens as an interim workaround on the journey towards gestural (+ audio) input. The mistake in this design shown in the video is (in my opinion) using a touchscreen at all - i.e. a 'touch ...


34

It's not psychology; it's purely physical. The reason is that the perpendicular ridges are easy for pedestrians to walk on, but bumpy for cyclists; and the in-line ridges are easy for cyclists and harder for pedestrians. Note that this is at the entry of the cycle lane. It's not designed to alert cyclists that their lane is ending; it's designed to make ...


34

CAPTCHA is an example of forcing a customer to deal with a business/technical problem - an exchange of great effort for little return on their behalf. "Are you human?" often accompanies these all too common patterns. You can do better than CAPTCHA by not questioning your customers' humanity, and instead build honey-pots to catch the bots. Honey-pots are ...


34

Personally, I prefer to have a limited number of carefully selected colors which will look good in most of the situations (or match some standard sets). I also suggest to show them near the note input box so user can see all of the variants and choose one more quickly:


32

Something which is done here in stackexchange is using colors in combination with k's to display weight (and I'm guessing m's as well). Look at how different colors represent different weight, in combination with the k's, you're receiving something which is unmistakably usable & understandable Reading further: Have you considered adding a ...


32

Probably the most well-known example of such "self-learning UI" is Microsoft Office 2003. They called it 'adaptive menu', see image below. The menu behavior was almost the same as you described. Besides re-organizing items, they also hid rare ones to maintain a reasonable number of items in a default collapsed view. My experience showed that most ...


31

The symbol on each button was created with references to sheet music and inventor's background. For example, the || in pause may come from the Japanese character リ and/or Caesura. The media control UI were first introduced by Swedish Engineer Philip Olsson while he was working in Japan. He also had a degree from Swedish design school. The glyphs were ...


31

The only case where a checkbox should be marked "required" is if it must be checked, like when agreeing to legal terms. For any other case, how do you determine whether the user has completed that checkbox field? It might be properly filled out by staying un-checked. Except for the specific case of agreeing to terms, it's important that your form validation ...


30

This menu got "famous" because Facebook and Path implemented it for the first time. Personally I'm not really attracted to this menu but if I need to choose a side I would choose the right side. That's because aprox. 67% of users use the right thumb (so that means the right hand) and in several studies have proved that the screen area is more difficult to ...


27

Displaying multiple progress bars is not a new concept. Your case is an ideal scenario in which usage is justified. One progress bar represents the overall progress and the other represents the current task's progress. If you want to use just one bar, then it makes sense to show just the overall progress rather than showing the current task's progress. A ...


26

I would go with a check mark on the left side. Reason being: Since the list is in English, the user will be reading from left to right. The length of the text need not be the same, leading to uneven right end. But the starting position on the left will be the same. Makes for easier scanning.


25

Answer: No. Checkboxes vs. Radio Buttons - Nielsen Norman 2004 Radio buttons are used when there is a list of two or more options that are mutually exclusive and the user must select exactly one choice. In other words, clicking a non-selected radio button will deselect whatever other button was previously selected in the list. Checkboxes are used ...



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