Hot answers tagged

142

It is a combination of manufacturing and usability... but mostly manufacturing. Doing a quick web search for "why are soda cans round" (Google does a decent job) yields multiple insights in the issue. But the only result you need to visit is engineerguy's YouTube video (you should also be Subscribed to engineerguy, because he is awesome). The Ingenious ...


129

They have (slightly) different meanings and usage Although both icons are similar and both are popularly recognized, they do have slightly different connotations. ❤ The heart icon Is more emotive by its very nature. As such, it's more likely to be associated with positive feelings such as love, like, happy, etc. Is used by popular applications such ...


76

I think a start would be to make it clear the total number of tests and/or total number of cards at the top of each card. And also the breakdown of how many rows you seeing out of that total. e.g. Total Tests: 22 Page: 1 of 2, showing tests 12 of 22 Mockup 1


53

Switch sounds perfectly fine to me, but I'd suggest Toggle which is specifically a two-position switch. If you rather want to describe the type of the value, not the UI element, I'd go for Flag.


52

It matches the user's mental model, which is more important than matching real-world circumstances. Users view a refrigerator as something that "makes cold". Therefore the number 5 corresponds to "more cold" and 1 to "less cold". The mental model of "a device that holds its interior at a constant temperature" is more complex and harder to reconcile with ...


50

Because crappy designers are everywhere There is almost no excuse for this kind of ambiguous, uncommunicative control labeling when there are so many better patterns to follow with fridge thermostats. Here are some control formats that are far more effective. They communicate the polarity of coldness clearly They are color-blind friendly (some use shapes ...


46

Other people have already said "manufacturing" so I will not repeat that. What is worth emphasizing though is that soda cans are pressurized to 2 atmospheres of pressure or more. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJiUWBiM8HE Side-note: this is why the container is made of metal in the first place. Few other packaging materials can deal with this load ...


45

As per the official Google announcement, the reasoning behind this change is to try out methods which would complement new password authentication methods. To quote the post Today, you sign in to Google on a page that includes both the ‘email’ and ‘password’ fields on the same page. We’ll be gradually splitting those two fields into separate pages in ...


43

A Facebook or Google+ sign-in method can actually encourage people to sign-up at all. Most users value the uncomplicated experience they get when signing up via Google+ or Facebook. Hiding this option behind another click will make this valuable option invisible and prevent sign-ups by "lazy" users.


41

Save is a byproduct Save is a byproduct of early hardware- and software design. It doesn't have a common equivalent in the real world. Consider: If you take a pencil and make a mark on paper, that mark doesn't require an extra step in order to become permanent. In other words, it does not need to be saved. The paper may need to be stored somewhere so it ...


37

Create a repository with actions from where they can be dragged to days. The question is what happens when you try to drag an item to a day that is already occupied. Replace the item and send the previous one to the repository Swap both items. In this case, if you start with a preset for every day you don't even need the repository.


26

Simply adding the arrow at the bottom will help. Check the below img


26

How will the data be entered and shown to the user? Presumably a checkbox or tickbox.


20

I think the difference between the two isn't huge, both are frequently used for the feature you are describing. Perhaps thinking of the emotion you are trying to evoke is more important. For example, a favourite on this site is represented by a star. This makes sense, it's a 'professional' site. Whereas if I'm on a site like say AirBNB, a heart makes ...


20

In my opinion, Option 2 is the most user friendly. Reasoning: If the hour has its own up and down arrow you do not expect that using the up and down arrow of the minutes can change the hour as well. to me, individual controls means individual effect. If you want to have the effect of changing the minutes influencing the hours, this is what you need: or ...


19

Provide a regular register method In a comment to your question I said that I wouldn't use your app if the only way to register is via social networks. The reasons vary from person to person and to not make this answer go off-topic too much I'll give you just a quick outline about some issues: Simple but relevant: I don't use the famous networks I don't ...


19

Make it explicit that the scheduled campaign will run in the LA timezone to reduce any confusion. MailChimp does it quite nicely with their Delivery by Time Zone feature http://mailchimp.com/features/timewarp/


19

When it comes to UI/UX, "better or worse" is very subjective. There is, however, a standard for best practices: cater to your product, users, and target devices. What I mean by this in your situation: If your product expects a date in the next week 90% of the time, design your date picker around that. If you users require a larger interface to better use ...


18

Date selection isn't easy... This has been a peeve of mine for a long time. I've not found a decent calendar widget. Generally, I prefer calendars to scrollers because: Using a scroller to select a date far in the future can be a real pain. Calendars provide a lot of valuable context (today's date, day of week, physical distance to the date, etc). In ...


18

Option 1: Print on multiple pieces of paper Just out of curiosity, is printing it on two separate pieces of paper an option? Having two papers and a staple indicates clearly to the reader that it isn't a single page document. Option 2: Add something to the end of the test to indicate it is done I wonder if there are workflow type triggers that you ...


17

There are many good answers about annotating the bottom of the page clearly (I like Dave Haigh's best), but as an alternative, how about making the last task (on each side) indicate that tests continue on reverse -- that way, it's directly in what they're (meant) to be reading/completing? I don't have an image editor to hand, but instead of: download ...


17

Visible not prominent Within a given component, help users know what to expect by visualizing app state. IOW, keep the arrow visible but clearly inactive. This way users will know where to find it at a glance and will have visual confirmation that the carousel is at the beginning/end. There has to be a better term for this but, recognition over recall ...


17

It's the same as the floppy disk icon: if there was a natural successor, you would already know what it was. If you don't, it means that no natural successor has emerged. And if one hasn't, frankly, who cares?


15

I think a thing that you can do is something similar to Amazon. When you try to access your bills or profile in amazon, you are asked to login again, since it may be possible that you just forgot to log off on some public pc. Other than that though I don't see much need for "masking" the data once you are logged in (with the exception of credit card ...


13

I'd use contextual words that relate to the option / question rather than trying to find a one size fits all solution. You might find a good way of representing the options like this but you must consider the context of the language of the option. So for 'Activate Widget?' You would use 'yes' or 'no'. Or for a list of widgets, you might use 'enable' or ...


12

As you have pointed out, the double click is not a standard behaviour that your users are familiar with in the situation you are describing. It's not good practice to use non-standard interactions where you could use a standard one. Irreversible actions (such as deletion) are usually followed up with a 'sanity check' like "Are you sure? [Yes] [No]".


11

You have a primary and secondary action. Details is the primary action, delete is the secondary action. What you could do is move the delete function into the window that contains edit/information. This has the added advantage of cleaning up your listing layout. This will only work if delete is a fairly uncommon function and the use case is something like ...


10

Official google explanation aside (as mentioned in the other answer), there is probably another work at play which goes unmentioned - using UX as stick/carrot method to promote desired behavior. Note that if you at any time previously checked the "stay signed in" checkbox, even after logging out of the Gmail the google will remember your username (via ...


10

It is logical to have "Back" and "Continue" next to each other for symmetry, but a button for going to the next page after filling in information is typically at the bottom, since it follows the user's flow of filling in the form from top to bottom. Why not have both "Back" and "Continue" at the bottom? Also, I might consider "Next" instead of "Continue", ...


10

Since the user won't be looking at the title more than once(users in general) and the marque involves a moving text, I feel that you should go for the other option. Do Marquees Have Good UX?



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