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65

Quite simply don't do this. False expectations are the biggest source of a disappointing experience. It commits you to features that you may not be able/want to produce, users will assume very short timescales for this functionality to be in action, and it also highlights your apps weaknesses leading users to look for these elsewhere with your competitors. ...


19

People often want to put some form of "under construction" messages in their UI, because when you're making something new you're enthusiastic about its potential and want to communicate that enthusiasm to your users. But if you think about this from the user's point of view (which is the basis of good UX), it's not a good idea. Highlighting new features ...


3

Amazon's process keep you informed of both the entire process and the step you are currently completing : A suggestion could be : to inform your users at the beginning of the process and also before they start the payment that there will be another key step after that to always display an Amazon-like path and current step to send an email to your users ...


3

What you describe is reminiscent of the popular "lean startup" idea of building a skeletal app or website which is known as an MVP - minimal viable product - and seeing who tries to use which features (including the 'sign up for paid account' feature) before you build them. You could potentially use this to your advantage to, say, figure out which features ...


2

This might not be a good idea to tease users, but as long as users are aware they are using a non-final version, this can be an important reassuring factor. Important (not for the core functionality of the application, but for the workflow of the user) features may still be unimplemented, but showing them already tells the user that they have been thought of ...


2

As long as the site is in "real beta" (as opposed to eternal beta): Grey out the links / give them a distinct color, and provide a mouseover that says "We are working on it!" I agree with the other replies that you should not wake false expectations. OTOH, advertising your current spec could greatly improve beta feedback, both by reducing the the ...


2

It is an extremely good idea to remind users of your password creation rules when they don't remember their passwords. Consider the following facts: most users cope with the amount of credentials they have through password reuse and password creation systems that transform an old password into a new one (see Cormac Herley's field study on password reuse ...


1

I recently tackled a similar problem, and this is what I came up with: The basic search box works in realtime for queries containing the search terms entered. Clicking the Advanced Search button bring up the second dialog where users can enter more complex searches like date ranges or things that don't contain a search term. The input fields vary based ...


1

The hints that you have offered as examples, password limitations, are the types of hints that could only help a certain type of user. Namely the type that uses the same password for every site, but changes it slightly when the restrictions require her to do so. So for this user, seeing that a Capital letter is required will be a helpful reminder to use the ...


1

Security notwithstanding, the answer would be yes, because security not withstanding, the best UX would be when users don't need to have a password - I'd always rather be able to get at my stuff right away without the login step and without needing to remember a password, especially one with constraints like special characters. Once security enters into it ...


1

As far as website security is concerned the answer is: NO (for personalised hints)! But as this is a UX Website, the answer from the UX point of view might be: yes, it could make things easier for some users, however instead of dropping hints it would make more sense to provide an easy and fast way to reset the password. When you start giving hints, the ...


1

During the beta phase only, how about a pop-up which says "We're thinking of implementing this because..." along with vote-up/down buttons? That way you are able to gauge the interest in a feature as well as making your beta users feel engaged in the product development. It might also help to break the feeling of entitlement which a "Coming soon..." ...


1

I think it might depend on your user audience as well. If they are early adopters or say Kickstarter supporters in a closed beta, it might be a good idea to use a process similar to this in certain places to indicate where development is progressing. I wouldn't do it too far in advance however because of the possibility that you might portray a feature as ...


1

I've seen an interesting guide feature when starting on Salesforce webapp. It consists on teaching you how to insert a new user and fill his information through tooltips appearing on each step. For example: "Click here to start inserting your first user" "Now fill this field with ID" "Click here to submit and finish the process!"


1

Here is some stuff I could think of: Pinterest solves this through having an already existing gallery such as "for the home". On the other hand tumblr and twitter (as far as I know) both have a sign up process where you are presented with posting guides. Facebook and somewhere ask questions: "How are you feeling?" Linkedin has a profile completion tips ...


1

If you only show a summary of each post on the first page: if they bookmark a post, then it must have been 'opened' with a unique url if they want the latest posts, then they can bookmark the summary page it's much easier for someone to scan through posts



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