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17

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


15

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


9

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...


9

This is perhaps perilously close to an off-topic icon discussion, but I think you could modify the arrow icons to make the outgoing versus incoming direction clearer. Essentially, you need to give context to the arrow: I would continue to use colour as an additional clue.


4

You can use the + and the - icons if arrows aren't required. I would probably use ↑ and ↓ if : I had to use arrows I can't write other account movement information. If you really want to use → and ←, you should display the other account from where/ to where the money goes.


3

When it comes to me, I feel really frustrated when the x button doesn't close the app. Has happened a number of times with Skype. Although, when I retrospect, I don't feel quite disturbed when, instead of a "x" button, the app has an "arrow pointing bottom right" to indicate it's still going to run in the background or will be minimized to the system tray. ...


3

The X symbol can be used when canceling or removing something. In terms of an application's or modal window, the X should be used to close the program or modal by convention. Xs can also be used to remove items from a list, delete something in some circumstances (comments come to mind), or otherwise cancel something. As such, minimizing or another action ...


2

The answer to your question is, it depends upon how the user uses the software. Like other user-interface questions, it depends on the use case. Many of those applications where the close function only minimizes the application do so upon the assumption that the value of the software only comes if it is running all the time. Looking at Skype or Hangouts ...


2

I will present an alternative view to tohster's definition of what X should do, based on what how I think your average user will interpret it. Your average user's mental model of how a computer works will probably not contain a sharp distinction between close/exit/quit, instead they are likely to have one "favourite" term that they use for all of these. I ...


2

I think this is a design question where the overall content and intent of the design needs to be assessed and understood first. By content I am referring to the actual differences between the plans (or tiers) that you are going to display. There would be very little point in showing the information in a table if all three tiers offered very similar ...


2

I've found that arrows without words tend to cause confusion amongst users, especially those that have a color blindness. If you use multiple indicators such as the arrow, color, words, and/or +/- you are meeting user accessibility the best you can. You can do something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


1

I agree with the idea of '+' and '-' icons going before the numbers as something to consider. With example 2 you're kind of on the right track. The common method in accountancy is to have incoming and outgoing funds in separate columns. However, you don't need an arrow to indicate things and unless you have quite an extravagant one like Matt Obee's (which ...


1

I think Interaction Design1 offers quite a solid classification. Evaluation strategies include: User testing - any method that requires users. This includes controlled lab experiments, interviews, questionnaires, user observations, field observations, remote testing, etc. Inspections - done by experts, largely by means of reason. Includes cognitive ...


1

Syncing files from two potentially offline sources is a hard problem that is basically impossible to solve in a way that makes sense all the time. For evidence of this, look no further than the complexity of the tools programmers use to solve this problem for source files rather than game saves: http://git-scm.com/ https://subversion.apache.org/ ...


1

I would suggest you to read this paper : An Estimate of a User Learning Curve on Web-Based interface Using Eye Tracking Equipment I am unsure if there is any specific research to check if custom Form elements need a higher learning curve. But It is obvious that a user will take time to adapt to any new elements. In simple words the best interface is one ...


1

Modal boxes are helpful for quick tasks or small notices where it is too cumbersome to load a new screen, and the user will want to return to the main screen after processing the modal. It's sometimes okay for modals to overflow a window (see pinterest for example). The form you are describing seems like the opposite of this situation: It has a lot of ...



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