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19

I'm not sure we can we specifically answer the question with the information given, but below are some ideas of what to do and what not to do that may help you determine the best course of action in your own scenario. Automate the sign-in after sign-up. I really dislike those sign-ups that gather all the site needs to use an account then redirect users to a ...


16

"Users are stupid" is a programmer's mantra. I think it has persisted because it inspires defensive programming and defensive design, which is usually a good route to take. However, it's not true, and it's a little bit harmful. I think the sentiment should be broken up into the following better notions: Always assume that users won't understand. This ...


8

Users aren't stupid, they just have more important things to do than focus on the interface you're designing. For you, the interface represents a lot of thought and work, and you care about getting it right. But the user doesn't care about the interface; at most, they care about whether it's getting in the way of what they actually want to be doing right ...


6

http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/64392 Is a great answer. Something to add to all this though: One of the main things I dislike when I need to create an account is the redirection to home-page / welcome page. Redirecting back to the home-page is fine, when the user has gone to the home-page and clicked a sign-up button. However, if I've created an account, ...


4

I upvoted Peter's and Mayo's answers and would like to add this: There are different groups of users. One interface can't possibly satisfy everyone or be optimally easy for everyone to use. Do user research and determine what the common shared qualities are within each user group. That will result in data-driven personas. When you have personas, you can ...


4

Users aren't stupid. They approach the application in different ways and with different expectations. One of the beautiful thing about the web is that one can get to the same information in different ways - one way is not necessarily better than another. I'm pretty much an "expert" user by every standard one can give and yet, just a few months ago, while ...


2

One can be a trained musician, artist or a doctor but may not be trained to use computers. Not knowing to use a computer interface does not mean one is stupid. They want to get in, get out, and move on with their own tasks http://www.nngroup.com/articles/are-users-stupid/


2

I would suggest that if a checkbox is used frequently and without little thought, either leave the label and its behavior unchanged or, if you do change it, make that change very prominent and easily noticeable. If the control looks the same at first glance apart from a slight text change, those regular users may not notice that the wording and the ...


2

What are the user needs? It is next to impossible to answer the question without more information. Primarily, why would users need such feature to begin with? What I have in mind is that if there are 1000 versions, involving 500 objects (490 of which may have been deleted) you'll be showing so much information that the visualisation will be impossible to ...


1

You should review your application and reexamine if a Ribbon is appropriate for your application. Ribbons are not meant to be used in parallel with menus and toolbars. The opening paragraphs to the Ribbons Guidelines: Ribbons are the modern way to help users find, understand, and use commands efficiently and directly—with a minimum number of clicks, ...


1

Many of the sites these days get the details of the users in steps which also is not advisable when the user doesn't know how many more steps are there before he gets in unless a progress is provided. Second, you can ask the user to verify his mail id as provided in the previous step and from where he should verify his account so that you don't get in ...


1

The little research I found has this to say "Keep the survey short so that the user can finish it about 5-10 minutes", that said,there is no definite point at which all users will drop off but there is always an increase in the drop off rates as the number of survey questions increase. To quote this article from survey monkey So what did we find? ...



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