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6

Your current approach is heading in the right direction. When your users use this data regularly, they will already know the relationship between the groups. Switching background color is one way of creating contrast between groups. Other ways would be to use line separators and white space. One thing you can have do to make it more obvious is by ...


5

Use grouping horizontal lines and eliminate the verticals one. Horizontal lines helps to lead the eye along the line, while vertical lines become a barrier along the eye path:


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Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


3

I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


3

Along with the pro's you mentioned, here are some more PDF's enable offline access to secured content PDF's can be used for forms which can be filled offline (e.g. i-9 ) which are required to be in a specific format. With regards to cons, here are the obvious ones Some PDF's can be very large which use up the users data or delay him considerably PDF's ...


3

I suggest the "I Agree" button. We all know that the "I Agree" button is just some legal mumbo jumbo that neither the developers nor the end user truly care about. By having the checkbox, we lose the "I Do Not Agree" button. This makes it more difficult and frustrating for the end user to quit, which they should be able to do easily and at any time. For ...


2

The solution here would be to go for progressive disclosure where you first show the list of questions and then tell the user that he needs to select a question. once a question is selected, then you can show the related content. Here is a quick wireframe to illustrate the flow download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

Reuters articles are probably written to serve both print and web and they don't have a rewrite-for-web process in place. CNN's markup strikes me as dated in many respects (note it's XHTML, not HMTL5 - not that there's anything wrong with that), possibly an artifact of an older CMS or other technology. Many of these outlets still publish in print and/or ...


2

The problem with the "split button" is that it is not just one control but that it is presented as one. I've seen people pressing the button while expecting opening the menu. Since they are seperate controls my first impression was to focus on A when pressing the tab key, and focus on B when pressing tab again. But I agree with @AlexeyKolchenko that it ...


1

There's a comprehensive topic on this here: Fluid Video With regards to the right and wrongs of UX/UI, my opinion would be the needs of the video to be shown to the user and how visible it would be in an extremely small view port.


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It's likely an unintentional artifact of the platform both sites use: WordPress. People who wrote/formatted the articles aren't UX, SEO or accessibility experts. The WordPress WYSIWYG editor is terrible when it comes to adding headings to text. The dropdown you need to switch from paragraphs to headings is hidden within the so call "kitchen sink" row. ...


1

Yes, it make sense ...if the only other choice is a 1-line input box. One line input boxes are terrible for editing long text (i.e. significant box overflow), for reasons that are almost completely obvious. They're bad on the web and even worse on tablets or mobile phones. If you have no other way to create space for the long paths, then a multi-line ...


1

In response to your comments my answer is this. If it improves the user experience to be able to see and edit the file name and path by breaking it over multiple lines then I would suggest its sensible to do so. As long as you keep in mind accuracy. Perhaps a better suggestion would be to breakdown the file path into it's constituent parts and allow users ...


1

If there is a special interraction with this file path that start a special event in your application, you may make it larger. The multi-line choice can be confusing if the path is totally filled : So I do not recommend to make it multiline. If it is a common file path, moreover next to Browse, make it one line and aligned with the rest of the ...


1

WCAG guideline 2.1 (Compliance level A - highest) states: Make all functionality available from a keyboard. If the function of the button and the dropdown trigger is different, users must be able to access both. So first "A" then "B" is the answer. Then comes guideline 2.4.7 which state that each should have its own focus indicator. I think your ...


1

That NNGroup article was, even back then, completely outdated and rather uninformed … HTML über alles. The biggest Pros of PDF are: • the integrity of contents: all needed resources are part of the document, and the integrity can be assured by applying a digital signature to the document. • the integrity of presentation: the way the document appears is ...


1

Good for maintaining a precise formatting (for printing) That's really the sole benefit online. And is really what PDFs were designed for in the first place. Alas, that's usually not a major benefit in general if the goal is to disseminate information online. Can be easily saved/copied/etc because it's in one file True, though it's fairly easy to ...


1

Regarding designing a longer form The problem with two columns forms is users would be confused by the two column layout and interact differently needing them to more time to get the task done. To quote this article One of the problems with form fields in multiple columns is that your users are likely to interpret the fields inconsistently. ...


1

Having inputs on the right side of the tablet that are easy to hit with the thumbs is almost irrelevant, or a at least a pretty low level concern. Users will typically rush through forms to get them over with, and having inputs scattered around the page will take away from the discoverability of inputs and their labels. Left aligned inputs and a scrollable ...


1

What you need is not abstract percentages which seem needlessly specific anyway, but statuses that shed a positive light onto the current situation. These should be visualizable in a symbol/icon and phrasable in few English words. The following examples are just a shot from the hip, since I’m not really a pub guy: 0% – relaxing atmosphere 20% – instant ...


1

Also in the SM, MD, LG Pagination you could remove one number in both ends having: < Prev 1 2 ... 79 80 Next > Instead of: < Prev 1 2 3 ... 78 79 80 Next >



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