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3

That is a very broad, but interesting question. To be honest, I'd simply follow an established set of design guidelines than try to re-invent the wheel. You also appear to be overthinking this a little bit. Of course text input needs to be styled accordingly (border, shadow, size, etc.) and inactive fields have to be displayed differently (e.g. grayed out). ...


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Rocket Surgery Made Easy by Steve Krug is the golden standard to read here, especially if you don't have a lot of experience and need to get something done fast. The process tends to be: Look at your product and see what needs to be tested, prepare some tasks and situations to test. Find participants that fit your target audience -- don't underestimate ...


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Oh! I thought menu 4 & 5 weren't tappable because of the missing arrows. So based on this new information and your comment on Big_chair's post I have the following idea: User will be sent to "Menu 1" screen when tapped on Menu 1. On the Navigation Bar of Menu 1 a cog will appear, making the user able to edit the settings (either on the same screen or ...


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Looking at the image, the first thing that is somewhat similar came to my mind was, Windows Registry Editor. According to me there are 2 changes you could do, they are: 1) Keeping three columns as it is and just removing (replacing) top and below buttons of ADD,DELETE, SAVE & CANCEL. 2) Changing layout to two columns and on double click of attribute ...


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If you think about it with some imagination, the graphic designer is also driven by a "user-centered mindset" (please notice the quotation marks). In this regard, you are both the same. A good graphic designer won't design something aesthetically pleasant for himself only. When he designs something, his purpose is to please people. He does it so that "...


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You could have an empty text box mean "I don't need that field" and use a checkbox to use a value for all files. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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The first thing that comes to my mind is that text field adds unnecessary cruft while being needed in only one situation. Consider showing this field only when "Constant" is selected. Once "Constant" is selected, it might be a good idea to focus the associated text field, so that the user doesn't have to work to target the newly appeared field. To comment ...


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There are many types of tests you can make! It depends on your goal/feature... For example, you can conduct focus groups, do user observations, have user interviews.. or you can do something less direct like running A/B tests. My favorite is to conduct user interviews because if the user can explain something, it means it has caught their attention! ...


1

A good summary. Making sure that you keep prompting the participant to think aloud is really important. What they say about why they are doing something is as important as the record of what they actually do. Also - don't attempt to take notes on what happens, your notes are to prompt you to ask questions at the right second in real time as the test ...


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Switching between all circles and your circles is actually filtering results, so display the filters:


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Try this kind of combobox. It adds in tag like bubbles which have their own X. I've used it in the past and usability is good. http://furqanzafar.github.io/react-selectize/#/ Lots of options.


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Interestingly enough, I think the answer I provided to a similar but slightly different question applies here as well. I have provided the link and the summary here: Colours that represent beginner, intermediate and expert The use of distinct colours can be subject to interpretation, as there are usual meaning associated with specific colours depending on ...


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If you expect users to search for pricing instantly it's a good idea to show them Landing page. It could also be that the pricing IS one of your USP's (i.e. cheapest on the market). In that case it's smart to be proud of your pricing and show it off on the landing page. In that case you would be introducing another step towards finding the information by ...


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The icons are a great idea and will help create/accentuate visually the 3 sections. Plus, it will create interest. People respond well to imagery, generally speaking. You can entice the user to type into the textbox by adding some quirky text in there (that is low in saturation and seems a little faded). This is a great opportunity to display the ...


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I think the way gmail handles swiping to delete is perfect: Three pieces of this interaction are key: 1. There's a clear indication that the user's swiping action means deleting. This is shown with the trash icon during the swiping motion. 2. There's clear feedback after the swipe that something was deleted. The deleted item is clearly marked with a "...


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How often dos the user need to access these settings? Because if it's only occasionally, then I don't think it's necessary to display that option permanently. How about this: Display something like "Edit" in the top right corner. When the user taps that control you display the settings icon on all the rows. Then it will probably also be clear what the ...


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You can argue it either way... Yes, you should conduct it. No, you shouldn't. What matters more is your usability and how memorable and appealing you are to your customer. After all, the point of conducting the usability test on your competitor is to gain some kind of advantage. I think you can put your time, money, and energy into something that will ...


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I agree with Philip that I adore the centered design more, and about putting the snippets always on the same side to ensure consistency. But here are some tweaks. Have you considered something like this? Have the timeline split the screen approximately 4:6 horizontally. (thus you will have more space for the diff windows, you can put them on top of each ...


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In a word, no. There is no consensus on swipe actions in apps. To illustrate the lack of consensus, here's a quick list of some applications of swipe actions: (When I say "swipe right", I mean swiping from left to right.) Google Android notifications: both left and right for dismissing Android recents: both left and right for dismissing Android wear: ...


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Google has something that might help you a lot. You can find the default and accepted general swipe gestures on mobile applications on the following link: Gestures Patterns by Google Users are really familiar with this kind of gestures and their actions.


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That really depends on the usage scenarios at hand. If the user is likely to spend a non-negligible amount of time reading through the detailed information, two screens make sense. You can see this applied in GMail and other messaging apps. If, on the other hand, a user is likely to only use the detailed information at a glance, perhaps to compare the ...



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