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43

A Facebook or Google+ sign-in method can actually encourage people to sign-up at all. Most users value the uncomplicated experience they get when signing up via Google+ or Facebook. Hiding this option behind another click will make this valuable option invisible and prevent sign-ups by "lazy" users.


9

According to Hick's Law, the more options a user is faced with; the harder it will be for them to make a decision quickly. For this reason, I would suggest the single button as on the homepage,as at this stage the user is making the decision of what they want to do. If they decide they want to sign up, the user can then be faced with the sign up options on ...


6

Oooh, pretty. Yeah, well, hairballs (this kind of huge graphs you have shown) are pretty much useless because unreadable. Genomicists and bioinformaticians have discovered this early in the days because their datasets are big enough to demonstrate the issue. And no, adding 3D will not help the cause. The solution for hairballs are hive plots. Also ...


5

Split the project and have two websites Absolutely to avoid, primary for maintenance. Administrators may switch between the two (same as users with multiple roles) but here you will pay highest price for any new addition/change (and if you pay this then your customers and your users will also pay). Give the users who have 'roles' in both teams a ...


4

I actually like the second option of showing Google, FB sign in options directly. Nowadays most users have such accounts and knowing that 'getting - in' process is just one click away encourages users to click on one of those options. With first option, you might lose some users right at the gate. I think Hicks law (as pointed out by Thomad Adcock) is not ...


3

I disagree with the assessment that the website looks good. Unfortunately, there's several things that make it look unprofessional. My very first impression was that it was probably someone's first website they ever tried making, and it comes across more as a spam or scam site than a site with legitimate business listings. Here's a few of the first things ...


3

It honestly depends on the type of work you are completing for your website. You might be testing a new design out, just to see if your new design is usable. Or you could be completing A/B tests, which are tests that are conducted to compare two similar designs to see which is more successful. Another thing you might do is benchmark your existing website, ...


3

Showing a separate content page prior to login is probably going to get ignored. I know I probably would ignore it. Here is one example that may accomplish your goal well. I would keep the content simple and high-level with no more than three bullet points if you are going to use any. Keep the page load time as low as possible since retaining current ...


3

I prefer the variant which already shows all the options separate, like it's done on Stack Exchange: While the second one immediately shows the visitor how they can sign up, the first one just appears to make an excess step, there's no need in those forewords, considering you're going to implement all those different sign up ways. I'd even say that ...


3

Your choices beyond the existing pan/zooming on the display could be to introduce a local focus+context lens around the mouse pointer, to unclutter/expand the current area of interest. However with the size of datasets you're mentioning you might need to consider aggregating and/or filtering on the data itself - a million node graph on a million-pixel ...


3

WordPress has something similar to Adriano's suggestion, where you can switch between multiple sites on the toolbar of the dashboard The 'My Sites' link shows the dropdown menu for switching between sites. The link next to the home button (Group 1 in this example) takes you back to the dashboard for group 1. If you changed to Group 2 on the 'My Sites' menu, ...


2

Disclaimer: Very random ideas from a non-specialist What would you recommend to use to avoid data overload with large graphs? I would look at successful visualizations of large graphs. Here's a few: http://internet-map.net/: it's easy to see the central points and the clusters. Also easy to see individual points. ...


2

On our team, we evaluate the user-based factors, brainstorm a couple of possible solutions, estimate the cost through an Agile development process (tech review and estimation meetings,) then present the viable solutions and their cost to the business decision-makers. I know this will grate on some people, but I do think it's possible to overanalyze these ...


2

Beginning? If users may start without a clear idea of what they're doing (or without a good idea for a name until the end) I wouldn't put it only at the beginning because you will force them to finish and then edit just created workflow to rename it. Of course if you can't do better I'd prefer at the beginning than at the end (more pros and less const, in ...


2

Why Statistics? Once you get beyond graphs, averages, and percents, the bulk of statistics concerns answering the question, “Is this sample size big enough to convince me that what I see in the sample actually applies in general?” This branch of statistics is called “inferential statistics.” It’s definitely worth knowing and doing inferential statistics ...


2

In my experience, a checkbox in the left hand column will select the whole row. Not selecting, as in this case, both the name and the subjects, but the whole row (the student, conceptually). So, I think it would be expected to select the row (a student) and perform the actions you have available, even if they are only performed on one of the columns. But, ...


2

Yes, smartphones with touchscreens can be used by blind people. Just like with any other computing device with screen, a screen reader is needed, which outputs what is displayed on the screen in a different way (e.g., via text-to-speech or via a braille terminal). While input devices like physical keyboards or microphones are typically more suitable for ...


1

It looks modern In UX, this is a terrible reason to do anything. Traditional More empty space on the title bar means it can be easily accessed with the cursor. For large desktop screens, this is a blessing in not needing to slowly aim your cursor towards available space to move a window. "Users are familiar with this format" Integrated Less space ...


1

Consider the following: Identify the columns that would likely to show first Add big arrow at the right page (center of the page not at the bottom corner) '>', when user clicks - show remained columns Freeze 1st or few left columns to get connect information with other columns when user click '>' Add link / button at the bottom of the cell text if you find ...


1

Best option from your post (d) seems to be the best one. One drawback of (d) is that the user can ultimately see only as much as the screen allows. In case of very long text, the exapnded content box may not fit in screen. My suggestion Let the text scroll slowly when mouse pointer hovers over content box. The scrolling speed should be slow enough so that ...


1

There are many problems with all three designs. First you have to know that the last option will not work with mobile since there is no hover with fingers. Also the label itself doesn't describe the action. What're you adding? A page title? A page? More text? When ever you're designing actions, make sure the CTA (call to action) has enough description to ...


1

I think one needs to address the question of what is being conveyed through the graph. If you want to point to certain interesting observations, marking them, or generating separate graphs to highlight the same might be one way to catch the attention. While such graphs look visually appealing, the process of generating insights might prove to be ...


1

I think you're on the right track but what's missing and what would make this really useful is for the design to empahise key metrics I've attached a comp This is a pattern I've seen elsewhere and addresses the use case "I have a loan amount in mind and I want to see over how many months I would need to pay it back at a rate I can afford" and brings the ...


1

I believe the initial purpose of the back to the top button was to help users reach the top easily, specifically when they didn't have a sticky nav for a mobile view. I recommend not including a back to the top button if you have a sticky nav bar that is easily accessible.


1

The first step in business process re-engineering is to identify all existing processes. This produce a list with process name and optionally a short description. When this list is finalized and accepted from all stakeholders, detailed steps and workflows are documented for each process. This approach has two benefits : You avoid duplicate and overlapping ...


1

Syslog has 8 levels of logging. They are pretty good: DEBUG: Info useful to developers for debugging the app, not useful during operations INFORMATIONAL: Normal operational messages - may be harvested for reporting, measuring throughput, etc - no action required NOTICE: Events that are unusual but not error conditions - might be ...


1

I occasionally find it useful to place issues against these axis: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Which generally leads to prioritising fixes from top-left to bottom-right.


1

Based on the UI attached, I'm assuming that you are toying with the idea of progressive disclosure; meaning some form of user activation to reveal the items that are available. There are circumstances whereby progressive disclosure would fit slightly better, such as form filling, check out process etc. In this case (a menu), a progressive approach would ...


1

If clicking the verification link automatically logs the user in, then yes, the verification link should expire. Why? Because if the user's inbox is compromised a hacker can search for the verification email and then click the verification link to gain access to the user's profile on the website. The question then is, when should the link expire. Maybe not ...


1

Even though this is an older post, the core issue remains. ChrisF makes a valid point--core functionality of the Web browser shouldn't be disabled unless absolutely necessary. Also, adding text instructions may often be overlooked/ignored by users. A good possible solution is to incorporate some JavaScript that will alert the user if they attempt to use ...



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