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14

Think of travelling to a new place and being lost, and being frustrated and worried because you don't know how to go where you need to go. Imagine your car, dishwasher or stove is causing you problems (or any device which you care nothing about - only having it work) and then you will start having a feel about what most computer users think about computers ...


13

UXD is Bad UI Detection User Experience Design itself, when effectively practiced, could be described as a methodology for "detecting bad UI" (when the concept of UI is applicable). A fundamental reason to practice user-centricity in the form of empathetic problem solving, and use an iterative continuous-validation design process, is to detect those ...


11

I would recommend going with the close button for the following reasons Your close button is a visual indicator to users that they can click here to close the popover. While some users might be accustomed to clicking outside or pressing esc to close a popover( and you should support those users too), the close button helps establish the escape route.To ...


9

I am not sure if this answers your question, as it actually undermines it, but there are fare more studies on why proper capitalisation is prefered: ALL UPPERCASE IS HARDER TO READ Because Your Mind Doesn't Read Each Letter, Rather the Shape Of The Word Wichh Is Why You Can Do Tihngs Scuh As Tihs Why Capital Letters Are Dangerous (Guardian ...


6

The best way to detect usability issues with your application is observing people actually using it. However, even without user testing a lot of design errors can be found with Heuristics evaluation. The most used design heristics are probably those developed by Jakob Nielsen. The ten Nielsen heuristics Visibility of system status Match between system ...


6

Although I wouldn't change a prototype based purely on the feedback from the first tester, I would definitely and fearlessly make such a change if I got a majority of the first 4-5 testers revealed a problem. ...and I would stop wasting testers on the old design until that change was complete. Here is why... In UX, Ignorance is precious. Every user only ...


5

From a pure user standpoint, I see two reasons to do so. 1. Radio buttons double as bulletin points download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The left version of this list looks much more organized because it looks like a list, whereas on the right side there are three rows of text, with buttons at the end. In your ...


4

People are going to find it extremely hard to scan a list of 50 items, particularly if their presentation involves a less than 3-7 word description. The tools you should consider (both, by the way, trace back to our working memory, which is cognition's biggest bottleneck): Clustering Divide features into logical groups, and even into sub groups. This will ...


3

I don't follow the current vendor-specific security-speak, but I can try to list some UX implications related to various security measures for log in dialogs: locking accounts, even temporarily (necessary against brute force password attacks) - link to the support service must be available, email notification to the user should be generated, admins have to ...


3

Tipping varies wildly between countries, and even between industries. I would suggest two alternatives: If possible, have the operator cofigure the menu according to his particular indusry's customs. Perhaps he could choose between placing the "No tip" item at the top or at the bottom (I think it's usually very inappropriate not to tip, or very uncommon ...


3

Not an easy question. 1. You can't let people click 5 years' worth of days. That will take ages. 2. Off the top of my head, a nice way to lower the amount of clicking: Perface the date picker with some thing like this download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This will at least ensure the user doesn't have to click ...


2

Working off a lot of the answers already given, what about randomly combining 3 3-letter words? http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_three-letter_words (taking out inappropriate ones for this purpose of course) Assuming: Your users are all English speakers You only need about ~3 million unique codes (150 * 150 * 150) I feel like "Don Gym Cob" ...


2

Absolutely. To be able to do that, you need to recalibrate your brain slightly to know users' model of mind. It may sound scary but it isn't. Think of it as running a virtual machine with some OS that you don't typically use. Just the machine you are going to run is going to be a generic user, a Layman. This model of mind will be entirely different from ...


2

The very fundamentals in creating good user interfaces is to be able to view them from other user's perspectives - not from your own. If you are a user of the software it can be a good thing, but don't expect others to see the product as you do. This is the basics of why programs designed by the programmers often ends up hard to use for "regular customers" ...


2

While others stress empathy, and ability to view UIs from other perspectives, I am going to be less nuanced: You cannot test your own software, and as a corollary: You cannot design the UI of your own software without input from another person, hence Great UI designs are much more likely to result from an iterative process involving (non-dev) outsiders ...


2

Usually this comes down to space. If you have the space, two buttons makes more sense and is easier to implement. A single button is bit more confusing because you don't know which action will happen first.


2

We don't know the details of the service context and targeting (or anything else, for that matter), but if this is a job searching service I think first user need (matching job offers) is much bigger (more important for the user) compared to two other. So it should differ visually and take more important place/be more accessible than two other CTA's. For ...


2

For me it would make sense to split the flow in two. Have Add Tip and Ask Question flows. This way there may be fewer mistakes when users are filling in the form.


1

I wouldn't display "No Tip" as an option in a list of tip amounts, that is a form of social pressure. To avoid social pressure, do not require the user to say yes or no, in this way by not taking any action, the decision is to not leave a tip. One idea might be to provide a button at the bottom when reviewing the total payment. "would you like to leave a ...


1

It looks like you can't do much to make this easier. If these are the only options you have than I would go for option 1 and leave it up to the seller to explain the tipping function. Your option #2 is misleading and #3 is confusing. Explaining the tipping function can be done in a very approachable way: Press the arrows to choose a tip if you will and ...


1

with number 50, they're not all features...they are functions. You don't have to show all functions of your products in one page, you have a whole website to do this. Back to features, usually most of products show no more than 3 features...range that people would remember about product before they use it. "Ah, this product A has ABC, APQ and AYZ, let's ...


1

It's one application but acts as a pack of different tools. How many tools? Does each tool have features that relate to it? You could try grouping the features by tool functionality, if that's the case. Another way is to pick the top features, and give more space to explain and demonstrate and then list the lesser features in one column. Do you really ...


1

Mobile first http://www.themobileplaybook.com/en-us/ Google have been instructed to think first about mobile and fit everything else (e.g desktop) in afterwards. Folders don't need to be big tiles and on a mobile, if they were, they would take up valuable space. So, for consistency, and with a mobile-first view-point, they should be smaller than the files. ...


1

If you can make it out to a DevExpress UI Roadshow, they do a very good job of educating developers on UX, and the training is free (as long as your boss lets you go to it during work hours). I attended their training a month ago and picked up a lot of pointers.


1

From Joseph Cooney's 2006 article about 'Developer UI': Here's my quick checklist of things to look for if you're trying to avoid create "the dialog" yourself: Strange aspect ratio/portrait aspect ratio (I think portrait just looks odd for dialogs, except maybe property-page style ones) Lots of controls (because you've allowed too many options) ...


1

A number of answers cover activities at different stages. There are numerous opportunities "to detect UX issues during development". UX worh should be done at discovery, design, implementation, test, beta and over iterations of the software. What is important is to have a reasonable technique to guide you at every step of the way. UX benefits from getting ...


1

This is difficult, in that it depends a lot on the size of your team, and the roles of the people in the team. It also depends on the target platform of your product/service. If you can get to a point where your developers are following a set of conventions (patterns/rules) about how to implement functionality for the specific platform, then you've made ...


1

I don't see anything wrong with placing them above the accordion. As long as it is clear that the controls belong to the accordion component that should be fine.


1

The problem with a lock is that is also used to depict a secure connection (HTTPS). Many browsers use the lock for HTTPS. A symbol is effective if is used consistently. Have a link to your security policies and practices. Don't make a general statement your data is secure/safe as if you do get hacked then you have lied. Maybe a key symbol to identify ...


1

I'd suggest using a monospace font. It helps a lot with readability and they're usually made so you distinguish letters. Also, why discard numbers? I don't have a study to demonstrate that, but i think humans recognize faster the numbers.



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