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35

If you implement the Ribbon, you are also supposed to implement the Quick Access Toolbar, where the user can add options they require. I find this useful in Office for example, where I can put common commands and not have to remember where they are on the main ribbon.


12

In this talk, The Story of the Ribbon, Jensen Harris explains how the Ribbon came to be from the old Office 2003 UI. At this point, he mentions what he calls Command Loops: two or three commands that users often run in sequence, that should be in the same tab of the Ribbon. We looked at Command Loops, which is if you have two commands that you use over ...


11

I think the simplest solution in this case would be to take the address the user has entered and map it to the closest matching location and let them know so that they are aware of the mapping and can approve or reject the address. Amazon does the same where if they dont find an address, they validate it and show the suggested address and let the user ...


9

ATM software is generally written by the bank, whereas ATM hardware comes from a very limited set of manufacturers like NCR. As ATM hardware improves, the same software is deployed on many different device form factors often at once; some are old-school (like the ones you refer to in the question) with the buttons running down each side of the screen, and ...


8

A few options: Have good, easily discoverable keyboard shortcuts. These users sound like expert users, and keyboard shortcuts would probably be faster for them than either the new or old interface. It would depend on them learning this new way of working, though. By "easily discoverable", I mainly mean list the keyboard shortcut in the tooltip. ...


7

The short answer Simply use labels. The long answer If you are to design anything based on future possibilities, you will never finish a design, because possibilities are endless. There are basically 3 design approaches (UX or software): Throwaway (revolutionary) When you have little understanding of the problem (high level of uncertainty) You design ...


5

To show this as a two state controller, you could try any of the following. Depending of the audience's knowledge of the matter, 1 and 0 could replace true and false to save space. If they are to be read only, you have the choice of disabling them, or just print them as labels (e.g. similar to a button, but not able to press it) - all depending what you ...


4

One way would be to implement a new floatable quick access area that's always visible, to where the user can drag and drop the favorit items. Hard to tell if this answer means that you have to alter your current ribbon implementation, as you don't want to. This has the advantage of not forcing the users to always be in their favorites ribbon tab. After all, ...


4

I think it really depends on the area, but maybe just the typography can help you: some ideas: 1)Strike-through PARTICIPANTS Jim Tim Bob It's quite clear who is participating and who's not. 2) disabled look I guess you can get what options are included :)


4

Here is a Google's Adsense heatmap. You're right, the lower left is comparatively less hot to place ads or promotions or banners than say top left or center. In your case, you don't want to place the banners on top right because it is annoying and will be in the way of accessing the main functionality. Hence, the benefits of moving it to the bottom left ...


4

Buttons down the edge are old technology and I suspect they'll all be replaced by touch screens before too long and this problem will go away.


4

Step back and consider the problem The goal of this interface appears to be to create a series of contiguous ranges (1-50, 51-99, 100-Inf), and then assign a unit price over each range. The key concept here is contiguous. You are currently allowing the user to input both the beginning and end of the range on each line. This is an example of ...


4

I will add my 2 cents that I think give a direct answer to your question (btw sorry about my english): Be specific: If you want the user to do something, just tell them. So you could change "Meeting address" for "Search the meeting address and select an option below". Divide and Conquer : Users like to be lazy. You could divide the search input in 3 ...


4

A simple and conventional way would be the ellipsis. CSS even has the element attribute 'overflow:ellipsis'. http://davidwalsh.name/css-ellipsis http://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/truncate-string-with-ellipsis/ Example My short string My longer string that will get cut ... My other much longer string tha... Working Example on UX Stackexchange This ...


3

I have designed a typeahead recently with UX in mind, which, I have to admit, was more challenging than I've expected. I couldn't find a single component out there that ticks all the boxes, although some only miss by a little. Anyhow, if I understand the problem correctly, then you should really always have a match selected on the match list, like so: ...


2

As JonW rightly pointed out, trying to define the fold is going to be a challenge with the surfeit of devices out there and you would be stuck trying to fit in as much content in a relatively small space (irrespective of the fold dimensions you choose). You could make a strong case that your form page design is like a single page design which basically ...


2

I get a lot of "above the fold" with a fairly arbitrary minimum height in my workplace as well (ours is based on the screen height of company-distributed laptops). What we've gotten away with arguing is, as long as the key element (form in this case) appears partially on the page, it will be obvious to the user that they need to scroll to see the full ...


2

In my opinion, the time saved and lack of annoyance is not worth the risk of having someone who shouldn't be on the user's profile go in and just have free range to change whatever they see fit. What I would do in this situation isn't have them log back in, but force the user to type in their password again in order to save any profile changes.


2

I saw this question, made some sketches, got distracted, came back to see that @dan1111 had described the majority of the fixes. In fairness though, all that's happening here is the application of some design conventions. The biggest variation is regarding the addition/editing of cases. I've proposed that the inputs mirror the data in the table. This could ...


2

A few suggestions: Cases should be rows, not columns. As bdimag already mentioned, there are some display problems with the current format, particularly when you can add an arbitrary number of cases. In addition, I would say that making the cases be rows would be more intuitive to the users. Add/edit cases in a pop-up overlay. The current "add case" ...


2

So it's a control that represents something extremely intuitive to human beings... Yes/No, True/False. The problem that you state is the the current check boxes look too similar to some check boxes that represent something else. My suggesting is to use the tried and true images... A green checkmark for True and a Red X for false. (Maybe an option for ...


2

The "normal" HTML components appear differently from browser to browser, so if anything, Bootstrap would make a multi-devise user more comfortable than stock elements. Moreover, testing the individual UI elements of the framework would be rather pointless, since trying to grade individual elements outside of the larger context of what the screen - or the ...


2

You can compose your verification code entirely out of numbers, and define the input field as numerical, so that only the numbers keyboard comes up to begin with. If you're worried that it reduces the number of possible combinations, you can add a character or two. You can also limit the validity of the issued codes to a day or two, so you can reuse the ...


2

Since these email ids are permanent, I would suggest allowing users to choose their own email id and if their email id is not present, then you can suggest alternate ones as you are suggesting. Here is an example of how Gmail does it You can also provide a button which when clicked generates a random email id for them for anonymity purposes. This way ...


2

Was there any prototyping or usability testing done locally before now and can you contact/get access to those people? (Ideally, this should be an ongoing part of the development process over time & you'll have a list of interested early adopters. If not this time then for the next one! :)). If not, can you get to anybody at all who fits the target ...


2

Test it rather than send out surveys If you are involved with it you'll already know how it should work so get some fresh eyes on it and watch them like a hawk. Testing it on 5 people is a lot better than not testing it at all


1

Companies are always looking for ways to better target customers, and there are documented cases of using operating system information to do this. For example, Orbitz suggested higher price hotels to Mac users: Orbitz Worldwide Inc. has found that people who use Apple Inc.'s Mac computers spend as much as 30% more a night on hotels, so the online travel ...


1

Yes, there are problems with allowing a user to customize a toolbar or Ribbon in any way that they would like, depending on your users and how this customization occurs. Allowing customization can lead a team to not spend time considering what the best default toolbar should be. When discussing the toolbar layout, if the answer is always, "well, the user ...


1

I don't think you need to show your main menu/action bar (all, my meetings and create) in the event detail view. I would instead only show the actions that are relevant to that context (actions that the user can perform on the event they are looking at). Pressing the back button at the top of the event detail view would go back to the event listing, where ...


1

how about you write true or false somewhere on the interface?



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