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18

When it comes to UI/UX, "better or worse" is very subjective. There is, however, a standard for best practices: cater to your product, users, and target devices. What I mean by this in your situation: If your product expects a date in the next week 90% of the time, design your date picker around that. If you users require a larger interface to better use ...


16

Date selection isn't easy... This has been a peeve of mine for a long time. I've not found a decent calendar widget. Generally, I prefer calendars to scrollers because: Using a scroller to select a date far in the future can be a real pain. Calendars provide a lot of valuable context (today's date, day of week, physical distance to the date, etc). In ...


11

It matches the user's mental model, which is more important than matching real-world circumstances. Users view a refrigerator as something that "makes cold". Therefore the number 5 corresponds to "more cold" and 1 to "less cold". The mental model of "a device that holds its interior at a constant temperature" is more complex and harder to reconcile with ...


8

Because crappy designers are everywhere There is almost no excuse for this kind of ambiguous, uncommunicative control labeling when there are so many better patterns to follow with fridge thermostats. Here are some control formats that are far more effective. They communicate the polarity of coldness clearly They are color-blind friendly (some use shapes ...


7

Using the word "you" should generally be reserved for descriptive texts that address the logged in user. For example, you would say "You have 1 task assigned to you" to illustrate that the user has a task pending, but in a grid of tasks and various status values, it would look more consistent to have the user's display name instead of just "you." If you ...


5

The value of a grid (aka, calendar view) is it adds the context of the day-of-the-week. If knowing the day-of-the-week is important, than a calendar picker will provide the user with a better experience. Trying to schedule a meeting next week? Knowing the DOTW is important. Choosing your birthdate? DOTW is irrelevant. So it depends on the particular ...


5

I can see why parallax effects took off originally as a gimmicky creative technique, but now that the novelty has worn off, is it time for this effect to die off? Yes. OK, fine. "Yes" is probably not a worthy enough answer here. So, to elaborate, yes, I agree with you. As with any design technique, ideally it's being used to solve a communication ...


4

Not at all. There are many studies demonstrating that general adjustments for older people are of benefit for both the elder and the younger extremes. These studies also demonstrate younger demographics (specially teenagers and kids) prefer big, bold, contrasting elements over subtle, low contrast elements. While there are many misconceptions around this ...


4

There isn't any "better" solution to this which applies universally, but generally I would err on the use of "You" rather than the person's name when addressing them or referring to them when they are reading. Partly this is because I favour a casual form of address in applications, but there are some other reasons too: Tone "You" presents a more personal ...


3

I'd combine a push notification with an in-app confirmation option. For example, if you want everyone to confirm within 6 hours before the meeting, you can send a push notification to everyone who opted in for the meeting 6 hours before the start time of the meeting. If a user clicks the notification, they are taken to the app where the top confirmation ...


3

Great to see you are building a case for not doing this. From a User Experience perspective, here is some ammunition to help build your case: Norman Nielsen Group - The Most Hated Advertising Techniques: 95% of users (based on 605 respondents) said that their web experience was impacted "negatively" or "very negatively". I recommend reading the full ...


3

I agree, it is time for simple brainless usage of the parallax effect to die off. But as people are generally get used to scrolling it is time to use scrolling wisely making better user experience. This is still not well explored area. You can use scrolling speed for additional content differentiation. Slower speed will make more friction which is ...


2

Hick’s Law does not necessarily require equally probable choices. Only the simplified version T = b Log2 (n + 1) does. It is algebraically derived from the “full” theory, which is T = b Sum( p(i) Log2(1/p(i) + 1) ), where p(i) is the probability of a choice i. Hick’s Law can be combined with other calculations to predict average menu item selection time, ...


2

On breadth versus depth... Yes, this topic has been studied with some rigor by the academic and professional community. You can do a search for "menu breadth versus depth" to get a good sampling of papers and articles out there, but the quick summary is: Generally, breadth has been proven to be more effective than depth across many different dimensions ...


2

You should not interrupt the user's flow. Frequently asking to rate the app is bad. If the user beats some level there will be a positive vibe in him. Utilize this vibe and ask him to rate the app. "Congratulations Dude(or user_name),That was awesome!! Would you mind taking a moment to rate us?" A swipe banner is always better than a popup.


2

It all depends upon what you are trying to achieve. If it's simply to prevent the user taking actions (such as posting in a forum), it seems overkill to destroy everything they've ever done and prevent them from actually logging in. Bear in mind that forum posts that are randomly deleted cause confusion when others have already replied - context is ...


2

It might be instructive to look at how other big players are handling this. If the 'big guys' are doing it then it's a reasonable assumption that many of your users will be familiar with the approach. Here's a non-scientifically selected sample based on what I happen to have open in Chrome right now... Facebook Avatar | Name Twitter Avatar only Stack ...


2

There's no right or wrong way in doing this. It depends on who your users are, the overall look and spacing of your UI and the purpose of your application. If you look at Google support threads there are several discussions about users who are having trouble finding the "Sign Out" button after it was moved into the dropdown. I myself worked with users who ...


2

Think about the user's tasks. They're using the app for a particular purpose, working toward certain goals. Ads are, therefore, distractions or hurdles in the way of reaching those goals. You might also be interested in reading about Banner Blindness.


2

It depends on many factors. Please avoid using popup unless you really want to get the users attention. Here in Sign in/Register popup is unacceptable. Number of fields in your sign up form If there are many fields say more than 6 it is better to go with a separate page. A Tabbed Modal or a Pop up will not match here. If your sign up form has less number ...


2

I think there are a few possible benefits that are overlooked: Reduce how long the 'flow' feels and help with narrative and sequencing of content: Firstly, by giving the page depth it means that you appear to be covering more 'distance' down the page because you are passing multiple layers of an environment in one scroll. Think of the way old platform ...


2

Usablilty means: How easy is your software/website to use. does everybody understand the concept directly or do you need to provide a manual? User experience means: how fun or exciting is it to use your product. As an example imagine an alarm clock: Good Usability: The alarm is easy to be set. Good User experience: It wakes you up by using birds' ...


1

I think it's key to take into account exactly what sort of UX is going on in the app. Some situations where "you" is definitely not appropriate: Signup form for a company, not an individual Management tool where the individual's settings are not the focus - eg. managing a calendar or an admin interface for a website Any interface where the admin is in a ...


1

One thing you must consider for this particular comparison is what happens if the user has Javascript disabled? Without Javascript your AJAX call will not work (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) Ajax without JavaScript Also it is likely that your popups will not work without javascript, sliders maybe with some clever CSS which can also be disabled How ...


1

I've experienced similar feedback from users, i.e preferring forms on a separate page rather than a modal box. Sign in and register are no exception. Don't think there are any prefered design patterns but personally I also think modal boxes are associated with pop ups, which can be pretty disruptive to the user.


1

It's bad practice to assume every user is familiar with keyboard commands and contextual menus, because many aren't (I know someone who just found out about CTRL + C/V, and he's college-educated and has been using computers for years). While they can benefit UX by streamlining commands, your interface and functionality should be able to stand on its own. ...


1

From a quick look at the page, it would seem that one way of handling this is to issue a page wide banner/overlay which identifies errors and on-click the user is directed to the element which is wrong/missing. The element can also be highlighted.


1

Just one page loading needed elements makes your life not easier: Seo: Isnt possible anymore as bots wont get all elements. Your websites will apear as just one single page - the starting page with its keywords. No mpre keywords possible. Thats the complete opposite of a landingpage.... Users: Cant use search engines to jump directly into your pages. They ...


1

Google does something like this for Google Web Fonts: As the user selects options, the estimated overall impact on performance is displayed in a "speedometer"-style graphic. Some explanatory text is displayed below the graphic so users can easily understand the effects of their selections.


1

I faced a similar problem and solved it by extending the Google Maps Marker Cluster Library and using pie charts as suggested by BDD instead of the default cluster marker that comes with the library. You can download the solution from my GitHub repository: https://github.com/hassanlatif/chart-marker-clusterer



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