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98

You are totally right As with many other devices (eg the QWERTY keyboard) the hot/cold tap persists not because it's the most usable design, but because of: Cost since proper temperature control requires an electromechanical feedback loop design, or calibrated thermostatic valves which needs to be periodically adjusted or replaced. This drives up the cost ...


32

Show the true state of your application In your scenario it sounds like Scenario A - Example A is the way to go because it clearly indicates to the user which features are Active and allows them to turn off features that they aren't using. Instead of asking Which of these features do you have? simply show them what is active and allow them to turn some ...


29

I suppose it's mostly a question of how much money you want to invest into your fittings. In most cases you'll have one pipe for hot and one for cold water. The knobs then just open and close those pipes – I can hardly think of any easier / cheaper solution. However there are actually different solutions that do exactly what you describe: Visiting Canada ...


17

I can honestly say I have never seen a shower that has separate hot/cold knobs like you describe, and I've lived everywhere up and down both the east and west US coast. Every shower I've ever seen has two concentric wheels. The inner one controls temperature while the outer one controls pressure. Here's what they look like (although the labels around the ...


15

350 is not very many questions. Why don't you just shuffle the list when the user starts the game and avoid duplicates altogether? This takes very little processing power (even a crappy mobile phone can do the operation in milliseconds) and minimal memory (store pointers or indexes to questions and not the question itself....the order can be stored in ...


11

Hot and cold knobs work great, and everyone intuitively understands that turning the knob makes more water come out, ie more water pressure. The practical reason is it gives maximum control with the fewest parts. Also, the range for usable water pressure is not very large, and dedicating an entire knob to it seems to be a waste. Your solution would require ...


10

They don't any more. They used to because it is the most mechanically simple implementation of temperature control. However, this is only historical. None of the other answers mention the legalities of this. The International Building Code (what most US local codes are modeled on these days) mandates that all new shower controls must be temperature ...


9

See: (a) Frederick D., Mohler J., Vorvoreanu M., Glotzbach R. (2015) The effects of parallax scrolling on user experience in web design, Journal of Usability Studies, 10 (2), 87-95: http://uxpajournal.org/the-effects-of-parallax-scrolling-on-user-experience-in-web-design/ Excerpt from article abstract: Participants believed that the parallax scrolling ...


9

Scenario C (This is Scenario B with a slight twist) No questions: Turn on/off features is used instead. All checkboxes are unchecked as default. If there are mandatory features that the user can't turn off, they shouldn't be included. If user doesn't have a feature he checks the checkbox. Example C - Default state. Turn on/off features: [□] A [□] B ...


8

I suggest the "I Agree" button. We all know that the "I Agree" button is just some legal mumbo jumbo that neither the developers nor the end user truly care about. By having the checkbox, we lose the "I Do Not Agree" button. This makes it more difficult and frustrating for the end user to quit, which they should be able to do easily and at any time. For ...


6

A couple things about checkboxes The ✓ check mark is associated with positive indications. So using a checkmark to indicate negative option is OK but it creates more cognitive load for users. Whether or not you use a checkbox, asking users to affirm a negative creates more cognitive load. For example: With this in mind, look at your case. You have a ...


6

Your current approach is heading in the right direction. When your users use this data regularly, they will already know the relationship between the groups. Switching background color is one way of creating contrast between groups. Other ways would be to use line separators and white space. One thing you can have do to make it more obvious is by ...


5

I would go like this. If the check boxes are between 1 and 15 (5 x 3), Will go with Scenario A (All are checked) If it's more than 15, will go with Scenario B (All are unchecked) Reason: It's easy for a user to grasp 10 check boxes and can uncheck easily without making a mistake. In case of more than 15, the user can't grasp that many and the chances to ...


5

Think about what your users need The magnifying glass is a very well understood idiom for zoom, so it's probably the right cursor to use. The use of inset (plus on the inside) vs offset (plus to the right) will depend on the size and use of the cursor. For example: For large cursors the inset cursor is visually simpler than the offset cursor, so option ...


5

Use grouping horizontal lines and eliminate the verticals one. Horizontal lines helps to lead the eye along the line, while vertical lines become a barrier along the eye path:


4

So there are two approaches coming from a cartographic standpoint that could work in your situation, but it depends on what you want the user to do with these markers. The first involves the user using these as just a visual aid meaning they would have no interactivity and be just static images to inform the user. In this case, I would a pie chart marker ...


4

Designing a visual indicator here is non-trivial A charger has at least the following states, and possibly more: The charger is not plugged in correctly, or there is no power in the wall socket The charger is plugged in correctly but the device is not charging (e.g. faulty cable, device isn't fully plugged in) The charger is plugged in correctly and the ...


4

Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


3

On my personal preference it's sometimes (or most of the time) convenient to just get an idea of battery status by having a look of filled or empty status of battery indicator (Like the one with default battery indicator ). Though, I am supportive to your idea of saving the space and moving the % inside battery icon but then we will have to take care of few ...


3

I found it very amusing reading all these answers which I assume were written by people in the US. I live in the UK and visit France and Spain very regularly. I believe a resident of any of these countries would be appalled to find a hot/cold shower in a hotel room in Europe - I have not seen such a thing for many years. All the talk about the the ...


3

Given you’re designing the user interface, not the program’s interface, it makes sense to signal what’s required of the user, not what’s required of the program. Part of the purpose of the UI is to communicate the actions the user can or must make. In the case of require fields, the commonly used red asterisk communicates to the user “you must put something ...


3

Take one step deeper. How should you display the questions? One step deeper. Why are users playing your game in the first part? If they want to learn something, they should repeat. If they want to be entertained they should repeat only if getting a repeated question allows them to feel confident or gain an extra advantage as this will enable a ...


3

Along with the pro's you mentioned, here are some more PDF's enable offline access to secured content PDF's can be used for forms which can be filled offline (e.g. i-9 ) which are required to be in a specific format. With regards to cons, here are the obvious ones Some PDF's can be very large which use up the users data or delay him considerably PDF's ...


3

I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


3

We work in mobile and have developed apps for the NHS and other healthcare clients. Clearly the patient's details and medical information is of a private and sensitive nature. The way we have tackled this in the past is that our developers have wrote routines to anonymize the data. For some clients it is simply enough to replace names, addresses and dates ...


3

Let's face it, serial numbers weren't meant to be consumed by humans. Can you imagine going to the grocery store and waiting for someone to manually enter each and every bar code number for all your items? In your situation I think option 3 is your best bet but I don't see why you couldn't combine option 3 with option 2. If the bar code scanner is failing ...


2

You could use a date range picker in order to have a combined view of start and end date. Also by re arranging the fields you can make the layout more compact and easier to scan


2

Some systems in South America (called "calefón" in my country) require certain level of pressure to get the hot water running (for example, you can turn the knob 30º without the "calefon" getting activated in order change the water temperature), so in that case it's a device limitation.


2

The best solution: Don't give the user any options Look, let's face it: We're halfway through 2015. Users these days have been subjected to so many pointless options ("Install this program to the default directory?") that they no longer read the options that they pick. You should pick whatever option you think most users want, and then take the choice out ...


2

Is it possible to group the features (checkboxes) in any way? From the description this is very similar to a survey or a registration form - information is given only once or rarely. So I would go with questioning which feature do the user need (not have), decouple the options into feature groups as different roles need different feature sets, and leave the ...



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