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72

Quite simply don't do this. False expectations are the biggest source of a disappointing experience. It commits you to features that you may not be able/want to produce, users will assume very short timescales for this functionality to be in action, and it also highlights your apps weaknesses leading users to look for these elsewhere with your competitors. ...


58

Handle-less doors exist in many restaurants. The idea is that you can be carrying trays/plates in both hands, and simply walk through the doors, and get where you are going (implementation note, when carrying food, you typically 'back into' the door to go through - you can't push through the door with plates of food in front of you, so, you can't see what's ...


47

A great question! I love how UX design makes you think of these things. However, just to play devil's advocate, I can list several reasons off the top of my head why we should not have all doors as you described: Hinges: would have be to become more complex. One-way hinges, as they exist now, are a quite simple 3-piece design that require very little ...


46

There is at least a single benefit for those not using a mouse - Normally you are able to tab between input elements using the keyboard, this is an indicator as to which element currently has your focus.


22

From the point of view of designing a building, the biggest problem with doors is that they create a lot of dead space in the floor plan (space that can't be used for anything else). The area you have to leave clear for a single door swing is at least as big as for a washing machine, and often more (e.g. if the door opens near a corner you need a space big ...


21

People often want to put some form of "under construction" messages in their UI, because when you're making something new you're enthusiastic about its potential and want to communicate that enthusiasm to your users. But if you think about this from the user's point of view (which is the basis of good UX), it's not a good idea. Highlighting new features ...


13

When I was in the US, I was told most doors had this simple convention: Handle == pull, Bar == push. Seem to be applied to most places I went (that being malls, restaurants, clinics, groceries). Emergency doors are designed so you can push outwards. Easily opened even when the inside is jammed. You don't need to step back to open. Rooms had doors open ...


13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


9

After doing some reading it seems that the highlighting in fact does help the user as people have come to be reliant on the UX/UI guiding them through the page and showing where they are focusing as well. For example if a user is filling out a form and using the "tab" key to jump from area to area they want to see the focus highlight change from what they ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


8

Of course there are multiple valid reasons to have doors as they are right now. To add to the existing answers (and excuse my english, I'm not a native speaker): Having hinges (the metal thing that holds the door, had that translated) that open in both directions makes it difficult to actually really close the door. There always has to be some amount ...


8

Reasons for using door handles: Keeping the door closed, e.g. against draft. Wind will push at the door in just the same way you would push. Wind will not turn a handle though. Closing the door when it is left open. If a door is opened all the way, you need to grab it somehow to close it. Hard to do without a handle. Keeping the door open. As just ...


8

If the exams option is always empty, then the users will (at some point, depending on the individual person) give up checking that menu option. If there is no mechanism in the application to draw the attention to new exams that appear, then you have a usability issue. Your suggestion is one way to indicate the "new items" idea, but it is not necessarily ...


7

Icons are a double-edged sword. A good icon is grokkable and serves as mental shorthand for a user, improving interactions. If they see the traditional save icon, they probably won't need to read the label, and in some cases the label could be omitted to save space. This mental shortcut reduces the user's mental load. Good icons match conventions, are ...


7

I have not seen this pattern employed exactly as you describe. My relevant experience in information-rich webapps stems from enterprise health-monitoring and deployment software, which has a deep navigation hierarchy. In my opinion, the left-navigation and the main content should not both employ accordions. Left hand navigation is typically vertical, and as ...


6

Two people meet either side of a two way door. Their only option is to push. This might comes across as rude. Two people meet either side of a normal door. The one on the "pull" side opens it for the other person. This comes across as polite. The directioness of the door design provides convention that helps the door's users. (Maybe this is a just a ...


6

The kind of door that you describe already exists. They are commonly used, for example, in restaurants between the kitchen and the dining area. Servers, who have the hands full, merely need to push their way through. To ensure that two people going in opposite directions don't crash into each other, they are always double doors, and the users adopt a ...


6

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at right hand side of ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


5

I guess it's coming down to this: It's impossible to close the door. You would always push it in, even a little bit. And it'd take really long to get the door to the correct closing position.


5

What you describe is reminiscent of the popular "lean startup" idea of building a skeletal app or website which is known as an MVP - minimal viable product - and seeing who tries to use which features (including the 'sign up for paid account' feature) before you build them. You could potentially use this to your advantage to, say, figure out which features ...


5

There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


4

Amazon's process keep you informed of both the entire process and the step you are currently completing : A suggestion could be : to inform your users at the beginning of the process and also before they start the payment that there will be another key step after that to always display an Amazon-like path and current step to send an email to your users ...


3

Did you take a look at Venn diagram? They could be simplified into icons, where AND could be two circles with the intersection filled with your theme color, and OR having the whole area. As long as they stay next to each other. I think they should be clear enough. Or, just put AND OR in the icon.


3

It sounds like you're starting with an assumption. Before going any further and risking over-engineering, I would take a moment to challenge that assumption. I would take a step back and understand your business requirements. Is there a security concern with letting your user change his name, letting him impersonate different people constantly? Is the ...


3

One other consideration is space. You have to clear a radius of space in front of the door, and if the door opens both ways, that's two fronts of the door, but if it's only one way, you don't have to clear behind the door. Now you probably don't want anything on the floor behind your door anyway--but you might want something like a cupboard attached to the ...


3

Reading the other answers, and not having done extensive studies, there are some reasons why I personally would not want to have such kind of doors at home or in the office. I am assuming swing doors that automatically set the door into a closed position when released. I like to have doors between rooms (and in my office) just open to the hallway My cats ...


3

It is an extremely good idea to remind users of your password creation rules when they don't remember their passwords. Consider the following facts: most users cope with the amount of credentials they have through password reuse and password creation systems that transform an old password into a new one (see Cormac Herley's field study on password reuse ...


3

If you want to consider users with special visual and/or cognitive requirements, it becomes quite complicated and there's no single answer. The W3C Web Accessibility Initiative's Web Content Authoring Guidelines (WCAG) provide a good starting point. That's probably the single most thoroughly-researched resource on web accessibility, though it's not totally ...



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