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71

I think a start would be to make it clear the total number of tests and/or total number of cards at the top of each card. And also the breakdown of how many rows you seeing out of that total. e.g. Total Tests: 22 Page: 1 of 2, showing tests 12 of 22 Mockup 1


52

It matches the user's mental model, which is more important than matching real-world circumstances. Users view a refrigerator as something that "makes cold". Therefore the number 5 corresponds to "more cold" and 1 to "less cold". The mental model of "a device that holds its interior at a constant temperature" is more complex and harder to reconcile with ...


48

Because crappy designers are everywhere There is almost no excuse for this kind of ambiguous, uncommunicative control labeling when there are so many better patterns to follow with fridge thermostats. Here are some control formats that are far more effective. They communicate the polarity of coldness clearly They are color-blind friendly (some use shapes ...


38

Save is a byproduct Save is a byproduct of early hardware- and software design. It doesn't have a common equivalent in the real world. Consider: If you take a pencil and make a mark on paper, that mark doesn't require an extra step in order to become permanent. In other words, it does not need to be saved. The paper may need to be stored somewhere so it ...


24

Simply adding the arrow at the bottom will help. Check the below img


16

Option 1: Print on multiple pieces of paper Just out of curiousity, is printing it on two separate pieces of paper an option? Having two papers and a staple indicates clearly to the reader that it isn't a single page document. Option 2: Add something to the end of the test to inidcate it is done I wonder if there are workflow type triggers that you ...


16

There are many good answers about annotating the bottom of the page clearly (I like Dave Haigh's best), but as an alternative, how about making the last task (on each side) indicate that tests continue on reverse -- that way, it's directly in what they're (meant) to be reading/completing? I don't have an image editor to hand, but instead of: download ...


8

Use workflow and cognitive dissonance to draw the user's attention The form workflow is top-to-bottom, left-to-right. So the user will naturally end up at the bottom right of the page. So, place the page-turn indicator on the bottom right since the user's eye will be there. The form uses a grid layout, and has a lot of content. Therefore if you use ...


5

I had a similar situation when I was designing an accordion menu. here you can find the related article. For navigation items such as previous and next I would use the icon based on the direction i want to point. (right placed icon for next, left placed icon for previous). For other cases left aligned icons feels more familiar.


5

These are great answers, particularly Dave Haigh's, however none of them seem to address one important issue: What if the paper initially is placed on their desk with page 2 upwards? All the suggestions about "turn over to see page 2" don't address the issue of "turn over to see page 1". For example the big black box "10 more tests" somehow needs to be ...


4

If each combobox is always going to have the same set of possible values, you could instead use a DataGridView with multiselectable cells, and change that "Copy to all" button into a "Set Selected Cells" button, so the user has to ctrl+click the cell they want to modify, select the value from the ComboBox and press that Button. This also lets the user select ...


3

This practice is common in checkout processes, as it isolates the vital information at hand and encourages the user to focus on the action needed. It also helps keep the process linear and avoid confusion as to what action needs to be taken next. I believe in a waiting room metaphor, this makes just as much sense. some interesting reading: Smashing ...


3

As answered by JeromeR the Save paradigm is a byproduct of early hardware software design. For simplicity I am only going to talk about two types of memory. "Save" actually means moving information from temporary memory (RAM) to permanent memory (Hard disk, flash ROM, etc). Temporary memory (RAM) can only keep information while it is powered on. Permanent ...


3

It's an Engineering decision That simplifies and complements some of the features Google docs boasts about Real-time Collaboration Offline editing Revision history Cloud storage ...allowing the user to focus only about writing/editing the content while the technology ensures that their precious content is always preserved. Content you edit on the ...


3

FYI, they used to have a save button in Google Docs: http://googleappsupdates.blogspot.com/2010/02/new-saving-buttons-in-google-docs-and.html however, it's been removed in Google Drive. I can't find anything online stating why they removed it, so can only speculate. Given that Google is an engineering centric organization my guess is that the change came ...


3

You are overcomplicating things. You define a monthly subscription fee/service not by when it occurs, but by how often. I would suggest, rather than looking for a specific day within each month, i.e. 17th, 29th, 31st of the month; instead we use an offset from the start of the month. We know that there are 12 months in a year, and each month starts on the ...


3

I think there are a few possible benefits that are overlooked: Reduce how long the 'flow' feels and help with narrative and sequencing of content: Firstly, by giving the page depth it means that you appear to be covering more 'distance' down the page because you are passing multiple layers of an environment in one scroll. Think of the way old platform ...


3

Tohster's answer is great. Vote for that one. But to address the 'mental model' aspect in another answer: The reason the dial is the way it is is that it's not a thermostat. It's actually a 'power' dial ala a volume knob. This is why it's confusing. Contrary to Nathan's hypothesis, I'd argue the problem with these dials is that they don't adhere to a ...


3

Yes, often called "First Time User Experience (FTUE)", "Out of Box Experience (OOBE)" or "Unboxing". There's lots of good articles out there depending on whether you're developing a website, mobile app or something else. Some good first guidelines are: Give users a clear path forward Instill confidence Delight the user Less thinking, more doing Teach ...


3

Both the options are good but Tree navigation is recommended. My suggestion would be add the search box above the tree navigation to access the menu item quickly. User can type 3 letter in the search box to get the respective page link.


3

What happened to the conventional arrows that were correlated to the number of pages there are? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You don't even have to show that left arrow when you're on page one.


3

There are good and reasonable answers here that explain how to show readers that they must turn the sheet around, but what you really want in medical applications is making sure all necessary tests have been ordered/performed, not superfluous ones and not the wrong ones (for adjacent rows for instance). That is why I think it is more important to change ...


2

Suffering from cataracts myself, I can assure you from myself, as well as others, that white or very light text on black is much more efficient for us. The research is there as well if you research low vision disorders. It all had to do with the amount of bright white light. There are some screens on some programs where there is so much white, all we see is ...


2

Usablilty means: How easy is your software/website to use. does everybody understand the concept directly or do you need to provide a manual? User experience means: how fun or exciting is it to use your product. As an example imagine an alarm clock: Good Usability: The alarm is easy to be set. Good User experience: It wakes you up by using birds' ...


2

As myself and others have mentioned recently, a good way to intuitively represent and modify percentages is a vertical bar chart with sliders/handles: With (editable) numbers for each part. By default I'd set them to have equally large portions, so for group A, 20%, group B is a full 100% for one resource, and C is 50/50.


2

Fridge temperature thermostat dials are just the worst. I want my next fridge to have something like this:


2

I don't know of any standards for this - I don't think I've ever seen a remote control like the one illustrated. It's somewhat reminiscent of a TV remote, using arrow cursors to move around, but has much fewer buttons than today's TV remote. I would use text along with row-of-buttons symbol. "Command bar" seems better to me than "Sub menu", maybe you'd have ...


2

I think you describe something like badges, which is supplied in Material Design Lite (MDL) and in Bootstrap (and probably many of the latest web frameworks). MDL provides a definition: The Material Design Lite (MDL) badge component is an onscreen notification element. A badge consists of a small circle, typically containing a number or other ...


2

You could probably adapt a card-sorting tool to find out what sequence most people expected to do the tasks. Or you could build a couple of prototypes with alternate task flows and test those. A quicker way might be to look for similar workflows on competitor sites and test those with a tool like http://www.usertesting.com/. Or, as Steve suggested above, ...


2

While there are quite a few similarities between the Start menu used in Windows and a hamburger menu, I'd say there are a few key differences in their execution. Amount of Content One of the biggest arguments against hamburger menus is the amount of navigation friction they introduce. Usually these menus contain a small number of buttons or functions that ...



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