Hot answers tagged

66

I feel bad that you have to work with this background color. Oof, i just can't even wrap my head around how that decision came to pass. At any rate, if that's not a variable you have influence over then I'd go with a color that'll always retain stark contrast. I'd also avoid venturing too far outside of the styles that that users are generally familiar ...


58

An interesting question, and one that I think many of us might have pondered before without really diving too deep into the possible issues. From a purely design perspective, I can think of a number of plausible reasons: Convention: the first person did it this way, and then everybody else followed because "that's how it's done". Safety first: separating a ...


56

I would go with something in the shade of the background, but have a more red text in the alert. You can add a border in the shade of the text to make it stand out as an error more, as well.


40

A bright yellow background with black text would work well. Fits the colour scheme of a warning sign.


21

The standard color for error messages is red, see this question : One important point to understand is that using conventional colors for errors is important because they make the errors more noticeable. User being annoyed by the color of error message is lot less of a problem than user not being able to complete the form because they didn't ...


16

Both Find and Find and Replace are related functionally as you mention. But both actions seem to be orthogonal in terms of what user need (mindset) they cater to. You will know in advance either you want to find something or you rather want to substitute occurrences of something. In the latter case it just happens that you need to find occurrences of the ...


16

That's an accessibility nightmare! Try reversing your error message styles: Red text on a white background.


13

You might try adding a white border, then play with the background color. The one color that communicates 'something is wrong' louder than red is the color of death, black.


10

When you can't think of a noun for an anchor or headline, think of a verb If you can't quite think of a name for the content on the linked page, you can instead try thinking of the action that users would do theres, just as the "registration page" may say "Register" or "Join." In this case, something like "Make connections" or "Expand your network"? ...


8

If you can expect your users to be power text editor users, for example programmers, then it makes sense to combine these dialogs into one, or, even better, make it a toolbar and show real-time results as you type. This is an expected feature for development tools nowadays, as it speeds up the editing process greatly. IDEs (integrated development ...


6

Building off of several other answers: Never only rely on color. Adding an icon or text or texture not only helps colorblind people, but also makes things a bit easier for regular-seeing people. Using a dark grey or black bar gives a strong contrast with the background. It's also color neutral so you can put other kinds/colors of notifications in those ...


5

Why not go with something more positive such as Available. That way it wont have any unwanted connotations and users may be more interested in requesting a connection.


5

Lets take this example - Say there is a menu item with broad heading: Shoes. So, the items inside will read Formal Shoes, Slippers, Kids' Shoes etc. and not just Formal, Slippers, Kids'. However if you changes the headline to say, Choose by Shoe type - then having items like Formals, Slippers, Kids are acceptable and make sense. So the esscence is that the ...


4

To be honest, your question isn't 100% clear - are you after some of the ways that an organisation can seek feedback from users to determine their requirements? For example, using evaluation processes such as focus groups and surveys. Or, do you mean that the organisation knows what it wants and what you're trying to determine is how to implement those ...


4

I strongly suggest that you ensure that you use more than just the photo to identify the role. The photo should really be ancillary to the informational content: the informational content can be read by eye, by screenreader, and can be machine-readable in a way that photos cannot. That deals with the informatics and accessibility issues. In terms of ...


4

I would use tabs. UI guidelines for using tabs stipulate that they present different views of the same information. so put the type and model search on the first tab, and the search by name search on the second tab. (Side note: Have a look at the Auto Trader website and the way they implement searches for different types of cars - I found it very easy and ...


4

I see this as new behaviour. Without an old install of MSOffice to test I can't be absolutely sure, but in the past find/replace dialog boxes were often modal, and covered quite a lot of text. For find only tools this isn't necessary - they tend to have 2-4 controls of which only one is a text box (wide). Replace requires at least another text box and ...


4

You can use Master-Detail interaction pattern, see the image: The list is fully visible, so you can observe and choose any item quickly. If it's possible, try to group the applications in some meaningful way, like Photo & Graphics, Office, etc. This will help to navigate on the list in a faster way.


4

One thing these cultures have in common is a top-down organization of writing. When a line breaks, both cultures continue writing below what was just written. You could lean on this in your designs. The Flipboard app uses "pages" that flip up and down rather than left and right. I'd start with something along those lines. Maybe new screens slide up from ...


3

As others asserted the terms can be ambiguous, depending on context. From my experience: Conceptual design A non-committing design, that often captures high-level ideas without the details. "For this specific problem with have sketched 5 conceptual designs." The name also stands for a phase during the creativity/problem solving process - once the ...


3

How about not using the pointer at all but switch controls directly as the user scrolls. So by example if your application has two buttons horizontally in a row and an input down below scrolling left and right will toggle between the buttons and scrolling down will toggle between the input and the last button selected. I remember to have seen this on ...


3

I would put this on a comment but I don't have enough reputation. In your case I believe the problem is you don't have a good UI for the small actions defined and want to solve it through keyboard shortcuts. Maybe you could rethink the whole process, simplify it an then think again about the shortcuts? Why does it take so many clicks? How many panels can ...


3

For the first question : How do you make it obvious to the user that a text area is blank in the series of text areas ? I would do something like this, a faded tool tip/label inside the text area that is on display by default for an 'empty' state. This is popular in forms. As you type, key in, that messages goes away. When made empty again, its displayed. ...


3

Provide context No matter what you do, it's no good idea to leave empty elements just like that, trusting that users will understand the affordance. Even if they do (and any test will show you form elements are rarely understood by default by 100% of people), you will create another set of questions for the user: why are these elements empty? Did they ...


3

And Apple uses white background for their videos on website. While using light background colors, make sure you apply shadows to the player so the visual content stands out. Take a loot at the Video Player UX on Pinterest Here are some aspects of dark color


3

There are a number of different strategies that you can apply, depending on the relationship between the applications (or lack of): Grouping: try to group applications of similar function into a subset and provide a label, that way the users can scan the headings first and reduce their search space. This strategy will work if you end up having to add ...


3

From the moment you can only choose one item, could a drop-down also do the job (perhaps even with a grouping as indicated above)? The reason I suggest this, is that judging by your example, you might get into layout problems when you have items with varying label lengths, which in turn might prompt you to choose for a vertical list (and as a result take up ...


3

The question actually provided a lot of the alternate options available, but for clarity I thought it would be good to summarize some of the answers provided: Find a complementary colour to use that will stand out - there are plenty of tools for this, and you can also consult the branding guidelines as a secondary check; this could be for the UI, the font ...


2

There is no one general right answer for that debate. It depends on the nature of the result expected : is it modular ? or is it a general decision ? Let me give an example : in medical domain, these images may be images of patient tissues, and the output required is a general decision : does the patient have certain type of tumor or not ? In such cases, ...


2

To be honest Violet, you haven't provided enough info in your question for anyone to offer a definite answer to your particular problem. The way I see it, the answer will depend on the following variables: What does processing the images produce? - For example, if it produces an animated GIF image for use on internal SharePoint sites, that's less critical ...



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