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73

Quite simply don't do this. False expectations are the biggest source of a disappointing experience. It commits you to features that you may not be able/want to produce, users will assume very short timescales for this functionality to be in action, and it also highlights your apps weaknesses leading users to look for these elsewhere with your competitors. ...


46

There is at least a single benefit for those not using a mouse - Normally you are able to tab between input elements using the keyboard, this is an indicator as to which element currently has your focus.


42

It is a general question that can be answered with a general answer: One more than is actually required by the business is too many. In other words, make sure all the required fields are essential to allow the user to progress. All too often, the required fields are only required in the sense that someone on the business side wanted the field, rather than ...


21

People often want to put some form of "under construction" messages in their UI, because when you're making something new you're enthusiastic about its potential and want to communicate that enthusiasm to your users. But if you think about this from the user's point of view (which is the basis of good UX), it's not a good idea. Highlighting new features ...


20

This post from Hubspot shows some interesting results for the number of form fields vs converstion: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/6746/Which-Types-of-Form-Fields-Lower-Landing-Page-Conversions.aspx They then (partially) break this down by input type. It's interesting to note that conversion appears to go up with from 1 to 3 fields and ...


19

Have you considered placing it immediately after the textarea title? That way, it's immediately visible to the user if they are confused. ("Description? What exactly does that entail?")


14

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


11

Adding just an icon may fail to serve the purpose. You can easily find through the stats from the server logs on how many user actually clicked on "Help" for the purpose of it's existence. It is always recommended to let the user know what he is going to do in short rather hiding it totally. You may use the pattern as stated by Arkuen after a threshold when ...


9

After doing some reading it seems that the highlighting in fact does help the user as people have come to be reliant on the UX/UI guiding them through the page and showing where they are focusing as well. For example if a user is filling out a form and using the "tab" key to jump from area to area they want to see the focus highlight change from what they ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


8

If the exams option is always empty, then the users will (at some point, depending on the individual person) give up checking that menu option. If there is no mechanism in the application to draw the attention to new exams that appear, then you have a usability issue. Your suggestion is one way to indicate the "new items" idea, but it is not necessarily ...


7

Icons are a double-edged sword. A good icon is grokkable and serves as mental shorthand for a user, improving interactions. If they see the traditional save icon, they probably won't need to read the label, and in some cases the label could be omitted to save space. This mental shortcut reduces the user's mental load. Good icons match conventions, are ...


7

I have not seen this pattern employed exactly as you describe. My relevant experience in information-rich webapps stems from enterprise health-monitoring and deployment software, which has a deep navigation hierarchy. In my opinion, the left-navigation and the main content should not both employ accordions. Left hand navigation is typically vertical, and as ...


6

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at right hand side of ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


5

What you describe is reminiscent of the popular "lean startup" idea of building a skeletal app or website which is known as an MVP - minimal viable product - and seeing who tries to use which features (including the 'sign up for paid account' feature) before you build them. You could potentially use this to your advantage to, say, figure out which features ...


5

There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


5

Placeholder If it's feasible to have your help text only show when the field is empty, you can use placeholder text. Top-right corner (or left, as already suggested) Seeing as your textarea takes up the entire width of the column, the top-right corner is also an appropriate choice. If applicable and if space permits, you can add supplementary help text ...


4

Amazon's process keep you informed of both the entire process and the step you are currently completing : A suggestion could be : to inform your users at the beginning of the process and also before they start the payment that there will be another key step after that to always display an Amazon-like path and current step to send an email to your users ...


4

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


3

If you want to consider users with special visual and/or cognitive requirements, it becomes quite complicated and there's no single answer. The W3C Web Accessibility Initiative's Web Content Authoring Guidelines (WCAG) provide a good starting point. That's probably the single most thoroughly-researched resource on web accessibility, though it's not totally ...


3

It is an extremely good idea to remind users of your password creation rules when they don't remember their passwords. Consider the following facts: most users cope with the amount of credentials they have through password reuse and password creation systems that transform an old password into a new one (see Cormac Herley's field study on password reuse ...


3

Did you take a look at Venn diagram? They could be simplified into icons, where AND could be two circles with the intersection filled with your theme color, and OR having the whole area. As long as they stay next to each other. I think they should be clear enough. Or, just put AND OR in the icon.


3

As long as the footer does not need a long scroll to show up, I think this design is good. If all you had in that 'contact us' page was just this small to fit in a footer, this new design would also be getting rid of unnecessary white space and an additional click.


3

Don't move my cheese I think this is a classic problem where the developers who've created these tools haven't been able to anticipate how their applications are going to be used. When you can anticipate everything, you're able to design a great UX on the first try. But that just isn't happening here. And then as features are added, they don't bother ...


3

This depends on what kind of information you're trying to gather. In general, the correct number of required fields is the absolute minimum number of fields required to make a record usable. If you are collecting information about a new user in your system, you may need only an email/username and a password. Without a username or password, a user record ...


2

In a study for designing the UI for a dental system from 2007, they found: One lesson learned from this study is that interface itself, whether GUI or TUI does not correlate with good or bad user performance. Because users have different needs depending on the application and their technical skill level, there is no good answer for this as a general ...


2

This might not be a good idea to tease users, but as long as users are aware they are using a non-final version, this can be an important reassuring factor. Important (not for the core functionality of the application, but for the workflow of the user) features may still be unimplemented, but showing them already tells the user that they have been thought of ...


2

As long as the site is in "real beta" (as opposed to eternal beta): Grey out the links / give them a distinct color, and provide a mouseover that says "We are working on it!" I agree with the other replies that you should not wake false expectations. OTOH, advertising your current spec could greatly improve beta feedback, both by reducing the the ...



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