Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You can use Selenium to write automated web tests. However this can be quite expensive and brittle, and might not pick up on UX concerns such as text overruns. Another way might be to have a 'demonstration page' that uses all of the key css for your application. You could create a snapshot of this demonstration page and play spot the difference after each ...


3

Combine two research methods Start with usability testing, for the reasons that @Kit-Grose gave. Have a quick glance at the illustration in this NN/g post about UX-research methods to understand which methods can give you insights into user performance, and which methods can survey their opinions and ratings. Then follow that research with a method that ...


2

You shouldn't really expect to get explicit feedback from a usability test (honest or otherwise); that's what focus groups and other such things are for. Usability testing is a way to test outcomes, not opinions. It's a great way to see if the changes have a noticeable improvement (or at least equivalence) when it comes to users performing a given set of ...


2

Test in Context First, I understand your explanation of the difference between having the choice to use software and not having the choice, but I don't really see how that's going to affect your testing. A user is either using the app to complete a task, or they're not, and you can't really control for all the reasons they might not be using it. Sure, in a ...


1

I am assuming that by Enterprise software, you mean software that is deployed on site and not accessible by the cloud. In cases where you can't A/B test with a live audience, you can use a choice test to determine the favourable icon. The choice test is like a simple A/B test but you can use it with your own team or recruit some users from the enterprise ...


1

The following reply is based on the information you supplied. Obviously there are different approaches that could be taken to the problem. I am guessing that you are quite far in the design process and what to test specific user journeys, content and interactions. When interactions require user input, one solution is to give the participant a task or ...


1

It depends where you are on development and design stage. If you have multiple ideas and more unknown questions, paper-prototype testing will be a good solution. Micro interactions are also important like updating a graph on fly based but I hope that this is not the only part of the system. You should have an overall testing for correcting the assumptions. ...


1

If you have a measure of performance that you can gather, from use of the software to perform a set task, then you can set up an experiment and analyse the results with a "t-test". (some details can be found here.


1

OK, here's a reply out of left field. How about human-computer paper-prototype testing? If you use hand-drawn mock-ups on paper, then afterward you can get the participant to sketch ways to make ti better. If you do this, I recommend: Use large-nib markers and really large sheets of paper. Use pieces of transparent coloured plastic (from a report cover) ...


2

You can get pretty close to fully-functional with some prototyping software, like Axure. Sometimes, though, building out every interaction and animation isn't worth the time. You can always use a simpler interaction to stand in for the real one. Some small confirmation that the user's action was recognized, in conjunction with your explanation, can be ...


1

Invision's prototyping product allows you to create and visualize UI interactions and responses based on your designs. Actions like state switching, hiding/showing of elements, and bringing in new data can be achieved. Create a mockup of the base graph, another of the exchanged data, and you can add what they call a "hot link" or "hot spot" to a button, ...


0

HcaLong participated with a company that made something similar and worked great, maybe you can contact them, can not remember which was the link the study, but you can look inside your web http://preparatumente.com


1

Reading your question, I think you need three factors: Which tasks do the roles perform and how often - for a later priorization. How usable they see the application. What is their top painpoint - for getting qualitative insights. Let them mark your identified tasks and an "others-task" and let them priorize them. Which is the most valuable for them? ...


2

Look for the point of least astonishment I really like this tweet from Jared Spool... How much user research do you need? Ideally, you continue until you reach the Point of Least Astonishment. Jared Spool describes this method of user research and design iteration by being able to guess what a user will do before they do it. Here are the basic ...


0

I'm not a fan of questionnaires and trying to make usability measurable. Usability is subjective, you can't measure that. Check out the book "Don't make me think" by Steve Krug. And do a usability test with a few (3) users. Just put them in front of their own computer and ask them to perform the task. Observate how different they do the task from how you ...


0

There's a couple ways you could approach this in my opinion: Segment your roles and tasks so that each person surveyed gets 1 SUS, but you cover all of your tasks/roles equally for each. Send SUS for a role's most frequently done task to a group, and do user interviews from that group to analyze the other tasks.


0

We recently used the single-field credit card input on a high profile donation campaign that raised 2.4 million in one month. You can check out the form here: https://freezemnd.com/donate/ The most difficult thing for us came after the client asked to add conditional logic to the form for some raffle tickets. This created some trouble with the javascript ...



Top 50 recent answers are included