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I know that this question is old, but the original description and its tone are telling. The asker mentions "the usual stuff" as though they're things to check off on a list without really paying heed to them. The test is said to drag on, but it's not clear why. What did the participant need to do to complete the test? Hopefully the requirements were ...


0

Since your goal in the research is summative, you do not necessarily need to test multiple devices. You can choose what you are measuring, and be clear that this is what you are measuring. If you do choose to measure a single type of device, you can either do it based on data (if you have it) about the types of devices that students currently use to ...


-1

You are testing two things, and confusing the results. This strongly suggests two independent tests. The first test is the usability of the main screen. Can they find the preferred way to contact you? Did they see the button? Did they hunt in your about screen? Did they search for "contact info"? Measure that activity. The second test, of course, is ...


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The often misquoted '5 users' is because Neilsen is describing 'iterative' testing of the same website. *You want to run multiple tests because the real goal of usability engineering is to improve the design and not just to document its weaknesses. After the first study with 5 users has found 85% of the usability problems, you will want to fix these ...


16

Asking someone why he didn't notice something isn't likely to provide useful information. People will confabulate a response for the sake of their own mental consistency without even realizing they've done so. We can only focus on a few things at once; if we don't notice something, it's because we were paying attention to something else. He didn't notice ...


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I would not say there is a definitive answer, rather it would depend on how you conducting the test and what type of data you are looking for. Tasks vs. Scenario Tasks would be quick and to the point, where participants don't necessarily need at background information. Having a series of very discrete tasks, with little to no relationship to each other, ...


1

But should you point that out to them? Yes. In a kind way, if its part of the functionality of the site to be tested. This also allows you to probe a bit as to whether they noticed it but didn't use it (and why) or whether they just didn't notice it in the first place This is also just part of a much bigger problem with testing: you'll have a user for ...


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I'd probably point it out to them, but I'd phrase it very carefully, putting the fault on the website design: "Did you notice this button up here? Many people miss it, do you think it just isn't noticeable enough or did you disregard it for a reason?"


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Before the study ever begins, participants are recruited by asking them a series of survey-like questions (the "screener") which is designed to include the types of people you want to test and exclude the people you don't. If the goal is to test a diverse audience, the screener will include questions that would flag people for various traits... for ...


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I did my master's thesis on Emotional Design with Prof. Pieter Desmet in TUDelft. He has several methodologies including the Premo http://studiolab.ide.tudelft.nl/studiolab/desmet/premo/ I am sure Pieter's work and related references will help you a lot with this. For my project, I used more quantitative methods based on the need of the research. Very ...


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Some general pointers (not sure about the literature that is out there) and hopefully people can build on some of the things I have listed here: Usability Testing If you are talking about a usability test then you should be focusing on goals and tasks first and understand the success rate. I suspect that people's emotions would be affected by how usable ...


1

I won't use remote testing for mobile apps, because: Hardware need to be good enough to handle simultaneously one consuming app (screen grabbing and video saving) and your test app. Streaming isn't possible or only in WiFi conditions. You need enough disk space / SD space. That narrows your testable smartphones down to premium phones with mostly huge ...


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personally i prefer guerrilla usability testing aka cafe testing, where you approach people in cafes (when they aren't busy) and offer them a coffee in exchange for their time.


3

I think that the best method to provide usability testing for an API is to specify a list of most common use cases and ask developers who are absolutely new to the API to complete them. Then you should analyse their problems, feedback, comments and so on. You could read how we did Dropbox API usability testing: ...



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