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Before you can do a usability test, you must think about what you want to get out the test. Not all usability testing requires the user to be trained. For example, if you are interested in whether the user interface is obvious or not, then you can use absolutely anyone as your participant and no training is required. All you then need to do is design a test ...


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Will using the mouse wheel also scroll the page? Many people use the mouse-wheel to scroll the page, rather than trying to manipulate their mouse in a circular motion (which will not be easy to do for some people). I am all for adding fun into the experience, but there is nothing fun or exciting about scrolling - it is a simple utility which comes with ...


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Training ensures employees beat the learning curve. The client knows it requires training and they know it won't go smooth. You're there to help identify those growing pains, and to tell them how to make the whole process go smoother. What I would do: Establish tasks around the main goals of the company Interviews the users before, during and after a ...


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I don't think training is a good idea, as you will miss a lot of feature testing and mental model validations. If the domain is new to the users some level of domain familiarization is required, not UI walkthrough. If they are new to the target device or new to computing itself, then you might need to provide a walkthrough of things work or design patterns ...


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Short answer: Show them the basics. Long answer: It depends. I think the correct way is to show them what "new people" first using this system will actually know. If there is a whole tutorial for all functions, super detailed, then, you should tell them the whole tutorial for all functions, super detailed. If there is no tutorial at all, you should be ...


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Try using VWO (Visual Website Optimizer) www.vwo.com. You might find what you are looking for. Also, for a better understanding of things, you can go for a Machine Learning course by nanodegree (Udacity). Machine Learning is in trend these days. I'm sure this doesn't sound easy. But you can give it a try.


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I think that if you open your favorite drawing software and try to draw a circle with your mouse freehand (using a pencil tool, not a shape tool), you'll find that it's quite challenging. Making circles with your mouse is a difficult task that requires very advanced motor skills and most regular people will find it very inconvenient - let alone people with ...


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It totally depends on where do you deploy this concept, and what your target Users are. If you are targeting users who do not interact with Websites or Apps much, then its a bad idea, as they will be confused. For example If your site or app is something like Amazon(for shopping), we can assume that all type of Users would be using your service, so in ...


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Card sorting is a great method for you to use to get a better understanding of how your users group the information or functionality available to them. Doing the open card sort will also help generate ideas for what to label the groupings. You'll definitely want to include more cards from across your product. There's also label criteria that you can rate ...


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One this to consider is the percentages of how consistently they were placed together and the naming conventions for that grouping. If for 80% of your cards are 70% or more, skip the closed card sort and go for a tree test. The mental model for grouping and finding are very different. The card sort is best used for understanding general groupings, finding ...


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Looking at the way you've posed this bit of the question... Some users may not care if there are only dirt trails and no sidewalks on a path while other users in a wheelchair can only take the route if there is 100% sidewalks so this metric would be more the most important. ...I get the impression that what you need isn't so much a way for users ...


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You can do multiple things here: 1. A/B test Test the old form vs the new one and see if there is a difference in behavior between the two. 2. Analyzing the data If you have GA incorporated in the website, check it for any data. You might be able to find some interesting data like bounce, time on page etc. 3. Monitor your visitors You could use tools ...


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Is it correct to go forward with just the inputs from the stakeholder? It's correct to start the project with just the inputs from the stakeholder but you need to expand from there. If the project is new how to go about testing it in the market? Create user personas: Who is using the product? Why are they using it? Flesh out who these individuals are ...


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Suggestions: Try to convince the stakeholder of the importance of user input to the process. While they may not be convinced to let this shape the requirements, perhaps at least you can gain access to some users for testing. Do some testing (with actual users if possible, or stand-ins). You can use this to shape the project beyond the higher level ...


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It's okay to go only with the requirements from the stakeholder but the risk of the project to fail is much higher when no prior user research is done. Users will often bring to light situations that you never considered and that you don't account for in your design. Lots of projects fail due to incomplete user requirements, so it's your stakeholders choice.


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Are you sure that it is the redesign of the form that changed user behaviour? If so try using A/B testing and see if the old form design improve conversion rates. If you are only assuming that the form is to blame get few of your users to do some user testing, I would suggest going through the flow of getting to the white paper page and filling out the form ...


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I would consider exploring any analytics data available. Particularly for forms, there are services that allow you to understand how users are engaging with the form, what fields are giving them problems and where they are clicking. Something like HotJar might be useful: https://www.hotjar.com/ - Obviously if you don't have any analytics you will need to add ...


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The methodology is good, although you can design much more valid experiment that focuses only on reading or making calculations with the digits (see below). But why would you think you will find any difference if you change the fonts? In my opinion, you will find difference only if your current font has really bad legibility, like alphabetic fonts. ...


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You can start with a moderated usability test of a prototype. There are steps which will help you to organize your first simple usability testing session. 1. Research First of all, you need to know what do you want to test. You don't need a test just for test. You need to test design assumptions, e.g. would users understand what that label means or that ...


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In Measuring the User Experience by Tom Tullis and Bill Albert, they devote a section to the analysis of testing closed card sorts (Chapter 9 section 9.2.2). They mention that the main thing you are interested in is how well the groups "pulled" the cards to them that you intend to belong to those groups. For example, the percentage of participants who put ...


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There are several ways of doing user testing. My preferred way is with the help of a ux tool. I am personally using loop11 for my user testing but you can do it with a pen and a paper. The reason I like to use tools is because this way i focus on creating meaningful scenarios that can really help me test my prototypes.It helps me quickly make specific design ...


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I think you may be misunderstanding the point of MVP. It does not mean that you skip all of those steps. From my blog post on the subject: http://commadot.com/mvp-deconstructed/ Hopefully, it will help. Additionally, I am a believer in Minimum Lovable Products. It is like an MVP, but with some details thrown in to make it more appealing. The key to all ...


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As Ryan Hoover (founder of Product Hunt) puts it in his now well-known article, The Wisdom of the 20-Minute Startup: “The purpose of an MVP is to learn, to validate & invalidate assumptions.” Here the key take-away is "Assumptions" you decide to set out with, and which through the MVP you validate. Note few things: 1) In terms of UX process, note that a ...


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Completely agree with @jazZRo about following guidelines, if nothing else you should be doing this. But also consider that just because those things you don't have time to do, or resources for user research, scenarios, prototyping, user testing... doesn't mean you can't do a small part of them. Each of these things could be a large undertaking, but they ...


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Follow guidelines. It's the only strategy that's left when you strip all the work you can do yourself. iOS/OS X, Android, Windows all have their own UI guidelines. For the web there is W3C. Find the (UI) guidelines for the frameworks and tools that you use. Also look out for other do's and don'ts by reputable people, books or sites. You probably already ...


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I partially disagree with what was said before: The MVP is a term from agile methodology - it is not the "little brother" of a finished product, it still is the product itself, just in an early stage. To pick up the metaphor Splatz used: The goal could be to build a racing car with the purpose of being very fast. The MVP here could be a bicycle. Why? ...


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Another way to think about minimal viable product is using an example. Imagine you have a table of data. Other features could be added to the table to enrich the table functionality, e.g. Search, filters, column sorting, customising the columns you want to show or hide, customising the sequence of columns using drag and drop, changing the width of the ...


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I'm not sure you understand what minimum viable product is. The minimum viable product is the minimum your users will accept/pay for. If you were inventing mechanised transport for the first time you might be trying to build something to replace the horse and cart - your minimum viable product could be a bicycle but only if your end users are mainly ...


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This might be a bit of overkill for your needs but it's worth mentioning. Ludei makes a tool called Cocoon JS for wrapping up HTML5 apps in a native container with special enhancements for HTML5 canvas and WebGL (and much more)... But as part of their tooling they enable you to "upload" a zip file of your page and all related assets for testing on your ...


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Make the checkboxes bigger - this is not a problem for users with age 30+ because their vision is not on 100% as before. Use button. You should design it to contrast your current color scheme so it is easilty visible. Use some accent colors (A100,A200, A400,A700) from the material design pallete to do that. You should play with the accent colors to find the ...


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Can you replace the checkbox with a toggle, some kind of select-button? I would place a large green submit-button at the bottom right of the page. Perhaps in its own row so it will always be visible to the user. The user shall be able to scroll trough the items and when the users is done selecting, the button is there at the "end of the list" were the users ...


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Since that graphic in Yohann V.'s post was taken directly from our old brochure (circa 2005), I can attest that with three ceiling cameras and a mirror behind them, the user's knew they were being observed. The door connecting the Evaluation and Control rooms made it much easier to get to the Control room after the usability moderator read the ...


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Being as brief as possible: Do you usually test with real users or with your internal team first? Internal team will be preferable since it doesn't cost you at all and it does help to find minor errors before going big and spending money with real users. Usually from 6-8 user tests will be good enough to find these errors. Just remember that they must ...


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To me wireframes are quick doodles in a whiteboard or a paper. I use wireframes to design and demonstrate the user's path and information structure. At this stage in design is always good to meet with the front end team and the back end and have a good brainstorm session. You can talk about all your ideas and initiatives. Is a process of discovery and ...


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We do both depending on user availability, available time. But generally what we do is test first with the internal team (1-2 iterations) and then test with target users. The real world is often complex so you have to adjust to your current situation. Testing with target users provides much more value, but testing with internal team saves a lot of time. ...


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Depends a lot on what are you testing, what's your intended function, what stage of design are you in right now. Usually, most designers go through some sort of understanding phase at the start of the project, continue with more concrete ideas and finish with evaluating their project empirically. You can do usability testing and evaluation in any of ...



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