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Even if your competitor's website is slightly different, his approach can inspire you. You don't learn exclusively from similarities, but from differences too. The true similarity doesn't rely on formal aspects, but on a common principles. If there is a common principly with regard to your competitor's website and yours, there is always a possibility of ...


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You can argue it either way... Yes, you should conduct it. No, you shouldn't. What matters more is your usability and how memorable and appealing you are to your customer. After all, the point of conducting the usability test on your competitor is to gain some kind of advantage. I think you can put your time, money, and energy into something that will ...


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There are many types of tests you can make! It depends on your goal/feature... For example, you can conduct focus groups, do user observations, have user interviews.. or you can do something less direct like running A/B tests. My favorite is to conduct user interviews because if the user can explain something, it means it has caught their attention! ...


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A good summary. Making sure that you keep prompting the participant to think aloud is really important. What they say about why they are doing something is as important as the record of what they actually do. Also - don't attempt to take notes on what happens, your notes are to prompt you to ask questions at the right second in real time as the test ...


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Rocket Surgery Made Easy by Steve Krug is the golden standard to read here, especially if you don't have a lot of experience and need to get something done fast. The process tends to be: Look at your product and see what needs to be tested, prepare some tasks and situations to test. Find participants that fit your target audience -- don't underestimate ...


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This post compares the costs of implementing the different formats, which can be one reason why you see more passive than active help systems: An overview of context-sensitive and embedded help formats It also has some examples of existing embedded help in different applications.


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My general advice on running any type of user testing is to have a practice run or two with someone so you can be confident with the process and procedures, especially if you are not that familiar with it. Steve Krug's Advanced Common Sense website is a good starting point to consolidate your existing knowledge on usability and testing in general. In ...


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We usually do user testing in early stages using low/high fidelity prototypes/wireframes to find design issues earlier and avoid dev rework. so it will take long time for us to create prototype which handles all real time scenarios.so we usually use some real time scenarios to do user testing.. Since you are redesigning, you will get analytics information ...


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Most tests are based on systems where the user has a number of choices in terms of the tasks they wish to perform - Even on a simple website the user can choose to find information about X, look at pictures of Y, contact the owners... etc. Each of these tasks has it's own complexity - How does the user find out how to contact the site owners? Do they use a ...


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Gauge their interest For guerrilla or in-person interviews, I schedule 30 to 60 minutes per user. That range represents the anticipated level of interest. IOW, if the product/feature is something the user will be very interested in contributing to, I'll block out 60 mins. For most things, any more than 30 will scare subjects away. Limit the scope That ...


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Time spent on an UX is variable. The amount of time spent on research, writing the plan and recruiting users depends on the project/website. I've worked on projects In my training where the target audience was pretty obvious. Research time wasn't really necessary and recruiting users was easy because I knew just where to look for them. Writing your plan gets ...


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First of I have to state that I haven't tried this myself (yet). However, I have heard from alot of people having tried this solution with success. There is an online tool called Try My UI that supports user testing with InVision. I won't explain the process here since this link explains it well enough: http://blog.trymyui.com/2016/04/prototype-testing-...


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You could try Loop11. The last time I tried their service, I was able to send users to any linkable prototype (external). You tell Loop11 which link on the website is the correct one for the conversion, and they will register it. They time it as well. You simply come up with the task questions and any follow up questions, and they handle the rest.


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The browser is a platform agnostic environment. You don't have to follow OS convention (although it would definitely aid UX if it did). Saying that though, you can't beat a bit of convention! Looking at some frameworks and examples, they generally follow the Windows way. Here's a jQuery UI dialogue for example: Also, doing a good ol' google search for ...


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Irrespective of if you are developing the web app for Mac or Windows, the web application's popup buttons like close, minimize, maximize are all placed on top tight; the windows style. Trust the Golden Ratio Recent studies suggest that people who are right-handed (which is 90% of us) tend to trust information positioned on the right of the page; ...


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Before you can do a usability test, you must think about what you want to get out the test. Not all usability testing requires the user to be trained. For example, if you are interested in whether the user interface is obvious or not, then you can use absolutely anyone as your participant and no training is required. All you then need to do is design a test ...


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Will using the mouse wheel also scroll the page? Many people use the mouse-wheel to scroll the page, rather than trying to manipulate their mouse in a circular motion (which will not be easy to do for some people). I am all for adding fun into the experience, but there is nothing fun or exciting about scrolling - it is a simple utility which comes with ...


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Training ensures employees beat the learning curve. The client knows it requires training and they know it won't go smooth. You're there to help identify those growing pains, and to tell them how to make the whole process go smoother. What I would do: Establish tasks around the main goals of the company Interviews the users before, during and after a ...


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I don't think training is a good idea, as you will miss a lot of feature testing and mental model validations. If the domain is new to the users some level of domain familiarization is required, not UI walkthrough. If they are new to the target device or new to computing itself, then you might need to provide a walkthrough of things work or design patterns ...


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Short answer: Show them the basics. Long answer: It depends. I think the correct way is to show them what "new people" first using this system will actually know. If there is a whole tutorial for all functions, super detailed, then, you should tell them the whole tutorial for all functions, super detailed. If there is no tutorial at all, you should be ...


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Try using VWO (Visual Website Optimizer) www.vwo.com. You might find what you are looking for. Also, for a better understanding of things, you can go for a Machine Learning course by nanodegree (Udacity). Machine Learning is in trend these days. I'm sure this doesn't sound easy. But you can give it a try.


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I think that if you open your favorite drawing software and try to draw a circle with your mouse freehand (using a pencil tool, not a shape tool), you'll find that it's quite challenging. Making circles with your mouse is a difficult task that requires very advanced motor skills and most regular people will find it very inconvenient - let alone people with ...


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It totally depends on where do you deploy this concept, and what your target Users are. If you are targeting users who do not interact with Websites or Apps much, then its a bad idea, as they will be confused. For example If your site or app is something like Amazon(for shopping), we can assume that all type of Users would be using your service, so in ...


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Card sorting is a great method for you to use to get a better understanding of how your users group the information or functionality available to them. Doing the open card sort will also help generate ideas for what to label the groupings. You'll definitely want to include more cards from across your product. There's also label criteria that you can rate ...


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One this to consider is the percentages of how consistently they were placed together and the naming conventions for that grouping. If for 80% of your cards are 70% or more, skip the closed card sort and go for a tree test. The mental model for grouping and finding are very different. The card sort is best used for understanding general groupings, finding ...



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