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1

If you're doing this for an e-commerce site, you'll be using payments options. All payment options that I know offer a "sandbox mode" that allows you to use fake info, although some of them provide you that info in a very specific way, like not any CC number, but very specific credit card numbers for testing purposes. So there you have your answer: ...


3

I would use a tool like Mockaroo to generate fake information for the users rather than their personal information. Some 'may' take offense at using their information, so giving everyone fake data removes that risk entirely. Plus if you use fake data, you could have each user do multiple tests with different data sets, thereby increasing the sample size at ...


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I agree with the stakeholders based on how the Apple Store (physical locations) handle appointments. Their reasoning is simple: if you need support, you talk to this group. If you need sales, you take to that group. Segregate and conquer individually, in an organized fashion. That leads to greater productivity and more specialization, which on a large scale ...


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Haven't done this myself, but have participated in things that have required this. Typically it just requires sending over a photo of an ID, meaning anything government issued. Legally, that's enough. Again, you'll face all liability, and it's not really an issue for someone to get a fake ID, so if you don't have a way to check against a government database, ...


2

The anwser will be determined by what your designer will design. Testing If they are designing only digital support rooms do not need to be huge : EDIT : as @Majo0od said, the rooms should be separated, with the user not being aware that he is watched/recorded. If you need to test smart-objects by example, you may need more space depending on the ...


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I'd say this depends a lot on what you are testing - If you're testing an iPad app then you just need 2 rooms: one with wifi, a sofa and a camera/mic setup and another where you can monitor the testing (via the camera and mic). If, however, you're testing cockpit instrument layouts under combat conditions then you're going to need something more complex ...


1

Double edged sword I'm afraid, guerilla testing is great for UX practitioners with little or no budget, but is exceptionally poor when trying to recruit and brief participants, given your remote location I think you're going to really struggle. Remote surveys could work for you on a cost & (again) remote level, engagement is still an issue.


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App design is new as a profession so I have borrowed wisdom from a much older profession for getting design perspective: method acting. User stories, psychographics, and personas are very common approaches to the initial/ideation phase of app design. I've found that they are helpful descriptive approaches, but I've found it more powerful to spend time ...


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I think the following activities can help to expand the perception of every UX professional: Usability testing (as much as you can) Constant research (new studies, trends, recognized blogs, etc) Participating in communities like this! Knowing your app use cases.


3

You're right in not making decisions based upon your own assumption. What you could do is usability testing with actual people. The best test would be conducted with 5-7 (or more) testpersons from the actual targeted audience in an environment they will be using the app or at least in an environment where they are comfortable. If you don't have time to ...


2

If you mean apps to use in your development, yes, there are many commercial and pretty good tools like AppSee, Heatmaps.io and so on. I don't know and I doubt there's anything free other than free trials for those commercial apps. If you mean research, there's a lot scattered around the web. The old and classic mobile UX research by Mozilla is always a good ...


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This isn't the answer you are looking for, but if you don't have time to test, don't try something out of the ordinary. I personally think that solution looks great, it's clean and clear, and the progression makes a lot of sense. However, I don't know your user base, and it could throw someone off. I also foresee some random Android phone that handles ...


2

I believe the advantage of UX professionals is that we can give reasons for our decisions. Everybody has an opinion, a gut feeling or past experience they can draw from. UX professionals also have the backing of proven UI patterns, tons of great literature describing state-of-the-art approaches and why they work, and international standards such as ISO ...


1

For a UX newbie you already have the right mindset. Don't do a complete makeover when the website or application is not working as well as expected, but try changing small things first. From your question I get the feeling there is even some anxiety for performing any usability tests and such. Sure this is fueled by inexperience, but it might also be fueled ...


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You could always use UsabilityHub. Here's what their customers have to say:


2

Use known processes There are lots of different routes through a UX project, some more popular than others. I'd suggest you research a few different strategies and pick one that sounds feasible. Here's a really quick (not too many steps) example: Create some personas, in this case maybe no more than 3 (1 may even do for now). see here for more info ...


2

The craziest thing about starting in UX is that it isn't always about your opinion but about proven methods. For example - the hamburger menu. The hamburger menu is now starting to show up on desktop sites because some designers prefer it/they like it better. However, hamburger menus generally perform poorly in testing. So for your site, start doing some ...



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