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my thoughts are keep testing until you find consistency in your findings. For major problems this does not take many users (2-5) but the thing that is good about getting consistent results is that it gives you more negotiating power when you come to justify your recommendations.


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The Nielson Norman Group has several articles on the subject. In the article "Why You Only Need to Test with 5 Users" the following is discussed: Summary: Elaborate usability tests are a waste of resources. The best results come from testing no more than 5 users and running as many small tests as you can afford. Where they show the diminishing ...


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While (as @inkmarble mentioned) clicking may be more effort compared to a mouse-over we now also have to keep in mind the growing amount of users on touch-only devices. With the current state of the art, there simply is no way to mouse-over an icon on a touch device, thus making this help information inaccessible to this user group. Example: I recently got ...


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For me there is no "perfect" number. It's more about the budget I have for testing, the timescale I have for testing, and how the results of the testing is going to be applied, and so on. For example: All things being equal I'd prefer to do multiple small-tests rather than one large test. So we can demonstrate we have fixed the things we discover in test ...


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First of all, I do agree with GotDibbs; it is MORE important to test early, and frequently throughout the process. However, by not testing on "experts"/your real target group, you might miss out on some useful comments, questions etc. that only a professional would come up with. These comments could give you valuable insight when designing for your users' ...



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