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Would my presence alter how they are timed? Yes, it would. It's known as the Hawthorne Effect, where subjects change their behavior simply because they are being observed. Measuring Usability has another writeup biases that also mentioned this effect: 9 Biases In Usability Testing. It's not a matter of you necessarily being in the room. The fact that ...


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What is the ideal scenario for test and save buttons? Another way of approaching this is instead of having two separate buttons for 'test' and 'save', is to incorporate the test connection into the save functionality. This way it becomes more of a validation process (the system prevents you from failing) rather than putting the burden on the user to ensure ...


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To answer one part of your question: Should I allow connection to be saved without testing? A good design would probably be to automatically test when the user presses save (if it hasn't been tested already). A related question is: should you allow the source to be saved even if the test fails? I probably would allow this (with a confirmation dialog ...


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User Goal is the Result that user wants to achieve. Use Case is the Scenario/way in which user is going to achieve that goal. Here is an example. You want to reach New York city. This is your User Goal. You book a flight ticket. Pay for it. Get on the plane. Transit. Reach destination. This is your Use Case. In short Use Case is series of related ...


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Alistair Cockburn described the structure of a use case in his book Writing Effective Use Cases, e.g: As a [user] I want to perform [some task] to meet [some goal]. [user] can be a person or a system [some task] is the activity [some goal] is what you want to achieve A use case should be written in non-technical language. A use case may also contain ...


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In simple words, use case means the step that user will be carrying out to accomplish a certain task, i.e. the goal. User clicks on New button User clicks Select Files User clicks Upload button This is a use case to achieve a certain goal.


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A user goal describes what the user is trying to do, a use case describes how they do it. Goal: Buy a car Task Scenario: "You've decided to buy a new car for your family with a budget of £20,000." Use case (this is highly simplified): User clicks "Buy a car" navigation link They change the max price to £20,000 They filter out smaller cars and view ...


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This article on wikipedia actually does a good job of explaining Use Case. If you take the time to read it, you'll find there are a number of references to user goals and the examples and steps provided help to differentiate between the two.


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You can embed Google Analytics into your solution. Some of the analytics will allow you to capture a few things related to human factors and the user experience. However, Google Analytics will not answer any "why" questions (e.g. why did the user do that?) or qualitative questions (e.g. How do you feel about that form?), so Google Analytics should always be ...


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Yes, it can be an MVP. The point of an MVP is to run experiments on the product to determine its value, no matter the scope or lucrative value of your entire product at the moment. This means that even small components, such as a single form or menu, can be considered an MVP. In the book Lean UX, chapter 5, the authors give an example of an idea for an ...


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Yes it is a MVP Because the concept of a MVP is about test early, learn and iterate. It is not focused on functionality as many assume, but on customer needs and market traction. Everyone knows the prototype, test, feedback and recode loops for functionality. Eric Ries just took this approach to marketing and startup building: test the market need before ...


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This depends on your product. Let me give two examples; Wordpress and Buffer. Both have integration with facebook and twitter; you can schedule to release posts at a certain time. However, wordpress is a complete publishing platform, while buffer is just a back end to schedule for other platforms. Without social media tie ins, wordpress is still a blog, ...


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Probably not. If it lacks a core aspect that's critical to the product viability, then it's not minimally viable. This is debatable territory, as the original definition by Eric Ries: a version of a new product which allows a team to collect the maximum amount of validated learning about customers with the least effort is a bit loose, and attempts to ...


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I think your idea won't work well. Primarily because if I first end up in an interface where I expect to fill in forms and see a search bar, my first thought will be that I'm in the wrong place, I expect form fields where I can input my data. Users won't know how to submit their data using your approach. They will need to be instructed or guided, which is a ...


2

While pretotyping has a marketing-ish side , I think its approach is interesting. Granted, it can be solved by other different testing approaches, but I think it has some merits to hold its own place. Also, despite the similar wording, I don't think it's the same as prototyping. Or at least, they have different intentions. From Prototyping page: ...


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Generally speaking no, they are not. The global UX described by the SUS may vary from the general UX described by the WAMMI. So you are basically trying to compare different things that have a similar 0-100 scale.


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Get a Huawei Mate 8 phone. This has a bizarre input shortcut: double knuckle -- double tap, to start video recording, and shows all touches within the recorded video. I am not kidding. Double tap the screen with two knuckles, instant video screen recording. Quite powerful device, 1920x1080 resolution recorded at 720p. Battery is very strong so you can do ...



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