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Valuable metrics are closely linked to goals Good metrics are simply a way of measuring how well something meets goals. You might be able to find a standard list of parameters to measure, but it might be argued that the more generic your metrics, the less value they actually provide. Examples: If a goal is to improve the perceived "performance" of ...


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Try usabilityhub's preference test, or 5-second test (can't really say without knowing more about your project) if you want to gauge messaging. If you complete other tests on the site, you get karma points, which you can then use to fund your own tests. Awesome service.


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It depends on how your "b" variant are implemented. Separate pages are difficult to test, whereas javascript transformations are much easier. Here is some general advice, hope it helps: Javascript method: All of your product pages should share similar CSS selectors. For example, if you are changing all buttons on all product pages you could use generic ...


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Your question will be closed as it's about implementation rather than UX but I'm feeling generous You should (if you're using modern web development best practices) be using a separate style sheet for your layouts, fonts, colours, etc. If you're being really clever you should be using sass to compile your stylesheets into single files. Using cookies and ...


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By "open card sorting", you mean to let participants create cards for the existing functionalities (including new as well as existing ones) and the group these cards, I assume. Sounds like a good approach to me. I am a little worried about your statement "we are creating a new section", which sounds like someone in your company decided these 4 new ...


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What if you made it more of a discussion about business needs and goals? Example: In this screen users can search for X and compare it to Y. We understand this is important to your business because the difference between X and Y is often a place where cost savings can be identified. Do you agree this is an important part of your business? Another example: ...


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Given your situation, any testing that you do will create an extra layer of assumption (i.e. that the managers think like the end-users), which you may need to validate or else it is very likely for you to fall into the trap of designing something that you can sell to the managers but the users won't want to use. So to me it is possible to get useful data ...


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I have always been a little bit critical of the way popular game review websites try to compare games, as least when it comes to the user experience (which I believe 'playability' is a big part of. While there are some quite objective metrics when it comes to graphics (polygon count, fps, etc.), you'll be pressed to find any reasonable comparison for ...


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You need to spend a lot of time planning and thinking about what you want to get out of the test. When performing a usability tests you should be looking to gather quantitative and/or qualitative data. As a rule of thumb, in terms of time, a typical usability test can be broken down into three phases: Planning - 45% of time Executing the test - 10% of ...


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As others have said, you shouldn't try influence the user in any certain direction for a usability test. Take a look at this test script, I found it really helpful in terms of framing the usability test and instructing the users to think out loud etc. In terms of analytics/data from your usability test, you could try using Canvas Flip - I haven't used it ...


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If you talk about restricting the time, please take a look at benchmark usability testing. If you want to give valuable insights, let the user talk and let them explain what they see, what they are doing., If I still want user to complete the task "as fast as possible", I'd give them scenarios like this: you have 1 minute to catch the subway, while ...



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