Hot answers tagged

19

Step size and security When they are well designed, they seem to prevent more incidents than what they cause. There's a lot of information in Pauls, Jake. "Relating stair nosing projection, tread run dimension, shoe geometry, descent biomechanics, user expectations, overstepping missteps, and closed-riser heel scuff missteps.". I've not found studies that ...


10

I am afraid my answer might not be considered as the definitive source as I am just quoting someone in a forum but the primary reason is to enable users to walk down steps better by providing more grip and space. To quote the post. For safety in going down the stairs. When you step down the stairs, you place the ball and toes of your foot on the tread ...


10

I've not done this before, but I am going to answer my own question because after reading each of the answers here, I found that I needed to dig deeper to find a definitive answer. Nosings offer multiple usability benefits The world's foremost expert on stair design seems to be John Templer, formerly Regents' Professor of Architecture at the Georgia ...


8

I suggest the "I Agree" button. We all know that the "I Agree" button is just some legal mumbo jumbo that neither the developers nor the end user truly care about. By having the checkbox, we lose the "I Do Not Agree" button. This makes it more difficult and frustrating for the end user to quit, which they should be able to do easily and at any time. For ...


5

This is conjecture as well but consider this analysis of stair climbing gait, specifically the transition from stage IV (Forward Continuance) → V (Foot Clearance) → VI (Foot Placement): In particular, note that while lifting the leading foot, the knee flexes more than the hip, thus causing the toes to have a net backwards movement. If you ...


3

Test in Context First, I understand your explanation of the difference between having the choice to use software and not having the choice, but I don't really see how that's going to affect your testing. A user is either using the app to complete a task, or they're not, and you can't really control for all the reasons they might not be using it. Sure, in a ...


3

FYI, the overhang is called nosing. Stair nose is used to create a decorative finished edge on a stairstep or staircase The primary reason is aesthetics and cost savings--not UX. Like a door or window casing, the stair nosing covers the seam between two materials meeting--in this case the tread and the riser. While it may cost more in materials, ...


2

I think you'll find that different people will have different opinions about this, so while this is probably just my opinion, I will try to explain it in the most objective way I can think of. When you approach design from an 'engineering' perspective, it is about providing a solution to a problem that comes from first principles. That is, you come up with ...


2

If you can, let the user know why you're going to ask for permissions before asking. "Sharing your location will help you [better accomplish a goal]. Please accept on the next screen." Or similar. Then they are not surprised by the request and understand how it will benefit them and their use of the app. In the case mentioned above, I would not see a strong ...


2

Icons by themselves are often confusing. Outlook 98 was a famous example that, at first, went with icons. Microsoft quickly realized that they had to add labels as well. Android could help the situation by having a label or tool-tip appear when the user starts selecting text. This would keep the screen clean until the user begins the action. [Don't focus ...


2

Consider yourself lucky to get such a challenge! I had a stint of time when I was designing mainframe applications - it was quite a shock to have to go from graphics to text-based interfaces, but it forces you as a designer to really focus on the core aspects of design. A few things I've found useful in CLIs: Easy way to access help for commands, ...


1

Most of the time it's not a good idea to do this as user gets annoyed but you can keep some things in mind to handle it better. Use whatever suits you best from below... If the App is available only in couple of cities or a few cities, considered just showing this info and asking the user to vote for his city. If all you need is just the City where the ...


1

(most) Enterprise A/B testing tools will give you a margin of error calculation given your desired confidence index. What this means, (assuming you want 90% confidence) <confidence %> of the time my conversion rate will fall within +/-<margin of error> of <conversion rate> 90% of the time my conversion rate will be +/- 10% of a ...


1

It is fine to prompt them to switch on GPS, but it should be easy (i.e. you prompt them, they click "Ok" and then it is switched on for them. It isn't so nice if they have to leave the application and navigate through their settings to switch it on before returning to the application. If the above is easy, you could order the actions this way to ensure ...


1

Satellites Underwater drilling wells Fire Hydrants


1

There are already a decent number of tools that do this, and even show offending code with the rule(s) that it's violating. Some code can "may or may not be" violating a rule, and they allow you to flag the particular snippet as "passing" or "not passing". Using Difficult ---- Formidable ---- Easy Is fine, but not terribly descriptive. Current WCAG ...


1

I am assuming that by Enterprise software, you mean software that is deployed on site and not accessible by the cloud. In cases where you can't A/B test with a live audience, you can use a choice test to determine the favourable icon. The choice test is like a simple A/B test but you can use it with your own team or recruit some users from the enterprise ...


1

If you have a measure of performance that you can gather, from use of the software to perform a set task, then you can set up an experiment and analyse the results with a "t-test". (some details can be found here.


1

One similarity between the two books you mentioned is in the editorial (back cover) reviews. They are by the same people, but for the most part simply replace the word usability by user experience. Uninspiring to say the least. One might therefore be led to believe that in the 10 year period between the two books, the author has seen an opportunity to make ...


1

This is a very interesting question. and all the reasons you carried maybe reasonable but nothing related to the toes and heel ... it is all about human comfort. The comfort space to get you feet onto a stair is 30cm tread X 15cm raise, but the comfort space for your next step average from 26cm to 28cm more than that you will make an extra effort to reach ...


1

That depends on your research question/s, but is nearly certain to be part of your research methodology. Research method If the evaluation is part of proving/disproving a hypothesis, or more commonly assessing the pros/cons of the resultant design in a thesis that aims to develop a system, then the choice of evaluation method (which you'll have to justify) ...



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