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19

The Usability Book Of Knowledge has a bunch at usabilitybok.


8

This is in fact your decision. You must define the usability goals for the project in the usability specification. They are usually formulated just like you suggest: "n% of the users accomplished the task in less that n minutes". A couple of "standard measurement" have evolved during the last decades. Measures like time-on-task, success-rate, ...


7

Here is my theory: Its about the ROI. Its not that there is a good reason for the passive ui for help sections, by all rights every part of a system should have an excellent and active ui. But we tend to focus harder on the core customer experience, because that's where the money is. And just tack on documentation / help sections. The effort that help ...


7

UsabilityNet has an interactive methods table, that filters out methods depending on three criteria: Limited time/resources, No direct access to users or Limited skills/experience Clicking a method takes you through to a page that explains the benefits, outlines the method and points to some further reading on the topic.


7

I suggest this three links: Quince Ux Patterns Luke Wroblewski Ux Diagrams Ui pattern factory


6

what do you think are the main differences in methodology between "Requirements Engineering" and "Usability Engineering" Personally, I would not separate these out. I spend a lot of time acting as a business analyst for projects, and whenever possible I make sure that usability is part of the main requirements gathering effort. They may be listed in a ...


6

We have developed over the last few years our own SWE BOK in our company, and there we see the two disciplines like that: Requirements engineering is the first of the disciplines which looks at the problem of the customer (only). It has to ignore completely the solution (even if you think you know it). Usability engineering has to think about how to make ...


5

Depending on how large your organization is and whether or not your building has a central gathering area, like a cafeteria, there is one method I've found very valuable in gathering quick and cheap usability data. Only test one simple thing (like the placement of a control on a page) Create a simple task which should take no more than 5-10 seconds to ...


5

I don't see any disconnect at all between the two. Most people will have a faster response to objects on the right side of their visual field. So that applies to moving balls; tigers that want to eat you; etc. It is about a tiny increase in visual perception. This has nothing to do with learned importance. Reading from left to right has taught us that ...


5

Perhaps it simply means that you should focus on being a UX researcher instead of a UX designer. There are generally fewer roles for researchers than designers, but there are still opportunities for those of us who love UX research, and who understand design but aren't designers. Personally, I've been a UX researcher for 12 years. I'm definitely not a ...


5

A success rate is one of many metrics used for measuring/quantifying usability. As http://www.measuringusability.com/blog/essential-metrics.php describes, if a task can not be completed, the product is not usable. "If users cannot accomplish their goals, not much else matters." The methods used for determine success rate will vary greatly depending upon: ...


4

Usability.gov has a great visual map of ux methods that provides an extensive step-by-step usability guide of techniques as well as several useful related templates. You can click any of the items on the visual process map for further information, including detailed definitions and step-by-step how-to's.


4

Dey Alexander has many User Experience design resources on her website deyalexander.com.au


3

I would say No, not entirely. There is of course the System Usability Scale which measures: effectiveness (can users successfully achieve their objectives) efficiency (how much effort and resource is expended in achieving those objectives) satisfaction (was the experience satisfactory) The measurement coming closest to your question would be ...


3

You need to set your business goals and based on that you can set you ways to measure the success. Think about an e-commerce site, or think about a social network. The goals of the business will be completely different, i.e. % abandoned baskets, conversion, etc. Tools like Google analytics help to make sure you are able to constantly monitor the site and ...


3

Twitter is still a delivered medium like sms or email. It makes no sense to offer an edit option because people will have already received the original tweet. UI has to follow the fundamental nature of the system. Even the delete option is only offered on the basis that it is fallible and clients might not respect it.


2

I hit this question constantly and almost always have to make adjustments during testing sessions. The post is correct that if the product isn't usable or accessible, then there is no product since it'd be a digital rock. Though the argument I think is flawed a little bit. Looking at the argument a different way...the user doesn't care what happens at a ...


2

I read the two replies by mliebelt and Gray a couple of times. I partially agree with both. It sounds correct to me to define UE as solution-oriented and RE as problem-oriented, but the current studies aim to focus on their intersection. If we take a look at the recent reference in RE (e.g Alan M. Davi's book: JERM), we see that taking product/solution into ...


2

I already have seen different kinds of interactive help at multiple websites. However, it were always used in context with a guided tour to introduce the features of a system to a novice user. One example is an online route planner - the tour can be started immediately after the page is loaded. Furthermore, facebook usually makes a short interactive tour ...


2

Your biggest challenge will likely be finding a steady stream of participants. If you are testing for internal products, you can try this: 1) Talk to HR, and make usability testing be part of onboarding for new hires. This will give you a fresh unbiased view 2) If you are testing minor functionality, grab anyone nearby for 5-10 minutes who isn't on your ...


2

At a recent UX conference I came across a talk dealing with User Research in Agile environment. Two methodologies are discussed in the talk: RITE and Krug. Some highlights: 'A morning a sprint, that's all we ask.' In every sprint, test 3 users (first morning of the sprint) Invite people to come and watch: Owners, developers, designers, writers, ...


2

There are many UX designers/developers that come from a visual design and programming background, and they don't have much interest or idea bout usability research and testing. Do you think that they should be the one's driving UX design and decisions? One of the biggest problem I see with UX design these days is the obsession and focus on the user ...


2

You can have several levels of "success rate", but in essence it's a matter of saying "yes" or "no" to this question: "Did the user accomplich the task?" Quote from the book, p65: To measure task success, each task [...] must have a clear end-state. It's similar to "effectiveness" in the ISO 9241-11 definition...


1

I got the CUA certification about 10 years back, hasn't helped yet.


1

In simple terms no. Task complexity can be determined through user testing, preferably using an approach such as contextual enquiry. All scales will be based upon interpreting the user feedback and if a user can successfully carry out a task. Common 'scales' are series of grades ranging from everyone completes the task with no problems through to tasks ...


1

Here's one way to do it, assuming that permissions are the same for each object group. (ie If User01 can edit an object under group X, then he can also edit the 500 other objects in group X). Rather than defining role as a group of users, define the role as a group of permissions. For example: Role 1 (admin) can edit, delete, and view Role 2 (author) can ...



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