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1

If there are two businesses named "ACME" (one from USA, one from Germany), why would they want to advertise their URL as /acme and not as /us/acme and /de/acme? The US business would know that users coming from Germany looking for their business would end up at the unrelated DE business, which would be some form of "advertisement" they most likely don’t ...


3

This is more of an implementation question but I'll try and answer the UX portion as best I can. It really doesn't matter what the URL looks like as long as it's consistent. I like that you are thinking about this problem as clean URLs make nicer looking bookmarks and are easier for developers to understand though most users won't even notice the URL. As ...


0

you should use solution 1&3, because it's depends on your domain , eg in Australia and most company have .com.au but they buy the .com as well, you probably why they do this ! and in uk as well like your case, so we have www.example.com.uk/volkswagen for the company then if you want to have .com as well in your company, i think the best approach is to ...


2

Solution 2 is the best option presented uk.example.com/volkswagen fr.example.com/volkswagen Going this route will provide the best UX for developers and here is why... 1. Use a two character code for each localized version of the text Anyone who knows the 2 character country code system will intuitively know how things are organized when they see the ...


1

You confuse site language with content The language of the site is the functional language of the site. Menus, instructions, buttons are all in my selected language / culture It is more than just language - GB has different currency than US but share the same language In the facebook example www.facebook.com/VolkswagenUK and ...


3

What makes a good domain name? I wonder whether "looking professional" or being "consistent" are so important in a domain name. I can understand that it may seem important to a designer to want to make all the ducks line up in neat row, so to speak, on a printed page. But I'd be inclined to think that, for any individual domain name, brevity and ...


5

Yes, it’s a good idea. Especially if you notice that there are some misspelled links out there, e.g. if someone links to your login page with /login. instead of /login (because the URL auto-detection of their CMS thought that the dot for ending a sentence belongs to the URL). Preventively adding such redirects is probably not of a high priority, however, ...


5

Short answer: yes. Extended answer: Yes and no. The main problem here, which I think has been made clear, is that for you to identify all of the possible mistakes (which is hard to plan for) and redirect them all is more effort than it's worth (unless you're Google, but even then...). An alternative solution would be to create a 404 page that offers ...


3

First I have to say I find it a bit difficult to answer since your question actually consists of several questions – and on the other hand you're suggesting answers yourself that in my opinion are all valid. When thinking about a geo- or country-related URL strategy it's difficult to come up with the right solution. Every option has its advantages and its ...


2

I'm coming from a web developer perspective, so I am a bit biased, but here's my two cents: Local domains are great, but hard to remember, if you're going to be using different countries, I would go with website.com/ca/mcdonalds. This actually makes it easier for other websites to integrate as well, as it is a simple RESTful interface. The /ca/ designates a ...


1

A URL must uniquely identify a page. This is simply a basic principle, and you should discard any option that breaks it. Note the requirement you mention in your question: I need the businesses to be able to post the URLs of their pages... It won't be acceptable to businesses if the only available URL goes to a page where the user selects from ...


0

Please also include a version tag/identifier in the URL so that later, in the future the next time someone comes up with a bright idea of let's do things a new way, the (old) URL does not have to break. Your users will hate that. User: www.example.com/apiv1/users/johndoe Business: www.example.com/apiv1/businesses/acmecorporation You might want to use ...


0

What if the user "owned" the business: User: dummy.com/johndoe Business: dummy.com/johndoe/acmecorporation This way the user can see the relation in the URL.


1

I would agree with @10MAY that subdomains are not appropriate here. Your only solution without subdomains is this one: User: example.com/johndoe Business: example.com/uk/acmecorporation *uk is the country of the business But why is the country all of a sudden that important (it wasn't for the other examples)? If you want to go with the standard ...


2

I would say it totally depends on what you are mainly targeting in the website. If the main purpose is more of social connection then the best way to go about would be to have User: dummy.com/johndoe Business: dummy.com/business/silversolutions On the other hand if the website mainly focuses on getting business information to the people rather than the ...


23

Since you want to indicate function in your URL:s, the best way would be to actually type out that function in the URL. My suggestion: User: dummy.com/user/johndoe Business: dummy.com/business/acmecorporation Edit: adding an excellent point made by 10MAY in another answer in this thread, regarding why you shouldn't use sub-domains: Also, ...



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