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My son's preschool has a long url for their website, the full name of their school, seven words mashed together. In theory, that's easy to remember and non-ambiguous, but as a user of their site I hate the domain name and have a hard time remembering it and always find myself asking if it was this slightly shorter version, that other slightly shorter ...


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To add to the previous answers I would state that having a shorter domain is in general better because it's easier to grasp in an instant and less likely to be associated with spam or advertising. Forgetting for a moment remembering a domain or typing error, having a short visual look is important for other reasons... When a potential ...


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Although it's true that some domain have had bad reputation and a lot of misuse, we can't predict what is going to happen next, a lot of things change and many of the things that have changed in the past few years involve more trust, better behaviour (in some aspects), more regulations about domain purchase and more education about Internet related things. ...


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No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


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Just bought a few of the new TLD domain names as they fit with certain businesses. For example bought http://www.bagel.coffee for a bagel shop. And bought http://www.Lawyer.coffee for a Los Angeles Family Law Firm. So it really depends on who is going to be using these, and their purpose. My thought is they are good marketing and an easy way to say the ...


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One thing to remember is the concept of people being able to recall about 7 items (established by George Armitage Miller's work on memory) in their short-term memory. If your name consisted of words like: big, dull, hello, car, house; each of these is ONE item because they connect to something already existing in their mental schema/mind. If it is something ...


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Do long domain names really affect user experience? Yes. It will be annoying to your visitors. Remember, most people will visit your site on multiple devices, so they have to type that extralongdomainname.com on each device. It could possibly be detrimental to SEO. (Keyword Stuffing) As a side-note: Be careful with words like "Therapist" which, in a ...


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In a case user entered an URL starting from ftp:// and you really want to explain to the user why FTP protocol is wrong you may show her something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It will not only explain the problem briefly but also suggest a fix.


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From your explanation, it seems that you are talking about a small specific set or URLs, so you should also check for the rest of the URL and transform the wrong one into a good that the user can use or copy. So for instance, if the user enters ftp://www.example.com/ and you know that the www.example.com is correct, then you can print a text like the this ...


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Do long domain names really effect user experience? Yes, in several ways: Memory Recall Long domains are difficult to remember. A shorter one tends to be more memorable. The mind can only recall 4 things at once in its working memory. Even then, the words need to make sense (and not keyboard mash). Source: ...


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While longer than desirable, 27 characters (including .com) is not overly excessive, but yes, long domain names do affect user experience. Some more than others. 'Power users' know how to avoid typing the address if possible. However, there are going to be some users who don't have a browser with a suggestive omnibox there are going to be users who ...


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Yes, it does. At least in the way, that your audience might have problem to remember the address, can mistype it easily etc. That is the branding part of domain name. But there's a chance you triggered really good keywords and this value might overweight the disadvantages long domain name might have for branding.


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It's better to allow non-Latin characters for two reasons: 1. For international delivery by mail, only country needs to be in Latin characters. Local post will do the job better if they'll be able to read an address in native language. 2. If address will be read by another users, it's still better to have native version, because conversion to Latin can be ...



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