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53

Do long domain names really effect user experience? Yes, in several ways: Memory Recall Long domains are difficult to remember. A shorter one tends to be more memorable. The mind can only recall 4 things at once in its working memory. Even then, the words need to make sense (and not keyboard mash). Source: ...


23

While longer than desirable, 27 characters (including .com) is not overly excessive, but yes, long domain names do affect user experience. Some more than others. 'Power users' know how to avoid typing the address if possible. However, there are going to be some users who don't have a browser with a suggestive omnibox there are going to be users who ...


7

Go with the hyphenated option. It will be easier to read for the user and if you have longer names, make it easier to recall too. eg: look at the URL for this question: questions/41595/what-is-the-casing-convention-for-url-routes Also, avoid capitalization if possible, just to remain consistent. eg: Was the S capital or was the D capital?


7

Unless you have a very important reason to do so (like URL shorteners e.g. bit.ly), URLs should never be case sensitive (regardless of the OS for the server). A user does not want to have to remember that the path to a certain page on your site has capital letters at position X and position Y. It is also much quicker for the user to type all lowercase. And ...


7

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


5

I don’t know any general studies about it, and I guess it would be very hard to come up with a sensible one. I think it’s safe to assume that this very, very much depends on a) target group and b) URL design. So even if users regularly manipulate URLs, this doesn’t mean that they do it on every site, because often the URL design is not good, i.e., the URLs ...


5

One thing to remember is the concept of people being able to recall about 7 items (established by George Armitage Miller's work on memory) in their short-term memory. If your name consisted of words like: big, dull, hello, car, house; each of these is ONE item because they connect to something already existing in their mental schema/mind. If it is something ...


4

Do long domain names really affect user experience? Yes. It will be annoying to your visitors. Remember, most people will visit your site on multiple devices, so they have to type that extralongdomainname.com on each device. It could possibly be detrimental to SEO. (Keyword Stuffing) As a side-note: Be careful with words like "Therapist" which, in a ...


4

The general consensus is that a dash is seen by google as a space, when an underscore and camel-case are not. So there is a SEO benefit there--which one could translate into a UX benefit in terms of 'findability'. As for readability, all lower case is certainly the hardest to read. So that leaves camel-case vs. a separator such as a dash. I'd argue the ...


3

If you really wanted to keep the space, you could HTML Encode it. The result would be: http://domain.com/api/user/firstname%20lastname Then all you'd have to do is HTML Decode it and you have your complete name. @AndrewLeach's comment got me thinking, you might need to use a combination of + and %20. A first and/or last name could have spaces in and of ...


3

If your api is RESTful or even RESTlike can't you just seperate them out into their own fields? That way, you'd seperate them out with a "/" character the same way you seperate out the user field and everything else in your api. This approach is the current convention in web api design. i.e.: http://domain.com/api/user/firstname/lastname


3

There is definitely usability benefit in creating user-friendly URL's that are descriptive of the page. It is also beneficial for a search engine and will aid the performance of your pages in organic search if they are rewritten like school.edu/admissions/apply-today/ to use your example. Breadcrumb trails are also beneficial for users to show the hierarchy ...


2

Even though this presentation is about REST, it talks a lot about URLs, (from 16min to 25min approx) and might interest you. Main points that gets out of the presentation is that the URL should represent a ressource, and filters of these ressources should go in the query string. The query string is meant to be specific to the query, and filters are a ...


2

Using uppercase characters in domain names is fine because they are not case-sensitive. Servers may be case-sensitive, so you should make sure that long URLs do in fact work whatever case is used. When typesetting long URLs, you can also make use of different styles. This works better with some font families than others. www.expertscientificanalysis.com


2

If your client is adamant that they want it to be a part of the same domain, you have another option, present in your browser address bar as you view this. You can use a subdomain to both separate and connect the sub brand, with a URL that looks like: SubBrandY.BrandX.com There is a more clear distinction with this approach for both humans and site ...


2

Your question made me join UX! UI is one of my biggest pet peeves of programming. And in the 20+ years I have been writing code, the single most consistent problem. The question doesn't give me enough context to weigh in too heavily about the technology you are using or are allowed but I'm assuming the platform includes Windows. The best I have seen ...


2

To get this to work properly, underscore _ is the language independent (ASCII) character to use. The dash (which I love to use) doesn't match in all character encoding languages. I've implemented a string.replace() of no less than seven different dashes imported from XML to a product database. I don't want seven different products depending on dash ...


2

What if instead of having these be an unlabeled list of items, what if it became an item list which had a unique identifier that can be optionally named. Similar to a wishlist. That way if I want to say give you a list of things to buy for my birthday party, it will be clearly named /BuyNow/User/Birthday and if unnamed... /BuyNow/User/12391 This will ...


2

In regards to your mention of character recognition capabilities, you might have to consider that QR codes are more robust and thus better suited to scanning of information that plain text. Compared to a written word, the redundancy of the stored information in a QR code is higher. See this section of the wikipedia article on QR codes. This level of ...


1

Although it's true that some domain have had bad reputation and a lot of misuse, we can't predict what is going to happen next, a lot of things change and many of the things that have changed in the past few years involve more trust, better behaviour (in some aspects), more regulations about domain purchase and more education about Internet related things. ...


1

Just bought a few of the new TLD domain names as they fit with certain businesses. For example bought http://www.bagel.coffee for a bagel shop. And bought http://www.Lawyer.coffee for a Los Angeles Family Law Firm. So it really depends on who is going to be using these, and their purpose. My thought is they are good marketing and an easy way to say the ...


1

Yes, it does. At least in the way, that your audience might have problem to remember the address, can mistype it easily etc. That is the branding part of domain name. But there's a chance you triggered really good keywords and this value might overweight the disadvantages long domain name might have for branding.


1

The URL should ideally be tied to the information on the page in a way that the user can know what information a page contains prior to clicking on it if the link is visible somewhere or if they save it. If users modifying the url is a concern, try the following, which is a combination of both: ...


1

I don't imagine many "Edit" the URL but most people do copy and paste, or click URL's. When a URL is abc123456 it's easy to be mislead or have to click on every link until you find the one which is actually the one you want. URL's are made to be read by humans, they aren't for the computer, they're for US. Having a human readable URL is a long established ...


1

You already use the {SKU}/{Quantity} pattern, so just reuse that pattern. You can use it multiple times by simply repeating the same key in the query args: /BuyNow?it=9999/1&it=8888/2&it=500/1 The parameter it should be returned as a list of {SKU}/{Quantity} strings. Note that the forward slash character is perfectly legal in a query argument per ...


1

It's better to allow non-Latin characters for two reasons: 1. For international delivery by mail, only country needs to be in Latin characters. Local post will do the job better if they'll be able to read an address in native language. 2. If address will be read by another users, it's still better to have native version, because conversion to Latin can be ...


1

In Cool URLs don't change, Tim Berners-Lee states what URLs should not include. The most pertinent is: Status- directories like "old" and "draft" and so on, not to mention "latest" and "cool" appear all over file systems. Documents change status - or there would be no point in producing drafts. The latest version of a document needs a persistent ...


1

Per RFC1738 your candidate characters are $-_.+!*'(), I'd choose "+". http://domain.com/api/user/firstname+lastname Encoders used the "+" character as a replacement for a space character in the early days, and many still do, though I think the official spec calls for using %20 now. I think dot, dash, and underscore have aesthetic value too. A note of ...


1

If by "display" you mean "show on a web page" (as opposed to "format in the address bar of a browser") then you have many Typographic options. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Color, Kerning, and other design factors can all make the win. You may even be able to use them to turn around an otherwise silly name by ...


1

I work in the central team of a corporation operating in 60+ markets and we have consistent feedback from local marketing teams that in countries with a low level of English as a second language that .com is a less preferred to the local equivalent (.fr, .es, .it etc). This is because users have been 'educated' that a .com on a SERP or elsewhere is less ...



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