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58

Do long domain names really effect user experience? Yes, in several ways: Memory Recall Long domains are difficult to remember. A shorter one tends to be more memorable. The mind can only recall 4 things at once in its working memory. Even then, the words need to make sense (and not keyboard mash). Source: ...


30

While longer than desirable, 27 characters (including .com) is not overly excessive, but yes, long domain names do affect user experience. Some more than others. 'Power users' know how to avoid typing the address if possible. However, there are going to be some users who don't have a browser with a suggestive omnibox there are going to be users who ...


11

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


5

I don’t know any general studies about it, and I guess it would be very hard to come up with a sensible one. I think it’s safe to assume that this very, very much depends on a) target group and b) URL design. So even if users regularly manipulate URLs, this doesn’t mean that they do it on every site, because often the URL design is not good, i.e., the URLs ...


5

Generally sites use either underscore or dash to replace a space in the URL. Underscore may be better because some persons have a dash in their name. Consistency is also important. Don't use dash sometimes and underscore other times.


5

One thing to remember is the concept of people being able to recall about 7 items (established by George Armitage Miller's work on memory) in their short-term memory. If your name consisted of words like: big, dull, hello, car, house; each of these is ONE item because they connect to something already existing in their mental schema/mind. If it is something ...


4

Do long domain names really affect user experience? Yes. It will be annoying to your visitors. Remember, most people will visit your site on multiple devices, so they have to type that extralongdomainname.com on each device. It could possibly be detrimental to SEO. (Keyword Stuffing) As a side-note: Be careful with words like "Therapist" which, in a ...


3

In Office 365/SharePoint Online, it's categorized as External Sharing with the name anonymous guest link. This anonymous guest link lets any user with the URL view an item inside an authenticated and authorization required SharePoint environment. I think this name is valid in a gaming context as well, since it doesn't specify the requested item. Until ...


3

Parameters in the URL make the URL not clean just by using them. I would rather go with URL structure like: https://example.com/products/secureEmail/ - to show the details of a product https://example.com/products/secureEmail/purchase/ - to start the procedure of buying https://example.com/products/secureEmail/purchase/?step=2 - to navigate to another step ...


3

If you really wanted to keep the space, you could HTML Encode it. The result would be: http://domain.com/api/user/firstname%20lastname Then all you'd have to do is HTML Decode it and you have your complete name. @AndrewLeach's comment got me thinking, you might need to use a combination of + and %20. A first and/or last name could have spaces in and of ...


3

If your api is RESTful or even RESTlike can't you just seperate them out into their own fields? That way, you'd seperate them out with a "/" character the same way you seperate out the user field and everything else in your api. This approach is the current convention in web api design. i.e.: http://domain.com/api/user/firstname/lastname


3

In regards to your mention of character recognition capabilities, you might have to consider that QR codes are more robust and thus better suited to scanning of information that plain text. Compared to a written word, the redundancy of the stored information in a QR code is higher. See this section of the wikipedia article on QR codes. This level of ...


3

There is definitely usability benefit in creating user-friendly URL's that are descriptive of the page. It is also beneficial for a search engine and will aid the performance of your pages in organic search if they are rewritten like school.edu/admissions/apply-today/ to use your example. Breadcrumb trails are also beneficial for users to show the hierarchy ...


2

Your question made me join UX! UI is one of my biggest pet peeves of programming. And in the 20+ years I have been writing code, the single most consistent problem. The question doesn't give me enough context to weigh in too heavily about the technology you are using or are allowed but I'm assuming the platform includes Windows. The best I have seen ...


2

To get this to work properly, underscore _ is the language independent (ASCII) character to use. The dash (which I love to use) doesn't match in all character encoding languages. I've implemented a string.replace() of no less than seven different dashes imported from XML to a product database. I don't want seven different products depending on dash ...


2

What if instead of having these be an unlabeled list of items, what if it became an item list which had a unique identifier that can be optionally named. Similar to a wishlist. That way if I want to say give you a list of things to buy for my birthday party, it will be clearly named /BuyNow/User/Birthday and if unnamed... /BuyNow/User/12391 This will ...


2

My son's preschool has a long url for their website, the full name of their school, seven words mashed together. In theory, that's easy to remember and non-ambiguous, but as a user of their site I hate the domain name and have a hard time remembering it and always find myself asking if it was this slightly shorter version, that other slightly shorter ...


1

As others have noted, it would be much easier for users to remember things that they have generated themselves - e.g. an e-mail or username rather than a nonsensical ID. If you want users to connect to each other, you don't need to expose your internal representation of their instance; simply use something else that uniquely identifies them. However, if ...


1

According to me, if you want to make the urls clean you should rewrite them instead of abbreviating. According to me, your URL's should be descriptive and short, but you shouldn't use initials to make it short, for example if you have an URL like https://example.com/purchase/?pcat=ps&p=se Now I don't get it what does ps and se stand for right? Also, ...


1

I don't know about research but there seem to be two issues here: 1) Fixed or dynamic URL bars - surely this should be delegated to the OS. The users will be most familiar with the default setting of their OS so it's almost certainly best to leave it at that. 2) Fixed nav bars - this is design dependant and what users will prefer depends on how ...


1

The wording that strikes me as most-close is Private Invitation It is a good term because it expresses the discretion that the user should take when sharing the link. It is not a great term because does not express the "no account needed" aspect of the pattern. @BennySkogberg's answer about MS Office's "anonymous guests" is a great reference, ...


1

Although it's true that some domain have had bad reputation and a lot of misuse, we can't predict what is going to happen next, a lot of things change and many of the things that have changed in the past few years involve more trust, better behaviour (in some aspects), more regulations about domain purchase and more education about Internet related things. ...


1

Just bought a few of the new TLD domain names as they fit with certain businesses. For example bought http://www.bagel.coffee for a bagel shop. And bought http://www.Lawyer.coffee for a Los Angeles Family Law Firm. So it really depends on who is going to be using these, and their purpose. My thought is they are good marketing and an easy way to say the ...


1

Yes, it does. At least in the way, that your audience might have problem to remember the address, can mistype it easily etc. That is the branding part of domain name. But there's a chance you triggered really good keywords and this value might overweight the disadvantages long domain name might have for branding.


1

If you are storing unique 'usernames' in your system then why don't you make use of these to generate a permalink to the user's page like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other big players do? E.g: http://twitter.com/srvikram13 https://github.com/srvikram13 http://in.linkedin.com/in/srvikram13 https://www.facebook.com/srvikram13 This way the ...


1

It's better to allow non-Latin characters for two reasons: 1. For international delivery by mail, only country needs to be in Latin characters. Local post will do the job better if they'll be able to read an address in native language. 2. If address will be read by another users, it's still better to have native version, because conversion to Latin can be ...


1

The URL should ideally be tied to the information on the page in a way that the user can know what information a page contains prior to clicking on it if the link is visible somewhere or if they save it. If users modifying the url is a concern, try the following, which is a combination of both: ...


1

I don't imagine many "Edit" the URL but most people do copy and paste, or click URL's. When a URL is abc123456 it's easy to be mislead or have to click on every link until you find the one which is actually the one you want. URL's are made to be read by humans, they aren't for the computer, they're for US. Having a human readable URL is a long established ...


1

Active Directory Federation Service (ADFS) has nothing to do with the URL on your site. ADFS is a technique to build trust between two different Active Directory domains to share resources across different networks. If you have a full trust duplicate direction trust between Company A and Company B, these companies use their previous sign-in pages. When ...


1

You already use the {SKU}/{Quantity} pattern, so just reuse that pattern. You can use it multiple times by simply repeating the same key in the query args: /BuyNow?it=9999/1&it=8888/2&it=500/1 The parameter it should be returned as a list of {SKU}/{Quantity} strings. Note that the forward slash character is perfectly legal in a query argument per ...



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