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23

Since you want to indicate function in your URL:s, the best way would be to actually type out that function in the URL. My suggestion: User: dummy.com/user/johndoe Business: dummy.com/business/acmecorporation Edit: adding an excellent point made by 10MAY in another answer in this thread, regarding why you shouldn't use sub-domains: Also, ...


11

Use the fully typed words Don't drop the first letter off the second word just because it happens to match. Dropping the first letter of the second word implies a new one word trademark. DirecTV People usually type out the full words of things they are searching for as evidenced by this image which was captured from the DirecTV homepage... As a ...


5

Like DaveAlger said, use the fully typed words. I would however also consider getting both domains, and redirect one to the other, but using the fully typed one as the main. This makes it even easier for users and could prevent abuse.


5

Yes, it’s a good idea. Especially if you notice that there are some misspelled links out there, e.g. if someone links to your login page with /login. instead of /login (because the URL auto-detection of their CMS thought that the dot for ending a sentence belongs to the URL). Preventively adding such redirects is probably not of a high priority, however, ...


5

Short answer: yes. Extended answer: Yes and no. The main problem here, which I think has been made clear, is that for you to identify all of the possible mistakes (which is hard to plan for) and redirect them all is more effort than it's worth (unless you're Google, but even then...). An alternative solution would be to create a 404 page that offers ...


4

Well, first of all, I'd seriously consider using another logic that implements non confusing, semantic URLs. Assuming this is not possible, I'd recommend you to track your user's behavior and see what happens. Nevertheless, the solution for your problem is quite simple: just use htacces to redirect any user that hits somesite.com/event/ to ...


3

This is more of an implementation question but I'll try and answer the UX portion as best I can. It really doesn't matter what the URL looks like as long as it's consistent. I like that you are thinking about this problem as clean URLs make nicer looking bookmarks and are easier for developers to understand though most users won't even notice the URL. As ...


3

It largely depends upon the site but I would say that in general it isn't good UX to have content change each time the page is refreshed for the following reasons... Most everyone suffers from a condition known as change blindness People might not even notice the change unless the view is drastically different after the page refresh. If one minor ...


3

The only reference to research which I found was on the site usability.gov which did some research on optimal url names for government organization. To quote the article When the General Services Administration (GSA) changed the names of the U.S. government's official Web portals from FirstGov.gov to USA.gov and FirstGov en español.gov to ...


3

What makes a good domain name? I wonder whether "looking professional" or being "consistent" are so important in a domain name. I can understand that it may seem important to a designer to want to make all the ducks line up in neat row, so to speak, on a printed page. But I'd be inclined to think that, for any individual domain name, brevity and ...


3

First I have to say I find it a bit difficult to answer since your question actually consists of several questions – and on the other hand you're suggesting answers yourself that in my opinion are all valid. When thinking about a geo- or country-related URL strategy it's difficult to come up with the right solution. Every option has its advantages and its ...


3

In Office 365/SharePoint Online, it's categorized as External Sharing with the name anonymous guest link. This anonymous guest link lets any user with the URL view an item inside an authenticated and authorization required SharePoint environment. I think this name is valid in a gaming context as well, since it doesn't specify the requested item. Until ...


3

Parameters in the URL make the URL not clean just by using them. I would rather go with URL structure like: https://example.com/products/secureEmail/ - to show the details of a product https://example.com/products/secureEmail/purchase/ - to start the procedure of buying https://example.com/products/secureEmail/purchase/?step=2 - to navigate to another step ...


2

Yes URLs are a valid communication tool for both users and machines. This slideshow gives more information.http://blog.rnf.me/ux-of-urls/#/. And, fittingly, you can also head to the 29th slide to see a pertinent quote: http://blog.rnf.me/ux-of-urls/#/29 Thankfully, the slideshow automatically updates the URL with the number of the slide you are viewing, ...


2

I would say it totally depends on what you are mainly targeting in the website. If the main purpose is more of social connection then the best way to go about would be to have User: dummy.com/johndoe Business: dummy.com/business/silversolutions On the other hand if the website mainly focuses on getting business information to the people rather than the ...


2

I'm coming from a web developer perspective, so I am a bit biased, but here's my two cents: Local domains are great, but hard to remember, if you're going to be using different countries, I would go with website.com/ca/mcdonalds. This actually makes it easier for other websites to integrate as well, as it is a simple RESTful interface. The /ca/ designates a ...


2

Solution 2 is the best option presented uk.example.com/volkswagen fr.example.com/volkswagen Going this route will provide the best UX for developers and here is why... 1. Use a two character code for each localized version of the text Anyone who knows the 2 character country code system will intuitively know how things are organized when they see the ...


1

This kind of falls into the 'flexibility and efficiency of use' heuristic from Nielsen Norman Group's heuristics. Their definition for this heuristic is: Accelerators -- unseen by the novice user -- may often speed up the interaction for the expert user such that the system can cater to both inexperienced and experienced users. Allow users to tailor ...


1

If there are two businesses named "ACME" (one from USA, one from Germany), why would they want to advertise their URL as /acme and not as /us/acme and /de/acme? The US business would know that users coming from Germany looking for their business would end up at the unrelated DE business, which would be some form of "advertisement" they most likely don’t ...


1

You confuse site language with content The language of the site is the functional language of the site. Menus, instructions, buttons are all in my selected language / culture It is more than just language - GB has different currency than US but share the same language In the facebook example www.facebook.com/VolkswagenUK and ...


1

A URL must uniquely identify a page. This is simply a basic principle, and you should discard any option that breaks it. Note the requirement you mention in your question: I need the businesses to be able to post the URLs of their pages... It won't be acceptable to businesses if the only available URL goes to a page where the user selects from ...


1

I would agree with @10MAY that subdomains are not appropriate here. Your only solution without subdomains is this one: User: example.com/johndoe Business: example.com/uk/acmecorporation *uk is the country of the business But why is the country all of a sudden that important (it wasn't for the other examples)? If you want to go with the standard ...


1

Same field. "Two fields" strategy require either a: radio button" to pick "single URL" or "multiple URL", which is an extra step If you just put both fields on the UI it will create noise. Also for the mind is trivial to pick where to put a single URL because in theory it also "fits" into the multiple field. However "same field" strategy IMO does not ...


1

As others have noted, it would be much easier for users to remember things that they have generated themselves - e.g. an e-mail or username rather than a nonsensical ID. If you want users to connect to each other, you don't need to expose your internal representation of their instance; simply use something else that uniquely identifies them. However, if ...


1

According to me, if you want to make the urls clean you should rewrite them instead of abbreviating. According to me, your URL's should be descriptive and short, but you shouldn't use initials to make it short, for example if you have an URL like https://example.com/purchase/?pcat=ps&p=se Now I don't get it what does ps and se stand for right? Also, ...


1

I don't know about research but there seem to be two issues here: 1) Fixed or dynamic URL bars - surely this should be delegated to the OS. The users will be most familiar with the default setting of their OS so it's almost certainly best to leave it at that. 2) Fixed nav bars - this is design dependant and what users will prefer depends on how ...


1

The wording that strikes me as most-close is Private Invitation It is a good term because it expresses the discretion that the user should take when sharing the link. It is not a great term because does not express the "no account needed" aspect of the pattern. @BennySkogberg's answer about MS Office's "anonymous guests" is a great reference, ...


1

We recently bought http://www.blue.coffee to show some art work. Was curious to see if people would go to the sites It is now December and so far decent but not great results. Our web-site names with .com are getting about double the hits as the .coffee names. An example is http://sdadoption.com/. That is getting 2x the traffic as lawyer.coffee. This ...



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