Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

139

The Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications is quoted by Business Writing as suggesting: Restructure the sentence so that the address is not at the end of the sentence. Set off the address, like this, with no period (full stop): Please visit my website at: www.syntaxtraining.com However the same site also ...


57

Do long domain names really effect user experience? Yes, in several ways: Memory Recall Long domains are difficult to remember. A shorter one tends to be more memorable. The mind can only recall 4 things at once in its working memory. Even then, the words need to make sense (and not keyboard mash). Source: ...


46

It is not only a problem with copy/paste. If Thunderbird (among others) receives a plain text message with an URL, it will transform it to a clickable URL, including the end period, as it is valid in an URL. A number of other punctuation characters are also legal, so care must be used. Tradition in such plain text messages is to surround the URL with < ...


37

Let them change their name. A woman getting married takes the last name of her husband (sometimes), and not allowing her to change her name at a website could translate into a poor experience for her. I'm a big fan of option #1. I had to go look up my ID# here at the UX website to find I'm #5737. Out of sight, out of mind, in a good way. I don't know ...


28

While longer than desirable, 27 characters (including .com) is not overly excessive, but yes, long domain names do affect user experience. Some more than others. 'Power users' know how to avoid typing the address if possible. However, there are going to be some users who don't have a browser with a suggestive omnibox there are going to be users who ...


27

If you're looking for the most SEO friendly URLs that are also human readable, then I would recommend using all lowercase, hyphenated URLs, as that is what Google recommends in their Webmaster tools documentation. However, if SEO doesn't matter for your web app (if, for instance, it all lives behind a login requirement), then you can use whatever ...


22

I don't have much in the way of hard data to back this up, but a number of sites which host user-generated links (eg. news aggregators, Wikipedia) specifically ban shortened URLs for trust reasons. Joshua Schachter (creator of Delicious) wrote a blog post explaining some of the issues with them.


18

Firstly this is really just an extension of an inherent problem with links in the first place, which is that the target doesn't need to have anything to do with the link text - even if the link text looks perfectly adequate. In fact I would suggest that a well written text link is even more likely to engage and fool the user than a shortened link which might ...


18

First, .co is a TLD intended for websites hosted in Colombia. Second, users are habituated to .com. The missing m is perturbing, and many people will forget about the fact that instead of accessing a company website, they must go to a website with a Colombia-type name. This being said, some well known companies, including Google or Twitter, reserved .co ...


16

In this specific example, the period is not really necessary. What follows the full colon need not always be a word/ phrase or some linguistic construct. It could even be an icon/ image etc. In general though, it is always preferable to place the link either inside the sentence or behind a part of text. Please follow the link ...


16

Yes, there are a few considerations for domain names: Is the name memorable? Could your domain name be confused with another address, such as goggle.com vs. google.com? Is the name easy to relay? Can you tell another person the name by saying something like "penny-dash-arcade-dot-com"? Is the name accurate to your brand? If your site is "Cheap Pens Now", ...


15

A solution to this some services have used is to have a separate username and display name. Your user name is your portal to the site; what you login as, what your URL is based on (usually), and sometimes how people find you. Twitter is probably the most relevant solution, as they have good SEO but they do have a display name you can change. You can't ...


14

I always go with alloneword unless: The words within the url start and finish with the same later e.g. business-shop.com Or if the non-hyphenated version creates something unfortunate e.g. expertsexchange.com an unfortunate error when they clearly run a expert sexchange business and keep getting mistaken for 'experts exchange'.


14

I just thought of an option 3, which comes in a few parts. I'm probably being excessively verbose, but I want to make sure I've covered every case :) Only allow name changes every so often (three months should be fine to accommodate real name changes like the Jane Smith/Jane Doe examples above). Maintain a columns in the database of the past, say... four ...


12

It is very important (it is also very good for seo). User friendly urls help a user understand where he/she is on your site just by glancing at the address bar. Another very important point about friendly urls are that they should be hackable. This means that a url like blogname.com/posts/sports/baseball/2010/08/17/your-post-title should show all the ...


12

If you really care about UX, so you have to validate URL automatically. So if user types "example.com" you have to change it to "http://example.com". If you want to add ability to navigate to url, that is just typed, so just underline it and make it blue; user will understand, that this is a link. download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


12

A quite common pattern for showing all of something is to extend the category with a filter, which in your case would be something like: http://mydomain.com/factories/all That way you can use the filter in your URL to select factories in let's say Europe: http://mydomain.com/factories/europe And moving down the list to a single factory, such as: ...


11

No. People place the most amount of trust primarily in .com, .org, and .gov and secondarily in .net. All other TLDs are subject to additional scrutiny by your users. In addition if I just know your domain, but not the TLD you are using. I'm going to guess, and I'm willing to bet most of your users will guess ".com". .com should always be the primary ...


10

It's an extremely contentious issue whether "user" is a bad word or not. If you want to maintain any clarity I would strongly advise against calling all people in all situations 'people.' You can't get any less specific and unhelpful than that. As long as there is a distinction between people that user or have access to your service and people in general ...


10

I think it's about time URLs in general got abstracted out of sight of ordinary users. Most people couldn't care less about this dotted syntax, the TLDs, the sub-domains, not to mention the protocol part. It's too bad that the current state of technology doesn't offer a superior alternative. Your aunt doesn't care about URLs. If she even knows which site ...


10

You might find Grammar Girl's advice helpful: ... unless you can control exactly how the address will be rendered, it's best to leave off the terminal punctuation or rewrite the sentence so the URL doesn't come at the end. I terminate a sentence with a period if I am writing for print. However, for online documentation, I would rephrase the sentence. ...


10

There are various reasons for this, amongst them: Bookmarks - I love the ability to drag and drop the browser address icon to my desktop to mark an important email. History - Looking through your history can be the quickest way to find an email you read half an hour ago. You need an encoded url to achieve this. App versioning - when rolling out a new ...


9

The most important part of the long term success of QR codes or in fact any form of 'recognition' technology will be closely aligned to the quality of the content you are directed to. Having used these codes recently in a case study for mobile context the main issue is where I end up. Almost all the pages I'm directed to are web pages and as I'm only ...


9

I guess it was in the late '90s that I learned that the "right" way to send a URL via e-mail (or on Usenet) is preceding text <URL:http://www.example.com>. I can't seem to find that reference now (does anyone know?) and I don't know whether that practice is still considered "right", or by whom. I either do that, recast the sentence so the URL is ...


8

It only becomes unwieldy if you need to actually interact with it. And that is not so uncommon. After all - simply the act of seeing the URL is interacting with it already! But let's say for example I want to translate a webpage and I need to put the URL into the translation engine. Not everyone is a great copy and paste user so imagine having to type it ...


8

They matter not only because they look "nicer", but also because they usually reflect your information architecture. For example, BloggersBase, the blogging platform I co-founded, used the following url structure: http://www.bloggersbase.com/internet/10-to-gain-access-to-blocked-websites/ In this case, we care less about the date, but rather which blog ...


8

I don't think there is any difference from a UX standpoint. But I'd say dashes are much more common and common is good. :) PHP content management systems like Drupal and WordPress prefer dashes. In the past, Matt Cutts at Google has also recommended dashes: http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/dashes-vs-underscores/ Edit: Google recommends dashes/hyphens too: ...


8

The shorter the URL it might be easier to remember for those people who tend to memorize URL's but if people relate to an URL with the name of the organization then you might have problems since people would struggle to figure out what the url of the site was by using the name. For example, I helped out a non profit called Getting to know cancer, we did ...


8

Go with the hyphenated option. It will be easier to read for the user and if you have longer names, make it easier to recall too. eg: look at the URL for this question: questions/41595/what-is-the-casing-convention-for-url-routes Also, avoid capitalization if possible, just to remain consistent. eg: Was the S capital or was the D capital?


7

Hyphens make it harder to read out the URL, and make typos more likely. As DA points out, though, they might help to avoid inadvertent misreadings of the URL, such as the classic expertsexchange.com (which is now, wisely, experts-exchange.com)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible