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2

An "undo" function isn't the same as a prompt because the former keeps control of the workflow in the user's hands, whereas the latter seizes it (i.e. the user is more passive). Undo is all about reverting state. If the previous state is: easy to remember or inspectable, and the action to change the state is easy to perform, and history (i.e. state ...


2

I think it's a good practice to provide Undo/Redo because a user can choose a function by mistake and he should be given a mechanism to leave this unwanted state. It's not a lazy solution but an option given to user for better control. When designing a system, it's important that you first optimize the design to prevent any errors. You can refer to these ...


0

Another option to consider is to forbid the undo operation once the user closes / dismisses the affected window. Closing the window is quite a strong signal of "I'm done here, all good" from the user. I remember being struck by this once. After manually sorting a bunch of files in the project folder I closed it and then accidentally hit CTRL+Z in another ...


4

Ideally, a user should be either aware of what will be undone, or reminded of what will be undone. If the user has changed the context of their work (i.e. scrolled out of view or changed views) or a significant amount of time has passed, they might no longer remember what the last action was. At the same time, it could be frustrating to be reminded ...


0

There is no UX reason to limit undos. The reason undos are limited are due to hardware and software limitations (which were greater in the past than today).



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