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5

The undo button is commonly styled as an arrow going back on itself. If you've ever taken a wrong turn at an intersection, the first reaction would be to do a U-turn and go back to the intersection to try again. The redo button would presumably be styled as just the opposite of undo. It basically is a U-turn button. Straight left-or-right buttons can easily ...


3

The idea behind those icons is to visually represent a thing coming back in a circle. Now the icons were mainly popularized by Microsoft as they became mainstream with the popularity of its office package. From a usability perspective the icons are not that bad but you have to accompany them with labels that clearly spell out the word "Undo" and "Redo." ...


20

I believe that it is meant to represent an analog clock, where the Undo function shows the time sweeping backwards, while the Redo shows the time moving forwards again.


33

I've done some search without any specific result, so I will answer considering usability principles and software history: Legacy The undo function was already here in the 70's but was not until the appearance and expansion of graphical interfaces and increasing popularity of desktop computers that it got its icon identity. In those times the users didn't ...


15

I believe it is to differentiate between the "Back Button" and "Forward Button" which is commonly represented with a straight arrow. Back buttons (and forward) represent and action that will navigate backward to a different place, i.e. the page that you were on previous to the current one. The undo button is round because it is rolling back to a ...


0

What about the case where the user has many items in her cart and wants to remove several of them. If you have an undo for each item, you end up clutter up the interface and turning a simple delete into a more complex problem (representing each deleted item with an undo action). Do you only have an undo on the more recently deleted item? if do, deleting ...


1

In GMail (and also other Google services, like Google Docs) all changes are applied immediately. In many cloud-based software there is no "Save" button. It's because of many reasons - one is to allow the user work with his web browser, which has limited capability of asking "Save before quit?", because modern browsers do not show this text (if provided by a ...



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