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The confusion is understandable. The arrow means "turn around," but can't tell the user what is being turned around where, and there isn't space to add more intelligible detail. Icons tend to be like that. Try labeling it "Undo" rather than using an icon. "Undo" is short word, and probably won't take any more space. This assumes the users already call such ...


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Android devices' physical touch buttons are problematic and have UX issues. This should be addressed by the manufacturers. However, the design of your back button could be adding more confusion to users' behavior. Since it looks similar to phone's physical back button. So maybe users are thinking that phone's back button would do the same action. Perhaps ...


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The main reason for preferring Undo over Confirmation Boxes is laid out by Alan Cooper in 'About Face 2.0, The Essentials of Interaction Design' Confirmations illustrate a quirk of human behavior: They only work when they are unexpected. If confirmations are offered in routine places, the user quickly becomes inured to them and routinely dismisses ...


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Aza Raskin wrote a great article on this subject: Never Use a Warning When you Mean Undo. He explains the psychological reasons why confirmations are inhumane while undo is better for how humans work.


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I don't know of any studies, but I've seen Google only use that when there is only one logical action performed on the user interaction (for example: regret a deletion, or regret sending one e-mail, etc.). You don't send many different emails when clicking "send", you only do "one deletion" when clicking "delete" (taking how their UIs are designed, for ...


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Blocking the user is bad UX unless the operation is catastrophic (i.e. causing great damage and/or suffering)     Imagine the following scenario... You want to copy a folder full of files from one location to another so you begin the operation and the computer is nice enough to let you know that files are copying and that it will take about 2.5 ...


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In the general case, I agree with Evil Closet Monkey: Undo creates less friction than Delete, so it is preferable. But there is at least one case where Delete+Confirm is preferable: When your users are overwhelmed. A user is overwhelmed when he wants to complete a task, but has no idea how to do it, and expects to fail. It can be so subtle that the user ...


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There would be a third way that i actually chose to implement in a small cms ui – and the clients seem to be happy with it so far. I also wanted to avoid the confirmation message and implementing undo just wasnt an option. So instead of adding an additional step after the user already tried to delete the content, I added a step before the user does so – so ...


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For consumer apps and websites - delete with undo option For enterprise apps that staff use at work - delete with confirmation notification This is to prevent from employees deleting important stuff accidentally. Since "undo" function normally disappears after X seconds. That way, there is a real risk of items being deleted permanently by accident. ...


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I think the Android Gallery "filmstrip view" and its swipe-down-to-delete is a strong counter-example for the idea that "delete and undo" is preferable. It's easy to accidentally delete while trying to browse, and the same type of action (unintentional touching) that deletes can also move you away from the opportunity to undo. To me, this is a huge UX ...


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As a counter-argument to the (well-expressed) claims already stated in other answers, confirmation dialogs should be used when an action is not performed often and difficult to reverse. A common example is installing a program on your computer: Windows machines provide this confirmation dialog any time a program requests access to your administrator ...


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Delete with confirmation Delete with confirmation looks like this: Assuming the user tries to get from 1 to 3 (ie, she intended to perform action 2), the user has no interest in step 2b. We put delete-guards in place to reduce user errors, but if the action was intentional (which it is more often than not) step 2b is superfluous. Undo Undo, on the ...


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The site Good-UI argues for Undo: Try Undos instead of prompting for confirmation. Imagine that you just pressed an action button or link. Undos respect the initial human intent by allowing the action to happen smoothly first and foremost. Prompts on the other hand suggest to the user that he or she does not know what they are doing by questioning their ...


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Judging from what you have written it seems that it should be clear for the user that the website is working in the "authorized" mode. Therefore the current authorization status should be displayed when interacting with the page- maybe it could be placed in some sort of activity / status placeholder that you could then later use for other important statuses ...



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