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Black text is not the problem. Glaring white background is. That background glare is the cause of eye-strain. Grey text just makes that worse as users often strain to read - which is why grey text often takes longer to read than black text. In fact, many people can "see" a whole page of black text and get a sense of the message in an instant - almost ...


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This is more of an algorithmic problem, but it is worth keeping in mind that some languages do not have the distinction of upper- and lowercase. E.g. Japanese (they also don't have the concept of bold text). And some letters do not exist in an uppercase variant, e.g. the German "ß" ('sharp S') is a strictly lowercase letter1 as there are no words that start ...


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There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


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This blog post provides a downloadable pdf with colors and their code numbers. It also provides suggestions for readable color palettes. http://www.dmcinfo.com/latest-thinking/blog/id/8840/simplifying-ui-and-ux-design-with-color-cheat-sheet


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A few rules of thumb: I recommended providing at least two themes - dark on light and light on dark as some users may not be able to read one of the two. For light on dark, make sure the contrast isn't too high (e.g. use grey on black, not white on black). Make sure the contrast between the intensity of foreground and the intensity of the background is ...


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If you want to consider users with special visual and/or cognitive requirements, it becomes quite complicated and there's no single answer. The W3C Web Accessibility Initiative's Web Content Authoring Guidelines (WCAG) provide a good starting point. That's probably the single most thoroughly-researched resource on web accessibility, though it's not totally ...


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I know a lot of people may scoff at the idea, but take a look at Twitter bootstrap for a guide. A lot of time and resources have been put into that project to make the defaults sensible and readable across multiple devices.


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If you are not concerned about beauty/ugliness just try to imitate the Windows High Contrast colour schemes.


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I'm still a HUGE fan of pixels. The problem however is that we're in the age of responsive design now. Unfortunately, Ems are starting to make more sense to me, even if I HATE what happens when you accidentally nest Ems or lose track of the base font-size. You could very easily end up with a font that's even smaller than you have now. Whatever you do ...


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If you are setting your body to 16px and body text to 11px, your resulting font size will be 68.8% of your body font size. Try using EM's instead and understand how PX, EM's & percentages work. Article on font units


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I would simply make sure that each menu item was correctly padded/margined. If so, you'd get something more along the lines of this:


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Honestly, you should be able to compensate fairly well by adjusting the padding in each tag. I believe margin is the distance between the and the bullet while padding is between the bullet and the . By adjusting that, you should be able to have a second line wrap properly under the first. You should also have in writing what the max character length for ...


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That is, I believe, a very fair concern I also face very often. Almost all the time, I try to have a sub-headline in a smaller font; explaining what is under, what actions can be taken... Limiting the character count while giving tips on how to limit them will go well with that solution. Depending on the need and type of the project other solutions I can ...


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You could be really aggressive and actually block admin users from entering titles longer than the maximum space you think they should take up. The down side is that this will make your system less flexible (there will always be genuine use cases for long titles), and create a negative experience for your admin users. Not good. Helpful hints can guide users ...


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Actually, after writing that comment, I think I've thought of an answer the question. No, I don't think there is an ideal multilingual font size. The question is akin to asking "what is the ideal font size to use in the user interface for software that does everything for everyone?". It depends on context, purpose, audience and all the other usual factors ...



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