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It was common knowledge that humans read words as a shape until Ph. D Susan Weinschenk informed the community in her article 100 Things You Should Know About People: #19 — It’s a Myth That All Capital Letters Are Inherently Harder to Read that the shape theory is wrong: It’s parallel letter recognition, not word shape — The old theory on word shapes ...


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There is definitely qualitative and quantitative difference between upper case and lower case reading experience. This has to do with reading speed, familiarity, shape and eye movement. I myself am a fast reader (moderately: I've been clocked at bit over 1200 words per minute), so most of what's below is from experience. Lower case is simply smaller, so I ...


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Small caps are the bastard child of lowercase and uppercase. Other than purely aesthetic "design" reasons, I've yet to see a good use case for small caps where full uppercase or mixed-case (uppercase first letter with lowercase thereafter) isn't a better choice. You can get into the debate as to whether it's better to use uppercase or mixed-case, and I'm ...


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There are two theories/explanations for why text in All Caps is harder to read. One says that it's because of the less unique word shapes, and the other says that it's because it's less common. Small Caps suffers from both these problems - it has a generic word shape and it's even less common than All Caps. So whichever of the "all caps" theories may be ...


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Based on UX.Movement: Why Text in All Caps is Hard for Users to Read The reason of the worse readability of uppercase vs lowercase is the lower contrast of shape. Small caps still has worse contrast of shape than lower case, so it will still be less readable. There're also some relationship with familiarity, taking into account that for sure more of a ...


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When non-dark RGB colors on a screen are translated into XYZ colors in the eye and then to something similar to hue-saturation-lightness colors by the brain, small changes in RGB values will result in small changes XYZ which will then yield small changes to hue and saturation (which I will refer to collectively as chroma). When darker colors are translated ...


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There's no rule here. In general, though, if you're writing paragraphs, then you're likely not 'getting to the point' as fast as typically warranted via a bulleted list. As for when to use ordered vs. unordered, that's a bit easier: is there a particular order to the points? Then consider ordered.


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To answer the question you would need to look at two things in particular: Best practice for bullet points Optimal length of characters per line Best practice would suggest that the purpose of a bullet point is to summarize or create an easily scannable list of items. The more you increase the length of the content in that bullet point item, the more you ...


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In general, columns of numbers which are being examined as numbers should be decimal-point aligned (or right-aligned if the only decimal point is "implied"). Quantities which involve more than one radix point (e.g. currency amount in Britain prior to decimalization) should align each radix point, and right-align the columns between them; e.g. an itemized ...


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When using right aligned numbers you must note that decimal separators are aligned only if there are equal amount digits after decimal separator: 12 345,90 132 987,9376 Aligning such numbers left would probably be even worse, so in cases where number of digits after decimal separator are not equal numbers should probably be aligned by decimal ...


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In our system, numbers in our common calculators are shown in powers of ten. Let’s take a number ‘8634’. 8634 = 8x1000+ 6 x100 + 3 x10 + 4 x1 So starting from right to left, we have 0 power 10 then 1 power 10 then 2 powers 10 and so on. To keep it simple, this tradition makes readability easy from right to left.


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Digits are right aligned for similar reasons as you would right align them in a spreadsheet or a table. i.e. when you see multiple numbers (and they all have a fixed set of decimal places), then it's easier to compare the numbers with each other because the digits corresponding to each place value are in the same physical position, thus making it easier to ...


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Screen digits are right aligned to maintain positional consistency between what a number represents (in base 10 that would be units, tens, hundreds, etc.). E.g. If I were to have 764 and then multiply it by 24, the answer would be 18336. By aligning to the right I've consistently seen the same unit representation in the same position, and when I've had new ...


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I don't have any data about this question, neverthless here my thought: Readability is much better for right aligned numbers. Why? Consistency. The Decimal points always stays at the same location, decimal separators too. So it is much easier for a user to identify how big a number is. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


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In my opinion truncated titles shouldn't be used. It seems to me that you can use a varied font-size depending on string length.


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I'm still not sure about this but I came across the term "Pattern Library" and I think that might be the thing I'm thinking about. Example here: http://patterns.alistapart.com/


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The introduction to the font says the following: The Android design language relies on traditional typographic tools such as scale, space, rhythm, and alignment with an underlying grid. (...) is essential to help users quickly understand a screen of information. To support such use of typography, Ice Cream Sandwich introduced a new type family ...



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