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On the web, columns are wider, and so you are more likely to get "rivers of white" in justified text, which stand out from the text and make it hard to read, especially for people with dyslexia (for whom the "don't justify text on the web" guideline was introduced). http://uxmovement.com/content/6-surprising-bad-practices-that-hurt-dyslexic-users/ ...


0

In the browser In old browsers, justified text looked horrible. Those browsers could't do a good work when justifying text. Obviously it has to be done each and every time the page was rendered, in different browsers and OSes that use slightly different algorithm. The result was potentially horrid. I've seen lines with two words, one at each end ob the line, ...


2

This is done, to my knowledge for 3 primary reasons. First, historic, or "because it's always been that way". When print media first started out, the typesetter would arrange the type (letters) on a slide. You can see a really good example here. As you can see the slide has a clamp that needs to have both sides aligned. As this style of printing (used for ...


2

Kerning (letter spacing) becomes more cumbersome with CSS and makes it difficult to read on screens. Jason Santa Maria explains in more detail in On Web Typography - also his book from A Book Apart. He covers saccades and fixations in how we read (chapter 1) which leads to contexts when full text justification is used, and why avoid it for body text on ...


4

Doing justified text well is not that easy if you don't want to end up with large, ugly word spacing and harm readability. At the very least you need hyphenation. For web browsers to automatically hyphenate well would probably require prohibitively large dictionaries, and one for every language. Even if they could, they would probably end up hyphenating ...


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To some extent this may be what another answer was getting at, but historical reasons are important. Justifying text takes processing every time the text is rendered. For paper output, you justify once for all readers. Justifying text for reading on screen would need to be done client-side, unless the server knew the internal window size and could ...


10

Typography is a broad subject which needs to learned. There are valid reasons why you will use justified text in print media: To ensure there is no right raged text To create a sense of symmetry, especially if there are many columns on the page To those people who say you cannot use justified text on the web, I say you need to learn more about ...


72

The newspapers use justified text as they have multiple columns side-by-side so the justification works as a line separator. The majority of web content (text) is not placed inside small columns we just have the standard long lines and people are very well used to it. On the other hand; newspapers cannot use long lines because it will be difficult for ...


4

Thats a very good question. Once I had a similar question. There is no hyphen appears when it viewed in different screens. Now technology is moving towards responsive. If there will no hyphen (-) at the end of the half word, it will be very difficult to read. CSS does have a hyphens property but it is not supported in all browsers. There is no ...


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This is true that not justified text is more readbale in comparison to justified text but Print media use it to save the space as the more text fit into the justification and save space. On the other hand online don't have limitation in regard of space due to which non justified text is used to give rich user experience Cons Justifying text on the web makes ...


1

An important point I would like to add is to have a soft shadow and a black outline on your text. The default subtitle font on one of my older televisions didn't have an outline nor a shadow and it made it very difficult to read the text. Without an outline or shadow With an outline and shadow Source: Lights Film School


0

No, Arial is not used just because of its ubiquity (at least not by publishing/communications professionals). I remember while doing a lot of publishing work in the early to mid 2000s that we were instructed to use Arial or Verdana (both Sans Serif fonts) when authoring content to be read online. However, if we were publishing content for printed materials ...



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