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73

The newspapers use justified text as they have multiple columns side-by-side so the justification works as a line separator. The majority of web content (text) is not placed inside small columns we just have the standard long lines and people are very well used to it. On the other hand; newspapers cannot use long lines because it will be difficult for ...


10

Typography is a broad subject which needs to learned. There are valid reasons why you will use justified text in print media: To ensure there is no right raged text To create a sense of symmetry, especially if there are many columns on the page To those people who say you cannot use justified text on the web, I say you need to learn more about ...


4

Doing justified text well is not that easy if you don't want to end up with large, ugly word spacing and harm readability. At the very least you need hyphenation. For web browsers to automatically hyphenate well would probably require prohibitively large dictionaries, and one for every language. Even if they could, they would probably end up hyphenating ...


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Thats a very good question. Once I had a similar question. There is no hyphen appears when it viewed in different screens. Now technology is moving towards responsive. If there will no hyphen (-) at the end of the half word, it will be very difficult to read. CSS does have a hyphens property but it is not supported in all browsers. There is no ...


3

As a general rule of typography using all caps reduces readability for long segments of text. It should never be used for paragraphs especially, and only for short headlines. You can certainly use all caps in buttons, though, because buttons by nature contain short segments of text. In fact, all caps is the convention for buttons in Google's Material ...


2

I couldn't find any research on best practices, (and when I tried to google for one, I've got all sorts of UX bibliographies ;-), Here is how some online libraries are dealing with it: From what you have described, and from my experience of dealing with the related text media, I would do something like this: Note that some info in the tooltip is ...


2

I don't see why not to use capital letters for buttons and actions. It can be quite nice and add visual discernment to your app. It would be wise to watch for device visual standards (e.g. Android Material and iOS have different visual standards). You should also take care to make enough of white space around text to make it more clear and readable. This ...


2

There is nothing to stop you using capital letters (all-caps) to indicate actions. It should be noted, however, that there is no common pattern for all-caps indicating actions. If you are using the pattern across your system then you will be encouraging your users to understand that, wherever they see all-caps within your system, there is an action ...


2

The name for this variation of the lowercase a is know as a single-storey (without hook) or double-storey (with hook). There are definitely more typefaces that use the double-storey and as JonW points out the most common typefaces on the web use the double-storey, so people will most likely be familiar with them. Some typefaces use the double-storey for ...


2

This is done, to my knowledge for 3 primary reasons. First, historic, or "because it's always been that way". When print media first started out, the typesetter would arrange the type (letters) on a slide. You can see a really good example here. As you can see the slide has a clamp that needs to have both sides aligned. As this style of printing (used for ...


2

Kerning (letter spacing) becomes more cumbersome with CSS and makes it difficult to read on screens. Jason Santa Maria explains in more detail in On Web Typography - also his book from A Book Apart. He covers saccades and fixations in how we read (chapter 1) which leads to contexts when full text justification is used, and why avoid it for body text on ...


1

An important point I would like to add is to have a soft shadow and a black outline on your text. The default subtitle font on one of my older televisions didn't have an outline nor a shadow and it made it very difficult to read the text. Without an outline or shadow With an outline and shadow Source: Lights Film School


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Google's Roboto Font has a Monospaced Variation known as Roboto Mono: Download it here: https://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Roboto+Mono This will be perfectly valid while following Material Design guidelines.


1

IMHO, it's the right way to do it. See, at first I agreed with you, until I realized you're not seeing an error message, but technical description on an error message, which is an absolutely different thing. The error message itself is short, clearly represented by iconography and header and a very short text that describes the problem. Then they have a ...


1

The ideal font size, for any typeface is 1em. That is the size the glyphs were intended to be displayed at, the size they are designed to be displayed at. Why second-guess the typographer who created the typeface, the OS / Browser manufacturer or your users (who may set their own preferred default font-size on the device)? Do nothing at all and all your ...


1

There are lots of standards and guidelines for accessibility, many of which deal with the aspects of design relating to typography and the legibility of the text. Some of the areas addressed that can be used to help guide your decision include: Knowing the audience and demographics: the classic example is the elderly people that require fonts that work ...


1

There is a problem for dyslexic readers by using extremely high contrast, but it has been greatly exagerated and propagated to the poin of myth (see this seminal report, which nevertheless recommends "to provide sufficient contrast between elements of a page" and "use a dark text on a pale background"). There's also a trend of abuses using unduly light grey ...



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