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16

Yes, there are a few considerations for domain names: Is the name memorable? Could your domain name be confused with another address, such as goggle.com vs. google.com? Is the name easy to relay? Can you tell another person the name by saying something like "penny-dash-arcade-dot-com"? Is the name accurate to your brand? If your site is "Cheap Pens Now", ...


13

Following the great work of Anders Taxboe who has categorized different types of UI elements in a classification which is easy to understand and easy to follow. At the very highest level he uses the following labels. It may look odd in the beginning, but going through each category, it makes the UI Design World quite understandable: Reference: UI ...


11

There are two books I would recommend The Elements of Typographic Style by Robert Bringhurst. Simply a must read Grid Systems by Josef Muller Brockman. Not typographically centered but really good at getting an understand about type in a broader context.


7

Readability aside, different typefaces invoke different feelings. Before you think about what typefaces and other graphical elements to use, you have to ask yourself what the site is about and what mood you want to establish. For example, Serifs typically are used for more traditional publications, while Sans-serif are more playful. (I'm over generalizing ...


6

So you need a typeface


5

In a scenario where the user has to select simple true/false or active/inactive states then I would really suggest that you use a checkbox control rather than a control which would feature redundant input, eg: In a case such as this there is no reason to add additional input controls which provides the same result as a more simple checkbox control. ...


3

It is always bad idea to enforce validation until you're absolutely sure you're doing a right thing, since enforcing validation may be harmful: for example, some of e-mail validation algorithms still doesn't know that "+" is allowed inside username part of e-mail addresses and that really hurts some users. So, unless value correctness isn't critical for ...


3

I think your problem should be rethought at a deeper level. It sounds like you hare asking users to do quite a bit of management an application that is supposed to be helping them with management. Requiring users to perform a weekly chore, negates the value of your app. In other words, there is not proper UX for making users do chores. Don't make users do ...


3

Domains are important for getting users to your site, not so much once they are there, that's the time for your interface, design and service to shine. A few points on marketing; Clarity If you are planning to promote it via word of mouth / radio / TV / telephone the domain should be; Phonetic (spelled like it sounds) Easy to spell Avoid hyphens (if ...


3

This one is kind of old, but it's outstanding. To those desiring the basics it's a good fit: The Mac is not a Typewriter by Robin Williams (link points to product page on Amazon). There is an edition called "The PC is not..." also, but the classic work that many other people recommend is the Mac one.


2

I find this to be more a philosophical question. To classify each type of interface is more likely a combination of terms. We would first have to think of all the different classifications that can be applied. There are some great examples listed above and choosing one would the first step. For instance, is it a website or a web application. What are the ...


2

You should bring up the scenario to the designer. Sometimes if you are working with a designer with print background, they might not realize they don't have the same degree of control on the layout when working on the web. Content that gets displayed may vary depending on the user's browser settings or even content that the system puts in. e.g. Sliders ...


2

I could not resist. Here is my try to separate UIs into separate dimensions. There is a Good/Bad axis on every bullet. - Content Quality | Sources | Refinement - UI Components Adequation with need | Interaction quality | Follows conventions - Visual Style Trend | Visual appealance | Colors | Shape - Navigation Style Workflow | mechanics type ...


2

To add my 2 cents At the higher level, interface types seem more difficult to efficiently name. Three examples, taken out from a thousand possible others, illustrate an almost infinite variety : I use just this two at highest level: Marketing / information page Workflow / application page Skype for iOS (recent release) and its elastic and ...


1

The name is just for show. Some teams play without name and use their sponsor. Some players have their first name and others have their surname, even in the same team. They are definitely not for any form of recognition by an official party. That's what the number is for. So it's just a designers preference. And although it is harder to read, it's also more ...


1

I suspect there's very little need for legibility. The referees are meters away from world famous celebrities - I think they'll be able to recognise them. Secondly the numbers on the shirt provide much greater legibility making the name largely redundant. So what do the players names on shirts do? I'd guess their main role is to increase sales of replica ...


1

I'm glad to join the StackExchange's UX community and this is my first UX-related answer. Without going into much details, nicely covered by prior answers, I just wanted to fill the knowledge gap by emphasizing one obvious, but often overlooked, aspect. The aspect, which, I think, radically influences the set of dimensions expected in an answer to this or ...


1

Lately I have been thinking about two primary categories when creating an interface; 'interaction approach' and 'content style'. Subcategories of each help to define a UX strategy and interface. Interaction approach I find it helpful to first classify the interaction approach of an interface as 'exploratory' or 'direct'. I don't mean to imply that an ...


1

I tend to avoid condensed fonts for that very reason (legibility on mobile), but that's not to say they won't work - they could still be legible and look good as heading fonts (IMO they don't really work as body copy fonts anyway). I would suggest just giving it a try in-browser and see what you think.


1

I can't imagine any scenario where a user would benefit from scrolling manually through a list of 8000 items. As such, I don't think a list is the best default UI element to use here. I think you're halfway there with the search field. I'd show that as the default view: [ (type term to search) ] Then, upon a minimum threshold (say 3 ...


1

This depends on the meaning of the input and whether you make one of the alternatives initially selected (i.e., the default). Since it should normally be obvious at a glance to the user what the choices are and whether one of them is the default, radio buttons are normally the best way to go. It would be poor usability to force the user to open a dropdown ...


1

(side note) This is just the type of question that does not quite belong on stackoverflow and yet doesn't seem to quite make sense here either. We need a general question site to handle this type of question. Typekit works great and there are some great websites that use it. ...


1

It's hugely more efficient to input values directly into the table. Especially in such a case where the user can input values, row after row. Try visualizing e.g. Excel, where the user can jot down numbers and switch to next row with Enter. There's no edit window involved, either. I very well can imagine a bunch of angry teachers if they have to open a ...


1

Thinking with type is an excellent introduction and is the most modern. Designing with type is a nice complement to it and a good reference as well. They're always nearby on my shelf.


1

Meet Your Type by FontShop is a pretty decent quick and free guide to the basics, which explains a lot of common terms (like cap height, x height, counter, points, families, kerning, leading, etc.), how to choose the right font and make it work and so on. It's only a 52 page PDF with lots of graphics, so if you really want to get into typography and learn ...


1

Well thats a tough question to answer... You are basically saying "tell me everything there is to know about typography". Here's a short guide. First of all you have to consider on which media your text will be read. Will it be read of a computer screen or from a piece of paper? For body text "sans" fonts (Verdana, Arial etc.) are best for on-screen reading ...



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