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8

We sometimes touch this area when designing user flows for new features. Some examples forced login or allowing the user to use the product as a guest user. In apps it's more likely to make the user sign up before using the app as apps tend provide more personalized features. The level of trust users already have when downloading an app is more compared ...


6

From NNGroup: Users pay close attention to photos and other images that contain relevant information but ignore fluffy pictures used to "jazz up" Web pages. The bottom line is that real photos from a company show a user what a company is all about, and they appreciate that much more than seeing stock photos of generic "good looking" people at professional ...


2

It’s complicated The fact that you're integrating with a third party means that you are, to some extent, reliant on the credibility they bring to the table. Are they recognized, trusted, reliable? In PayPal's case the experience is awful but recognition is ubiquitous. Their miserable bounce around UX is how they choose retain control over brand and ...


2

I also found this article talking about why you should avoid stock photography: http://www.intechnic.com/blog/why-you-should-never-use-stock-photography-on-your-website/ The article illustrates several good points, which I'll try to summarize in case the link ever dies. Original photography benefits you by Presenting/Controlling your vision Having ...


2

Trusting vs. skipping doesn't have to be an either/or choice. When I see a site that uses Facebook/Google OAuth rather than its own handrolled security, that increases my confidence that they understand good software design practices and will do the right thing in other cases where they're managing my data.


2

Using an iframe will result in a disjointed and potentially confusing experience that will inhibit conversion such that users are likely to abandon the process before trust really becomes an issue. Even if you style your site to just look just like the other site in an effort to make the alien content look more natural, it will just add to the confusion. ...


2

I have recently conducting and learning about Human-Centered Design. PET stands for : Persuasion Emotion Trust All of these element could be understood by following Persuasion Design that contains 6 Principles ( reciprocity, scarcity, authority ,consistency, liking, consensus ). If you look at Airbnb.com, you would notice that they are using at least ...


1

I would say it depends on the situation. But I think there are at least 3 different scenarios where one approach may be better than the other. Here my opinion on the subject: Trusted By > Testimonial This is more likely to be true when the User does not know the person who is giving testimonial. Testimonials from an unknown source are less likely to be ...


1

Trust is relative Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a ...


1

The UX answer would be "don't lie to users". If you're showing a photo of an employee, show a photo of that employee. Now marketing, on the other hand, may disagree.


1

Just a comment first: they're all "real people", the difference between both scenarios is one of them is staged and with obvious models, while the other is just casual. If you use the same "beautiful" people in no staged, casual scenarios, they will turn "real". The above is because this difference is fundamental in the answer, which has several different ...



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