Hot answers tagged

44

While space is an obvious part of the equation, it's not the main one, you could simply have a sliding physical keyboard just as previous generations of smartphones and be a happy camper. However, physical keyboards had several issues: smaller keys than on-screen keys structural weakness short lifetime (the flex connector and pieces of sliding keyboards ...


33

What caused this decline in the use of physical keyboards? The iPhone What is the impact on the UX of mobile devices? This is a pretty deep question and is tough to answer objectively. I would argue that dropping the physical keyboard was a net gain. That the benefits it brought far outweighed the usefulness of the physical keyboard. As others have ...


23

The main reason is versatility. A keyboard in software can be easily adapted to different layouts, different character/symbol sets and different cultures. In addition, custom keyboards such as Swype or Word Flow are then feasible. Physical keyboards add to the physical complexity of the device, have to be revealed (deployed) to be usable and are more ...


9

A keyboard has obvious costs: Increased device size. Reduced space for a screen. Mechanical complexity/manufacturing costs. The need to localize the keyboard to different languages. On the other hand, the main benefit of a keyboard was easier data entry. At one point, a keyboard was worth it despite the costs, for this reason, because touch screens were ...


5

Most probably because of 2 trends in the smartphone industry. Phones get thinner and thinner, and losing a physical keyboard makes a phone a lot less thick. Screens on phones kept getting bigger, and started using touchscreen. The combination of these gave to option to type on your screen by tabbing a "digital" keyboard. The downside to this though, is ...


4

This is actually a really good example of Darwinian evolution in action: The natural analog might be something like a flight-capable wing on an ostrich: The natural habitat for ostriches favours running for a bird of that size. A large wing would only cause drag and use energy and nutrients that would be better spent on powerful legs - many thousands of ...


3

In the past people used to use cellphones mainly to talk and text only, nowadays people doesn't use smartphones JUST for that, so you don't need to use the keyboard all the time but just on demand which allows to place a bigger screen to offer an overall better experience without losing any functionality. It's a cost benefit adaptation, you can emulate a ...


3

I recommend looking at this article which talks about a A\B test that was done on seeing the conversion rates while using a solid call to action vs a ghost button in emails. To quote the article Test A used our baseline newsletter template, which includes ghost buttons. Test B replaced these ghost CTAs with solid blue buttons. Everything else about ...


2

I'm not really a fan of trends, but Ghost CTAs are now the trend. Also specially across mobile apps you will see there's even no outlines for some buttons. the user's understanding of it something if it is clickable or not hugely depending on context and familiar patterns


2

The reason why apple specifically veered away from a physical keyboard was because of this question: "If I don't want a keyboard, why do I need to have one present?" This truly speaks to the idea that simplicity is key. A use case: I'm watching a video - I don't need a keyboard, infact, I need more screen space. But when it does come down to writing ...


1

I will add one additional item that the other answers have not hit on is that Blackberry has a multitude of patents covering physical keyboards making it extremely difficult to not infringe on their IP. Here are some examples- Hand-held electronic device with a keyboard optimized for use with the thumbs Ramped-key keyboard for a handheld mobile ...


1

Skeuomorphism is good when it is fairly minimalist and only shows affordances on things that are clickable, draggable, etc. It is bad when it goes completely over the top and starts styling things like real-world objects unnecessarily. Great article about it here: http://gizmodo.com/skeuomorphism-will-never-go-away-and-thats-a-good-thin-1642089313 Flat ...


1

I don't think that material design is going anywhere or replaced by some other trend anytime soon, instead it is growing rapidly across multiple platforms. Google is amending its guidelines constantly. Coming to the problem of usability, that how would user recognize if something is clickable or not. Flat design initially had this kind of usability issue ...


1

I have to bring this up everytime Skeuomorphism is mentioned. Note that Skeuomorphism is not the opposite of flat design. Flat design can be as skeuomorphic as any other visual design style. "Realism" is perhaps the term to use. A simple example would be iOS's calculator app. iOS3's calculator has a realistic visual style. iOS7's calculator has a flat ...



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