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I want the same user experience that I'd get from a knowledgable real-live seasoned traveller working at a high street travel agent. I want to be able to enter my details once. Exactly once. Not more than once. Not even twice. Just Once. I want to progressively give more information to narrow my choices, but I never want to feel that I might be losing out ...


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Things that come to mind for a travel booking website is that most people come there with unrefined questions and don't want to complete a full booking on the first attempt. They need to check it with other people, or find out if they can actually have those dates from work, etc. For the unrefined questions, one thing is the fuzzy logic mentioned by ...


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Comments on Original Design My thoughts are the following: Distance: For distance, maybe you want a more neutral image. Your icon currently suggests that the person will be cycling to the location. So something like this might be better: http://www.solidview.com/content/images/tips/distance-icon.jpg Weather: People commonly associate weather with a ...


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I think you are going to need more than just country/state/region IA, because people have many different reasons for travelling, and might be at various stages of planning when they hit your site. For example -- If Sally is interested in historic architecture (or hiking, or wine tasting) but doesn't know where to look, a geography-based IA won't be helpful ...


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What's the purpose of the travel site -- business travelers, golfers who travel, families, singles? That's another way of asking, "Who is the audience?" If it's a specialized audience, skew for their particular weltanschauung. If it's a general audience, use generally accepted geographic divisions -- the UN, wikipedia, etc.


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You have researched and discovered the answer to this already with your A/B testing. I would conclude that there is no benefit from the left location to the right (depending on length of A/B test and the amount of eyeballs that have seen both layouts). If you are still uncertain about this, do some quick usability testing. Write a scenario question along ...


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I think you should consider the goal of your user in this case. If you have any idea what your typical user is, you could figure this out by defining personas or talking to a few potential users. I would expect that, when a user considers buying a ticket, the following applies: Is it going to be worth it, or is walking just as fast/efficient? Not knowing ...


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You don't need a modal; instead, have it straight on the site: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This way the user isn't blocked by a modal. However, the downside is this is an added layer before they can start shopping, but it won't be intrusive in any way. Also, this can be saved by cookies so it won't be a ...


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While I am not a big fan of skeumorphism as a tendency in design, I think it should be used as a tool whenever needed and this is the case you should do so. The travel cards within the app are equivalents of the physical travel cards. AFAIK, one user does not have many of them, so there should be no need to worry about how to pack 20 of them within one ...


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First, ask your target audience what they considered important when the went on their latest trip. I'll bet you'll find a ton of insights from them). Do a quick site inventory of the competitors - how do they structure the content? You could also group the destinations by Interest (golf trips, skiing, cultural trips, adventure-oriented, partying, ...


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I'd probably start by looking at what some other travel companies have done... Rather than having to build your own site to test - you could do a bit of informal testing on what is already out there to see what works best.


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How about providing and alternate grouping by destination visit purpose, for e.g., "visit with kids", "honeymoon destination", "religious importance" etc. Over a period of time, you can provide further help to the users by saying: "people who searched for honeymoon destinations also looked at..." or "also bought tickets to...". As a user, I would expect to ...


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@colmcq if it is allowed, you can further divide based on gender survey. Because, men and women have their own perception of travel place/experience etc. I have seen this in some survey sites. Also, you can include inhabitants wise data, example people of particular group (like chinese , indians etc) staying in large number etc..


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I would have thought a drop down searchlet would be a nice solution here. Something like this: http://www.asp.net/ajaxLibrary/AjaxControlToolkitSampleSite/ComboBox/ComboBox.aspx I allows the user to filter via typing in all/part of a location name and also provides the option of simply laying out all options in the form of a drop down.


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Its one of the kind of Classic conventions, people are used to see the search bar on the right side. so its hard to see the quantitative difference .



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