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9

Yes. (My Ph.D., for example, relates strongly to UX, although it is in cognitive science / computer science.) There are a lot of ways to come at UX. Pick one that interests you, and start looking at professors who are doing work in that area. Look at papers they are writing and research they are leading. Read conference proceedings and figure out who is ...


9

I got my PhD in cognitive psychology, then researched and taught it (lecturer/assistant prof) for the last nine years before deciding to move into UX. You don't have to go my route ;o) but I'd say that it's a really useful subject in which to get a little experience, mainly for the following three reasons: Being able to explain to your UX team the science ...


7

If I were hiring a usability trainer, I'd want evidence that the trainer… knows the appropriate material well; has real experience in the field; and is a good teacher: he or she can explain complex ideas clearly, has a good stage presence, and can engage and captivate the audience and provide a memorable experience. A certification or a relevant academic ...


7

Three ideas for you to google around: Jeff Patton's User Story Mapping Luke Hohmann's Innovation Games Dave Gray's Gamestorming Story mapping will get you to a specification of user stories (aka requirements) and give you an overview of the system in a similar form to Todd Warfel's task analysis grid and Indi Young's mental models The ...


7

Introduction Read The Design of Everyday Things for usability Don't Make Me Think for empathy. Then read Sketching User Experiences for sketching, learn what a persona is (google it or read the entire book The Inmates Are Running the Asylumn), and Emotional Design for desirabity. Good solutions are usable, useful, and desirable. To start ...


5

Not an easy situation, and there is a lot that you could cover. Therein lies the biggest problem. If you try cover everything that they should know, you're going to lose them in the volume. Decide what 3 concepts are the most important for them to get fully, and then stick to those three. Then let them experience the concepts rather than you just telling ...


5

Rating using a set of stars is a quick way for a user to provide feedback, while a big empty text box to type a review in is much more daunting. If you're interested in actually getting ratings, rather than only getting ratings with a detailed explanation of why the rating is the way it is, I think putting the star rating first and the box for a textual ...


4

There are many UX topics you can do a PhD in. For a start, look at universities having a graduate program in human computer interaction (or human-machine interaction / human media interaction) and take a look at the types of research they do. Read a couple of scientific papers, and investigate the topics which people are talking about at the scientific ...


4

In Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability by Steve Krug, he notes some very interesting points that I believe are relevant to your question. The importance of recruiting representative users is overrated. It's good to do your testing with people who are like the people who will use your site, but it's much more important to test ...


4

I guess I am really lucky to have the services of an excellent technical writer to handle all the documentation for the manuals. The process she follows is as follows: Provide a high level screenshot Provide annotations on the screenshot using numbers or callouts Provide a table which specifies what annotation or call out does. The thing to note here is ...


4

I'm going to recommend 3 books for you. Don't Make Me Think is a very brief (each page is like a paragraph), funny introduction into the UX mantra. It gives you a more holistic view of the people using your product, instead of focusing narrowly on just the product itself. You can read this book in one short afternoon. The Inmates are Running the Asylum is ...


3

I hired a woman who received a PhD in Human Computer Interaction from Cal Berkeley. Im not sure how much of that degree helps her, but she has it nonetheless.


3

ux london looks good as does alistapart. NNgroup I went to a few weeks ago and here's what I posted in meta: "I attended mobile user experience 1 and 2 on Sept 29 and 30. My expectations: to learn detailed mobile design guidelines and what academic research backed up those guidelines; psychological principles of mobile UX. Verdict: While I learned some ...


3

I have never been to any in the USA, however I have been watching a lot of the videos from UX Week lately, and finding the content quite good. http://uxweek.com/2012/


3

You want someone who is going to leave deep memorable insights. As a killer question: I'd ask them whether their presentation covers door handles. The affordances of door handles issue gets the idea over better than anything else because its simple. http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/when_bugs_become_features.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affordance


3

I'm currently taking a degree in 'Cognitive Systems' which includes ComputerProgramming/Informatics, Cognitive Psychology, Linguistics, and a bit of Philosophy. From the courses I've taken (mostly CompSci classes with a couple Psych and Ling), I've found the Linguistics courses to be just as relevant to UX design than the Psychology, if not more so. ...


3

To be honest - I don't think this problem is unique to UX. I see the same sort of questions come up on developer related lists. My bro the engineer says he gets the same sort of questions too. Professions are complex things. When you're standing outside looking in it's difficult to see where to start. Asking the people on the inside seems to be the best ...


3

I've been 2 weeks ago in Edinburgh at NN/g "Usability Week" and i've met a lot of people from different industries, from banks to medical electronics. It's not focused only on web, it's focused on any kind of HCI. At least my seminars where this way, but i think the other ones are based on the same rules.


3

I experimented with this myself recently. With the star rating below the review box people tended to miss the star rating when submitting the review. It's possible some visual design improvements might have mitigated the problem, but simply putting the star rating above the box basically eliminated it.


3

In Technical Communication, Volume 51, Number 2, May 2004, Gellivej and van der Meij present evidence for the effectiveness of screen captures in four scenarios, and I summarize their findings as follows: Switching attention - no significant effect Developing a mental model of the program - strong effect on accuracy Identifying and locating window elements ...


2

Be aware that over time, a Masters course can change in nature, even though it bears the same name. For example, the content can become dated and lecturers can leave. Or - an injection of new blood and a new syllabus can bring radical changes...


2

I think the problem is that user experience is still too wooly a subject in terms of courses and career paths. Is it psychology? Do I do compuer science with HCI? Is it design? Fundamentally it's still such a young industry that is not yet established. On top of that UX still is not an ingrained business function. Most business have been producing "good ...


2

Have you studied cognitive psychology? Either 1 class or more... Yes. and what did that give you? That's a difficult question. A lot of the academic cognitive psychology probably isn't that relevant to UX to be honest... (for example the language generation / comprehension bit ) Without some good guidance you could spend a lot of time reading ...


2

You might want to take a look at the Human Centred Computing Systems MSc at The University Of Sussex: (Bias warning: I used to help out teaching on this back in the early 90's, and Sussex was where I got my undergrad degree) The official site The site the students have to do each year I like it for a couple of reasons: They've got a some really nice ...



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