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14

Here are 3 ways to accomplish a high-precision, trace-style outline without the fat-finger effect. Approach 1: Similar to Kit Grose's excellent answer. A mask gets applied, and you can use brush and eraser to adjust the boundary. The only difference here is, if you need to see the detailed interior of the wound, then the mask works in reverse, i.e. the ...


3

You can use an offset pointer/cross-hairs above the center of the touchpoint with an appropriate width. This will make allow you to see where the line is being drawn, not being obscured by your finger or hand.


14

I would flip the problem on its head: instead of tracing around the wound, have the user paint a colour over the wound. Give them two tools; a paintbrush and an eraser. This behaviour is similar to the Quick Mask mode in Photoshop and it works great because you can use a very large brush size at first and then come at the sides with a large eraser to ...


0

PaRaP briefly touched on a really important point "In traditional touch interfaces, like [kiosks], targets are usually a lot larger than in mobile phones" There's not going to be a single optimum size in px or mm, as it depends on how the user is interacting with the interface. If they're liking going to be sitting still, such as a news reader app, ...


2

I'm not sure it is a standard per-se, but it is certainly very common. It's commonly known as "auto correct" but is really just a form of error correction algorithm. To illustrate the extent of what's happening, there are keyboards that take this much farther than merely looking at what keys you're pressing, and actually allow you to draw words: ...


1

1. Check with your users Depending on how large the data is that your users need to navigate and drag around could make all the difference between what feels right versus what feels clunky. You will need to test the offsets you come up with and possibly even let the users tweak them somewhere under advanced settings as what is too fast for me may be too ...


0

Yes, this is already done by mobile keyboards although with varied results. The iPhone keyboards tend to do much better than Android keyboards at interpolation. If you have an Android device I'd suggest trying out the various keyboards available (Google keyboard, swiftkey, etc) to assess how they do interpolation and word completion. I am not as up to ...


1

I think just as important is padding between buttons and where the button is located on the screen. Some advocate that due to phone cases it is difficult to touch buttons at the edge of the screen. Due to the large size of smart phones currently in the market one handed use is probably on it's way down, but it may still make sense to consider reach of a ...


3

"Click here" or related "Action here" have become a bad practice for navigation. In case you want to use a text, I would be better just to specify the action (continue, buy, finish, next, etc). If for some reason you HAVE to describe a "mechanical action", tap / touch are the options. I don't have scientific support for this but here some reasons from: ...


1

You can reference Apple design guidelines: Avoid lengthening alert text with descriptions of which button to tap. Ideally, the combination of unambiguous alert text and logical button labels gives people enough information to understand the situation and their choices. If you must provide detailed guidance, follow these guidelines: Be sure to use ...



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