Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Very cool question. You're right, left or right handed individuals would expect to see different factors to gesturing. I think it would be more of an preference based on the end-user. I usually use both my hands to operate or gesture on a mobile device while it's in portrait. Kinda weird, but that's my preference... when it works :P. In landscape, totally ...


0

Don't make it too complex just: Avoid dialog popups on mobile as it distracts, interupts flows and increases mental effort. And your popup-ad won't work in terms of CTR because it is annoying. Don't use dialogs like "Do you want download/signup/etc" just present one link for it to do. Use plattform specific convention for the order of ok/cancel. Check ...


0

Don Norman ("father of UX") talked about this fairly often, and finally he posted an article talking about this very big question: do I put ok first or last? His conclusion was it didn't matter, but what does matter is being consisted throughout your interfaces. Switching the order continuously throughout will cause the biggest problem. One way of making ...


0

I would agree with Vincent (based on the research done by Nielsen Norman Group), but would even take it a step forward by saying consistency within the application is probably what is most important here. If you have the "OK" button on the right and then switch it to the left on the next dialog, this inconsistency is what is going to trip users up more than ...


1

If they are touching a different area I suspect you can use the same gesture for both. As to the question of if this will confuse the users, I would say it depends on how its set up. Carousels are often interacted with in the left / right manner because they re-enforce with graphics the mental model of having to go left / right in a stack of images. Going ...


1

The fact that you want to use a "tutorial" to explain the gestures, which could provoke a "wrong" behaviour, if made on the carousel, seems to me to be a design smell. I agree, lots of users know the "swipe-to-get-back" gesture, but I think you should still provide a back link. Have a look the the iOs mail app. They provide the gesture and a button too. The ...


0

Well... are buttons round everywhere in real life? Look at your keyboard. How many 'round' buttons are there?


0

It seems to me button shapes are more about the connection to the functionality, than it is about the connection to the finger. For example: magnifier = search two arrows in a circle = refresh three squares underneath each other = options three horizontal lines underneath each other = menu and so on...


2

Interesting is the general form of the question: Does a user understand how something is intended to be used because it's shape is an ergonomic match for a body part? Examples seat : Yes handle : Yes button : Historically may have been Yes, but currently No. Buttons have been culturally well understood for many generations which has let them evolve ...


1

The article here covers the best practices for touch targets. The rules are not so much based on the shape, but size.


-1

No. I cannot speak for the Apple ecosystem, but if you look at Google's Android, or Windows for the past ten years or so, even Linux, circular shapes for buttons can be quite rare. I would assume that rectangles are ideal because width implies that something can be swiped horizontally. If you look at older touch screen devices and machines, those ...


0

No, definitely not. Rounded edges are just another piece of the aesthetic formula as you build your UX. I've found that playing with 0% rounded edges allows for an almost fun, "flat design" aesthetic so popular in 2014.


5

No, not necessarily. In the past, designers used heavily skeuomorphic patterns -- visual styles that strongly resembled physical, tangible objects in order to suggest how they can be interacted with. Physical buttons are often round or shaped to someone's finger because the user is physically touching them, and early digital designers wanted to make sure ...



Top 50 recent answers are included