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1

So here is what we designed simply suggest there is something more by adding partially visible trash bin. want to see more? Well, move the row. it will reveal the trash, and maybe some slighty visible text (e.g. "slide to remove") once you went all the way to the left, it will show on undo button/link for a few seconds Pros It has a simple regression ...


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Show a one-time tutorial that explains such features, and provide an option to have it re-displayed if the user wishes. You may want to make it interactive, e.g. have this for one of its screens: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups After swiping away, the tutorial ends (or goes to another screen, if you have more ...


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I'm not sure that "sliding" give a good user experience. This "system" exist on my Galaxy S3 (for a contact, sliding left for a message, sliding right for a call) and if a hint wasn't displayed on my first usage, i never guess this feature! IMHO, you should prefer a light grey cross (or garbage, or whatever you want) on the right of the rows. If you still ...


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Adding a tap would require extra efforts from the user. Why make user to take such steps. Scrolling is synonymous to exploring without causing the pain. Plus when I look at other Ecommerce apps, scroll is used almost everywhere. Have a look at some of these Images:


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As already mentioned in the comments to your question: Go with scroll! But never forget: Most people don't like to read a lot. So, if you can, try to keep texts short and easy to read too.


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Your design should be able to better capture the features of touch devices. You can use a card sorting method for the page that would showcase each product tile. Look at other shopping apps out there. There are lots of apps that keep breaking down the view in such a manner that you're constantly drilling down for more product detail. I would suggest ...


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If you're only looking to evaluate whether the user's like the gestures then I would have them complete a series of tasks using a prototype and then have a brief interview afterwards asking questions like, which gestures were memorable, which were hard, which worked differently than they expected, were any fun to perform, which did they like the most, etc. ...


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Here's an older article (2007) on Mouse vs. Direct-Touch for tabletop displays. Back in university I saw a number of papers that compared the speed and accuracy of different input methods in completing certain tasks. I suspect that there have been more modern papers that have revisited these experiments.



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