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One thing I've seen some apps do (ex: CamScanner, Idea Growr) is to display a notification which says "Press back again to exit" if the back button would trigger an exit. This doesn't stop accidental presses during internal app navigation, but it at least prevents the user from exiting the entire app by accident. For internal navigation, something you could ...


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Why not simply write the name of the function on the button (unless it's tiny). That way the user doesn't have to hover over every button until they find the one they want. Having mystery buttons or links that would require hovering is known as Mystery Meat. If you really want to have pictures instead of text, then I like the idea of one touch to 'hover' ...


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I believe this is already very clearly handled on android devices. There is only one back button Applications should have only their own 'up' buttons, not back buttons. Applications should never ever add their own back buttons. The 'up' buttons which you probably are confusing are about going up in the application hierarchy, whereas the back button is ...


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When I design for Android, I don't use in-app back buttons. Android users should be accustomed to the platform's built in back button, so including a back button is redundant, and, as you mention, potentially confusing. As for accidental presses of those buttons, is that documented or anecdotal? This is the first I've heard of it.


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1. Make the buttons tactile Tactile buttons do nothing when your finger rests on top of them and require physical force to click them. All external buttons on Apple devices are tactile with the exception of the touch id fingerprint reader which has very few negative consequences from accidental touch. Some Android devices use tactile buttons as well so ...



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