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4

Assuming that you are targeting Android and iOS devices, you should try to use icons that are already known to users and popular among the Android/iOS ecosystem. For web, you could use Material Design Lite or Polymer to do the same. You can see a list of icons following Material Design for Android here. Now, if you have any icon that is not accurately ...


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There's a very good read from Aurora Bedford on icon usability: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/icon-usability/ and there's a section arguing that "icons need a text label": To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all icons face, a text label must be present alongside an icon to clarify its meaning in that particular context. (And even if you’re ...


2

I've asked Your questions to our lead ux tester and she answered the next: That is a very good idea - and also proved to be useful - to let the user turn on textual controls or function titles alongside icons on their wish and that is even better when this 'help' switch is available on every page consistently at the same place - but if You put it ...


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Great question h22! First up, this depends on the platform you're developing /designing the app for. If it's Tizen, the new Samsung Gear 2 is designed for a round smartwatch. So, developing for Tizen will allow you to do that. You can see that in the Design Documentation for Tizen, it is catered towards the round watch face and proudly showcases the ...


1

I'm sorry but icons simply aren't the primary content here. Icons are nice. Labels are good. Good labels are critical. If there are so many buttons or controls that it's a struggle to include the accompanying text, then it's the structure of the layout that's at fault not the inclusion of the labels. Take a step back. Lets say the labels are non negotiable ...


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I think you should go with help-mode switch because a lot of users are going to use it when they get lost and more advance users would understand the icons as longest is good iconography. Don't rely in first screen tutorials because it is been prove people skip those all the time. no matter how many animations you add they don't work trust me Force touch ...


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Try to stick with the mobile-os standards. On Android, long-pressing an ActionBar/Toolbar icon will show the label as a small pop-up in every app that uses the default ActionBar/Toolbar. I can't speak for iOS, but most apps on iOS i know use a permanently visible label below the icon. Please do not try to create a layout that fits different OS's if you want ...


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If you need more space to show labels for the actions then I think it would be best to have less actions visible at one time and give them each enough space. This would mean being very clever in two ways Knowing what actions the user is most likely going to use to have them visible (this might be different for different users, and might even change over ...


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One solution would be to add undo buttons to every action. That way, users would become comfortable experimenting, with pushing buttons they don't fully understand. Once they tap something, the app would demonstrate the effects of that action, and give the user a better understanding than any tooltip would. At that point, if the button did what they want, ...



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