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43

Luke Wroblewski covers this topic in his book Mobile First He stresses the importance of transitioning your on-hover menus to mobile using the most appropriate solution for your site: ...any actions that rely on mouse hovers in our desktop web experiences need to be rethought—and that’s a good thing. Many uses of hover actions on the web assume too ...


42

Don't rely on shaking as the only way of selecting any common action. The exception is novelty apps like whips or throwing dice. For other apps it is poor UX as it: Is uncommon behaviour for many users, as most apps (sanely) don't use this action. Has poor discoverability as there is no cue on the screen letting you know how to use it. There may be an ...


35

We are really at the early days of touchscreen technology. While audio feedback and advances in haptic feedback could make this slightly more viable, I see touchscreens as an interim workaround on the journey towards gestural (+ audio) input. The mistake in this design shown in the video is (in my opinion) using a touchscreen at all - i.e. a 'touch ...


30

Yes, and it's called finger-friendly. Smaller touch targets are harder for users to hit than larger ones. When you’re designing mobile interfaces, it’s best to make your targets big so that they’re easy for users to tap. But exactly how big should you make them to give the best ease of use to the majority of your users? Many mobile developers have ...


22

A main component of natural interactions is Direct Manipulation. Traditional interaction methods (keyboard) are very efficient but often very unnatural because what you do and what happens on screen aren't necessarily very logically connected. This was a classic problem with command line interfaces (or worse, punch cards). The Graphical User Interface was ...


21

Thought I'd throw my two penneth in as a former Automotive Interaction Designer for a large British car manufacturer in the premium and off-road/footballer market owned by an even larger Indian company. Starts with "Jag", ends with "...nd rover" Anyhow, for those of you familiar with those brands you'll know they use touchscreens. I'm not a fan. The NHSTA ...


20

It would mean a very different technology than what is currently used. I wouldn't try to force touch devices into screen device semantics. Touch devices are developing their own distinct set of user expectations. Touch to hover is perfectly acceptable. I've seen some nice examples of hinting to the user where "hoverable" areas are when the screen first ...


20

I usually get both eager and upset everytime I stuble upon advanced UX topics, like Fitts' law. Eager because I find the basic research very interesting, and upset because there are so many misinterpretations of these. I actually have my own version Fitts' law: Don't use Fitts' law as a formula, use it as a guideline. So, what is the simple ...


19

This is a pretty broad question, but if you're looking for some resources, here are a few I would suggest: Apple iOS UI Design Dos & Don'ts Apple: Designing for iOS7 Android Design Guidelines Designing Mobile Interfaces by Steven Hoober and Eric Berkman Mobile Design Pattern Gallery: UI Patterns for Mobile Applications by Theresa Neil Microinteractons: ...


14

I think it has nothing to do with plasticine :). Hold up your hand and show "a small amount of something". You're probably pinching. "A pinch of salt" is a small amount of salt. I assure you that both the gesture and the expression have existed long before multi-touch :). Ask a person to demonstrate something large, and he will spread his hands. Ask him to ...


12

Have the list item be split. Something like a label to the left and a button on the right. It is basically what you already proposed. Here is an example how it could look like. There is just no hover replacement for touch based devices. At least not for all types of touch based devices.


11

If you're confident in the quality of the touch-screen, your design is a good one. Some points to note: Some touch panels, particularly bigger ones, have quite a lot of noise and can have "dead spots" where the touch is not (as easily) registered. You may want to delay snapping back the item once you notice the touch event finishing if you can. It's not ...


11

That's a tough problem. You could use a drag-from-the-edge to reveal a menu. I would make drag from the left edge to pull a menu "drawer" from the left. You could put some visual cue that this feature exist, something minimal like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups or teach that this feature exists with no ...


11

The difference between touch and mouse is much deeper than just the size of the controls. It requires another way of thinking: • Swipe rather than scroll (which requires you to rethink the role of scrollbars) • Pinch rather than click to zoom. • Cursor remains invisible (because under your finger). This makes operations much more direct but also less ...


10

The best examples I've seen use touch gesture hand icons, similar to these: http://graffletopia.com/stencils/587 At times of application rest, where the app isn't being used -- the home screen can be devoted to a simple touch icon moving on the screen and appearing to click/flash on a button that is selected, but no further action is taken, until the user ...


10

Designing Gestural Interfaces by Dan Saffer is a nice start with some basics. I've been working on a largescale POI system for a postal company for over a year, and we've also done numerous user/usability tests and it is very different from your regular webapp or site. I think for me there were 3 or 4 major differences: 1) size and spacing (the tip of your ...


10

Gracefully degrade your subnavigation or drop it by reiterating its contents on the index pages. It's true. Just look at the evidence below. Two great examples of responsive web design are Smashing Magazine and The Boston Globe. Ethan Marcotte himself was involved in the Boston Globe redesign. Smashing Magazine: Drop the Subnav Note in these screenshots ...


10

Should I advise the client to do away with so many modals and hover windows if we go the Responsive route? I'd restate that question as: Should I advise the client to do away with so many modals and hover windows? And the answer to that is, usually, yes. But not always. If it's a very complex desktop-centric site, maybe modals are a good option ...


10

Let's assume for a moment that we're talking about a touch interface without any other controls. Direct Manipulation As noted in the comments above, there are a limited number of gestures for directly manipulating content. From gestureworks: The Tap family are all out. Rotation is possible, but unlikely to be intuitive. It's also not particularly ...


10

@Obelia has proposed good idea. I just want to show how cue could be implemented in unobtrusive way, so instructional modal window could be eliminated. The menu itself explains the feature with its behavior.


10

You could try to expand responsive zones of small draggable areas. Moving close toward those zones is clear indicator of user intentions. It brings smart behavior to your app and provide better usability, as target is increased and moving distance is decreased (Fitts's law in action). To indicate small zones more clearly, you could also use more brighter ...


9

I don't think that we will ever get away from having some form of click/tap/"action" interaction. I saw dontclick.it for the first time quite a while ago when the site was first published and still think now what I did then. Essentially by eliminating the ability to click you are greatly reducing the ability to consider an action before taking it. Consider ...


9

Two problems here; it's usually set at the hardware/OS level, and it's often far too complicated to present to the normal user. Touch screens aren't supposed to have "sensitivity" like mice or joysticks do. It's direct manipulation, you should either be touching X or not. If a first press doesn't register, you press harder; this is annoying but it works. ...


9

Sensitivity of an input device means how much interaction needs to be performed to achieve the wanted result. It can be measured in: Distance - how far an analog input device needs to be moved to affect the active element on the screen (e.g., mouse or joystick); Time - how long an input device needs to transmit a signal to be considered an interaction ...


9

In Designing Gestural Interfaces, Dan Saffer touches (!) the subject of Fitts' Law in relation to touchscreens (specifically pp. 40-2.) Saffer argues that the law holds true for gestural interfaces; minimize reaching across the interface and making sure that targets are appropriately sized to accommodate the "cursor" (i.e., the finger.) However, he also ...


9

Following platform conventions is the most important factor here. Different platforms play by different rules and ignoring this can confuse and alienate users. If you look through the screenshots displayed in the Android design guidelines, you will find a variety of examples that show that in the latest android version the primary button should go on the ...


9

To answer your specific question, users should not be able to activate disabled options. To diverge from UX standards like this is a bad idea - most users would never click the disabled button, and those who did (likely by accident) would be surprised by the result. They way I would solve this is to display printer status next to the button. Normally, this ...


9

You could try something like this: Note the line breaks at left and right as well as the cut off text. Omit the left line breaks if nothing to swipe to at left. Even the line breaks alone would be a very simple cue that would be better than nothing if the cut off text is a problem to implement:


9

The guidelines given for the various platforms are all based on the idea that the minimum size should be 9-12mm. The variation between the guidelines is mostly due to differing pixel densities on the devices, and hence different number of pixels needed to reach the 9-12mm figure. Note, that this isn't an ideal dimension to make the button easier to use, ...


8

The basic gestures, such as flicking, pinching, and tapping, are mentioned in user guides that are included in the box. For example, see PDF manuals for Apple iPad, HP TouchPad, and Barnes & Noble NOOK (search for "pinch" to find the section on gestures). If an application uses gestures in an unusual manner, developers provide an intro about the ...



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